File #18965: "Robert Russell Diaries Vols 1-5, 1876-1900.pdf"

Text

1
Memorandum and Diary
for the years
1876-1900
of Robert Russell
Proton Township, Grey Co., Ontario
Transcribed and edited by
Delbert Russell
Preface
Robert Russell (born 17 Jan. 1836, Raphoe, Co. Donegal, Ireland, died 11 March 1900, Proton Town-
ship, Grey Co., Ontario) was the eldest of the seven children of James and Anne Russell. He was fifteen
when the family immigrated to Ontario in June 1851. When Robert Russell retired from teaching in
December 1875 because of ill health, just before his fortieth birthday, he had completed seventeen and a
half years as a school teacher in Melancthon Township, while also farming in Proton and Melancthon
Townships. Perhaps it was turning forty, and intimations of mortality caused by his heart disease, that
inspired him to begin a diary, which he faithfully kept for twenty-five years, with very few missed daily
entries.
The diaries provide an insight into rural life in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, centred
on the village of Dundalk and Proton Township (Grey County), as well as Melancthon Township (first
Grey, then Dufferin County). The entries record events in family, social and political life, as well as the
changes in farming methods, and the migrations of family members seeking better circumstances else-
where. As well as farming, Robert was Treasurer for Proton Township from 1882 until his death, plac-
ing him at the centre of municipal politics. Before becoming Proton Township Treasurer, he had been
Secretary Treasurer of the SS No. 5 Melancthon school board, as well as Treasurer for one year for the
Mayburn Grange. In the last decades of his life he was also Secretary Treasurer of the Dundalk Cheese
Factory, a task which he sometimes found onerous. He also frequently wrote letters, or prepared leases
and wills for neighbours.
At the time Robert begins writing his diary, January 1876, he lives on his farm, Lots 215 and
216, Con. 1 SW, Proton (purchased in 1862), and he also owns Lot 220 Melancthon, Con. 1 NE, just
north of Dundalk on the Gravel (or Toronto-Sydenham) Road, later Highway 10, from Toronto to Owen
Sound. He is turning 40 years of age, his wife Nancy is 35, their children are Jim (12), John (10), Clark
(8), Eliza (or Ida, 6) and Willie (4). Nancy’s parents, and her brother John Agnew and his wife, farm the
adjacent Lots 217, 218, 219, Con. 1 NE, Proton, just to the south. Two miles east of Robert’s house is
the farm of Robert’s parents, James and Anne (Lot 37, Con 4 NE, Melancthon), and on the next lot to
the east, the farm of his brother Sam (age 28) and wife Phoebe (Lot 37, Con. 5 NE, Melancthon). Lot
37, Con. 5 is later farmed for a few years by Robert’s sister Margaret (age 31) and husband, William
Lonsway. Robert lives about 2½ miles (north and east) of the train station in Dundalk. His brother John
Russell (age 35), married to Nancy’s sister Elizabeth Agnew, has a farm on the east side of the Gravel
Road (Lot 236, Con. 1, Melancthon) about ½ mile south of the Dundalk corner. Robert’s sister Sarah
(age c. 33), married to Allen Thompson, a farmer, lives in impoverished circumstances somewhere close
to Dundalk, but her family later moves repeatedly, living finally in British Columbia.
2
In the following transcription I have assumed the reader has a basic knowledge of farming prac-
tices, such as ploughing or harrowing, and harvesting. For more arcane details of rural life I have pro-
vided notes, with the detail marked by *, and the note, prefaced by *, inside square brackets at the end of
the daily entry. Names of family members, or other persons mentioned, are identified also by notes,
when possible. Slightly longer contextual details are given in Appendices at the end of Volume 5. Ap-
pendix 1 gives Russell family relationships, and the names and ages of a sampling of neighbours, based
on 1871 and 1881 Census data. Appendix 2 gives details on Teaching Qualifications and School Inspec-
tors. Appendix 3 is a brief history of the Grange, and other, related rural political and social movements.
See also the separate Material Description of the diaries for the provenance, and the collation and physi-
cal dimensions of the volumes.
Editorial Conventions and Establishment of the Text
The prose in diary entries is usually in telegraph style. The text has been transcribed as written.
Spelling varies, often merely the doubling of single, or reduction of double, consonants (e.g. accross,
barell), or the insertion of glide vowels between consonants (e.g. greately, slightely) or vowel substitu-
tion (e.g. dissipated, dissapated). When a spelling is isolated, or might lead to confusion, the standard
form is added in square brackets (e.g. Esther [=Easter]). The following are typical examples of this var-
iation: cedar, ceder; celler, cellar; choring, choreing; cradle, craddle, cradelled [oats, wheat, cut with
scythe and cradle]; diptheria [=diphtheria]; dissapear, dissappear, disappear; evening, eavning, eaven-
ing; evidentally [=evidently]; extravagence; fallow, follow; gentelly [=gently]; medecine [=medicine];
misshap; occassionally, occasionally; occured; passibly [=passably]; pease [=peas]; ploughing, plow-
ing; preceeding [=preceding]; prepaired; preparetory [=preparatory]; rappidly, rapidly; sett [=set];
shore [past tense of shear]; sowing [=sewing, or sowing]; swail, swale; tendancy [=tendency]; thresh-
ing, thrashing; unprincipalled [=unprincipled]; visably; volumn [=volume]; wagon, waggon; wed [past
tense of weed].
Proper and place names are also variable: Cederville [=Cedarville], Conners, Connor, Faucett,
Fawcett, Hewitt, Hewett, Irvin, Irwin, Mulmer [=Mulmur], Nethercut, Neithercut; Trugon [=Trudgeon].
Robert’s son Clark is written Clark, Clarke, although the final -e may just be an ending flourish of the
letter k; his son John is referred to as John, Johney, Johnny; the name of his sister-in-law Phoebe is fre-
quently written Phebe.
Robert uses parentheses occasionally, and several standard Latin abbreviations: these include the
still current “+ c.” (=etc.), and “viz.” ( =namely), as well as the now archaic “inst.” [for instante mense]
and “ultimo” [for ultimo mense] referring to days of a month (“10th inst.” means “10th of the current
month”, and “29th ultimo” means “29th of last month”). Robert’s syntax shows some distinctive usag-
es: something functions as an adverb, meaning slightly, somewhat. For the preposition until he prefers
till, and sometimes to. His vocabulary is often formal and erudite (particularly noting weather, e.g. the
prevailing character of the day, or ameliorated, etc.), but in describing daily activities he lapses into
vernacular usage frequently in verb tenses, such as using done, seen as the past tense, rather than did and
saw, respectively, or using gave as the past participle of give. On occasion he uses a singular verb fol-
lowing a compound plural subject (e.g. “John and Clark is working there”), and these have been left
unaltered.
The scribal hand is variable: the large, clear, cursive script used for titles and the beginning of en-
tries, is sometimes reduced to very small, and often shortened, forms at the end of entries. At times it is
difficult to distinguish between a and o, and between e and i, and because of compressed writing of low-
ercase letters, words such as there, then, them are often indistinguishable.
3
Editorial changes made to the text are as follows. Square brackets [ ] enclose editorial additions
(replacing missing letters or words), or rejected MS readings following a correction (e.g. “wets [MS
weets]”, “tidied [MS tieded]”), or to indicate unintentional scribal repetitions (dittographies), e.g. “When
he came home [dittog.: when he came home]”; or editorial comments, such as notes, referenced by an
asterisk.
The diarist’s idiosyncratic use of capital letters on words mid-sentence is usually preserved in the
transcript at the beginning of a word, but not at the end (e.g., BoB, DundalK, O’clocK become Bob,
Dundalk, O'clock). Punctuation is modernized editorially, commas and full stops are added for clarity,
and an uppercase letter added on the first word after a full stop. Word division is normalized (e.g.,
cordwood, firewood, sawmill, today, tonight).
Waterloo, Ontario Fall 2018
Delbert Russell, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, French Studies, University of Waterloo, is the great-
grandson of Robert Russell. Born in 1944 in Flesherton (to parents Glenn and Marian Russell), he grew
up on the Russell farm at Shrigley, attended the local one-room elementary school, then Dundalk Dis-
trict High School, and the University of Toronto (B.A. Mod. Langs., M.A., Ph.D. French). He married
Ruth Weber in 1970, and they have two daughters, Susan K. Russell (spouse, Yves Filion), and Jocelyn
M. Russell (spouse, Owen Rees), and four grandchildren, Samuel and Thomas Filion, Fiona and Max-
well Russell-Rees.
Select Bibliography of Printed Works Cited
Corporation of the Village of Dundalk. A History of Dundalk. Printed by Stan Brown Printers Ltd.,
Owen Sound, 1987.
Dodds, Ernest H. The History of Education in Dufferin County, 1834-1983. Grand Valley: Star and
Vidette Printing Ltd., 1983.
Illustrated Historical Atlas of Counties of Grey and Bruce. H. Belden & Co., Toronto, 1880; rpt.
Cumming Atlas Reprints, Port Elgin, 1975.
Leitch, Adelaide. Into the High County: the Story of Dufferin, the Last 12,000 Years to 1974.
Corporation of the County of Dufferin, 1975.
Raphoe Guild of the Irish Countrywoman’s Association. About Raphoe. Browne (Printers) Ltd.,
Letterkenny, 1998; rpt. 2000.
Sawden, Stephen. History of Dufferin County. n. d., n. p. [c. 1939, since the author notes in his Preface
that Dufferin County (formed in 1880) “has been in existence for approximately sixty years.”]
Wood, Louis Aubrey. A History of Farmers’Movements in Canada. Toronto: Ryerson, 1924; rpt., with
intro. by Foster J. K. Griezic, Toronto and Buffalo: University of Toronto Press, 1975.
Online sources used are cited within the text.
Volume 1
4
21 January 1876—31 Dec. 1883
The foliation of the three Quires comprising the first Volume is supplied inside angle brackets (e. g. <Q3 folio 2
recto>), indicating front (recto) and back side (verso) of each folio. A running title is centred on each diary page.
The Quires are foliated separately, the numbering restarting again at 1 for each (Quire 1 has 96 folios, Quires 2
and 3 each have 72 folios). Digital images of each diary page may also be consulted in the relevant subdirectory.
<Quire 1>
<Q1 folio 1 missing>
<Q1 folio 2 recto>
January 1876
21st Snowed a little today, wind pretty strong, pretty sharp freeze. Paid stranger at noon today, did
not want to keep him as he showed some aberration of mind. Underbrushing on Lot 216, Proton.
Calm and very cold 8.40 P.M.
22 Still snowing but blowing so strong that the snow does not lie on the road. Split some wood in
the forenoon. Joseph Malowney came here looking [for] work, did not obtain it. I went to the
Station (Dundalk) in the afternoon and purchased a dozen grain bags at $4.50. The wind is pret-
ty strong at present 7.57 P.M.
23 Sabbath. A little sleet in the morning. Stopped at home all day. Mrs. Russell went to her broth-
er John’s in the afternoon. Brother John and his two men and John Agnew paid us a visit during
the evening.
24 Kept snowing a little during the day, calm and moderate now, 9 P.M. Son Jim and I were chop-
ping cordwood on Lot 216 today.
25 Snow fell all day, wind blowing strong, especially in the eavning. Engaged a man to chop seven-
ty-five cords of wood at sixty cents per cord, he to take the note I hold against Anthony Trugon
for $45. for his pay. I was chopping cordword today on Lot 216 Proton.
<Q1 folio 2 verso>
January 1876
26th No snow fell today, rather mild and the sky cleared off about noon. Was chopping today on lot
216. Wind rising while I write (8.40 P.M.). Mrs. Russell visited Brother John’s (Melancthon)
today.
27 The weather mild and indications of a thaw. Helped John Agnew to clean a load of oats and
went to Dundalk in the afternoon. John Agnew made me an axe handle at night.
28 Slight rain falling through the day and getting heavier now (9.45 P.M.). Was chopping cordword
on Lot 216 today. Mrs. Russell and I visited Mr. Lonsway at night, had ourselves weighed there.
Mrs. R. weighed 141 pounds and I weighed the same.
29 Stormy all day, high winds and snow falling incessantly, very cold now (9.10 P.M.). Was chop-
ping cordwood today on Lot 216.
30 Sabbath. Cold stormy day, keen freeze. Stopped at home all day. John Agnew paid us a visit dur-
ing the eavening.
31 Cold in the morning but ameliorated during the day, sun shone out bright, mild now (9.50). Was
chopping firewood on lot 216. Posted two letters in the afternoon, one for Public School Inspec-
tor, the other for Mrs. Campbell, Carder. Mrs. Russell and I attended [MS.: attendended] prayer
meeting at night.
<Q1 folio 3 recto>
5
February 1876
1st Mild morning, began to snow about ten O’clock. Kept falling heavier throughout the day, heavy
fall at night, wind rising (8.40 PM). Went to Mr. Shepherd’s Grist mill, Skeffington Bell and I
with waggon. One horse slipped coming up hill from mill and fell, struck me on the ankle when
rising with his front foot, hurt me, but not badly. I purchased a plow from Mr. Corbett of Shel-
burne. The plow is the Wilkinson No. 11, wrought iron beam, and for said plow I gave my note
for $20.00 payable First March 1877 without interest.
2 Extremely cold day. Blowing, Freezing and snowing. Done no work, only fed the cattle and
split a little stove wood at the house.
3 Not so cold as yesterday. Snow falling and lying pretty good. Sleighing improved rapidly.
Calm at present (8.30 P. M.). Chopping firewood on lot 216 Proton. Brother John came out to
the bush during the afternoon.
4 Cold stormy day, wind very high and snow drifting. Was sawing stove wood with brother John
on Lot 216 today. I and Mrs. Russell visited John Agnew at night.
5 Not so cold as yesterday, neither so high wind. Split some stove wood on Lot 216 and John and
James hauled it home. Father came to see us today.
<Q1 folio 3 verso>
February 1876
Sabbath. 6th Very mild day. Went to see Father and Mother. Mrs. Russell and the three eldest boys
went to meeting in the afternoon.
7 Mild, the sun shining and the snow thawing. Was working with Bother John helping to make a
sleigh road to his wood.
8 Mild and thawing, cloudy part of the day, indications of a change of weather. Was helping
Brother John to kill pigs and make a wood rack for the sleigh.
9 Snowing a little in the morning and turned to sleet during the afternoon. Son James and I were
hauling cordwood to the house today from Lot 216 Proton.
10 A little sleet falling throughout the day, commenced raining at dark, with some lightening at in-
tervals. Heavy rain falling now (10.7 P.M.) Was hauling cordwood to house with oxen off lot
216 Proton. Mrs. Russell and I went to Protracted meeting at night held in Zion W. M. Church.
11 Raining in the morning and continued so to noon, clear in the afternoon. Snow most all gone,
spring birds coming round. Went to Rich[ard] Campbell, Blacksmith, got two iron bolts made
for Bobsleighs. Came home and I and Anthony Fak[a]y fitted them in their place. Brother John
came here in the afternoon.
<Q1 folio 4 recto>
February 1876
12 Bright sunny morning and continued clear and warm all day. Freezing now (9.23) P.M. but not
very cold—chopped a road in the forenoon into the cordwood on Lot 216 and in the afternoon
got brother Sam to assist me in putting wooden shoeing on Brother John’s Bobsleighs
13 Sabbath. Fine mild day, sun shining most of the time. Mrs. Russell and I visited Mr. James Mills in
the afternoon.
14 Mild during the day although a sleet and rain-storm had prevailed during the previous night, very
warm during the day and the tree toads calling in the eavening. Was at brother John’s cutting
wood today.
15 Mild morning, a little frosty rind on the trees, commenced snowing about 11 O’clock A.M.,
snowed a little all day, but the wind was so strong that it did not lie on the roads. Brother John
6
and I were sawing stove wood today on lot 216 Proton. Went to a trustee meeting to Mr. May’s
Hotel at night.
16 Snowing in the morning and the wind blowing very strong, continued all day. Was helping to
saw cordwood on lot 216 Proton. Was also called upon to draw Mr. Richard Millsop’s Will and
a Quit Claim deed from Mr. Henry Johnson to him. The township assessor was here today and
assessed me $1100.00 for Real and $130.00 for personal property. Brother John called in the af-
ternoon.
<Q1 folio 4 verso>
February 1876
17 Pretty mild day, snowed some during the afternoon. Was hauling cordwood out of the bush for
Brother John with the oxen today. James A. Fakay came to Board at my place today.
18 Mild day, freezing in the afternoon, snowed some towards night. Was hauling cordwood out of
the Bush with my oxen for Brother John.
19 Cold morning with a very high wind prevailing in the afternoon. Was hauling cordwood with
oxen for Brother John today
20 Sabbath. Mild, Snowed a little but not of sufficient quantity to cover the roads. Was at home all day.
Sister Margaret and her husband* called during the afternoon, also had Mrs. Agnew Snr. and
Mrs. Agnew Jnr. [*William Lonsway, son of Andrew and Hannah; the Mrs. Agnews are Nancy’s
mother and sister-in-law.]
21 Snowed a little in the forenoon, got soft and mild towards evening, then turned to snow, a great
amount of soft snow falling at present (9.20 P.M.) and the wind very high. Was hauling cord-
wood out of the Bush on Lot 216 with the oxen, did not get along very well as the oxen were
wild and not handy today. Broke the wood rack fetching a load to the house. It’s wet, rough,
hard work swamping green cordwood. Mr. Andrew Lonsway visited us at night and I wrote a
letter for him to Mr. James Henry, Aurora P. O.
<Q1 folio 5 recto>
February 1876
22 Remarkably storm day, snowing, blowing and freezing. Mended wood rack in the forenoon and
swamped cordwood out of the bush in the afternoon. Brother John was here in the eavening.
Skeffington Bell brought me the remainder of my flour from Mr. Shepherd’s mill.
23 Very cold, stormy day, high wind prevailing all day. Keen freeze, and snow drifting. Was
swamping out cordwood today with the oxen. This is a very sickly season and several children
have died in the neighbourhood from diptheria, also typhoid fever has been bad lately.
24 Sharp cold morning, not snowing any however, got mild in the eavening, freezing keenly at pre-
sent (9.40 P.M.). Was swamping out cordwood with the oxen today on Lot 216 Proton.
25 Cold morning and freezing keenly but turned out mild in the afternoon. Brother John and I were
swamping out cordwood with the oxen on lot 216 Proton.
26 Cold raw morning with a South-Easterly wind blowing, continued cold all day with indications
of snow now (10 P.M.). Swamping out wood today with oxen on lot 216. Went to Post Office
and store in the afternoon.
<Q1 folio 5 verso>
February 1876
27 Sabbath. Cold day, keen freeze, wind coming from the South-East. Went to John Agnew’s in the
forenoon.
28 Very cold morning. Sleet and snow falling and a South-East wind blowing. Stormed nearly all
day. Fixed stall for the young mare in the afternoon, was at John Agnew’s in the forenoon.
7
29 Not so cold as yesterday, no snow falling, pretty good sleighing just now. Bought some hay
from Mr. Skeffington Bell and he and I hauled it home. First load 2900 pounds gross, second
load 3170 gross, weighed Bobsleighs and driver, their weight was 1100 pounds, which leaves
3870 pounds net weight of hay, @ the rate of $10 per ton comes to $19.35, Said sum to be re-
duced out of the note I hold against him.
<Q1 folio 6 recto>
March 1876
1st Mild day, sun shone a little in the afternoon. Was hauling wood out of the Bush with Brother
John.
2 Very sharp morning with a Bright clear sky. Sun shone bright and warm in the afternoon, wind
in the North-West. Was swamping out cordwood with a team of oxen, Good sleighing snow.
3 Moderately mild morning, got warmer during the day, sun came out bright and warm, thawed a
little during the afternoon. Wind in the North-East. Was swamping out cordwood with a team of
Oxen. Mr. R. Trimble, Collector, called this afternoon and I paid him the balance of my account.
4 Bright clear day, thawing and the maple trees running sap. Wind in the South-West. Was haul-
ing firewood home today assisted by James, John and Clark. Harnessed up the young mare Ger-
ty (three years old) in the afternoon for the first time, drove her, along with the old mare, back
and forth to accustom her to the harness. She went quietly and gentelly enough. Did not draw
anything with the team.
5 Sab. Very mild day. Raining some of the time, a complete thaw. Brother John and wife visited us
today and also John Agnew.
<Q1 folio 6 verso>
March 1876
6th Still thawing, most of the snow has disappeared. Raining part of the forenoon. Wind in the
South. Was making sap troughs assisted by James Anthony Fack[a]y in the afternoon.
7 Raining all forenoon incessantly, cleared off during [the afternoon]. Was preparing material for a
stone boat* and helping also to cut down some large maple trees. [*Stone boat, a flat, sturdy
wooden dragging platform (typically with a surface area about 3’ x 6’), on which heavy loads are
placed to be dragged along the ground by horses.]
8 Very stormy morning, High winds and snow prevailing. Went to the station with brother John in
the forenoon, met in with Andrew Lonsway at Dundalk, got a little broth –O be jovial*—
Returned home about (7 AM)[=P.M.?] all (O.K.). Mrs. Marshall was buried today. [*seems to
refer to a having a friendly drink with someone; see also “O. B. Jovial” 11 Mar. 1879.]
9 Mild day, sun shone out bright in the afternoon, melting most of the snow that fell yesterday.
Was helping brother Samuel to saw some Hemlock logs.
10 Mild day, thawing in the afternoon. Brother Sam and I were making stow trough.
11 Very wet sleety morning, rained during the forenoon. Made spiles* in the afternoon.
[*Spile (or spoil), small spout inserted into hole drilled into maple tree trunk, through which sap
drips into the stow trough, mentioned in previous entry; all part of making maple syrup. Wooden
spiles are hand made (see 6 Apr. 1877, 22 Mar. 1880), but later are replaced by iron ones, pur-
chased 19 Mar. 1881.]
12 Sabbath. Rainy morning, began to snow in the afternoon and continued snowing through the night.
<Q1 folio 7 recto>
March 1876
8
13 Very cold stormy morning, snow falling fast. Continued snowing and blowing all day, freezing
keenly now (10-45 P.M). Was skidding saw logs at Brother Sam’s in the forenoon and helping
Brother John in the afternoon to make a place to pile his cordwood.
14 Very sharp morning but the sun came out bright and clear and kept shining all day. Was helping
J. A. Fakay saw cordwood on Lot 216 Proton. Brother John, Joseph Bowler and Mr. and Mrs.
Lonsway were here this evening.
15 Very cold morning with a piercing wind, continued very cold all day. Went to Mr. John Lud-
low’s today to buy a cow from him.
16 Cold day and very high wind prevailing. Began snowing about noon and continued snowing all
day. Was at a bee today helping brother John to swamp out cordwood.
17 Cold stormy day, snowed and blowed most of the time.
18 Bitterly cold and wind blowing strong. Hauled a stow trough to the sugar bush in the afternoon.
<Q1 folio 7 verso>
March 1876
19 Sabbath. Very cold day, but the sun shone out bright and clear, causing a warmth in the sheltered
sides of buildings, etc. Mrs. Russell and I went to Mr. Lonsway’s at night.
20 Cold morning with an easterly wind prevailing. Got colder on through the day, began snowing
early in the forenoon, kept coming down heavier. At this hour (8.10 P.M) it is still blowing and
snowing. Went to the blacksmith’s in the forenoon, got sleighs fixed and pot mended. Brother
John came in the afternoon and took his Bobsleighs home.
21 Pretty cold morning but got milder during the afternoon. Was breaking in a filly assisted by John
Agnew. Jos[e]ph Malowny was here.
22 Rather milder today than yesterday. Sun broke out bright and clear in the eavening. Went to see
about seed pease in the forenoon. Broke down jumper[?]. In the afternoon hitched up filly and
drove her in as far as Father’s.
23 Bright sunny morning, got brighter and warmer as the day advanced, snow melting on the roads,
and sleighing vanishing. Went in the forenoon to Dundalk to look about pease. In the afternoon
hitched up the filly and Nancy and I went to Dundalk.
<Q1 folio 8 recto>
March 1876
24 Bright morning, the sun shone out clear and warm, causing the snow to melt. Sleighing is nearly
gone again. The wind is in the East at present (9.10) P.M. Hitched up the filly in the forenoon.
Nancy, Eliza, William and I went in to Brother John’s. Mr. John Abbott came with some seed
pease I had purchased off him, in the afternoon.
25 Stormy morning with snow falling and the snow kept increasing through the day and is still
snowing a little now (11 P.M.). Wind blowing from the East. Mr. John Talbot’s little girl, four
years old, was buried today and old Mr. Millsop died yesterday.
26 Sabbath. Mild day with a little snow falling. Hitched up the filly this afternoon and drove Mrs. Rus-
sell and the family to William Lonsway’s.
27 Pretty mild day, a little snow fell in the morning, good sleighing on the roads. Got a letter from
Brother William today, he was thrown from a waggon and ran over, dislocating his shoulder, but
is reported out of danger. Was swamping out cordwood today.
<Q1 folio 8 verso>
March 1876
28 Mild morning and partly a thaw wind. The wind veered around from North-to-East after noon,
began snowing about Two O’clock P.M. The storm kept increasing in violence and at this hour
9
10:5 P.M. the amount of snow that’s falling is something terrific. Was hauling cordwood out of
the bush today.
29 Snowy morning and continued snowing all day. Went to the Post Office this afternoon. Done
nothing of any worth today. Mrs. John Agnew gave birth to a daughter* tonight and Mr. Skeff-
ington Bell was married to Miss Sarah Robinson today. [*Nancy, who dies 20 May, 1892.]
30 Snowing all day moderately, did not do any work.
31 Mild, the snow turning soft, indications of a thaw. Hauled a load of straw from John Agnew’s in
the forenoon and James, John and I were swamping out cordwood in the afternoon.
<Q1 folio 9 recto>
April 1876
1 Beautiful sunshiny day, clear and bright all day long. The snow thawed considerably today. Was
swamping out cordwood, assisted by James.
2 Sabbath. Mild day, the snow getting soft. John Russell and his wife and two of his children were at
our house today.
3 Mild day, the snow disappearing. Sleighing getting bad. Mrs. Russell and I went along with
brother Samuel to the funeral of Alice McDowell, daughter of Mr. John McDowell. The child
died of diptheria.
4 Mild day, the air balmy, the snow still thawing, bad sleighing. The boys and I were sawing logs
and skidding them.
5th Pretty mild day to the afternoon, when the wind arose and some snow fell, the wind blowing
from the south-west. Brother Samuel and I were hauling saw logs to the mill. We hauled nine
logs. The sleighing gone from the gravel to the mill generally.
6 Sharp morning, but the sun rose bright and continued so all day, a strong wind blowing from the
South-West causing a thaw. Was swamping out cordwood today.
<Q1 folio 9 verso>
April 1876
7th Very stormy morning, the wind pretty high and snow falling very thick. The heaviest fall of
snow in the same time for the season. The wind from the South-West. It cleared up about noon
and the snow had fell on the level about twelve inches. Swamped out cordwood in the afternoon.
Paid up James Anthony Fakay, the man I had chopping cordwood. He had not finished his con-
tract but I paid him in full for what he had done. Fakay, I rather think, is not his name, he has
told that it is Campbell. He is a man of about thirty years of age, rough featured and brown in
colour, about Five feet seven inches in height, weight about one hundred and fifty-five pounds,
talks with a Scotch accent, says he was born in Belfast (Ireland) and raised in Glasgow (Scot-
land). I think he is an unprincipalled scamp as he went away and left unpaid to Mr. Bowler Six
dollars of a board bill.
8 Bright morning and the sun out strong and warm, thawing off the snow rappidly, wind from the
South-West. Was hauling cordwood out of the bush. Helped Brothers Samuel and John in the
side road with two loads of hay in the afternoon.
<Q1 folio 10 recto>
April 1876
9 Sabbath. Bright clear day, the sun shining strong and warm, snow melting rappidly. I and family
took a sleigh ride into Melancthon.
10 Very warm day, the sun clear and bright, the wind in the North-West. Was tapping trees today in
the sugar bush. Saw a robin today, being the first seen by me this spring. Sold Mr. Andrew Lon-
sway a single sett of old harness.
10
11 Sun very strong and the day very warm, the warmest I think for so far in the season. Attended
Mr. Frederick Hessey’s sale of stock and farming implements—all things went very high—one
cow six years old at thirty-one dollars, one heifer with calf at foot $28., nine month’s credit.
12 Rainy morning and continued so to noon. In the afternoon was getting some firewood for the
sugar camp.
Mr. John McDowell’s son Adam died yesterday with diptheria.
13 Foggy morning and the sky overcast, began a light mizzle of rain about ten o’clock A.M., con-
tinued getting heavier to the afternoon, cleared up a little during the eavning. Chopped a little
cordwood in the forenoon and fixed the floor of stable in the afternoon. Mrs. Russell and I paid
a visit to Mr. Lonsway’s at night.
<Q1 folio 10 verso>
April 1876
14th Rainy morning and continued so till about noon, cleared up in the afternoon and the wind rose
and is blowing very strong now (8:45 P.M.). Was moving some hay in the barn assisted by John
Agnew in order to make a sheep pen. In the afternoon assisted John Agnew to butcher two pigs.
15 Cloudy morning and continued so all day. Was making rack for the filly to feed from. Went to
Dundalk in the evening to see about getting my cordwood insured. A cow of mine calved this
morning.
16 Sabbath. Cloudy morning and a snow storm came on about 11 O’clock A.M., covering the ground.
Mr. A. Lonsway and wife and sons, William and Henry, were here a short time in the afternoon.
John Agnew visited us at night.
17 Pretty cold cloudy morning with a slight shower of snow now and then through the day. Was
cutting firewood into drags and son James was hauling them with oxen.
18 Cloudy cold morning and the sun did not shine out clear at any time today. Was chopping cord-
wood on Lot 216 Proton, assisted by Mr. A. Lonsway while my sons* James and John also were
chopping on their own account in order to obtain the price of Boots for them. [*James 12 yrs.,
John 10 yrs old]
<Q1 folio 11 recto>
April 1876
19th Bright sunny morning and continued clear and pleasant with warm sunshine all day. Went and
hired Joseph Malowny at Fourteen dollars per month in the forenoon. Split cordwood in the af-
ternoon. First lamb came this afternoon. Mrs. Russell making molasses* today. [*maple syrup]
20 Sun rose clear and bright but got cloudy soon and continued so all day. Very high wind prevail-
ing now (10:10 P.M.). Sap ran very well this afternoon. Was chopping cordwood today. John
Agnew came here in the afternoon.
21 Cloudy morning and continued pretty much so all day. Plowing has not commenced yet in this
neighbourhood and the spring is rather backward. Was chopping cordwood today on Lot 216
Proton.
22 Cloudy morning but the sun shone out about ten O’clock A.M. then shortly clouded over again.
Was chopping cordwood in the forenoon. Went in the afternoon to Dundalk station taking along
with me James, John and Clark, got them Sunday boots, also a pair for Eliza. The boys had
earned said boots by chopping me cordwood and I to haul it to the station and sell it for them
next winter. Mrs. Russell, assisted by her mother, was in the sugar bush making molasses. They
boiled down after gathering Eighty pails yesterday and Seventy-five today.
<Q1 folio 11 verso>
April 1876
11
23rd Sabbath. Sun shone out bright in the morning. The whole day was about the warmest which has
come yet this spring. One sheep lambed this night.
24 Bright sunny morning, but the sky got a little overcast during the afternoon. Tried to plow in the
forenoon but had to quit it on account of the frost on the ground and the softness of the land. The
boys and I gathered stones in the afternoon. Bought one ton of hay from Mr. Wakely at Eleven
dollars delivered. He brought me half a ton this evening.
25 Clear morning, the sun shining brightly, the day mild and warm. Was gathering stones today
assisted by the boys. Mr. Wak[e]ly brought me one half ton of hay. Two ewes lambed today.
26 Clear morning, but the sun became a little overcast during the day, pretty warm all day. Was
gathering stones assisted by the boys in the forenoon. Was ploughing in the afternoon. One ewe
lambed today.
27 Dull cloudy morning, began to rain about Six O’clock A.M. and continued so for about one hour.
Went in the forenoon & hired up Joseph Malowny. In the afternoon prepared the plow for work
and sowed some cabbage seed.
<Q1 folio 12 recto>
April 1876
28th Misty morning and a little rain fell about Seven O’clock but soon cleared off and continued fine
the remainder of the day with a drying wind. Was plowing with the old mare and the filly. Filly
went very well, it being the first day in the plow.
29 Bright morning but a pretty hard frost, causing the ploughing to be delayed a little in the fore-
noon. But the day was a little chilly. Went to the Blacksmith in the morning and got colter
t[o]ughed[?].* Plowed with the horse team in the afternoon. One cow calved today. [*perhaps
tempered, i.e. hardened in the forge]
30 Sabbath. Slight snow storm this morning and continued snowing till about ten O’clock. Cold wind
blowing and a sharp frost prevailing. Visited Mr. Lonsway’s in the afternoon.
<Q1 folio 12 verso>
May 1876
1st Very hard frost this morning, retarding plowing till the afternoon. Joseph Malowny and I hauled
rails in the forenoon and ploughed in the afternoon. Mr. William Robinson died this morning.
2 A little cloudy this morning with a pretty hard frost which delayed plowing till about nine
O’clock. Joseph Malowny and I were both plowing from this hour and the women were making
molasses. Went to meet the Trustees of No. 5 at the School House at Six O’clock. Nancy and I
went at night to Mr. Robinson’s wake. There were two lambs came this morning.
3 Bright sunny morning with a little frost on the ground. Joseph Malowny and I were plowing all
day and the women were making molasses. The day continued fine throughout. There were
three lambs came today.
4 Rainy morning but cleared off about Seven A.M. Started to plow with the oxen but changed
with Joseph Malowny for the horse team. Borrowed Mr. Lonsway’s wagon in the evening and
sent Joseph to Mr. Skeffington Bell’s for nine bushels of seed wheat. One lamb came this morn-
ing.
<Q1 folio 13 recto>
May 1876
5th Rainy morning and continued wet all day with a heavy rain just now (8:40) P.M. Joseph
Malowny made me a rack for the horses to feed out of and I went to the station in the evening
and bought some clover and grass seed, the former at Eighteen cents per pound and the latter at
Four dollars per bushel. One lamb came this morning.
12
6 Misty morning with a slight rain falling, cleared off soon and the remainder of the day was fair.
Joseph Malowny was plowing on Lot 215 Proton and I was plowing on Lot 220 Melancthon.
Mrs. Russell went to the station and bought the boys hats.
7 Sabbath. Rainy morning but cleared off during the day. The ground very wet.
8 Very wet morning, but cleared off about 1 O’clock. Went to Lot 220 Melancthon to plow but
could not on account of the ground being so very wet. Went then to John Agnew’s and took the
share of his Mo[l]dland plow to the blacksmith’s to be fixed. Brought it home and put it on the
plow, tried to work it but could not on account of the dip in the share. I and Joseph Malowny
plowed in the afternoon in the sod with my own ploughs. The ground is so uncommonly saturat-
ed with rain that the horses sank one foot and a half in the highest part one time. Sold 17 bushels
barl[e]y at 50¢ per bushel. Seen the first swallow today.
<Q1 folio 13 verso>
May 1876
9th Cloudy morning and a mizzling rain falling, continued slightly wet all day at intervals. Joseph
Malowny and I were plowing sod but the ground is so wet we can only plow on the highest of it.
10 Very wet morning and continued raining less or more all day. Cleaned up about Sixty bushels of
barley in the forenoon and plowed in the afternoon.
11 Clear bright morning and the sun shining, kept clear to about noon then the sky got overcast and
every appearance of rain. There was a pretty heavy frost on the ground in the morning.
Ploughed in the forenoon and sowed some wheat in the eavening, being the first grain I sowed
this season. Went to Dundalk station in the eavning and got the waggon I had previously or-
dered.
12 Dull morning and a slight mizzle of rain, cleared off however, and the day held up. Finished
sowing wheat today. Had one team plowing on Lot 220 Melancthon.
13 Rather cloudy morning but cleared of[f] and the day remained dry. There was a slight frost in
the morning. Had both teams plowing today on the Melancthon lot.
14 Sabbath. Very severe frost this morning. The sky got overcast early in the day and even indications
of rain appeared.
<Q1 folio 14 recto>
May 1876
15th Rainy morning, but slacked off a little towards 7 O’clock. Went to Melancthon Lot to sow pease
and Harrow and plow. The day became very wet and after sowing about four bushels the teams
and I had to come home, thoroughly wetted. Went to John Agnew’s in the afternoon, helped him
to clean and weigh 38 Bushels of oats that I had bought from him. Came home and after tea
throwed the manure out of some old buildings on Lot 216 Proton. The day continued rainy less
or more from morning till night.
16 Rather misty morning but no rain fell till the afternoon, when a little sprinkle came. It is raining
some just now (8:55) P.M. with indications of a wet night. Was plowing at home today. In the
afternoon put one team to plow in the garden. It is a very late wet spring so far and most of [the]
people cannot get their seeding done on account of the wetness of their farms. Hay is also scarce
in the neighbourhood, but not dear, selling from ten to twelve dollars per ton.
17 Rainy morning with thunder and lightening, the ground is a perfect sea of wet. Cleared off about
8 O’clock A.M. Gathered some stones off a potatoe patch and put a fence around it. There is
lightening just now (9:35 P.M.) and some indications of a thunder storm. It is a question with
many whether they can get their grain sown.
<Q1 folio 14 verso>
13
May 1876
18th Cloudy morning, but the sun shone out bright about 9 O’clock. The day was very [dry] and fine
through[ou]t—in fact the only spring day of the season as yet. Sowed some pease on Melanc-
thon Lot in the forenoon and in the afternoon washed the sheep in the gravel pit in front of the
house. There was about 2 feet water, and it was quite warm.
19 Clear morning and the day got very sultry and hot, and kept so. Was plowing in Melancthon and
the oxen almost gave up on account of the heat and the softness of the land. John Agnew hauled
me the thirty bushels of oats I bought.
20 Sun rose bright but clouded over in a very short time, rain came on about 7 O’clock, accompa-
nied with thunder and lightening. The day cleared about 9 O’clock and remained dry for the re-
mainder of it. There is a good deal of lightening and a little thunder at present (9:45) P.M. Was
working on Melancthon lot today. One team plowing and the other harrowing. Sowed the re-
mainder of the pease today and have got them once harrowed. Never seen such a time of wet,
the harrows were swimming, sometimes, in water. It is very fatiguing [MS fatuiging] on the
teams and they are dragged out, nearly, tonight.
21 Sabbath. Bright sunny morning and clear day but a great storm of thunder, lightening and rain oc-
cured the night before. Continued from 11 to 2 O’clock A.M. Brother John and wife visited us
today.
<Q1 folio 15 recto>
May 1876
22nd Very sharp frost this morning and ice on the water about an inch thick. The sun came out bright
and the day continued fine. I was plowing a potatoe patch and James was harrowing the sod,
breaking it in before sowing the oats. Nancy shore the sheep. I went to the station in the after-
noon and brought home twenty-seven apple trees that I had purchased from Mr. R. J. Doyle. The
ground on which I sowed twenty-five bushels of pease is so wet that I could only get them har-
rowed once.
23 Rather misty morning and some appearance of rain but the mist rose and the sun got out and the
day continued fine. Sowed ten bushels of oats today for the first. James was harrowing and Jo-
seph Malowny was planting out the fruit trees.
24 Clear Sunny morning and the day kept fine all through. Was sowing oats today, had one team
plowing and the other harrowing. Brother John came here in the afternoon and turned his ram
into a weather [=wether, castrated ram].
25 Fine day all through, the sun obscured by clouds in the morning but soon the[y] dissipated.
Staked fruit trees in the forenoon and planted potatoes in the afternoon. Had one team plowing
and the other Harrowing.
26 Fine day with a very slight frost in the morning. Sowed oats in the forenoon and planted pota-
toes in the afternoon, had one team plowing and the other harrowing. Sold 7½ Bushels oats at
30¢ per Bushel and 5 of Barl[e]y @ .50¢
<Q1 folio 15 verso>
May 1876
27th Bright unclouded morning, the sun strong and warm, and the day very fine. I finished sowing
oats today and planted some potatoes in the afternoon. Had one team harrowing and the other
hauling manure. The heifer calved in the morning and the mare colted at night.
28 Sabbath. Bright morning and fine dry day. Nancy and I visited Melancthon folks today.
14
29 Cloudy morning and appeared somewhat like rain. Was plowing for Barley today. Paid Joseph
Malowny His wages. Went to [stricken letters] Dundalk in the eavning and bought 8 Bags of
early Rose potatoes at .70 per Bag. The day was fine and dry all through.
30 Very sharp frost this morning. Went to the station in the forenoon for potatoes and ploughed in
the afternoon, the day was cool but dry. Found one very old ewe dead in the field today, also
Brother John’s Ram that he had casterated on the 24th inst. Think the ewe died from age.
31 Fine day and very warm. Was plowing today, the boys fixing fences in forenoon and went to
Melancthon in the afternoon. Nancy was at Mrs. May’s picking wool. Boys finished potatoe
planting yesterday.
<Q1 folio 16 recto>
June 1876
1st Fine day with a very slight shower of rain in the morning. Was plowing in the forenoon and in
the afternoon sowed three acres of barley.
2 Cloudy in the morning with a few drops of rain, but the day cleared up and was fine. Sowed
three acres of grass & clover seed. James Harrowed barley ground. Brother John bought four
bushels of barley from me at fifty cents per bushel. Black flies and mosquitoes have been perfect
pests these last three days, bit my face all over till, with the swelling they caused, I could scarce-
ly see out of my eyes.
3 Cloudy morning and came on rain about 9 O’clock A.M. Kept raining less or more till about 5
O’clock P.M. Was replanting some potatoes which had not sprouted and went to Dundalk in the
afternoon. Sold 10 bush[els] 13 lbs of barley to William Henders @ 60¢ per Bushel.
4th Sabbath. Rather cloudy cool day. Stopped in the house mostly all day and was very tired.
5 Cold cloudy morning and continued so all day. Went to Dundalk with old mare in the morning
to see Sir W. Walace.* Plowed some ground and planted some potatoes in the afternoon. Sold
George Morrow 13 Bushels of oats at .35¢ per Bushel, if not paid within two weeks, and 9 Bush-
els & 8 pounds of barley at .70 per bushel, if not paid in the same time. Respectively, to be .30
& .50¢ per bushel if paid within two weeks. [*a stud horse]
<Q1 folio 16 verso>
June 1876
6th Fair day with the exception of a slight shower about one O’clock. Sold Richard Bamby 12
Bushels of barl[e]y at .70 per bushel to be paid in Six months. Purchased one cow at $29.00 and
one heifer at $19.00 from John Little of Artemesia. The cow he said had calved about three
weeks and the heifer would calve in about ten days. He lied to me most abominably, and my
opinion of him is that he [is] both a liar and cheat and swindler. Had great trouble in fetching the
cows home and it kept me days [=this bothered me for days?].
7 Very fine day, but exceedingly hot. James, John and I brought one of the cows from Little’s.
Helped John Agnew in the afternoon to wash some of his sheep & Got colt casterated [sic] by
Mr. Sloan of Eugenia Falls. Mr. Sloan stopped all night.
8 Heavy Rain fall in the morning, continuing about three hours, the day fine afterwards, with a
splendid growth. Done no work today as I felt so tired I could not.
9 Rainy morning, very heavy shower. Put up fence beyond the Swale in the afternoon.
10 Bright sunny morning and continued fine all day. Went to Shelburne and obtained Drs. Barr &
Norton’s medical Certificate of inability to teach School.* [*this was required each year, in or-
der to qualify for his superannuation pension of $101.]
<Q1 folio 17 recto>
15
June 1876
Sabbath. 11th
Warm day and without rain. Brother John paid us a visit.
12 Remarkably warm day, the hottest I think that has come yet so far this summer. Cleaned up my
oats and took a load of them in the eavning to Dundalk station. Sold Four bushels and twelve
pounds of them at .30¢ per bushel and the remainder of them (51) bushels to M[ess]rs. Thomas
and Beam at 24½ ¢ per bushel. Could scarcely sell them at all as they had heated and were very
musty. Had to hire the Section boss and pay him one dollar to take them to the above named
gentleman on the lorry.
13th Bagged up the remainder of oats. Sold 30 bushels of them to Mr. John McDowell for .25¢ per
bushel, I to deliver them. The day was very hot till about 10 O’clock A.M. when there came on a
heavy rain storm accompanied by thunder and lightening and there was a great hail storm at the
same time about Four miles North-West of this. I and Nancy visited at Mr. Lonsway’s this
eavning.
14 Rained part of the day. Hauled McDowell his oats. He acted mean with me and took 1 bushel
off me for a few thistle tops being in them. Hauled Messrs Thomas and Beam 60 Bushels of oats
in the eavning.
15 A great deal of rain fell today, especially in the afternoon. One heifer calved this morning.
<Q1 folio 17 verso>
June 1876
16th Rather cloudy day with some rain falling now and then. The boys and I were preparing a piece
of ground in the forenoon for mixed feed and in the afternoon I went to Mr. David Farrier’s Rais-
ing of a Frame Barn. Sold Mr. Kenneth McAulay 4 bushels Barley at 50¢ p. B.
17 Cloudy day with frequent showers. Was preparing a piece of ground on Lot 216 for mixed feed.
18 Sabbath. No rain today. Visited the folks in Melancthon.
19th Very cool morning but no frost. A little rain fell today. Was plowing on Lot 216. Mr. George
Rutherford came in the afternoon and insured Two thirds of Eighty cords of hardwood for me in
the Stadacona Company for one year for the Sum of three dollars.
20 Cold cloudy day for this season of the year. Some rain fell through the day. Was plowing till 5
O’clock P.M. Sowed some mixed oats, pease and Barley for green fodder. Joined the Sons of
Temperance at night. [“Around 1848, the Sons of Temperance lodge, a fraternal and prohibition-
ist society, reached Canada from the United States.”
http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/temperance-movement. Accessed 11/7/2017]
21 Cold cloudy day. Was doing statute labor in Melancthon under James Mills. My James was
harrowing.
22 Bright sunny day and pretty warm. Sowed some Grass and clover seed in the morning. Done
statute labor. Went in the eavning and got paid for oats. [“The Statute Labour Act has its origins
in the earliest days of British settlement in Ontario. In colonial times, many local roads received
no government funding and male residents were forced to work on roads and bridges for as much
as 12 days a year. Eventually, the number of work days required came to be tied to the assessed
value of a settler's property. Landowners had the option to pay the municipality to hire someone
to work on the roads in their place. Refusal to perform statute labour or pay for its value was
punishable by up to six days in prison” (Bob Aaron, “Property Law”, Toronto Star, Sat. 7 Dec.
2007).
<Q1 folio 18 recto>
June 1876
16
23rd Bright Sunny day without any rain. Was doing Statute labor for Melancthon Lot. Nancy took
the wool to Flesherton to be oiled[*], Carded and spun [*after de-greasing, a special spinning oil
is added to the wool before carding: see “Steps in Processing Wool into Yarn” at
https://www.blackberry-ridge.com/prosdscr.htm. Accessed 11/7/2017.]
24 Bright Sunny day and pretty breezy. Took five bags of barley to Dundalk Mill to get chopped.
Went to see a game of ball when at the station. Dundalk boys beat Shelburne boys. Bought two
coal oil barrels at fifty cents each. There was horse racing at Bowler’s Side road this afternoon.
25th Sabbath. Cloudy day but no rain. Nancy and I visited Mr. Lonsway’s in the afternoon. Gerty, a
three year old mare, colted this morning. Time she took: Eleven months less five days.
26 Bright Sunny day and very warm. A thunder storm during the night with very heavy rain. Was
turning manure.
27 Cloudy day without rain, only a slight skiff in the morning and evening. Done two days statute
labor with oxen and self for Lot 216 Proton.
28 Rather cloudy day, but no rain. Was ridding out barn to fit it up for a stable. Boys were hoeing
potatoes.
29 Warm day, a little cloudy but no rain. Was getting posts and beams for stable. Boys were hoeing
potatoes. Nancy was at picking bee at Sam’s. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway & John Agnew visited us
this evening.
<Q1 folio 18 verso>
June 1876
30th Bright warm day and for a wonder there has been no frost in this section of country during this
month. Was cutting logs for beams and posts to fix stable and also hauled them out of swamp.
Boys were hoeing potatoes. Nancy was at a picking bee at her brother John’s.
July 1876
1st Dry day till about 6 O’clock P.M. when it commenced raining slightly and is raining now (11
P.M.). Was helping Brother John to fix a milk house. Nancy and family were at Sunday School
pick nick at Dundalk.* Nancy and I visited John Agnew this night. A stranger was there bring-
ing a lot of land promotion. [*celebrating Dominion Day, July 1, Canada’s national holiday.]
2nd Sabbath. Wet Morning and continued wet mostly all day. Andrew Lonsway and Mrs. Lonsway,
William Lonsway and Mrs. Lonsway and Henry Lonsway visited us this evening.
3 Rainy morning and continued so till about 9 O’clock A.M. Was at Mr. James Mills’ helping him
to raise a log stable.
4 Clear morning but began to rain about 10 A.M. and continued slightly so till 12, noon. Cleared
off and was fair in the evening. Was at Skeffington Bell’s logging be[e] with the oxen. Nancy
went to Flesherton for her dress. John Agnew was here this eavning.
<Q1 folio 19 recto>
July 1876
5th Cloudy morning and with frequent showers through the day. My Boys and I were [dittography:
were] hoeing potatoes for John Agnew.
6 Bright morning and the sun shone all day, clear and strong. Was doing Road work in Proton as-
sisted by John Agnew and his team. Boys were hoeing potatoes.
7 Cloudy morning, with some thunder and lightening accompanied by a heavy shower of rain
about 10 A.M. Very hot in the afternoon. The boys and I were hoeing potatoes for John Agnew.
Nancy was at a Quilting Bee at Mrs. Lonsway’s.
17
8 Bright sunny day and very hot. Was putting in posts and beams in old Barn, fixing it up for a
stable, assisted by John Agnew and Andrew Lonsway.
9th Sabbath. Very hot day. Nancy visited in Melancthon today.
10th Bright morning and very hot through the day. The sky got overcast in the eavning and rain be-
gan falling about 7 P.M. Raining pretty sharply now (9:10) P.M. Was hoeing potatoes at John
Agnew’s today. Boys were hoeing at brother John’s. Nancy and I were at Mr. Lonsway’s this
afternoon. Road men repaired the gravel opposite my lot today.
<Q1 folio 19 verso>
July 1876
11th Very warm day and a great growth. Was helping John Agnew to hoe potatoes. The boys were
hoeing in at Brother John’s.
12 Warm day but a little cloudy. Nancy and the family went to a pick-nick, or gathering of the
friends*, at brother John’s. I went to Dundalk. The day appeared to me dull and spiritless.
Bought a horse poke* at .90¢ and a whetstone at .11¢ [*Northern Irish Protestants celebrate 12
July as the anniversary of the Battle of the Boyne, 1690, a victory for Protestant William of Or-
ange over Catholic James II, both claiming the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland. John
Russell was a charter member of Loyal Orange Lodge No. 797; see A History of Dundalk, p.
168. *Horse poke: a device hung on the neck of a horse, with a hinged, hanging bar that allows
grazing, but discourages jumping fences.]
13 Pretty hot day. John Agnew and I were providing material for a hay rack. The boys were hoeing
potatoes at brother Sam’s.
14 Warm day. John Agnew made me a hay rack. I put up a cook house. The boys were hoeing
potatoes at Sam’s.
15 A little cooler than yesterday. I fitted up some rakes, put the grass Scythe in order, cut some
poles for stable loft. The boys were bugging potatoes.
16 Sabbath. The day a little cloudy, with a nice breeze of wind. Brother Sam and wife, Brother John
and wife & John Agnew and wife were here today.
17 Dry day with a breeze of wind. Began mowing today for the first on Melancthon Lot.
18 Rather cloudy morning and commenced raining about 10 A.M., cleared off about 11:30 A.M.
Was mowing today, went in the evening to get William Henders to help me. Nancy was at a
sowing bee at Eliza’s.
<Q1 folio 20 recto>
July 1876
19th Bright sunny day, and pretty hot. Some cloud arose at night, indicating rain. Mr. William Hen-
ders and I were mowing on Melancthon Lot. Nancy and the boys were making hay.
20 Cool morning and a little cloudy, rained some about 9 A.M. Rained a little again at noon, cleared
off and was dry and windy in the afternoon. Very cold just now (9:40) P.M. and there is an ap-
pearance of frost. Had Mr. Henders mowing for me in Melancthon. The boys and I Hauled in
two loads of hay from Melancthon in the forenoon. Cut a pitch hole in the stable and shook out
some hay in the eavning.
21 Cloudy morning but the clouds dispersed and the sun came out and the day continued dry. The
boys and I hauled five loads of hay from Melancthon Lot and Nancy and Clark were raking in
the field while Eliza and William H. minded the gap at home.
22 A very heavy dew this morning but no frost, the sky clouded over. Went to Melancthon Lot and
raked up some hay. Rain came on about 9:30 A.M., not very heavy, but it kept rain[in]g a light
rain all day and is doing so now (9:54) P.M.
18
23rd Sabbath. A pretty cool, cloudy day, but without rain.
<Q1 folio 20 verso>
July 1876
24th Cool, cloudy morning. Nancy and the boys and I went to Melancthon Lot and raked up some
hay and put on a load. It began to rain slightly, but enough to prevent us hauling in any but the
one load. I mowed in the afternoon. Sold ten lambs to Mr. William Acheson at $2.50 each.
Subscribed for Northern Messenger.
25 A very dense fog this morning. Mowed a little in the morning. Nancy raked up some hay, the
boys and I hauled in three loads. I mowed some after tea. There was a little rain fell today.
26 A slight frost this morning but there was a very heavy fog which came down like fine rain, pre-
venting the frost from doing injury. The day was cool but cloudy. Nancy and the boys raked
hay to 5 P.M. and I mowed. Then I hauled in a load.
27 Cool morning and cloudy, but the day kept dry to about 4 P.M., then there was a slight rain which
increased to a pretty heavy shower about 7 P.M. It is now rain[in]g slightly and has the appear-
ance of a wet night. I mowed in the forenoon, hauled in one load of hay in the afternoon and
mowed again in the eavning. Nancy and the boys raked up and helped with the load.
28 Cloudy morning and a very cool day, with a slight mizzle of rain occasionally. Was mowing on
Lot 220 Melancthon, assisted by Jim.
<Q1 folio 21 recto>
July 1876
29th Bright sunny morning and the day continued fine and pretty hot. Was mowing on Lot 220
Melancthon, assisted by Brother John. Nancy and the boys were raking hay. Mr. W. Acheson
took away the lambs which he had bought from me.
30th Sabbath. Bright warm day, and pretty warm. Nancy went to Meeting in the forenoon and She and
I went to Meeting in the afternoon.
31 Clear, bright day and pretty hot. Nancy and the boys and I raked hay on Lot 220 Melancthon.
___________________
August 1876
1st Bright sunny morning and continued clear and hot all day. Had John Agnew helping me haul
hay with his team from Lot 220 Melancthon. Finished haying today. Mother, Brother John and
wife, and Sister Margaret were here today. The weather has been pretty favorable for haying and
I have all mine saved in good order.
2 Bright morning and continued hot and fine all day. The boys and I were fixing pasture field
fence today.
3 Rather cloudy morning and very sultry. The day was warm and dry but clouded over in the
eavning with indications of rain. Was helping brother John to do his Statute Labor in Melanc-
thon.
<Q1 folio 21 verso>
August 1876
4th Bright sunny morning and the day dry and very hot. I felt more oppressed by the heat this day
than [dittography: than] any other time for so far this summer. Brother John and I pulled down
the old driving shed on Lot 220 Melancthon and split some rails out of the cedar logs and James
and John hauled rails with the oxen to fence in the meadow on said Lot.
5 Warm day, but not quite so hot as yesterday. A very heavy rain storm passed over Dundalk about
6 P.M. A rain storm accompanied by thunder and lightening is here at this time (9:53 P. M). I
was hauling rails today with the oxen on Lot 220 Melancthon. Brother John was splitting rails
19
and putting up fence for me on said Lot. The boys, James, John and Clark, were picking huckle-
berries.
6th Sabbath. Fair day till the afternoon when there was a smart shower. It cleared off then began rain-
ing at night. Nancy went to Melancthon Meeting in the forenoon.
7 Smart shower in the morning; it cleared off and remained fine all day. I was digging a well to
water the cattle on Lot 220 Melancthon. Brother John assisted me, and the boys hauled some
rails for the fence on said Lot.
8 Dry day and pretty warm. Was bugging potatoes till 5 P.M., then went to the Post Office. Also
went to the Division and requested my name to be taken off. Sent a letter to Brother William.
<Q1 folio 22 recto>
August 1876
9th Dry day and pretty hot. Went to pick huckleberries today. There were four of us, viz. Nancy,
James, John A. and I. There were four of Mr. Lonsway’s, two of Mr. Trugon’s, six of Mr. Mills’,
three of Brother John’s and Brother Samuel. The berries were plentiful and we all filled our ves-
sels. The road was very rough coming out of the marsh, and carrying the berries as far as the
wagon tired us pretty well. We gathered about four paten pails full for ourselves. [Paten’ pails
held 10 or 12 quarts, according to Joshua Fraser, Shanty, Forest and River Life in the Backwoods
of Canada (Montreal: Lovell and Son, 1883), p. 308]
10 Dry and very hot. Was mowing a piece of grass for brother John, the boys were bugging pota-
toes. Heard yesterday that Mr. Robert Bell had died at Bracebridge.
11 Very sultry day and oppressively hot in the forenoon. Tried to prepare some stuff for chinking
the barn but became so fatigued that I had to give it up. There was pretty heavy rain accompa-
nied with lightening and thunder about 7 P.M.
12 Rainy morning but cleared off about 7 A.M. and continued fine and pretty hot all day after. Was
helping Brother Sam at a Manure Bee today.
13th Sabbath. Warm and dry day. Nancy and I visited Mr. Lonsway’s in the eavning.
<Q1 folio 22 verso>
August 1876
14th Very warm day although somewhat cloudy. Lightening at night and indications of rain. Went to
the sawmill in the morning and hauled nine logs, about seventy rods[*] on a crotch, to the gang-
way. Got them sawn and brought home two loads of lumber with oxen. The day was so very hot
that I had to let the oxen crawl along the road. [* units of measurement: 1 chain = 66 feet long
(20.1168 meters) = 4 rods; 1 chain = 100 links; 1 rod = 5½ yds. (5.0292 m)]
15 Misty morning and a slight sprinkling of rain fell, but the day cleared up and remained dry. It
was pretty cool in the eavning, as if indicating frost. Brother John was helping me to saw some
Hemlock logs in order to prepare lumber for a frame barn. We sawed 15 from 10.30 A.M. to
6.30 P.M. Mr. Lonsway hauled me some lumber from the mill that I left there yesterday.
16 Very cool morning but no frost. The day rather cloudy and cool without rain. Brother John and I
were cutting saw logs. We cut 18 to 4 P.M. and then went to a ra[i]sing of a frame barn on lot
240 Melancthon, belonging to Mr. Stephens. I then went from there to Dundalk and bought a
grain cradle and blade from Mr. Graham for $3.50. P. S. John Bennett, Sawyer for John
McDowell, had his hand cut off today with the mill saw.
17 Rather cloudy morning but the day was dry. Brother John and I were sawing Hemlock logs. We
sawed 15 then went and cleaned out the well on the hill. James assisted us to limb the trees.
<Q1 folio 23 recto>
August 1876
20
18th Cool morning and a little cloudy, with a sharp shower about [stricken text: 5 A.M. the remainder
of the day was dry. The eavning pretty chilly and cold at night indicating] 6 P.M. and continued
raining some through the night. Brother John was helping me to saw logs. We sawed 16.
19 Shower of rain in the morning, but cleared off and the day remained dry. Very cool in the
eavning and a frosty look with it. Brother John was helping me with the saw logs. We sawed 16.
John and James went to Mrs. McCoy’s with the Cotton Warp.
20th Sabbath. A very cool morning and continues so all day. There was a very sharp frost this night,
and apparently it done a great deal of harm. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway visited us this eavning.
21 A very cool morning but the sun rose bright and clear, the frost lay on the ground pretty heavy.
The day kept dry and warm. Was at Brother John’s helping him to mow barley. Slept at Father’s
all night. There was a slight frost this night.
22 Clear sunny morning and continued dry all day with some appearance of rain towards eavning.
Was helping Brother John with his barley today. Slept at Father’s all night.
<Q1 folio 23 verso>
August 1876
23rd Fine morning, a little cloudy but the day dry and pretty warm. Was helping Brother John with
his barley. He sent me in the afternoon to help Brother Sam put in oats. Slept at Father’s to-
night.
24 Rather misty morning and the day was cloudy but very warm, especially in the afternoon. There
was a slight shower of rain accompanied by thunder about 4. P.M. Was with Brother John help-
ing him to haul in barley. Mr. Mich[a]el Boucher’s* barn was burned today. Slept at home this
night. [*Michael Boucher was a trustee in 1860 for S. S. No. 5 Melancthon, where Robert taught
for 17½ years]
25 A slight shower of rain this morning but the day cleared up and remained dry. Went in the morn-
ing to Mr. A. Lonsway’s to apprize damages done by J. Trugon’s horses. Employed Samuel Rich
to harvest at $1.25 per day for cradling and $1.00 per day for other work throughout the harvest.
There was a pretty high wind this afternoon. Was helping Brother John today with wheat and
barley. Slept at Father’s this night.
26 A slight frost this morning, the day was cool, cloudy and windy. Was helping Brother John with
his wheat today. Came home this night.
27th Sabbath. A severe frost this morning, doing injury to most grain that had escaped the preceding
frosts. The day dry and fine. Mrs. Russell, James and Eliza went to sister Margaret’s.
<Q1 folio 24 recto>
August 1876
28th Fine morning and the day dry and warm. Brother John was helping me to harvest. Got some
wheat cradled, being the first I had cut of wheat this season. I raked and bound.
29 A fine bright harvest day. Got some wheat and also oats cut today. I bound, Nancy helped me at
night. The straw was so brittle that binding through the heat of the day was impossible.
30 Morning a little cloudy but soon cleared off and the day remained dry and warm, with some
clouds towards night. Nancy and I bound a little through the day, then hunted up the oxen, then
bound a while at night. Had a man cradling oats.
31 Misty morning but the sun soon shone out and the day was dry and pretty hot, with some lighten-
ing in the eavning. The boys, Nancy and I were hauling in wheat. Sam Rich was cradling oats
for me. It has now been pretty dry for quite a spell and water is getting scarce.
<Q1 folio 24 verso>
21
September 1876
1st A cool damp morning after the shower of rain last night. Could not haul in any today, it was too
damp. Fixed up a hen house in the forenoon. Nancy, the boys and I bound oats in the afternoon.
Sam Rich cradelled. Mr. Lonsway and wife and William Lonsway visited us this night.
2 A little rain very early in the morning, but the day cleared off and got breezy with a very stiff
gale blowing in the afternoon. The boys, Nancy and I put in the barley and the remainder of the
wheat. It has been very favorable harvest weather so far, and people in general are well ad-
vanced. The crops are ripe about four weeks earlier than they were last year.
3rd Sabbath. A slight shower fell this afternoon. There was frost in the morning but the day was gener-
ally fine. Brother John and wife visited us this eavning.
4 A little rain this morning but nothing to retard work. The day held up dry and pretty breezy in
the eavning. John, James, Nancy and I were binding oats. Samuel Rich was craddling.
5 Damp morning, but soon dried off. The boys, Nancy and I were binding. Sam Rich was
craddling. Mr. Johnson, Presbyterian Student, visited us today. Paid Sam rich $11.00 for 9 days’
work.
<Q1 folio 25 recto>
September 1876
6th Very sharp frost this morning and ice on the water. The forenoon dry but the afternoon was a
little damp. Was helping Brother Sam to harvest. The boys and Nancy were binding oats at
home.
7 Misty morning, but the forenoon cleared up. Towards night there was a slight mizzle of rain.
John Agnew and team, Brother Samuel and team, and Brother John were helping me to haul in
pease from Melancthon lot. Mr. Lonsway helped me in the afternoon to build the stack. Mr.
Lonsway met with a loss this eavning as his mare died, through the effects of eating, it is
thought, too much soft clover. The two teams hauled in 16 loads of peas, clearing a ten acre field.
8 A little rain fell this morning, but the wind rose and the day became dry. Brother John helped me
to top off the pea stack and cover it with boards that he loaned me.
9 Damp morning, but soon became dry and continued so all day. The boys, Nancy and I were
binding oats.
10th Sabbath. A very cool day for this time of the year, but dry. Nancy and Eliza and James went to
Meeting.
11 Cool morning and a slight mizzle of rain. Was helping Brother Sam to harvest. His oats were so
poor with both frost and rust that we had to mow them. Scarcely any grain in them.
<Q1 folio 25 verso>
September 1876
12th A bright clear morning, and continued very fine all day. Brother Sam and team, John Agnew and
team, I and the ox team, Brother John, Andrew Lonsway and James Mills, Jun[io]r, were all
hauling in oats for me today. We cleared of[f] 15 acres. The straw was a good crop, but the
grain appears very light on account of the frost and rust. This day finishes my harvest.
13 Morning a little misty, but the sun shone out clear after some time and the day remained fine.
James, John and I were helping brother Sam at his harvest.
14 Rather cloudy morning but the day kept dry till about 4 O’clock P.M. when there was a pretty
sharp rain which continued till about dark. James, John, and I were helping brother Samuel to
harvest.
22
15 Bright clear morning, and continued a fine day. Posted a letter to the Dep[u]t[y] Minister of Ed-
ucation and another to the Manager, Bank [of] Montreal. Bought a ram lamb from Mr. James
May at $3.00, and went to employ a thrashing machine.
16 Fine day, clear and dry. Went to Mr. Mills’ thrashing. His grain turned out very poorly also.
The machine done very little work.
17th Sabbath. Rather cloudy day, but no rain fell till night, when it rained pretty much all night long.
William Lonsway and wife, and brother John and wife visited us today.
<Q1 folio 26 recto>
September 1876
18th Rainy morning and continued a mizzle during the forenoon. Went to James Mills’ thrashing but
he did not begin on account of the rain. Sold a spring colt to Andrew Lonsway for one milch
cow and a note of hand for $13., payable in 15 months. Sold another spring colt to Thomas Fos-
ter for one yonge[sic] cow, 2 years old, coming 3, in calf, and $11. payable in one year.
19 Cool morning with a slight rain. Faired up during the forenoon and remained dry. Went to a
manure bee to William Lonsway[’s].
20 Rather cloudy morning but the day was dry and warm in the afternoon. Went to the voting on
the Dundalk Bill and voted against it.
21 Rather misty morning but the day was dry. Was hauling out manure today.
22 Misty morning but the day broke up dry and warm. Was hauling out manure today. Nancy and
Jim went with John Agnew’s team to Flesherton for the yarn. Did not get all, only part. Went to
the Post Office in the afternoon.
23 Misty morning with a slight mizzle of rain, but soon cleared off and the day remained dry. Jim
and I were putting out manure. Johney & Clark were helping their uncle John to take up pota-
toes.
<Q1 folio 26 verso>
September 1876
24th Sabbath. Misty, cloudy day but without rain. Stopped at home.
25 Misty morning but the day remained dry till the afternoon, when it commenced raining, which it
did through all the night. Was hauling out manure, the boys were raking up some mixed feed.
26 Rainy morning and continued showery all day and is raining and blowing pretty strong now
(8.40) P.M. Done nothing today, did not feel well.
27 Cold, raw day, but no rain of any account. Was spreading manure. James, John and Clark went
to the station and left their measures for boots.
28 Wet morning and continued showery most of the day. There was a very heavy rain in the after-
noon. Was digging potatoes in the forenoon. James was plowing with the oxen in the forenoon.
29 Cool morning and a little rain fell through the day. Mr. May sent me the ram lamb I bought from
him. James and John were plowing, Clark and I were digging potatoes. Mr. and Mrs. A. Lon-
sway visited us tonight.
30 Chilly morning and continued cold all day with frequent showers. Sold 208 pounds butter to Mr.
D. Davidson* of Dundalk @ .20¢ per pound. Jim put the brand on ram today. [*Davidson’s is a
general merchandise store in Dundalk, and in later entries Robert frequently mentions D. Da-
vidson and his clerks; see History of Dundalk, p. 101, list of businesses in 1877].
<Q1 folio 27 recto>
October 1876
1st Sabbath. Cold morning and continued cold and show[e]ry all day. Nancy went to Sister Sarah’s.
23
2 Cool morning but the day remained dry with a pretty strong wind at night. Was fixing stable for
the mares today. Took the colts from the mares and delivered them to Mr. Foster & Lonsway.
Sow pigged this morning, had nine. Borrowed six bags of oats from Mr. Lonsway as I had not
thrashed yet and want to start plowing. James and John went for the oats with the oxen and
waggon.
3 Cool morning but dry, soon commenced raining and continued showery all day with pretty heavy
rain at night. Henry Lonsway came to work today. I have him hired for one month at $8.00. We
were hauling in some mixed feed this forenoon. The last of it was pretty wet. I had to go to Mr.
Foster’s and borrow back the colt which I had sold him because its mother had so much milk that
she had swelled up to such an enormous extent in her bag that she would have certainly have
[sic] died if I had not brought the colt to suck her again. Father and Sister Sarah were here today.
I bought some lime from John Charters for white-washing purposes. James & John went for it.
4 Cool morning and continued cold all day with frequent showers of sleet and hail. Was plowing
with oxen and John drove them. Henry Lonsway and my Jim were chinking the stable.
<Q1 folio 27 verso>
October 1876
5th Cold day with some showers. Was plowing with the oxen. Henry Lonsway was fixing stable.
6 Very chilly, cold day and the afternoon from about 1:30 P.M. was very wet. Plowed with the
oxen till the rain prevented me. Henry Lonsway was fixing stable. Bought a cow from Thomas
Buchanon for a note against A. Lonsway for $13.00 and $6. cash.
7 Cold day with frequent showers of sleet and snow. Snowed considerable during the night and
the ground was covered with snow before morning. Was plowing with the oxen, Jim was driv-
ing. Henry Lonsway was fixing stable.
8th Sabbath. Bleak wintry morning, the ground covered with snow. Was a chilly, cold day. Brother
John came out today.
9 Ground covered with snow this morning but it went away pretty much all before night. Henry
and the boys were fetching in potatoes in the forenoon and plowing in the afternoon. I was in
search of a thrashing machine. Very windy night.
10 Cold morning and remained cold but dry all day. Henry and Jim were plowing today with oxen.
[“Good” written in left margin, rotated 90◦ right. Following entries have the letter Y {= yes?} in
left margin, similarly rotated, at every entry to 24 Oct, then no rotation to 24 Nov; then Y anno-
tation is sporadic, ending on 6 Dec.]
11 Cold morning, sharp frost and the ground covered with snow. The day broke up fine and the
snow mostly all left. Hitched up the mares and started plowing with them. The young mare was
weak from suckling her colt, had to unhitch them and plow with the oxen.
<Q1 folio 28 recto>
October 1876
12th Cold morning and a great deal of frost in the ground. It thawed out a little during the day. Was
plowing in the forenoon. Henry and the boys were putting potatoes in the cellar in the forenoon.
Was preparing for the thrashing machine in the afternoon. Traded a sheep to Kenneth Perry for
one hundred of beef, and gave him .50¢ to boot. The thrashers are here tonight ready for work
when tomorrow comes.
13 No rain today although it was cloudy most part of it. Was thrashing wheat and pease. The wheat
and [barley: stricken] turned out poorly. The pease were good but very wet as the stack had tak-
en the rain.
24
14 Snowing this morning and continued so mostly all day. The men and teams gathered to thrash
but could not on account of the stormy, snowy day.
15th Sabbath. The ground covered with snow and a cold day all through.
16 A cloudy morning but no rain or snow fell. A pretty high wind. Was thrashing the remainder of
the pease, the barley stack and the oat stack. Barley and oats turned out poorly, not half a crop,
oats light as chaff almost, stack very wet. I have lost as much as $40. on account of having no
barn to put my grain in. Times are getting a little hard on me as my crop will do scarcely any-
thing for me this season.
Mr. James Allen of Artemesia thrashed for me, his charge was $14.00.
<Q1 folio 28 verso>
October 1876
17th A dry day with sun shining pretty nicely in the afternoon. The boys and I were cleaning up the
barnyard in the forenoon and in the afternoon were putting potatoes in pits for the winter. Nancy
took some yarn to the weavers in the afternoon.
18 Fine sunny morning and continued so all day. Went to the station with some pease in the fore-
noon. Sold them @ .61 per bushel. Mr. Hunter asked me to haul nine bunches of lathe for him
from the Freight House to his house. I done so, but had to fetch the lathe back again to the
Freight house as Hunter had not paid the Freight on them. I consider it was mean of him to ask
me to move anything from the freight house when he had not discharged all dues against it. Was
plowing in the afternoon. The boys were fixing up the barn yard and hauling some potatoes to
gather [sic].
19 Very hard frost this morning, but the sun came out strong and the day continued fine. Was plow-
ing in the forenoon and James, John and I were at brother John’s thrashing in the afternoon. His
wheat and barley turned out moderately well.
20 Bright sunny morning and the day continued fine. The boys and I were at Brother Sam’s thrash-
ing. His grain turned out very poorly.
21 Heavy rain this morning about 1 o’clock but the day was dry and very sultry. Was at Sam’s in
the forenoon and plowing at home in the afternoon. The eavning was so warm that the oxen put
out their Tongues.
<Q1 folio 29 recto>
October 1876
22nd Sabbath. Cloudy day, but dry and very warm for this time of the year. Brother John was here this
eavning.
23 Rainy morning, commenced long before daylight and continued a perfect pour most of the day.
It is still raining 7:30 P.M. Was fixing the horse stable in the forenoon and in the afternoon went
in to Proton to see about a school to teach next year as I am getting tired of farming.
24 Rather cloudy morning and frequent showers of rain throughout the day. Went to Mr. Thos. Fos-
ter’s in the forenoon and put some fencing round the straw stack in the afternoon. Clark and I
went to Mr. May’s and brought home the muly[*] cow which I had previously purchased from
him. James, John and Henry Lonsway were at Mr. Lonsway’s thrashing. [*muly, or muley are
naturally polled cows, i.e. without horns, typical of certain breeds such as Black or Red Angus]
25 Rainy morning and turned to sleet and snow in the afternoon. Was choring around today and
went to Mr. John Ludlow’s to see about selling him a yoke of working oxen. He came and seen
the oxen and bought them at $110.00 on a year’s credit. The boys were at Lonsway’s thrashing.
25
26 Snowy morning and continued so pretty much all day. I and John were at John Agnew’s thrash-
ing. James and Henry Lonsway were at Mr. Lonsway’s till 11 A.M. Henry then went to Mr.
Mills’ thrashing and James hitched up the horse and plowed.
<Q1 folio 29 verso>
October 1876
27th Dull cloudy morning with a little snow on the ground, but no rain or snow fell through the day.
John and I were at John Agnew’s thrashing. James was plowing.
28 Snowed some last night, the ground white with snow this morning, but some fell during the day.
Done nothing this forenoon. Went in the afternoon to a Trustee meeting of No. 5 Melancthon,
then went to Dundalk and bought a pair of boots for Eliza at $1.25
29th Sabbath. Cloudy day, rather cold and some snow on the ground.
30 Cloudy morning, but cleared up a little through the day, and became mild and warm in the after-
noon. Piled some cordwood in the bush in the forenoon and in the afternoon done some writing
as Sec. Treasurer of School Sect. 5 Melancthon. Also sent a letter to the Educational Depart-
ment. James plowed today.
31 Dull morning, but it did not rain any through the day. Henry Lonsway and I were chopping logs
for a barn in the bush. Jim was plowing.
November 1876
1st Cloudy morning and commenced raining about 10 A.M. and continued a pretty sharp rain for
about one hour. The remainder of the day was misty with a slight rain towards night. Jim was
plowing, Henry and I were chopping logs.
<Q1 folio 30 recto>
November 1876
2nd Rather cloudy morning, but no rain fell to about 3 O’clock P.M., when there was a pretty sharp
and continued shower. It became windy in the eavning and is now (11:45) P.M. blowing a very
stiff gale. I was chopping some barn logs in the forenoon and in the afternoon was choring
around. Jim was plowing. Henry Lonsway’s month was up this morning and I paid him his
wages, $8.00. I also paid his brother William for him $4.00, for which Henry is to haul out of
the bush with William’s oxen as many logs as will build me an end to my Barn of the size of 24
feet Square of a mow and 12 feet of a thrash floor. I must get up a Barn through some means be-
cause I am continually loosing [sic] my grain by stacking. I have lost this year as much as would
put up a mow to the one I have. Besides, my straw is always so badly stacked at thrashing that
the one third is wasted on me. I had thought that I could manage a Frame Barn for next summer,
but I cannot, as my grain turned out so poorly it is not half a crop. Things are beginning to look
squally with me financially. Still, I think I will be able to tide over my difficulties. I must pay
off my debts if possible and be very careful in future not to incur any more if I can possibly
avoid it. It is a very bad thing to get in debt here, depending on the crops to pay it off, because
they seldom do well here. It appears to be a frosty, barren, cold, wet, poor and unproductive part
of the world. [this entry covers the entire page]
<Q1 folio 30 verso>
November 1876
3rd Cloudy morning but the day continued dry with the exception of a slight mizzle of rain in the
forenoon. Was cutting roads in the bush in the forenoon to get out barn logs. In the afternoon,
26
John and I went to K. Perry’s thrashing. Did not thrash as something went wrong with the horse
power. Came home and went to cutting roads again.
4 Misty morning but the day continued dry. John and I went to Kenneth Perry’s thrashing. Jim
chored [MS:shred] around at home. Kenneth got done thrashing about 4 O’clock P.M. John and
I came home and chored around. Mrs. Lonsway and husband were here tonight.
5th Sabbath. Rather cloudy morning but no rain fell during the day. Visited Father this day.
6 Dark, misty morning and began to rain and sleet about 10 O’clock A.M. and continued so with-
out intermission up to the present hour, 8:45 P.M. The boys and I went to the woods in the fore-
noon to take out rafters, but the rain coming on so soon we had to give up the work. I began to
teach my children tonight.
7 Dull morning with a slight mizzle of rain through the day. The boys and I were taking out rafters
in the bush to 4 O’clock P.M., then I went into William Lonsway’s to get him to haul out logs for
the barn.
<Q1 folio 31 recto>
November 1876
8th Misty morning and a [second “a” stricken] good deal of sleet and rain fell during the day. The
ground is remarkably wet at present and the roads are so bad that very few venture on them with
waggons. Such a wet fall has not been known for a long time. William Lonsway was hauling
out Barn logs with his oxen and I was cutting roads, &c.
9 Cloudy morning but there was no rain through the day. Had W. Lonsway with his oxen in the
forenoon hauling out barn logs. In the afternoon I went to Mr. May’s and then to Dundalk and
bought an axe at $1.50 and a helve* at .15¢. [*axe handle].
10 Misty morning, but there was no rain through the day. Was taking out rafters in the forenoon and
in the afternoon turned over some oats in the barn as they were getting warm. The boys, Jim and
John, were cutting stove wood in the bush. Brother John is stopping here tonight.
11 Pretty clear morning with frost on the ground, enough just to keep one from sinking into the
mud. Went with Nancy in the forenoon to Dundalk to get her tooth drawn. In the afternoon
chored around. Boys were chopping stove wood in the afternoon.
12th Sabbath. A very fine day for this time of the year. Brother John was here today.
<Q1 folio 31 verso>
November 1876
13th Beautiful day for this season of the year. Very warm and the sun out bright and clear, but there is
some appearance of rain just now (8:30) P.M. Gave John Agnew four pigs six weeks old and he
is to winter on straw four head of cattle for me. I was hauling out beams and rafters for the barn
with the mare. The boys, Jim and John, were chopping.
14 A little snow on the ground this morning but it soon disappeared. The day was dry and favoura-
ble for working out of doors. John and I were getting out the remainder of the rafters and beams
for the barn. James went to help his uncle John Russell to bank his house. Mrs. Russell is very
much pained this eavning with an inflamed eye.
15 A little foggy this morning but the day brightened up and remained very fine. Went to Dundalk
and got some medecine for Mrs. Russell’s inflamed eye, as it is very painful. Then went to Mrs.
McCoy’s for our cloth. It was not woven. Came home and fixed a beetle* [*maul, large wooden
sledge hammer; see also 13 Dec. 1881, 20 Aug. 1883].
16 Misty morning, but the day held up well. There was a very slight little sprinkle of snow in the
morning. Went to William Lonsway’s and helped him to crosscut stove wood, as he claimed a
day of me for one I had him at the thrashing machine. Stopped at Father’s this night.
27
7 Cloudy day without sun, every appearance of rain tonight. Nancy’s eye is a good deal better.
Tried to burn the logs of the old house on Lot 220 but they were too wet to burn.
<Q1 folio 32 recto>
November 1876
18th Misty morning and a good deal like rain. The day kept dry till the afternoon when there was a
slight mizzle of rain. John and James were chopping stove wood in the bush. I was splitting
rails.
19th Sabbath. Warm, misty day but without rain. Brother John visited us today. I went to John Ag-
new’s in the eavning, my dog followed me. John had two sheep killed a few days before by ei-
ther dogs or wolves. He said he would get some strichnine and put on the remains of the sheep.
Afterwards he said that he had got none. I and the dog passed the remains of one sheep in his
bush. The dog ate some of it but I, believing there was no poison on it, did not mind it. When I
came home Nancy and I went to Mr. Lonsway’s, the dog with us. While there he took convul-
sions and swelled up. I got melted butter and poured into him, he seemed to get a little better.
After some time we came home, poor dog could only come part of the way, took another fit and
fell into the water. I lifted him out and carried him home, put some more melted butter into him,
but he died about 11 O’clock that night. John still asserts that he did not put poison out, but the
fact remains that after eating of the sheep, poor dog died, and I think that his death was caused
by poison, and I also think that it was a very treacherous proceeding on the part of John Agnew.
20 Foggy day with a slight mizzle of rain occassionaly. Helped Mr. Lonsway to kill some pigs in
the forenoon and in the afternoon cleaned up some pease. Jim and John were chopping fire-
wood.
<Q1 folio 32 verso>
November 1876
21st Misty morning with a very slight mizzle of rain through the day. Cloudy and without sunshine
all day, but pleasant and warm, nonetheless. It is remarkably mild weather for this season of the
year and most people are busy plowing. I was splitting rails today, John and James were cutting
stove wood in [the] bush.
22 Sleet and rain this morning and continued so mostly all day. Went to split rails but gave it up,
the day was so wet.
23 Snow on the ground this morning and some fell during the day. Did not work any today, only
done the chores, as I was not well, having caught a cold. Visited Mr. Lonsway in company with
Mrs. Russell in the eavning.
24 Rather a cool morning and indications of winter as the snow is falling. Went to Dundalk in the
eavning with Mrs. Russell. She sold six pairs of mitts at 50¢ per pair. I went to Mr. Freeland’s
in Melancthon and got from them a little dog which I fetched home.
25 Rather cloudy morning and still some snow on the ground. In the afternoon it thawed some and
at night some more snow fell. Got the BobSleighs put to rights. Nancy plucked eleven geese in
the forenoon and we took them and two bags of beets to Dundalk in the afternoon. She got 15¢
per pound for five of them which were undrawn, and 16½¢ per pound for six of them that were
drawn. They were very fat for young geese and weighed about ten pounds each (the undrawn
ones). Nancy bought herself a sett of dishes. Sold the beets at 50¢ per bushel.
<Q1 folio 33 recto>
November 1876
26th Sabbath. Some snow fell this morning and the day was rather foggy and inclined to be soft. Mrs.
Russell and I visited Mr. John McQuarrie at Dundalk.
28
27 Misty morning with a very slight fall of snow through the day. The roads are very rough, there is
a little sleighing of a poor kind. Fixed a place in the stable for the cows and cleaned up some
barley for market.
28 Several little skiffs of snow fell through the day, but it was inclined to melt. Went to Dundalk in
the forenoon with 15 Bushels & 35 lbs Barley and only got 40¢ per Bushel. It was frozen and
poor stuff and was all I had off 2½ acres sown. In the afternoon went to Dundalk with Fourteen
bags of oats—they only weighed 23 Bushels and 13 lbs. Got 37¢ per Bushel. The oats are very
light and very little of them to an acre. The sleighing is very bad and I would not have gone, on-
ly my grain is in my way where I mean to stable my cattle. Gave my James the price of two
bushels of Barley as he said he had sown the ground that produced that quantity.
29 A little more snow on the ground this morning and continued coming down some more. Hauled
out some oats today and got 37¢ per Bushel. Oats very light: 28 bags well filled only weighed
47 Bushels and 15 lbs.
30 Real cold morning and continued a very sharp freeze all day with some snow falling. Andrew
Lonsway helped me to kill two pigs and a three year old steer. The pigs weighed 502 pounds
net. This is the first cold day there has been this winter.
<Q1 folio 33 verso>
December 1876
1st Very cold morning and continued freezing and snowing all day, a regular stinger of a day. The
boys and I cleaned and bagged the wheat—had about 40 Bushels from Six acres sown.
2 Not quite so cold as yesterday, though cold enough to be very uncomfortable. The boys and I
cleaned up and put away 17 Bushels of pease for feed in the forenoon and in the afternoon built a
pen of rails for the sheep. The co[l]ts were playing this eavning and Rodney, a two-year old,
sprained his leg or bruised his foot on some of the frozen lumps that are thick around the barn-
yard. He is very lame. Also the old mare, on going to water, came into the shed where we had
butchered a steer two days ago, and she smelled the blood. It seemed to make her sick, as she
lay down several times and seemed as if she were going to slip her colt. I put her into the stable
and gave her about a quart of spring wheat. She now (9 O’clock P.M.) seems all right.
3rd Sabbath. Mild day with a nice bit of sleighing. Mrs. and Mr. Lonsway visited us this eavning and
Brother John and wife at night.
4 Rather mild day with pretty high, clear sky. The sleighing is passibly [=passably] good.
Cleaned up 1425 pounds pease and took them to Dundalk. Sold them for .60¢ per bushel. The
highest price for other pease than mine was .58¢, but mine were a pure white pea and no thistle
tops nor oats in them. Sold a steer hide for .15¢ per pound. It weighed 70 pounds.
<Q1 folio 34 recto>
December 1876
5th Mild winter’s day, got a little cold in the eavning. Sleighing pretty good, especially on the gravel
road. Cleaned up some pease (15 Bags) and took them to Dundalk. Got .60¢ per Bushel for
them. Settled with Mr. Thos. Hanbury, and paid him out in full for Boots and shoes & mending
done by him during the year. Gave him a note in my favor on Mr. Barnaby of $8.40, another
note on W. Henders for $4.16, a steer’s hide at $3.75 and 10.00 in cash.
6 Pretty cold morning, but got milder through the day. Passibly good sleighing now. The wind
pretty strong tonight. Was helping John Agnew to saw wood.
7 Rather mild morning and not very cold. Began snowing in the eavning and continued so for
about two hours. Was helping John Agnew at sawing machine in the forenoon. In the afternoon
Mrs. Russell and I joined the Mayburn Grange.
29
8 Cold stormy morning and continued very cold all day. The boys and I were cleaning and putting
away oats.
9 Very cold morning and windy, piercing freeze, continued cold all day, it is freezing at present
(8:35) P.M. as it has not froze this winter. I believe this is the coldest day that has came for this
winter. Finished cleaning oats today and fixed a place in the barn for the horses and calves.
<Q1 folio 34 verso>
December 1876
10th Sabbath. Pretty cold. Wind in the South-East. Snowed a trifle during the day.
11th A little milder this morning, but the wind is rising and it is snowing now (10. P.M.). Went to
Melancthon with some oats I had borrowed from W. Lonsway. Brother Sam and I then got some
stakes for wood rack and put them in. Came home, went to the back field where I had some
wood corded up. Put on about a quarter of a cord and came home and finished my load, ready
for the station tomorrow. Ground terribly rough in the back plowed field. Wind in the S. E.
12 Rather mild day and passibly good sleighing. Was hauling cordwood to Station. Got Gerty, a
three-year old filly, shod on the front feet for the first time. Also got two shoes on the old mare.
13 Mild day and seemed almost like a thaw in the forenoon, then there was a slight shower of snow
in the afternoon. Was hauling dry cordwood to Dundalk Station.
14 Mild day on to about 5 P.M. when there arose a very severe wind and snow storm which contin-
ued through the forepart of the night. Was hauling cordwood to Station. Went in the eavning to
R. Cam[p]bell’s, Blacksmith, had two hind shoes put on old mare and a piece cut off sleigh
tongue.
15 Sharp stormy morning, snow falling and drifting, the storm increasing in the eavning, the roads
terribly heavy. Was hauling wood today to Station. Young mare pulled remarkably well through
heavy drift[s].
<Q1 folio 35 recto>
December 1876
16th A very cold, stormy morning. Snowing, blowing and freezing at an awful rate, and continued so
all day. The stormiest day which has came this winter. Only seen one sleigh on the road today.
Too stormy to take out the team to work, only done the necessary, the chores.
17th Sabbath. Very cold stormy day, snowing, blowing and freezing.
18 Cold day and storming high wind, snow drifting. Hauled wood from the back field to the front.
Very hard work on the team.
19 Stormy, cold day, snowing, blowing and freezing. Did not take the team out today.
20 Pretty cold day. Keen freeze, but no snow fell. Was to a wood bee at brother John’s.
21 Rather mild day, snow pretty deep and not much packed. Sleighs cut off the track very easy, not
so easy getting them on again. Was hauling wood to Station today.
22 Mild day. Was hauling wood to Station.
23 Mild day. Was hauling wood to Station.
24th Sabbath. Pretty sharp freeze. I went to Father’s.
25th Christmas. Rather cold day, keen east wind. Went to Mr. Foster’s in the forenoon to see him about
hauling logs. Nancy and I dined at Mr. Lonsway’s. Nancy and the three boys went to the
A[n]niversary at night.
<Q1 folio 35 verso>
December 1876
26th Rather mild day and very good sleighing. Hauled wood to Station.
30
27 Rather cold day, wind in the north-west. Snowed a little during the day. Went to a Grange Meet-
ing at Mayburn, Mrs. Russell and I. Hauled wood to the station today.
28 Mild day, almost a thaw, a little snow fell during the afternoon. Was at a wood bee at Br. Sam’s.
29 A pretty cold day and turned out very stormy in the eavning, snowing and blowing, and is still
continuing so at present, 8:45 A.M. [sic]. Was hauling wood to Station.
30 A Stormy morning, cold and blowing. The snow drifted during the night, making the roads very
heavy. Was hauling wood to Station.
31 A little milder than yesterday, but still a sharp freeze. Brother John visited us today.
<Q1 folio 36 recto>
January 1877
1st Rather sharp morning and continued so with increasing cold towards night. Hauled wood to
Dundalk today. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway spent part of the eavning with us.
2 Not so cold as yesterday, pretty good sleighing. Was hauling wood to Station.
3 Very sharp morning and continued extremely cold all day, not much blow but a piercing freeze.
Was hauling wood to Station.
4 Rather cold this morning but got somewhat milder towards eavning. Was hauling wood to Dun-
dalk today.
5 Pretty mild day, capital sleighing! Was hauling wood to Dundalk.
6 Very pleasant day, sun came out strong and warm, causing the snow to melt where not exposed
to the north. Was hauling wood to Dundalk.
7th Sabbath. Not a very cold day, rather mild in the morning. Nancy and I went to the back line today.
8 Rather cold day, keen frost. Was hauling wood to Station.
9 Very cold day all through, piercing frost and cold wind, felt more chilly today than any day so far
this winter. John Agnew drove me to Priceville to the Inspector’s. I tried for a permit to teach,
did not succeed. Think perhaps that I will get one [later?]
<Q1 folio 36 verso>
January 1877
10th Rather cold day but not so much as yesterday. Attended the Annual School Meeting of No. 5
Melancthon. Sold 12 cords of dry hard wood to Mr. Stephenson at $1.80 per cord. Bought 4
Bushels Manitoba wheat from him at $2.00 per bushel and .30¢ for each bag, and .23¢ freight on
each bag.
11 Cold morning and a pretty sharp snow storm in the eavning. Was hauling wood to Station.
12 Very cold morning and [dittog.: and] continued extremely so all day. Went to the station and
sold my dry wood to Mr. Stephenson at $1.75 per cord, car measure.
13 Very cold morning and continued so all day. Got windy in the afternoon and the snow began to
drift, filling in the track, causing bad sleighing. It is now (9. P.M.) blowing very fiercely and the
snow rattling against the house and windows. Was hauling wood to the Station today.
14th Sabbath. Pretty cold day all through, the roads very heavy on account of the big blow last night.
Mr. and Mrs. McQuarry visited us today.
15 Pretty cold morning, the roads still heavy. Hauled one load wood in the afternoon to Station. A
pretty large snow storm came on at night filling up the roads.
16 Bright, sunny morning but roads very heavy. Went in the afternoon with a load of wood to Sta-
tion. Old mare got badly corked in turning off to let a loaded team pass.
<Q1 folio 37 recto>
31
January 1877
17th Bright, sunny morning and continued a very fine winter’s day all through. Hitched up Rodney, a
two-year old colt, for the first time and went to Dundalk. He went well. Bought a bottle of
Saunderson’s Infallable oil @.50¢.
18 Pretty mild day and fair sleighing. Boys went to the bush and chopped stove wood.
19 Rather a soft day, and foggy, indications of a thaw. The trees all coated over with frost rind. A
young man came along and hired with the trustees of Sch[ool] Sect[ion] 5 Melancthon @ 330.
per annum.
20 [date number is opposite last line of previous entry] Very Stormy morning, snowing and blowing like
Greenland, and continued a raging storm all day, not a piercing freeze, but an awful heavy blow
and the snow came down very heavy. Went to Dundalk and bought a box of Abernathy’s worm
candy.
21st Sabbath. Stormy day, snow drifting, filling the road.
22 Cold stormy day. Went to the station and piled up some culls, bought some worm candies, and
spirits of turpentine and coal [MS: coil] oil. John Russell’s wife had a son* tonight, which
caused Nancy to be away all night. [*William Henry Russell; see 28 Nov. 1880, which records
his death from diphther.]
23 Very cold stormy morning and continued getting worse all day. It is snowing and blowing at a
lively rate at present (9:30) P.M. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway visited us today.
<Q1 folio 37 verso>
January 1877
24th Very Stormy day all through, snowing, blowing and freezing. Thomas Buchannon got married to
Miss Myles today. Helped John Agnew work at his horse stable.
25 Not much of an improvement on yesterday, scarcely so cold, nor so heavy a blow. Mrs. Tyggart
[=(Mc)Taggart?] died yesterday at Dundalk. Was helping John Agnew till noon today, then went
to Dundalk, bought three Copy Books, a clothes line, 3 doz. Clothes pins, and borrowed a sy-
ringe.
26 Rather milder than for some days back, the day calmer, not such a sharp frost, nor any snow fall-
ing. Was helping John Agnew at his horse stable.
27 Pretty mild day, sleighing is improving, the drifts on the roads are getting packed down with the
amount of sleighs going over. Was working at John Agnew’s.
28th Sabbath. Very fine sunshiny day, and mild. Went in to Melancthon and brought out Brother Sam
and wife, took them home in the afternoon.
29th Beautiful day, the sun shone bright and warm, causing the snow to melt in favorable situations.
Went to the School in Melancthon in the forenoon and from there to the Station. Went at night to
Mr. Lonsway’s.
30 Very beautiful day, sun warm and bright. Young mare sick this morning, lying down and rising
repeatedly. Was either cholic or gravel. Went to Station and got some medecine for her. I put
also a little table salt in her water channel and she urinated and got relief immediately.
<Q1 folio 38 recto>
January 1877
31st Sky red in the east at sunrise, began to darken and looked stormy about 9 O’clock. A little rain
fell during the forenoon, a thaw is evidentally in contemplation. Split a little wood at Father’s.
Wrote some copies at night for Mr. Lonsway’s Children. The wind is rising now (9:15) P.M.
February [1877]
32
1st Rather mild day and inclined to thaw. Roads getting pretty well cut up. Nancy and I attended
Grange meeting this eavning.
2nd Mild day, slight sprinkling of rain. Went to see Mr. Stephens [sic, earlier Stephenson, Jan. 10,
12] to get paid for the wood I sold him. Hunted up and down through Dundalk for him. John
Charters told me he was in Mrs. Stinson’s. I went to there and while rapping on the door, heard
Stephens talking inside. I went in but he had evidentally hid as he was invisable [sic] and the
widow said he was not there. Seen him about 10. O’clock at night at Mr. May’s hotel. Asked
him for the money. Said he would give me an order for $30.00 on Mr. Brown. Asked him when
he would give me the balance, said he did not know. I then refused taking the order.
3 Mild day and pleasant throughout. Went to Dundalk to see Mr. Stephens, did not see him.
4th Very pleasant suns[h]iny day. Fetched Father and Mother out, drove them home in the eavning.
<Q1 folio 38 verso>
February 1877
5th Mild and rather inclined to be soft in the morning, got foggy in the afternoon and a frosty rind
covered the trees. It is blowing a little now (9:15) P.M. and snowing some. Took in a small load
of cordwood to the Station. Got the hind shoes taken off the old mare. Saw Step[h]ens, asked
him for my money. He gave me an order on Mr. Brown for $30.00, says he will not give me any
more as he paid me $20. before. He never paid me $20.00 and he is trying to cheat me out of my
hard-earned money. Don’t know what to do about it. Told him I would sue him. I am thinking,
though, that when he’s rogue enough to cheat me, he would swear a lie to carry out his roguery.
I never got cheated before, nor never had any difference with any person about money matters.
I and Mrs. Russell visited Mr. Lonsway’s tonight.
6 Rather colder than yesterday, but not so much as to be unpleasant. Wind blowing a little and soft
this eavning, a small quantity of snow falling. Was hauling cordwood to Station. Sleighing pret-
ty good. Mr. Kenneth Perry was here this eavning.
7 Mild day and a very slight mizzle of rain fell. Was hauling wood to Station. John Agnew was
here this night.
<Q1 folio 39 recto>
February 1877
8th Very fine day, sun shone pretty strong in the forenoon. Was hauling wood to Dundalk.
9 Bright, sunny morning and the day continued warm. Bad sleighing in some parts. Was hauling
wood to Station. Got the goods the Grange had sent for.
10 Fine morning, sun bright and warm, the day fine throughout. Hauled one load of wood to Station
in the forenoon. Sold a ten cord pile to Mr. H. Graham* for $1.75 per cord. He said there would
be about a cord of culls in it, for which he allowed me .50¢. I got a bolt put in the runner of the
sleigh. Settled my account with Mr. Graham ($3.50), he gave me .50¢ worth sugar and a due bill
for $12.25, being the balance due me on wood. [*H. Graham’s, Staple & fancy dry goods, 1877
list of businesses, History of Dundalk, p. 101.]
11th Sabbath. Mild day. Sun shone bright, thaw wind in the eavning. Nancy and Jim went to Melanc-
thon.
12 Very windy morning and snow falling, continued stormy and cold all day.
13 Bright, sunny morning, but piercingly cold. The day ameliorated as the sun got up in the sky.
Went to Mr. Agnew’s in the eavning and Witnessed a Deed and Lease. Skeffington Bell was
there also and witnessed the same documents.
<Q1 folio 39 verso>
February 1877
33
14th Mild morning and the day continued fine all through. Attended Council Meeting in Proton. Ap-
plied to be assessor, did not get the office. Middleton went back on me.
15th Bright, sunny morning, the day continued fine all through. Went to Mr. May’s in the eavning.
Sent off the amount of invoice for goods Grange obtained.
16 Rather fine morning, but there came on a snow storm with strong wind about 10. O’clock A.M.
Soon cleared off. Nancy and I went to James Murphy’s.* Paid $10.00 at Shelburne on the note
due 1st March next for a plow. Did not get the note. Mr. Corbett said the note was in his own
house. Took a new note for $10.00 with 10 per cent interest. Gave me a receipt for the $10.00
paid and said he would send me the old note. [*Mrs. Mary Murphy is a cousin of Robert’s—
probably the sister of his cousin William Russell who wrote him from Ireland; they live in
Simcoe County, near Rosemont, just west of Alliston. Robert and Nancy pass through Shelburne
on their way to the Murphy’s.]
17 Rather cold morning and continued blowing pretty strong all day, with a very sharp wind.
18 Sabbath. Snowing in the morning and continued so all day. Left James Murphy’s and came home,
the roads pretty heavy.
19 Very sharp morning but the day ameliorated considerably. Went to Dundalk this afternoon.
<Q1 folio 40 recto>
February 1877
20th Sharp cold morning and continued pretty cold most of the day. The snow drifted, making the
sleighing bad in the eavning. Took 19 Bushels and 20 lbs of wheat to Speeton Mills*, Artemesia.
Got 720 pounds flour. Entered a case in Division Court against Mr. John Stephenson.
[*Located within 1.5 miles of Flesherton—advertised for rent in Nov. 1885; see imag-
es.ourontario.ca/Partners/GreyHighlands
/GHPL002485236pf_0632.pdf Accessed 12 July 2017]
21 Very fine sunshiny day. Hunted up the colts in the forenoon and Mrs. Russell and I went to the
Grange in the afternoon.
22 Beautiful day, sun warm and bright. Sun melted the snow so that it ran off the road in streams of
water. Took 17 Bushels and 20 lbs of wheat to Speeton Mills, Artemesia. Got 680 pounds of
flour.
23 Fine mild day, without either snow or rain. Did not do any work today.
24 Fine mild day all through, thaw wind, snow melting. Went to Mayburn and sent off for some
goods for the Grange. Went at Night to John Ludlow’s.
25th Sabbath. Mild morning, but the day got rather chilly in the afternoon. Went to Melancthon and
visited Brothers John and Sam, Father, Mother and Sister Margaret.
<Q1 folio 40 verso>
February 1877
26th Fine mild morning and the day continued pleasant. Went in the forenoon to Mrs. McCoy’s and
settled with her for weaving done for us there. Was $1.40 remaining of last year’s account and
$4.10 due for this year. I gave her a due bill which I held against Mr. Graham for wood I sold
him. The amount remaining unpaid on the due bill is $7.25 which overpaid Mrs. McCoy $1.75
and this sum is to go towards next year’s weaving. The assessor was here today and assessed
Lot 215 at $750, and Lot 216 @ $200. and my personal property at $140. Sum total $1090.
The muly cow calved today.
27 Clear day, the sun bright and warm, continued fine all day. Went to Mr. Thomas Ross’ and pur-
chased 2 Bushels Redchaff wheat at $2.00 per bushel. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway visited us this
eavning.
34
28 Bright sunny morning and the day continued fine, although the wind was pretty sharp. Got Mr.
John Ludlow’s note discounted by Mr. May: Note $110, Cash received $100. Paid my note for
wagon to Mr. Norval of $50.00.
March 1877
1st Very beautiful day, the sun clear and bright. Mrs. Russell and I went to see old Mrs. Talbot, who
is very ill, this eavning. Mrs. Agnew was here today, also Anthony Trugon. The first hens’ eggs
of the season obtained today.
<Q1 folio 41 recto>
March 1877
2nd Wet morning, rain and snow combined with a pretty strong wind, and continued a wet slushy day
all through. The rain changed to snow in the eavning. Mr. James May’s Hotel, dwelling house
and Post Office were totally destroyed by fire this morning about 7 O’clock. The fire originated,
it is supposed, in one of the stove pipes. A good deal of household effects were saved, but a con-
siderable portion of them was burned. The loss is very heavy on him as there was no insurance.
3 Snowy morning and continued so all day. The snow is pretty soft, does not appear as if it would
last long. Went to the Station today for some dry apples.
4th Sabbath. Pretty cold day. Brother John and wife visited us this afternoon.
5 Cold, stormy morning and continued cold all day with snow falling. Went to Dundalk for the
goods for Grange and distributed them to the members in the eavning, then sent away the price
of them.
6 Very cold morning with Snow falling and the day got colder and stormier all through, snow fall-
ing and the wind piling it up in heaps. Was around with a subscription list for Mr. J. May, got en-
tered on the list $109.00 and $20.00 of this was paid in cash. I do not approve of the undertak-
ing, as I think it will sting him afterwards.
<Q1 folio 41 verso>
March 1877
7th Cold stormy morning, the roads drifted up with snow. The storm abated as the day advanced and
the sun shone out about noon. Was working in the bush helping to load saw logs for Mr. May,
who had a bee. He had thirteen horse teams hauling logs to the mill and two yoke of oxen work-
ing in the bush.
8 Very stormy morning, snowing and blowing. The snow came down very thick about 4 O’clock
P.M. The snow has got to be a great depth again.
9 Very stormy morning and continued snowing and blowing all day. John Agnew and Robert Nes-
bit visited us today.
10 Cold day but not so stormy as yesterday. The snow is a great depth at present. Not much traffic
of any kind on the road today. Went in the eavning to the Post Office.
11th Sabbath. The storm is somewhat abated, the day, however, is pretty cold, the roads heavy.
12 Something milder this morning and the day was not unpleasant although the snow is deep. Went
to the Grange and got some meal (corn) and two patented pails.
13 Bright, sunny morning and the day continued clear and fine all through, wind in the S.-E. Was
helping brother John to load and unload cordwood. Mrs. Agnew Snr. and Alexander Patterson
were here today.
<Q1 folio 42 recto>
March 1877
35
14th Inclined to be a little stormy in the morning, some snow falling which was mixed with a little
rain, the wind pretty strong. The day kept getting rougher and the storm increased till now (8)
P.M. it is blowing and snowing at a furious rate. The roads are drifted full and the wind is whis-
tling outside at no small rate. Was helping Brother John in the forenoon to haul wood with his
team to the Station. He had to give up in the afternoon on account of the storm and also because
he took a very severe sore throat. William Lonsway and wife were here today.
15 Pretty stormy morning and continued cold and blowing all day. Went to see Br. John.
16 Some improvement on yesterday, neither so cold nor stormy. Went in to see Brother John and
Father and Mother. Brother Sam and wife and John’s wife came out here. Sam and I and John’s
wife went to Dundalk. I sold a calf’s skin for .40¢ (in trade) and I bought 2 Bushels of Redchaff
wheat at $1.35 per Bushel.
17 Bright morning, clear sky, but very sharp air. The day continued cold and clear all through.
Helped John Agnew to clean grain in the forenoon. Went to the Post Office in the eavning. Mr.
Chambers died.
18th Sabbath. Bright warm morning, sun shone, the day fine. Mrs. Russell, her brother John and I went
to the wake of Mr. Chambers in the forenoon. In the afternoon Nancy went to Mr. Lonsway’s.
<Q1 folio 42 verso>
March 1877
19th Bright sunny morning and the day continued fine all through, inclined to be a little cold in the
eavning. Was helping Brother John at his cordwood.
20 Clear bright sunny morning, sun shone all day. Capital sleighing at present! Was helping Broth-
er John at his wood in the forenoon. Did not feel well in the eavning and stopped at home.
21 Windy and snowing in the forenoon. The afternoon was sunny and fine. Was helping brother
John with cordwood in the eavning. Mrs. McCoy was here.
22 Mild morning with a rather soft wind blowing, the day continued fine all through. Was helping
brother John at his wood. Mrs. Russell was at Mrs. McCoy’s quilting bee.
23 Bright sunny morning and continued fine all day. Was helping brother John with his wood. Sent
to Clerk of Division Court for two summonses for witnesses.
24 Morning rather dull and overcast, sun shone a little about noon. Was getting out some Saw logs
on Lot 36 Melancthon, assisted by brothers John & Sam. Slept at Father’s at night.
25 A little drizzle of sleet this morning and the day showed signs of a thaw.
26 Raining and sleeting alternately all day. Attended the Sch. Examination at Melancthon. The
teacher is a bass wood one [?]. Went in the eavning and seen Br. John Express $50.00 to Rolf &
Rolf[?], Toronto.
<Q1 folio 43 recto>
March 1877
27th Stormy morning, snowing and blowing, the roads heavy and the Snow soft underneath on ac-
count of the thaw yesterday. The wind is very strong now (8:20) P.M. and the snow drifting.
Went with Jim in the morning to School Sect. No. 2 Proton and in the eavning went to Mr. Hen-
rick Lemcke’s sale.
28 Very stormy morning, blowing and snowing. The storm kept increasing all day and at this hour
(10 P.M.) it is furious. Went to the Grange this eavning with John Agnew, did not stop any
length of time as there was no likeliness of a meeting on account of the storm. Posted a letter to
Brother William today.
36
29 Pretty sharp, cold morning, but the storm abated since last night. The sun shone out bright but
the wind was pretty strong and sharp. The day got calmer towards night. Mr. James Wilson of
Melancthon and Mrs. Agnew, Mr. A. Lonsway and Mrs. Lonsway were here today.
30 Bright sunny day and a pretty good thaw in the afternoon. Went to Dundalk in the eavning and
bought a barrel of cornmeal @ $4.25
31 Morning inclined to be soft, a snow storm came on about one o’clock P.M. and continued for
about two hours. Went to Mr. James Robinson of Osprey and bought Twenty-three bushels of
oats at forty-two cents per bushel. Bought three pounds of nails at five cents per pound and paid
four dollars on my Blacksmith’s bill. Went in the eavning to the Post Office.
<Q1 folio 43 verso>
April 1877
1st Sabbath. Bright, sunny morning, Sun remarkably strong and warm. Sky became overcast after
dinner. Pretty sharp shower of rain near night, some lightening, quite a storm. Mrs. Russell,
James, Eliza and I visited the folks in Melancthon.
2 Sharp morning, the wind cold, did not thaw much today. Bought one ton of hay today from Mr.
Duggan @ $8.00. Went in the eavning to Silver Star Grange Meeting, accompanied by Mr. May.
3 Pleasant day, although the wind was chilly. Sun shone out all day long. Went to the back line,
Melancthon.
4 Fine, mild morning, sun shone bright, the day fine all through, the snow thawed considerably.
Brother John helped me fetch one ton of hay from Mr. Dug[g]an’s. I brought home the young
cow, Violet, from John Agnew’s. Attended our Grange at night.
5 Snow falling this morning, thick and soft, cleared off about 8 O’clock A.M. Went to Mr. Robin-
son’s, Osprey, for seed oats. Mr. John Conners hauled them home for me. Went in the eavning
to brother John’s and helped him castrate his hog. John Agnew was here this eavning.
6 Nice sunny day, snow thawed a good deal. Was making spoils [=spiles]* for putting in the maple
trees. Went to Mr. Fothergall’s [=Fothergill’s] and asked liberty to tap in his bush; leave granted.
[*See 11 Mar. 1876.]
<Q1 folio 44 recto>
April 1877
7th Frosty morning but the sun shone out bright and clear, and the day became pretty warm. The
boys, Mrs. Russell and I tapped some maple trees today. [in margin] First trees tapped.
8th Sabbath. Mild sunny day, the sun pretty warm, the day continued fine and thawing. Mrs. Agnew
visited us today.
9 Bright sunny morning, although the wind was rather sharp. As the day advanced it got warm, the
snow is melting away, but slowly. We were all working in the sugar bush. I went in to Melanc-
thon with the team in the eavning. John Agnew and Kenneth Perry were here this eavning.
10 Bright sunny morning, and the day continued warm and fine, snow melting rapidly. Served
summonses on three witnesses in the case which I have against John Stephens. The roads very
bad, had to walk through water a good part of the way to one of their places. Mrs. Russell and
the boys were in the sugar bush. Was summoned this eavning to attend Magistrates court at
Flesherton to give evidence against Mr. May for selling liquor without license. Kenneth Perry
was at our house this eavning. Seen five Robins today, being the first seen by me this spring. [in
margin] Spotty & Violet calved.
11 A beautiful day, sun warm and bright. Attended court at Flesherton, was sworn whether Mr. May
sold liquor on the 4th inst., or within thirty days of that time, in Proton, he having no licence for
37
that township. I had to tell the truth and Mr. May was fined $20.00 and costs. The informer,
whoever he is, must be a mean, low skunk. John Agnew & K. Perry were here this eavning.
<Q1 folio 44 verso>
April 1877
12th Beautiful spring day, warm and bright, the sky blue and clear. Nancy and I were working in the
sugar bush. The sap does not run well for so far.
13 Very lovely spring morning and the day continued fine all through. Nancy and I were working in
the sugar bush till noon. In the afternoon went to Mr. Gallaher’s in Melancthon. The boys start-
ed for school today, but could not get there on account of the roads being flooded over. Went to
John Agnew’s at night and stopped there for about two hours.
14th Bright sunny morning and the day continued very fine all through, beautiful weather for this time
of the year. Mr. Gallaher was here looking at some stock I had to dispose of. I traded him a colt
two off [=not yet two?], four spring calves and an ewe for a first-class buggy and a sett of double
and single harness.
15th Sabbath. Very beautiful day, the air mild and balmy, spring weather entirely!
16 Sky a little overcast this morning, and continued cloudy all day, a few drops of rain fell. Went to
the sugar bush in the morning, and helped to start the fires and hang our kettles. Came home and
hauled some rails and lumber off the ground I wanted to plow. Mr. Gallaher brought the buggy
in the afternoon and took away his stock. I went to Dundalk in the eavning. Wife and boys in
the sugar bush.
<Q1 folio 45 recto>
April 1877
17th Beautiful spring day all through, sun warm and bright, got a little cloudy just at night. The boys
and I gathered some rails from around the barn in the forenoon, and in the afternoon started to
plow. The ground plowed nicely, no frost to an[n]oy one. Spring has commenced a great deal
earlier this year than last. Two cows calved and one ewe lambed. [in margin] first plowing
18 Rather a cloudy cool day, with indications of rain. It kept fair to about 5 O’clock P.M. when it
commenced raining, the eavning decidedly chilly. Was plowing today. One ewe lambed this
morning. John Agnew was here this afternoon.
19 Cold, cloudy morning, with a raw wind. A slight sprinkle of rain fell in the forenoon, and in the
afternoon there was a good deal of rain. Was plowing to noon, when it became too wet to con-
tinue at it any longer. The ground is very wet today and plowing don’t go good. Was at John
Agnew’s in the eavning.
20 Cold raw morning, but the day cleared off and got pretty fine and dry. Attended Division Court
at Flesherton, settled my case with Stephenson, took his due bill for $17.50. The amount he
owed me for wood was $20.00, but I wished to be done with law and so settled.
21 Warm, sunny morning and the day continued fine all through. Went to Dundalk and presented
the due bill to Stephenson. He would not pay so I suppose I will have to sue him again. (What
trouble!)
<Q1 folio 45 verso>
April 1877
22nd Sabbath. Beautiful day all through, sun warm and bright. Mrs. Russell and I visited Mr. James
Trugon in the eavning. Brother John was here this eavning.
23 Very nice morning and a beautiful spring day all through. Sowed wheat and Jim harrowed. Mrs.
Russell was in the sugar bush. Old Mr. Gott got his arm broke by one of his cows striking it
when he was untying her. [in margin] first wheat sown
38
24 Very beautiful morning and the day continued charming all through. Finished sowing wheat
(Eight bushels). Went to the Post Office in the eavning.
25 Beautiful day all through, the air mild and balmy, very spring-like. Sowed some pease. Mrs.
Russell and I went to the Grange in the eavning. Seen two swallows today. [in margin] first
pease sown; seen swallows
26 Rather sharp frost this morning, sun came out bright and warm, the day fine but the sky clouded
over in the eavning. Finished sowing pease (15 bushels), Jim harrowed. Mrs. Russell, the boys
and [I] sorted over the potatoes. They had kept pretty well in pits through the winter, about one
twentieth of them was spoiled.
27 Fine day, although a little cool. Jim finished harrowing the pease in the forenoon, and plowed in
the afternoon. Mrs. Russell and I went to Dundalk in the eavning, and at night I drew up Mr. C.
Bell’s will.
28 Very cool day and a cold rain at night. Was plowing today. Mr. & Mrs. Lonsway visited us this
eavning.
<Q1 folio 46 recto>
April 1877
29th Sabbath. Cool day but fair on till the eavning when there was some rain. A good deal of rain
mixed with snow fell through the night. Mrs. Russell and I were in Melancthon today.
30 Cool day but varied occassionally by a shower of snow. Was plowing today. Brought the sugar
kettles and barells out of the bush.
May 1877
1st Cool morning and the day continued rather chilly all through. Was plowing. James made anoth-
er start to attend School today. One of the cows did not come home with the rest and it gave us
considerable [MS: of] trouble hunting her up.
2 Cool morning with a slight frost, but nothing to retard work. The day was clear but cool all
through. Was plowing today.
3 Cool clear day all through till the eavning when the sky got clouded, and there was a slight fall of
snow at night. Was plowing in the forenoon. Skidded up some logs which were in my road in
the afternoon.
4 Cool clear day with some snow laying on the ground in the morning, which soon melted. Was
plowing today.
5 Cool morning. The day got warmer and kept fine and dry. Sowed about 20 Bushels oats. Went
to Dundalk in the afternoon to get Stephenson [to] pay due bill. Did not see him. Planted four
nice plum trees which Mother had bestowed me. [in margin] first oats sown
<Q1 folio 46 verso>
May 1877
6th Sabbath. Fine day, clear and dry with a bright sun. Visited at Father’s.
7 Fine Spring day, warm and bright, ground dry and moldy, harrowed splendid! Was picking up
roots in the forenoon. Harrowed some in the afternoon. John Charters was here wanting to buy
a milch cow.
8 Cool day and a little cloudy. Harrowed in the forenoon, plowed some in the afternoon and
sowed a bag of oats.
9 Cool cloudy day, plowed to 4:30 P.M. The old mare, being very heavy with colt, got tired and I
unhitched for the day. Went to Dundalk in the afternoon, sent away for some Grange goods.
39
10 Cool, cloudy day with quite a sharp frost in the morning. It has been a very favorable spring for
so far for seeding, but there is no growth on account of the coldness of the weather. Was plow-
ing today and the three eldest boys were at school. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway visited us this
eavning.
11 Cool day but favorable for working. Finished plowing for oats and sowed and harrowed them.
[in margin] finished sowing oats
12 Warmer than yesterday, sun pretty strong. Was plowing for potatoes. Went to see Mr. Stephen-
son in the afternoon. Did not get my money from him. He offered me $8.00, would not accept
it. He said he would fetch all of it to me next week. [in margin] first potatoes planted
<Q1 folio 47 recto>
May 1877
13th Sabbath. Very fine warm day. Brother John was here in the eavning. Mr. Jenkins’ little boy, aged
about Eleven years, was buried today. He died of diptheria.
14 Warm sunshiny day. Was plowing on Lot 220 Melancthon. The ground plows nice and mellow.
15 Rather cool morning, the sun shone out for a little, then clouded over. A slight mizzle of rain fell
in the afternoon. Was plowing on Lot 220 Melancthon. The four eldest were at school.
16 Sultry day, but a little cloudy. Was fencing. Brother John’s wife and Nancy shore the sheep.
The four eldest were at school.
17 Sultry morning and cloudy, came on to rain about 10 A.M., a beautiful warm rain making vegeta-
tion rapidly. The rain ceased about 2. P.M. Was plowing on Lot 220 till the rain stopped me.
Harrowed a potatoe patch at home in the eavning. Mrs. Russell and I went to see old Mr. Gott at
night.
18 Warm dry day with rather a strong wind. Good growth today. Was plowing at Lot 220.
19 Very warm day all through. Sowed five bags of mixed grain on Lot 220. Jim harrowed with
Lotty, a two-year old filly, and Gerty. I came home and planted potatoes, and when finished
went to Dundalk. [in margin] Finished planting potatoes
<Q1 folio 47 verso>
May 1877
20th Sabbath. Pretty warm day, got cloudy in the afternoon and a slight shower of rain fell. Went to see
the folks in Melancthon.
21 A pretty sharp rain this morning before day. It cleared off and the day was dry all through.
Plowed in the forenoon with the two young mares, plowed in the afternoon with the two oldest.
Went to Mr. Lonsway’s tonight, got two bushels of pease from him at one dollar per bushel.
22 Cloudy cool morning. It came on to rain early in the morning, then cleared off. It was show[e]ry
till about 2 P.M., cold rain and the night extremely cold. Was plowing on Lot 220 Melancthon.
23 Very cold morning and frequent showers of snow through the day. It is cold enough now, (9:5)
P.M., almost, for the month of February. There is snow sufficient to make a score of snowballs
laying at the end of the milk house. Was at a Logging Bee at brother John’s.
24 Very cool day and continued cool and cloudy all through, sharp frost this morning. Finished
sowing and harrowing mixed cattle feed (oats & pease). This winds up my seeding for the sea-
son. The boys went a-fishing!
25 Cool day and cloudy, with frost in the morning. Turned over the potatoes. Mrs. Russell and
Mrs. Mills and I went to Dundalk. Got some milk pans and boots and slippers. Fixed the milk
house in the eavning and attended a Trustee Meeting at night.
<Q1 folio 48 recto>
May 1877
40
26th Cool day, frost in the morning. Was repairing a fence today.
27 Sabbath. Very warm, dry day. Was hoping for some rain but it still seems to shift off. Old mare
colted this night.
28 Very warm, dry day. Was helping brother John to rid up his bush fallow.
29 Dry, sultry day, and very hot. Was helping brother John at his fallow.
30 Sky a little overcast, no rain fell, dry and warm throughout the day. Was helping John in his fol-
low.
31st Cloudy but dry and warm. Was helping John in his follow [=fallow].
June 1877
1st Dry and warm, but a little indication of rain. None came, however, through the day. Went to
Dundalk in the forenoon and bought a cow bell for .45¢ and a bell strap for .40¢. Brother Sam
hauled me a barrel of Cornmeal I had obtained through the Grange. I took it back in the eavning
as it was very inferior. Bought another Barrel at Station for $4.50 cash.
2 Slight shower of rain this morning, doing no more than mearly [=merely] wetting the leaves.
Was helping Brother John today.
<Q1 folio 48 verso>
June1877
3rd Sabbath. Dry sultry forenoon. Got a little cooler in the eavning. Brother John and wife and Mrs.
Samuel Russell were here this eavning. Rosey, a young cow, calved today.
4 Dry day with pretty strong wind. Was helping Brother John with his new fallow.
5 Dry day and pretty warm. Was at Joseph Bowler’s logging bee, putting in time for brother John.
6 Dry day and very warm. Was choreing around home today. A young heifer (Elly) calved today.
7 Dry day and very hot in the forenoon, the latter part of the afternoon was quite cool. Was at a
raising at James Patterson’s of a hewed log dwelling house.
8 Pretty warm day all through. Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the afternoon, took two bags of
Early Rose potatoes, sold them to Mr. May at $1.25 per Bag.
9 A slight rain fell this morning and the day continued showery to about 6 P.M. when the rain came
down in right down [sic] earnest and continued raining most of the night. The ground was very
dry and the grain and grass had much need of rain. Nancy and I took our wool to Flesherton to
be carded.
10 Very cool morning and continued cold all day, with a slight shower or two of rain. Mrs. Russell
and I visited Mr. James Dane [Daw?]. (Gerty) a young mare sprained her leg when going along
the road and is lame.
<centrefold Quire 1>
<Q1 folio 49 recto>
June1877
11th Quite cool and cloudy this morning and continued so all day. Jim, John, and I were picking up
stones in Lot 220 Melancthon.
12 Cool cloudy morning with a pretty high wind in the forenoon. Slight thunder and heavy rain in
the afternoon about 4 P.M. Mrs. John Agnew was very sick this night and I went to Dundalk to
get some medecine for her.
13 Cloudy morning and the day not very warm. Was doing Statute labor for Lot 215 Proton. The
boys made a start at plowing the summer fallow, but they did not succeed very well.
14 Clear sunny morning and the day very warm and dry. I was doing Statute labor for Lot 215 Pro-
ton. Jim was plowing on Lot 220 Melancthon with brother Sam’s team.
41
15 Fine morning, heavy dew, sun rose bright and warm. Got very hot about 1 P.M., then followed a
heavy shower or two accompanied by some thunder and lightening. Was doing Statu[t]e labor.
Jim was plowing on Lot 220 with Sam’s horses.
16 Heavy dew this morning and a little cloudy. There was a slight mizzle of rain about 8 A.M., the
day continued fair though dark. Jim was plowing on Lot 220, John, Clark and I were picking up
stones which I consider pretty hard work. Still, the bible says “Man shall earn his bread by the
sweat of his brow.”
<Q1 folio 49 verso>
June1877
17th Sabbath. Fine dry day and pretty warm.
18 Warm dry day, inclined to be a little cool towards sunset. Was helping brother Sam.
19 Cool cloudy day with a pretty sharp wind, got cold towards sunset. Was helping brother Sam.
20 Warm morning, the sun was bright and clear, the day remained dry although cool towards night.
Chored around in the forenoon. In the afternoon Mrs. Russell and I went to Grange.
21 Rainy morning, but cleared off about 9 A.M., the day continued cloudy and cool. The boys and I
fixed a fence in the forenoon. Took part of brother John’s lumber home to him in the afternoon.
22 Bright sunny morning, although cool and remained so mostly all day. Very cold just now, 11:45
P.M., and every indication of a frost. Was fixing stone boat and making bars[?] today.
23 Bright sunny morning, in fact too much sun as there was a very severe frost last night wilting
down the potatoes to the very ground and injuring grain and grass. Jim, John and I were picking
stones on Lot 220. Mrs. Russell and I went to Dundalk in the eavning. I posted a letter to Broth-
er William.
24th Sabbath. Bright sunny morning and a pretty warm day. Mrs. Russell and I went to the funeral of
old Mrs. Thomas Talbot.
<Q1 folio 50 recto>
June 1877
25th Rather cloudy day but dry all through. Was plowing in summer fallow on Lot 220. Went in the
eavning to Post Office. Heard wolves howl tonight.
26 Cool morning and the day not very warm, a slight shower of rain about noon. Was helping
brother Samuel today.
27 Bright sunny morning, although the sun clouded over during the day, but it was very warm with
indications of a thunder storm. I was at a logging bee at John Agnew’s. Mrs. Russell and family
were at a Pick-Nick of the Sabbath School Scholars on Lot 220 Melancthon.
28 Bright morning, the sun shone out strong and warm. Was doing Statute labor today.
29 Slight shower of rain this morning, just enough to lay the dust for a little while. I was doing stat-
ute labor today.
30 Cloudy warm morning and continued so to about 10 A.M., when there came on a very nice rain
which continued about one hour. There were spells of very warm sunshine through the eavning
and I got the benefit of it as I was in John’s clearing, on the edges of his bush, helping him to put
a fence round his barley. This night is very cloudy and black, with a pretty high wind. The air is
close and very warm.
<Q1 folio 50 verso>
July 1877
1st Sabbath. Some slight showers of rain fell during the day. A fine growing day.
2 Pretty warm day all through. Was helping Brother Samuel to log. I slept at Father’s.
42
3 Cloudy morning and frequent showers of rain fell during the day, wetting the ground pretty well.
Was at a logging bee at John Mills’ lot in 5th Range, Melancthon.
4 A very warm morning and the heat kept increasing to about 2 O’clock P.M. It was almost un-
bearable. I felt more oppressed with the heat today than I did any other day so far this summer.
Brother John was making me a gate. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. I traded my buggy to
Mr. John Hanbury for seventy-five dollars worth of work to consist of lathing, plastering and
mason work. Brother John stopped here tonight.
5 A pretty warm day but not so hot as yesterday. Brother John finished the gate and gate posts.
We hung the gate and I fixed the fence to it.
6 Clear warm day, although a little cloudy, a few drops of rain fell during the forepart of the night
and it looks like more. Was fixing fences today. Jim was plowing. Went to Dundalk in the
eavning.
<Q1 folio 51 recto>
July 1877
8th Sabbath. Pretty warm day with indications of thunder and rain in the south, though none of the lat-
ter fell here.
9 Warm day with a little wind. It got quite cool in the eavning. I was hoeing potatoes, assisted by
John. Jim was plowing. The crops are doing well for so far but the frost has consid[e]rably in-
jured the potatoes. The hay crop will be very light on account of the dry spring.
10 Pretty warm day although cloudy with a rather brisk wind. The eavning got chilly, almost cold
enough for frost, but happily there was none. I was at Samuel McDowell’s logging bee. Jim was
plowing, John and Clark were hoeing potatoes.
11 A very fine day, a little cloudy with a little wind, not quite so cold this eavning as it was yester-
day eavning. I and John were hoeing potatoes, Jim and Clark were plowing.
12 Fine, pleasant day, a little cloudy but dry and warm. I and all the family went to a pick-nick at
brother John’s. [The Glorious 12th! John Russell was charter member, John Agnew first Master,
of Loyal Orange Lodge No. 797, Proton District; History of Dundalk, p. 168]
13 Pretty warm day, the roads remarkably dry and dusty. John and I were hoeing potatoes. Jim and
Clark were plowing. Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the eavning.
14 Dry morning, sun bright and warm, tokens of rain about noon, small shower fell about one
O’clock. Sowed five acres of turnip seed, hand cast on a piece of old land I had summer fal-
lowed.
<Q1 folio 51 verso>
July 1877
15th Sabbath. Warm day, the sun a little obscured with clouds.
16 Very warm in the forenoon, the afternoon was somewhat cooler, the sun got overcast and rain
fell slightly. Was mowing on Lot 220. Miss Mary Trugon disappeared yesterday eavning from
her home. Her parents are very anxious about her and are looking everywhere for her. [in mar-
gin] First mowing
17 A pretty nice shower very early this morning, but it soon cleared off. The day was fine and
breezy. Was mowing today. Jim helped mow some. Nancy and John raked hay in the after-
noon. My hay crop is very light, I think not more than between seven or eight hundred weight to
an acre. The hay crop in general is light on account of the exceedingly dry time which we have
had. Mr. Trugon got intelligence of his daughter today: she is west[w]ard bound, going through
Proton in search of employment.
43
18 Rained very early this morning, but cleared off a little after daylight. Came on to rain again
about 9 O’clock A.M. It stopped raining after a little. The afternoon was showery and it is now,
(8:40) P.M., raining pretty briskly. I and Jim were mowing today. Mrs. Abbott came along in
the eavning to enquire about the money for some goods she had sent through the Grange to To-
ronto.
<Q1 folio 52 recto>
July 1877
19th Wet morning, but cleared off soon. Went in to the back line this forenoon, mowed on Lot 220 in
the afternoon. The boys raked hay in the eavning.
20 Slight showers of rain fell all through the day. I mowed and the boys chored around at home.
21 Bright sunny morning and a fine breeze of wind drying the hay nicely. I helped Brother Sam to
rake hay in the forenoon and in the afternoon I helped him to haul in. Nancy and the boys were
raking hay on Lot 220.
Sabbath
22 Very warm forenoon, but a slight shower fell during the afternoon, cooling the air considerably.
William Lonsway was here a short time today. Nancy and I visited Mr. Lonsway.
23 Bright sunny morning and the day continued dry and warm. I was hauling in hay, assisted by
Brother Sam with his team. Nancy and the boys were raking. We hauled home five loads and
stacked it.
24 Bright sunny morning and the day continued pretty hot all through. Was mowing on Lot 220, the
boys were making [sic=raking?] hay in the afternoon.
25 Very fine day but extremely hot, especially about one o’clock P.M. The sun went down under a
bank of clouds, indicating rain soon. I was mowing today and the boys were raking hay.
<Q1 folio 52 verso>
July 1877
26th A pretty sharp shower about 6 o’clock this morning. Was mowing on Lot 220, the boys were
raking in the afternoon. Mrs. William Lonsway gave birth to a daughter* on this day [“this day”
stricken, “yesterday” written above line]. This day excessively sultry and hot. [*Annie, daugh-
ter of Robert’s sister Margaret.]
27 Cloudy morning, with thunder and lightening very early. There was a pretty brisk rain about 9
A.M. The day was cloudy all through. Was mowing on Lot 220 Jim also mowed some, and he
and his mother raked hay after supper.
28 Bright sunny morning but the sky got overcast and was cloudy, the day was very sultry all
through. I finished mowing today. Nancy and the boys raked and put in hand shaking.*
[*making by hand small mounds of hay, called cocks, with a lateral hole in the middle to allow
drying, and a smooth top to repel rain. About ten pounds of hay are picked up by hand and light-
ly shaken, then shaped into cocks. See The Belfast Monthly Magazine 7 (1811), 139.]
29th Sabbath. Warm day with a shower of rain in the morning. Went to Father’s and stopped all night
there.
30 Bright sunny morning, although the day got a little cloudy, there was no rain. Brother Sam
hauled hay for me today. I forked on and built the stack. Nancy and the boys raked up about an
acre and a half in the forenoon.
31 Bright sunny morning and the day continued fine and very hot. Was helping Brother Sam at his
hay. The boys, James and John, were helping Brother John.
<Q1 folio 53 recto>
August 1877
44
1st Bright sunny morning and the day very warm. Was helping Brother Sam at his hay. The boys
were helping Brother John.
2 Clear morning and the day continued fine. Was helping Brother John to haul the hay, the boys
also were helping him.
3 Clear cool morning, almost cold enough for frost. The day was pretty windy. Was helping
Brother John to haul in hay. He has a remarkably good crop, about 15 tons on 12 acres.
4 Very cool morning. I think there was a slight frost this morning but I was not up early enough to
see. The day got pretty warm. It is cool at present (10. P.M.). I went to Dundalk today, got my
boot fixed, seen about some lumber. There was quite a bit of excitement at Dundalk on account
of the fire burning so close to the village, the wind being strong and everything so dry. The boys
had this for a play day.
Sabbath
5 Bright morning and a dry warm day. Nancy went to see Mrs. W. Lonsway.
6 Dry day, and pretty warm, wind in the N. W. Brothers John and Sam helped me to take out some
barn timber. Mr. & Mrs. Lonsway were here this [“morn” stricken] Eavning.
7 Foggy morning, but sun soon dispersed the fog, dry and warm with some wind in the N. W.
Sold four Lambs at $2.50 each. Nancy drove them to Station. Brothers John and Sam helped me
to take out barn timber.
<Q1 folio 53 verso>
August 1877
<insert><Letter inserted between pages 53 verso, 54 recto> “ Shelburne P. O. / Aug. 6th 1877 / Robert
Russell / Dear Sir / By all means go up to Dr. Christoe for examination and comply with every
request from the Department as the more strict they are, the more likely you are to succeed if Dr.
Christoe reports favourable / Yours truly / John Barr Md”
[See above, 6 June 1876; Dr. Barr was later MPP, then MP, for Dufferin; see Adelaide Leitch,
Into the High Country, pp. 211, 222, 262-4; Sawden, History of Dufferin County, p. 42.]
<end of inserted letter></insert>
8th Very misty morning, caused, I think, by the great number of fires around, which are filling the air
with smoke. The vapor cleared off about 8 A.M., the day was pretty hot, wind in the N. W. John
and Samuel were helping me to get out barn timber. Albert Bowler, a young man of about 20
years of age, who has been deranged in his mind for some time back, was sent to the Asylum to-
day.
9 The morning a little cloudy, wind from N. W., dry day with a very slight shower about one P.M.
Was helping Brother Sam to do road work today.
10 Quite a cool morning, with a heavy fog. Nancy and I went to Flesherton. I had a medical Exam-
ination passed on me by Dr. Christoe. He said I had an enlargement of the heart. While I was at
Flesherton I purchased a small spirit level for .25¢ and a mink trap for .30. When we came home
I went to Dundalk and purchased a manure fork for $1.10. Brother John stopped here tonight.
11 Very misty morning, almost like rain. The day kept dry and pretty windy, wind in the N. W.
Went to Archie McAulay’s raising in the morning. Helped John who was working at a barn for
me in the eavning. Mr. Lonsway was here a few hours tonight.
Sabbath 12th Rain very early this morning, but faired up pretty soon. Brother John’s wife was here this
eavning. I went to Mr. Clements Bell’s in the eavning. [Clements Bell is father of Skeffington
Bell]
<Q1 folio 54 recto>
August 1877
45
13th Misty morning, but no rain fell during the day. Jim, John and I were pulling pease. Brother John
was working at a post Barn for me. [in margin] First pease pulled
14 Wet morning and had rained a good deal through the night. There were some slight showers
through the day. I was throwing out manure where the foundation of new barn is. Brother John
was working at Barn, the boys were choring around.
15 Bright sunny morning and the day continued dry, although the sky got overcast early in the day.
There were dark, heavy clouds to the South and east and thunder rolling in the distance. Wind in
the East. Jim, John and I were pulling pease. Pease are very light and full of thistles, I think, on
account of me having the ground plowed the fall before and not plowing it again in the spring.
Nancy took the team and the three youngest of the family and went to Proton to Widow Swee-
ny’s for her yarn which she had left to be spun for her.
16 A little wet this morning and the day got very show[e]ry. I and Johny were pulling pease part of
the time. Jim was helping Brother Sam. Brother John was helping at the Barn.
17 Dark morning, but no rain fell, the afternoon was dry and very warm. Was helping at the barn.
Made a bee and put on the plates, long girts* and rafters in the afternoon. Messrs. Lonsway,
Mills, Russell, Trugon, Russell, MacAulay, Agnew and Self composed the gang. [*plate, girt and
rafter are technical terms for members of a frame building: plates are long beams going end to
end of the building, to support the base of the rafters, which rise up to the peak and support the
roof; girts are long beams (on top of the posts) that go from side to side across the end of the
barn]
18 Bright, Sunny day. Helped at the barn. Jim helped Sam.
<Q1 folio 54 verso>
August 1877
Sabbath 19th Warm sunny day. Mrs. Russell went [to Church of] E[ngland] Church.
20 Bright sunny morning, the day very hot. I went in the morning to Kenneth Perry’s and employed
him to cradle oats for me at .50¢ per acre. Then went to Brother Sam’s and borrowed his horses
to haul lumber for me. I hauled three loads from McDowell’s mill.
21 Warm day, in fact, hot. Hauled one load of lumber today. I bargained with McDowell that he
would lend me the logs to winter and I would pay him for the sawing. When I came to settle
with him, he charged me $8.00 per thousand for the lumber, took $3.00 per thousand for the saw-
ing, and says I must put in logs in the winter for the other $5.00 per thousand. He went back on
his bargain and served me very mean. I got 2700 feet from him. I was pulling pease in the after-
noon. Brother John was working at the barn, Jim was helping Brother Samuel.
22 Bright morning but the sky got overcast in the N. W. and threatened rain. Pulled pease in the
forenoon and in the afternoon helped John at Barn. Jim helped Samuel. K. Perry began to
craddle for me this morning.
23 Bright sunny morning, and the day continue[d] fine. Was helping brother John at my barn in the
forenoon. Hauled in some pease in the afternoon but the horses were all wild and unmanageable.
In fact I think some of them were baulky, did not come much speed, broke the hames.* Got
Kenneth Perry’s oxen at night. They hauled in two loads. [*hames, part of horse harness, at-
tached to the collar, and to which tugs are attached.]
24 Bright morning, but there came on a very heavy rain about 6 P.M. K. Perry was cutting my
wheat. Nancy and I were binding, assisted by John and James.
<Q1 folio 55 recto>
August 1877
46
25th Rather misty forenoon with a sprinkling of rain occassionally. Was cleaning out the barn this
forenoon, in the afternoon Nancy and I bound some wheat. Bargained with Kenneth Perry: I
gave him a black Ewe, valued at $5.00 and he cut me three acres of wheat and is to make me
enough shingles to cover a building 20 x 16 in the clear, I to help saw the shingle stuff and to
board him. I also further bargained with him: I gave him two spring calves for which he is to
make me ten thousand of shingles sixteen inches long, I to help saw the timber and board him.
The former shingles to be made any time this fall, the latter to be made some time through the
winter.
Sabbath
26th Bright morning but the day was rather cool and windy. Nancy and I went to Zion church.
27 Bright warm day, but rather windy to about 5 P.M. K. Perry finished cutting oats for me today.
Borrowed Brother Sam’s horses, hauled in a stack of hay out of the yard. The boys finished the
hauling in the afternoon. Nancy and I bound oats in the afternoon. John & James went to the
back line. The water is got very scarce and the cattle are suffering some. One of our cows did
not come home last night and when she came this morning she was in very great pain. Her body
was all covered over with lumps as large as marbles. She appeared to be choking and would uri-
nate or try to continually. We thought she had been poisoned, she swelled a great deal. We
mixed about a tablespoon full of mustard in a cup of cold water and poured it into her. She got
better soon after and appears to be all right now.
<Q1 folio 55 verso>
August 1877
28th Bright morning but the sky got overcast towards noon. There were [sic] some thunder and light-
ening accompanied by rain about one o’clock. Was helping brother John to harvest his barl[e]y
in the forenoon, Jim and John were also helping. Helped him in the afternoon to make a road to
the barl[e]y through the bush to haul in.
29 Wet morning, the grain too damp to bind. Cleared off. Nancy and I bound oats in the afternoon,
assisted by Jim.
30 [Bright stricken] Very misty morning, the grain quite wet. Kenneth Perry cut the remainder of
the wheat. Nancy and I bound it. James, John and Clark were hauling in wheat with Mr. Perry’s
steers.
31 Very wet morning and the day continued show[e]ry. Done no work today, did not feel well.
Mrs. R. and I went to Mr. Lonsway’s in the eavning.
September 1877
1st Damp morning, the grain not fit to tie to about 11 O’clock. We were all binding and stooking
from this hour till night, at oats. It has commenced raining again (8:50 P.M.).
Sabbath 2nd Cool day, but no rain fell. Brother John visited us today.
3 Showery in the forenoon, fair in the afternoon to about 6 O’clock, then rain. Nancy and the boys
bound oats in the afternoon, I was logging at Mr. A. Lonsway’s
<Q1 folio 56 recto>
September 1877
4th Rather dull morning but the day broke up fine. Nancy and the boys bound oats in the forenoon, I
logged at Mr. A. Lonsway’s till noon. Then he came with his team and finished hauling in my
wheat and also hauled in some oats.
5 Misty morning and a slight mizzle of rain fell. Mr. A. Lonsway hauled in oats for me during the
forenoon. This finished my harvest, except some cattle feed that I have still to cut. Brother John
came here in the afternoon, was preparing to put in a thrashing floor in the barn. He hitched up
47
Gerty to pull some sleepers. The mare was wild and he beat her which made her worse and at
last she would not pull any for him. I think he done wrong. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway were here
this eavning.
6 Rather misty morning, but no rain through the day. Was helping Brother John to harvest his bar-
ley. The boys were pileing [sic] up some manure at home.
7 Misty, rainy-like morning, several little skiffs fell during the day. Was helping brother John to
haul in his barley. John and Jim also helped.
8 Very fine, bright morning, the sun shone out fine and clear, the day warm and dry all through.
Brothers John and Sam were helping me mow some mixed feed. John got sick in the forenoon
and had to go home. The boys, Jim and John, were hauling in a hay stack with Sam’s team.
9th Sabbath Very pleasant day, dry and the sun bright and warm. Went in the afternoon to see old Mr.
Clements Bell who is very sick. Father visited me today.
<Q1 folio 56 verso>
September 1877
10th Rather misty morning but the sun soon got out and the day was dry and warm. Wind in the S. E.
Brother John was helping me to mow some mixed feed. The three boys were raking it up. Water
is very scarce now, not near enough to wash, water cattle, and scarcely enough to make the
meals. The night is cloudy with signs of rain. I hope there will be a good shower.
11 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and warm. Was helping A. Lonsway to log, Boys raking
mixed feed.
12 Misty morning and very heavy dew. Sun got out strong and warm. A. Lonsway with team
helped me haul in mixed feed. Boys raked up.
13 Bright sunny morning, and a very sultry day. Scarcely done anything as I was not well. The
boys and wife were at Mother’s for plums, then they drove to Dundalk.
14 Dry day and pretty hot. Nancy and I went with a headstone and placed it over Baby’s grave* in
Armstrong’s Grave Yard. We went to Dundalk in the afternoon. Old Mr. Clements Bell died this
day. [*the grave of their first child, Robert Clark Russell, who died in infancy, b. 7 June 1862, d.
10 Sept. 1862, buried Inistoge Cemetery.]
15 Bright sunny day and warm. Nancy and I went to Mr. Bell’s wake in the afternoon. The boys
raised potatoes.
16 Sabbath. A very slight shower this morning. Nancy, James and I went to Mr. Bell’s funeral.
17 Misty morning, and there was a nice shower in the eavning. Nancy and I went in the afternoon
to an Apple paring at Mr. A. Lonsway’s. The boys were raising potatoes.
<Q1 folio 57 recto>
September 1877
18th Fine morning, but there came on a little sprinkling of rain about 10 A.M. John and I were help-
ing Brother John in the forenoon and Brother Sam in the afternoon to thrash. James had the team
to J. Mills’ thrashing.
19 Very fine dry day. I went to help Sam to thrash, was not able to on account of sickness. John
helped him. James had the team at J. Mills’.
20 Fine morning. Nancy and I went with the team to Shelburne to see Dr. Barr.* He said I had a
little heart disease and that my body was weakened down to nothing. He gave me some mede-
cine and said I was not to work any till I got strong. It began to rain in the afternoon and rained
quite sharp in the beginning of the night. Brother John was here all night. [*See above, 10 June
1876, and letter, 6 Aug. 1877.]
48
21 Dry sunny morning. Went to Brother Sam’s and the boys and John cleaned nine bushels of
wheat. I took it to the mill in the afternoon. The boys helped John to put in his straw.
22 Dry sunny morning. Nancy and the boys took the team and went to Dundalk for the grist left
there yesterday. The boys left their measure for a pair of boots each. They hauled some stove
wood in the afternoon.
23rd Sabbath. Dry day and pretty warm, everything is scorched up with the excessively dry weather.
Nancy and I went to Mr. Lonsway’s in the eavning.
<Q1 folio 57 verso>
September 1877
24 Very fine morning, dry day and windy. The boys were raising potatoes.
25 Dry day, hot and windy all through. Boys were fixing up the potatoes. In the afternoon we lit up
some brush and logs around the swamp.
26 Dry day and warm. Boys were digging for water.
27 Dry, hot day. I went in the forenoon to get help to thresh. In the afternoon the machine came,
threshed about four hours, then had to go to blacksmith’s to get some part of the machine fixed.
29 Dry, hot day. Thrashed till about 2 P.M., when they got done. Pease turned out poorly, oats and
wheat turned out well. The boys and team helped Mr. Lonsway to thrash in the eavning.
30th Sabbath. Very hot and warm.
October 1877
1st Dry day and very hot. Went with Brother John to Melancthon Council and became one of his
sureties for the collection of Township rates. The boys and team were with Mr. Lonsway.
2 Dry, hot day. The boys and Nancy were putting the straw into the barn. I helped a little.
3 Dry, hot day all through. Water remarkably scarce. Had to drive the cows to John Foster’s
spring for a drink. The boys, Nancy and I put in straw. Brother John dug me a hole to get water
but it caved in at once.
<Q1 folio 58 recto>
October 1877
4th Rain this morning and pretty heavy. Kept coming a little through the day, cleared off in the af-
ternoon. Cold this eavning. Went to the Station in the afternoon. Seen Sir John A McDonald on
his way to Owen Sound.
5 Cool morning and a pretty heavy rain in the afternoon. Nancy and I went to Owen Sound on the
Excursion to hear Sir J. A. McDonald.
6 Cool day, with some rain.
7th Sabbath. Cold day and show[e]ry.
8 Cool day and a little show[e]ry all through the day. Went in to Melancthon today. Mrs. Agnew*
died this night at about 10 O’clock P.M. of Cancer in the Stomach. [*Mother of Nancy Agnew
Russell, wife of Robert Russell.]
9 Showery cold day all through.
10 Cold day and raining.
11 Cold wet morning and the rain came down incessantly. Mrs. Agnew was buried today. [Buried
in Gravel Road cemetery, Melancthon, Lot 295, Con. 1 ETSR, adjacent to 156407 Highway 10;
now inactive, 64 monuments preserved; see https://brucegrey.ogs.on.ca/wp-
content/uploads/sites/7/2017/09/Melancthon-Cemeteries.pdf]
12 Fair day, but cold. Took 5 Bushels and 15 lbs of wheat to the mill today.
49
13 Fair day and moderately warm. Pitted up the potatoes for the winter. They are a very poor crop.
The boys fitted up an old house for a pig pen and we put the hogs up to fat.
<Q1 folio 58 verso>
October 1877
14th Sabbath. Dry, warm day all through.
15 Dry day with the exception of a slight shower at noon. James started to plow today, being the
first this fall.
16 Cool day, but dry. The boys plowed till noon, then went to the show fair at Dundalk in the after-
noon. Nancy and I took in 526½ pounds of butter and sold it for .17¢ per pound. There was a
great gathering at the show fair and so far as I could judge from appearances it was financially
successful.
17 Cool day, but dry. Jim was plowing in Melancthon.
18 Cool day and show[e]ry. Jim plowed till noon then took some yarn to the weavers. I went to the
mill for a grist that I had there.
19 Showery morning and a good deal of rain had fallen through the night. I plowed in Melancthon
today, being the first day’s work I have done for a long while on account of being weak and not
fit. John was at Mr. Trugon’s threshing. Jim was choreing around home.
20 Rather cool day and a slight rain in the morning. Was plowing in the forenoon and in the after-
noon attended a trustee meeting.
21st Sabbath. Cool day but dry. Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the afternoon to hear Mrs. Agnew’s
funeral sermon preached by Mr. Williamson.
<Q1 folio 59 recto>
October 1877
22nd Cool forenoon but dry all day. Was plowing . The boys were choring around home.
23 Very fine day all through, resembling Indian Summer. Was plowing, the boys were choreing
around home getting wood. Nancy went to Dundalk.
24 Very fine warm day and dry. Got a little foggy towards eavning. There was a slight rain at
night. I was plowing, the boys were choring around home.
25 Cool day and a slight mizzle of rain in the afternoon. I was plowing. The boys were choring
around home.
26 Cold morning with a pretty hard frost early in the morning. I was plowing today. Mr. and Mrs.
Lonsway visited us this eavning. Bother John had one of his lambs killed on my lot this morn-
ing. His sheep are pasturing with me and some animal, most likely a lynx, killed the lamb.
27 A slight frost this morning, but the sun shone out strong and the day was very pleasant. I was
plowing today. The boys cleaned up some pease and Jim went to the Weaver’s for the full cloth
in the afternoon.
28th Sabbath. Misty morning, the day dry but close and sultry. Mrs. Russell and I went to Sister Mar-
garet’s.
29 A little cool this morning, no frost, dry and cool. Was plowing. Phebe was here today. The boys
were cleaning off some rubbish of wood where the old stable was on Lot 220.
<Q1 folio 59 verso>
October 1877
30th Very fine day, the sun shone out bright in the eavning. Was plowing today, and a very nice day it
was for the work!
31 Dull morning, with a very slight rain. Went to plow but there came on a pretty wetting shower of
snow and rain. I plowed for about two hours, then unhitched. The day continued showery all
50
through. I fixed the pen for the fattening pigs in the eavning. James and John are helping Broth-
ers John and Sam. Nancy was at Mrs. Mills’ sowing [=sewing] bee.
November 1877
1st The ground covered with snow this morning, but about noon it had all disappeared. The after-
noon was foggy and warm. I was fixing at a pig pen in the forenoon and in the afternoon cleaned
a grist for the mill. James at his uncle Sam’s. Nancy in at Eliza['s] getting her dress cut out.
2 Very rainy morning and continued a wet day all throug[h], Snow and rain mixed pretty well in
the afternoon. I was choring around home.
3 Very stormy morning, blowing and snowing, which it continued doing all day. There is now, 7
P.M., about three inches of snow on the level and it is still increasing. I only done the necessary
chores today.
4th Sabbath. Snowy day, the snow about one foot deep. One of our cows eat[sic] too many turnips in
the field today, and with the cold and turnips she swelled up so that I had to kill her. Mr. Lon-
sway and Henry helped me to Skin her.
<Q1 folio 60 recto>
November 1877
5th Very stormy all day, snowing like fun and blowing strong. Went to Dundalk with three quarters
of beef and the cow’s hide. Got six cents per pound for the hide and Four cents for some of the
Beef per pound and five cents for some.
6 Cold day and pretty stormy. Was fixing the stables.
7 Bright sunny morning, and a very pleasant day, snow going fast before the sun. Took one bag of
Red River wheat to Dundalk mill. It turned out well, more than forty pounds per bushel. James
and John hauled some rails in the eavning.
8 A slight rain in the morning, which increased to a heavy rain, and kept at [it] all day long. It is
raining steady now (8 P.M.) and the snow is going fast. The boys hauled a load of rails from the
back field to the garden. James Mills brought me ten bushels and forty-nine pounds of pease
which I had purchased from him yesterday at Fifty-five cents per bushel.
9 Cold morning, with some snow falling, the day pretty cold all through. I fixed the garden fence
in the forenoon and in the afternoon went to Melancthon. The boys were hauling wood.
10 Fine sunny morning, and the day continued fine all through. I took the number and dimensions
of some saw logs which I had cut and went to Dundalk in the eavning to see Mr. Cross, Builder,
about putting me up a house. I exchanged four pounds of tea with Mr. Brown which I had pur-
chased from him. It was bad and the tea he gave me is no better. The boys were hauling wood.
<Q1 folio 60 verso>
November 1877
11th Sabbath. Fine morning and the day continued mild and warm, causing the snow to thaw. The old
mare got at a quantity of pease I had fed to the fatt[e]ning pigs. She ate a quantity of them,
the[y] caused her to swell. I thought she would have died. We poured about a pound of melted
butter in her and I walked her around for about three hours, when she got better.
12 Very mild morning and the day continued mild and thawing . Helped brother Sam to put some
hay out of a stack into his stable lofts.
13 Nice mild morning, the snow still thawing, the day fine all through. Butchered some hogs (8),
assisted by Brothers John and Samuel.
14 Very fine, mild morning and the day was warm and bright all through. Butchered three hogs this
morning, assisted by Brother Samuel. Took them to Dundalk in the afternoon. They weighed
51
Ten hundred and thirty-four pounds net. I got Four dollars and Eighty-seven and a half cents per
hundred for them, making $50.40. I purchased a throat latch for $0.20 and a breast strap snap for
.05¢.
15 Wet morning and continued very showery all day. Went to Flesherton with a Grist, 9 Bushels
and 20 pounds Red River wheat, got 390 pounds flour. Also took some cloth to the mill to be
fulled. Brought home Mr. Lonsway’s cloth. Nancy and Clark were at Flesherton also. She trad-
ed off some butter, only got 16¢ per lb for it in trade. Better markets at Dundalk.
<Q1 folio 61 recto>
November 1877
16th Very fine dry morning and the day was mild and warm for this season of the year. John, Jim and
I were helping Brother John to settle up his turnips and potatoes.
17 Pretty nice morning, although no sunshine. All the frost and snow have disappeared. The
eavning got cool and there was a shower of rain, also some pretty large hail stones. The wind is
very high now (8) P.M. I finished my fall plowing today: it was sod and it ploughed very well.
[in margin] Plowing
18th Sabbath. Very cold day, the ground frozen quite hard and a piercing wind blowing. Visited Mr.
Lonsway’s.
19 Cold morning but on towards noon the day ameliorated and was quite pleasant in the eavning.
Went to W. Henders to see about getting him to skid Saw logs for me. Then went to Dundalk,
then came home and from thence went to Joseph Lepard’s. [Surname Lepard (but not Joseph L.)
is in index of History of Dundalk].
20 Bright sunny morning and the day continued very fine for this season of the year. The boys and I
were cutting some shingle timber in the bush. It was very hard to get. The bush has been culled
and we did not come much speed. Mrs. Lonsway visited us today, so also did Mrs. Skeffington
Bell and Miss Sarah Bell.
21 Cold raw morning, sharp frosty wind. The day got a little milder towards noon. The boys and I
were getting out shingle timber. I attended a Trustee meeting at Mr. May’s this night.
<Q1 folio 61 verso>
November 1877
22nd Rather misty morning and a slight mizzle of rain fell once and again through the day. The boys
and I were getting out Shingle timber. Mr. William Henders bought the spring colt from me for
$27.00 to be paid in a year. [in margin] Sold spring colt
23 Misty morning but a very mild day for this season of the year, dry and rather sultry. The boys
and I were taking out Shingle timber. Nancy went to Dundalk this eavning.
24 Very Rainy morning and the day continued showery. Sold a cow and three spring pigs to Mr.
John McDowell. I asked $25.00 for the cow, he offered me $20.00. He said he would give me
$1.00 each for the pigs. I told him they were worth about .75¢ each. He finally gave me $25.00
for the cow and I bestowed him the pigs. Mr. Lonsway was here this afternoon and Nancy and I
went to his house at night. We all had ourselves weighed there. I weighed 147 pounds and Nan-
cy 132—the lightest she has been since I re[me]mber. Must eat more and fatten up. It won’t do
for her to go round being so light the wind might lift her and carry her off! [in margin] Sold cow
25th Sabbath. Misty morning and a slight mizzle of rain fell all through the day. Visited Mrs. Clements
Bell, Nancy and I.
26 Rather dull, misty day all through with a little rain. The boys and I were getting out Shingle tim-
ber.
<Q1 folio 62 recto>
52
November 1877
27th Rainy morning, but dried off so that the boys and I went and cut some logs for Joice [=joists].
John Agnew came here this eavning.
28 Pretty cold morning, quite a hard frost with a slight sprinkling of snow on the ground. The day
remained cold and freezing all through. Still, there were a good many plowing. I went in the
forenoon and helped John Agnew to saw three cherry logs that were in his way of plowing, and
in the afternoon went in to Brother Sam’s. William Henders came here today and said he had
heard that the colt he purchased from me was ruptured and spavined. I told him that if it was
ruptured, and that he would get Mr. Sloan of Eugenia to casterate it in the summer, and the colt
died through the effects of the rupture, that I would return him his note. I slept at Father’s to-
night.
29 Very cold, freezing morning and the day remained cold all through. Helped Brother Samuel to
Butcher six pigs. Jim took Mr. Henders his colt today.
30 Very cold morning and the day continued so with some snow falling. It is now snowing at 9 P.M.
Was choring around home today. Brother John is stopping here to night.
<Q1 folio 62 verso>
December 1877
1st Very cold morning, sharp frosty wind, the day ameliorated a little in the afternoon. Helped Mr.
A. Lonsway to kill a beef in the forenoon and in the afternoon he and my brother Sam helped to
kill and dress one for me. I went to Dundalk with the hide, got 6½ ¢ per pound for it, and it
brought me $5.35.
2nd Sabbath. Cold morning and the day was pretty sharp all through.
3 Cold morning, but the day got a little milder in the afternoon. Chored around home. Sent Mr. J.
McDowell the three pigs he had purchased from me. Mr. Isaac Coote, an old Settler on Lot 36—
4th Range, New Survey, Melancthon, with his wife and family left here for the State of Michigan
where he intends settling.
4 Misty morning and wet afternoon. Mr. W. Henders was skidding saw logs for me today with his
oxen, at $1.50 per day. He came at 8:40 in the morning. James, John & I collect the logs. We
skidded 41.
5 Misty morning and the snow all gone. Commenced to rain about 8 A.M. and rained on till about
11. The sun then came out for a while, but the afternoon was cloudy and cold. Mr. Henders was
skidding logs, worked to about 8, then took shelter from the rain in the bush. Came home after a
while, it was then 9:10. Had an early dinner, started to work about 11, finished 2:30 P.M. Put up
35 logs. Mr. A. Lonsway helped me from morning, and John Agnew from 11 O’clock.
<Q1 folio 63 recto>
December 1877
6th Cold morning and a little snow on the ground, the day passibly mild. The boys and I were cut-
ting roads in the bush.
7 Cold morning, with a little more snow, the day cold all through. The boys and I were cutting
roads in the bush in the forenoon, and in the afternoon I went to Dundalk. Mr. W. Henders
brought two Sheep here today to let them stop with the ram for a few days.
8 Cold morning and the day was rather chilly, with several showers of snow, drifting fiercely. Got
home the sheep from John Agnew that I had got from him some time ago for a sett of second
hand harness. Jim and I hauled some shingle timber out of the bush home in the afternoon.
53
Sleighing very bad and the bush very rough. Johney went to Dundalk to get his boots mended.
Mrs. Russell and I were at Mr. Lonsway’s tonight.
9th Sabbath. Rather cold morning and the day was chilly all through. Hitched up the team and Nancy
and I went to Melancthon. I heard today that John Patterson, a former pupil of mine, and now
about 28 years of age and a Miller working in Orangeville, was severely injured by the explosion
of the boiler of the Mill. His leg had to be amputated.
10 Rather milder this morning than yesterday, a little snow falling now and then, but very bad
sleighing. Nancy and I went to Melancthon. I helped brother John to kill a beef.
<Q1 folio 63 verso>
December 1877
11th Nice mild morning and the day continued soft and thawing. Sleighing nearly all gone. Went to
Dundalk and contracted with Mr. Cross to do the carpenter work of a new house, 21 X 27 feet
and 16 feet high, he to do all the carpenter work and to provide the pine lumber that would be re-
quired, and to board himself, I to provide the Hemlock lumber and shingles. His price for it is
$142.50, I to pay him $82.00 when the work is completed and the balance the following January.
And he is to do all his work in a workmanlike manner, and not slight any portion of it.
This was fair day in Dundalk. Cattle sold cheap, good fat cows that would weigh about 500 lbs
dressed meat at from $20. to $18.
12 Very nice morning and the sun shone out for a while, almost like Indian Summer. The day was
beautiful all through. The boys and I were helping John Agnew at his threshing. Nancy was
helping to cook.
13 Rather mild day for this season of the year, with rather a high wind in the eavning. Was choring
around today, did not feel well.
14 Sharp, frosty morning, although the sun shone out bright in the forenoon. Mrs. Russell went to
Dundalk in the forenoon and at night she and I went to Mr. Lonsway’s.
14 Mild morning, and the day got pretty warm with a soft wind. The snow has disappeared, and
cattle are out in the fields grazing. Went to Dundalk. The boys sawed some posts. Brother John
was here this eavning.
<Q1 folio 64 recto>
December 1877
16th Sabbath. Very fine day, mild and warm, the sun hazy, giving one the impression of Indian Sum-
mer. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway were here.
17 Very nice morning and the sun shone out bright and clear. The day was beautiful all through.
Mrs. Russell and the boys took some beets to Flesherton, but they only succeeded in selling .60
cts worth, no sale for beets.
18 Cold morning and the day continued very cold with a sharp frosty wind. The ground as hard as a
brick. It commenced raining at night.
19 Rainy morning, the day misty all through, the roads quite soft. I went to a Grange meeting but
there was not a quorum. Nancy went to Mr. Bell’s.
20 Soft morning, the snow all gone, roads bad and the ice coming out. Started to haul shingle tim-
ber to the mill. Took two small loads. The roads very bad.
21 A slight sleety rain fell this morning. The day was foggy and mild all through, the roads in a
fearful state with mud. I have heard that some people are plowing today.
22 Nice mild day, like a day in Spring, foggy, close and warm. Went to Dundalk to Settle the plan
and kind of house Mr. Cross is to build for me, and also got some shingles sawed at the Mill.
The boys were gathering stones today. I saw a man plowing. Brother John is here this eavning.
54
<Q1 folio 64 verso>
December 1877
23rd Sabbath. Very fine mild day, but a little misty. Brother Sam and wife and children were here to-
day.
24 Rather misty morning, but the sun shone out about 10 A.M. The day was mild and balmy, like to
any day in spring. Took four bushels and thirteen pounds of Red chaff wheat to Dundalk Mills,
got 150 pounds of flour. The roads are so bad that the empty wagon is enough for a team to
haul.
25 Christmas, and such Christmas weather I never seen in Canada, not a particle of snow to be seen
in the fields or on the roads, the day close and warm with a slight sprinkling of rain now and
then. Mrs. Russell and I, with William and Eliza, spent our Christmas at Mr. A. Lonsway’s. Jim,
John and Clark went to the Sabbath School social at Dundalk.
26 Mild day with rather a close mist prevailing most of the time. Mr. A. Lonsway helped me to
butcher two pigs in the forenoon and in the afternoon he hauled one of them to Dundalk for me.
I had sold it to Mr. Cross, Builder, for $5.00 /100 per cwt. It weighed 253 pounds. I attended
[MS attendended] a meeting of the Grangers, when they chose another secretary in my place.
The Grange, I honestly believe, is a fraud and for all practical purposes I have disconnected my-
self with them The boys were picking stones of[f] the field today.
27 A very fine day all through, a little misty. The boys and I were hauling out manure with the
wagon.
<Q1 folio 65 recto>
December 1877
28th A remarkably fine morning and the day continued bright and warm. The sun shone out clear and
strong. The boys and I were hauling out manure with the wagon. George Kirby was here today.
29 A fine mild day all through, this weather surpasses anything for mildness that the oldest inhabit-
ant has ever seen. Mrs. Sweeny was here today. The boys and I were hauling out manure with
the wagon.
30th Sabbath. Cold raw day, freezing a great deal. Mrs. Bell and Skeffington and wife were here.
31 Cold day and some snow falling. Went to James Kinnear’s, Lot 35 Melancthon and drew up his
Will for him. I went in the afternoon to Dundalk.
January 1878
1st Cold day, snowing a little and freezing a great deal. Went in to Melancthon in the forenoon. Mr.
Lonsway and Wife and Henry were here at night.
2 Very cold morning and some snow falling, the day extremely cold all day, the coldest this winter
for so far. Went to R. Campbell’s, Blacksmith, paid him $10. 00/100 on Act., purchased 10½
pounds of Binding chain from him at 10¢ per pound. He to put a ring on one end at 12¢ and a
grab hook on other at 25¢.
3 Cold day all through, with a little snow falling. Nancy and I went to Mr. Lonsway’s at night.
<Q1 folio 65 verso>
January 1878
4th Cold morning and the day continued so. Went to Mrs. Sweeny’s and paid her $3.50 for [weaving
stricken, above:] spinning. The three eldest boys were at School today.
5 Cold morning, the day cold all through, a little more snow on the ground. The boys and I were
hauling out manure with the sleigh. Nancy and two of the boys and I attended a prayer meeting
at night at Mr. Clipperd’s.
55
6th Sabbath. Cold day all through, with a little snow falling. Nancy and Eliza went to Melancthon.
7 Very cold morning and the day continued so. Went to the Voting in Melancthon and Proton and
voted. The boys at school today.
8 Rather cold day all through. Prepared my vouchers for the Auditors. The boys at school today.
9 Mild morning, the snow soft[e]ning, the day mild all through. Drove Nancy in to brother John’s.
He and I then went to the Annual Meeting, from thence I went to Mr. Kinnear’s, fixed his Will.
Then I took the team and went with John to Shrigley Post Office where some money awaited
him as Collector of Township taxes. Came from there to John’s, then home.
10 Mild day, the snow disappearing fast off the road. Went to Dundalk, Nancy and I. Bought ½ Brl
flour, took it to Sister Sarah’s. John sent her a bag of potatoes. Poor Sarah, she has the most
miserable and poverty-stricken life imaginable.
<Q1 folio 66 recto>
January 1878
11th Mild morning, although there fell a pretty brisk shower of snow during the night. The day was
fine all through. Jim is sick with something like a cold. Isabella Montgomery, a young woman
about six miles from here, died with diptheria today.
12 Fine mild morning, the day pleasant all through. Went to Brother Sam’s to a wood bee. Jim and
his mother went to the weaver’s.
13th Sabbath. Cold blustering day, with a slight mizzle of sleet. I and Nancy went to Mr. Lonsway’s at
night.
14 Rather mild day, with a little sleighing as some snow had fell during the night. Took in some
shingle timber to the Mill, about ¾ cord. Brought away some shingles which I had got cut (11
half squares). Went to Mr. R. Cam[p]bell’s, blacksmith, and got him [to] cut the Lampers* in my
colt’s mouth. [*a lump or ridge in a horse’s palate, related to the eruption of teeth; sometimes
causes difficulty in eating; often treated by burning or cutting; see Burney James Kendall, A
Treatise on the Horse and his Diseases (Claremont, N. H., 1878, p. 22); and
http://equimed.com/diseases-and-conditions/reference/lampas (accessed 18/7/2017).]
15 Cool day, but not so cold, sleighing something better. Went to the Sawmill in the morning, put
one log on the gangway. In the afternoon fetched three logs out of the bush as far as the house.
Nancy helped me.
16 Fine mild day, sleighing pretty good. Was hauling saw Logs to the mill. George Hanbury of
Dundalk died today.
17 Rather sharp morning. The day got warmer towards noon. Was hauling logs to Mill. Nancy
helped me to load them.
18 Mild morning and the day pleasant all through. Was hauling saw Logs to Mill. Posted a letter to
Brother William today.
<Q1 folio 66 verso>
January 1878
19th Mild morning and the sun came out bright and strong about noon, causing the snow to melt and
run down the roads. Sleighing completely gone. Hauled 3 Logs from the bush and 2 to the Mill.
20th Sabbath. Soft day all through. Some soft snow fell in the afternoon. Mr. John Mills, an aged man
and a mason and plasterer, working at Mr. James May’s, died today.
21 Mild morning and the day continued soft all through. What little snow was on the roads was so
soft that the Sleighs cut through when the[y] went on it. Brother Sam helped me fix my barn
doors [“(doors” written at end of previous line].
56
22 Mild day to about noon, when it commenced snowing and blowing, which increased as the day
advanced, till the storm rose to a fearful pitch at night. Was helping Brother Sam to cut fire-
wood. Stopped at Father’s all night.
23 Fearful cold morning and the day all through continued freezing something like Greenland. The
coldest day for so far that has came this winter.
24 Not near as cold a day as yesterday. The wind rather soft and indications of a thaw. Our youths
have all went to the Sabbath School Social.
25 Mild morning, but some soft snow falling through the day. Asked some help for a Bee to haul
saw logs.
26 A Good deal of Snow fell through last night and today. The wind pretty strong in the eavning.
Boys and I fixed some skids. Took some wheat to Mill in eavning. Went from there to a trustee
meeting.
<Q1 folio 67 recto>
January 1878
27th Sabbath. Rather a mild day, inclining to be a little soft. Brother Sam’s wife had a male child this
morning.
28 Cold stormy morning, the wind piercing sharp, the day very cold all through. I had a bee today,
hauling saw Logs from the bush to the house. There were Skeffington Bell and team, Brother
Sam and team, John Agnew and team and my own team. Of rollers there were James Patterson,
Brother John, Andrew Lonsway, Joseph Jackson and Mr. May’s man. Mrs. Agnew and Mrs.
Lonsway were helping in the house. We got 63 Logs hauled and skidded at the house.
29 Cold morning, but the day ameliorated towards noon, and became pleasant in the eavning. Was
hauling logs to Sawmill.
30 A very cold morning and the day was piercing cold towards night. Hauled logs to Mill in the
forenoon. Brother Sam’s Baby of [dittog.: of] three days old died this morning and was buried in
Father’s garden between the second and third poplar trees at the South-East end. Nancy and I
were at the burial.
31 Very cold morning, cold noon and cold eavning. Sleighing pretty well gone on the hill sides.
Was hauling logs to Mill and also hauled one load of wood to house from the bush. The wind is
rising at present, 8 A.M. [sic=P.M.?]. Sold a firkin* of butter to R. Cross, Builder, for (.18¢)
Eighteen cents per pound. The gross weight was 59 pounds. [*a firkin is ¼ barrel]
<Q1 folio 67 verso>
February 1878
1st Very Stormy morning, snowing and blowing, the storm abated about noon. Was hauling logs to
Mill in the afternoon.
2 Not near so cold as yesterday, the sun came out bright and strong. The sleighing is excellent.
Was hauling logs to the mill and also hauled some lumber home. Mr. J. Agnew is here tonight.
3rd Sabbath. Very nice, mild morning, the sun shone out bright and strong about 10 A.M., the day fine
all through. Brother John was here this day.
4 Nice mild morning with a mist which soon dissapated, the sun shone out clear and warm, melting
the snow and causing bad sleighing on the hills. The snow is very light for this season of the
year and the days are a great deal like spring. I think the snow is not more than seven inches
deep in the bush. I was hauling logs to the mill.
5 Mild day, although somewhat colder than yesterday. The snow wasted a little today. I was haul-
ing logs to the mill. I put in old mare in order to rest the colt. She done pretty well.
57
6 Pretty sharp morning, but the sun came out strong about noon and the snow was so light on the
slopes of the hills that it soon melted away. The water was running down the hills on the road in
the afternoon, and in many places the roads were bare of snow. I hauled logs to 2 O’clock A. M
[sic=must be P.M.], then drove in to Dundalk.
7 Splendid morning, the sun rose strong and bright and shone all day, the snow melted very rapid-
ly. I hauled some firewood from the bush. J. Jackson and J. Patterson were here this eavning
asking for subscription for C. Minister.
<Q1 folio 68 recto>
February 1878
8th Very mild morning, the sun out and the snow disappearing, with quite a strong wind, the day
very mild all through, in fact, like a spring day. I was chopping logs to make battons [=battens]
of. W. Lonsway and family and wife, with Mr. A. Lonsway and wife, were here today.
9 Very cold morning, the wind in the north, in fact we are transported from the tropics to the polar
region in the Single space of one night! The day did not improve any and as night drew in apace
one got closer to the stove. Ah!, what comfort there is in a red-hot stove a night like this. It
commenced snowing about 5 P.M. and is now indulging in the same gai[e]ty, with a rather sharp
wind blowing. I was at Brother Sam’s and Father’s today. Mrs. Russell went to the weaver’s for
cloth.
10th Sabbath. Cold, freezing day, pretty sharp wind with snow falling most of the day, but drifting so
that it done the roads little good. Brother John was here today.
11 Very sharp morning and the day continued cold all through. Sleighing bad, roads rough, and the
frozen lumps sticking up. I was hauling logs to the mill.
12 Mild morning and the day continued fine all through. Sleighing getting a little thin on the roads.
Dundalk cattle fair was held today, no buying worth mentioning. I was hauling saw logs to the
mill.
13 Very mild morning, indications of rain, the sun shone out very bright and warm about 11:15
A.M. Brother Sam helped me fix my wood rack. He and I then took a load each of cordwood to
Dundalk from his place. Sleighing all gone at C. McConell’s hill. My co[l]ts could not pull the
load at this place on account of no shoes on them. Sam took me up. All the family but myself
are at the C. of E. Sabbath School Social tonight at Gott’s O.[range] Lodge. [in margin] John
Gott married to Miss Glazier [?too miniscule to read]
<Q1 folio 68 verso>
February 1878
14th Mild morning and the sun shone out clear and warm about 10 O’clock in the forenoon. The day
continued fine all through. Was helping Brother Sam to swamp out Cordwood. Went to Skeff-
ington Bell’s at night.
15 Very fine morning, the sun shining like a day in Spring. The day beautiful and clear all through.
It is remarkably pleasant weather. I was helping Brother Sam to swamp out cordwood.
16 The sun rose bright and warm this morning, but clouded over after a little. The clouds disap-
peared about 10 O’clock A.M., when the day became very pleasant. I was helping Brother Sam-
uel to swam[p] wood. The Assessor for the Township of Proton was here today and assessed Lot
216 [sic:= 215?] at $450 and Lot 216 at $100. He also assessed my personal property at $120.,
Sum total $670, and put 4 days of Statute labor on me.
17th Sabbath. Mild day all through.
18 Sharp, frosty morning and continued cold to about 10 A.M., when the Sun shone out. I was get-
ting some saw logs off brother John’s place, assisted by Brother Samuel.
58
19 Sharp, cold morning, but the day ameliorated about 10 A.M., and became mild and warm. There
was a snow storm at night. I was getting out saw logs off Brother John’s lot, assisted by Brother
Sam. Mrs. Samuel Russell was at our place today. Skidding logs is pretty heavy work, as my
bones ached in a manner that was not pleasant.
<Q1 folio 69 recto>
February 1878
20th A little more snow on the ground this morning, but the sun shone out in the afternoon, melting it
off the roads. Very strange winter, very mild and delightful weather for cattle, or men working,
good for all purposes except teaming, and there has been scarcely any sleighing worth [doing?]
during the winter. Locomotion is performed by both sleighs and wagons. The back liners use
sleighs on their roads, the Gravel road people mostly waggons, while those who live south, when
they visit this locality invariably fetch their wagons along. I went with Brother Samuel today to
Mr. Doyle’s mill to see if the roads through the fields were passible, or if the mill was sawing, or
would saw.
21 Very dull, dark morning, sky lowring. Rain came on slightly about 10 A.M. and continued all
day. Hauled two loads of Saw logs for Brother Sam to Doyle’s mill.
22 Wet morning and very stormy night before, wind high. The day continued wet all through,
rained without ceasing. Brother John stopped here tonight.
23 Snow falling this morning, although very soft, not much account for sleighing. It kept snowing
less or more all day. The boys and I Cleaned up about 20 Bushels of wheat for the mill. Mr.
Best of Artemesia was here today wanting to buy my young mare. He offered me $80., I wanted
$100. John Agnew traded off his farm of 218 acres in Proton to a Mr. Tho[ma]s Arnold for 100
acres, improved farm with good buildings, in Essa.* Nancy and I visited Mr. Lonsway’s this
eavning. [*Essa Township, Simcoe County, just west and north of Alliston, ON.]
<Q1 folio 69 verso>
February 1878
24th Sabbath. A little snow fell now and then through the day, but it was rather Soft and not of much
use to help the sleighing.
25 A slight skiff of snow in the morning and continued snowing some all day. Hauled a load of Saw
logs for Brother Sam in the afternoon.
26 A bright, sunny morning and as the sun rose in the sky, the snow began to dissapear, not much
sleighing at night on the travelled roads. Took 21 Bushels and 52 lbs of wheat to Feversham
mill. Nancy went with me, I only got 787 pounds of flour, but the miller said that the bolt had
went wrong and that he would make it up, 40 pounds of flour to the bushel, which he did al-
though I told him that I thought my wheat would not make 40 pounds to the bushel. I lost a bag
at the mill through some means. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway were here this eavning.
27 Fine bright sunny morning and the day was one of spring-like aspect. Hauled a load of saw logs
for brother Sam in the forenoon, and in the afternoon, Sam and Mr. A. Lonsway and I made a
sleigh track through Mr. Adams’ bush, coming out on the Gravel at Mr. Kenneth McAulay’s bars
[=type of gate?]. Sleighing is all gone on the roads so we had to try this expedient! Maple sap
ran in a proper streem [sic] today.
28 A little cooler this morning, but the Sun soon got out strong. Sam and I hauled some saw logs
today. We got through the bush very well, but in crossing E. Noble’s lot at the beaver meadow
the horses broke down through the ice. We were trying to get to the mill this way, but the road is
very bad and dangerous, we will have to give it up. A credit sale of stock at John Conners’ this
day.
59
<Q1 folio 70 recto>
March 1878
1st Cold, raw morning and there was mostly a chilliness in the air all day. Snow is completely gone
off all the leading roads. Took my waggon in to Sam’s and left it for him. Helped Brother John
to haul in some turnips, he gave me about half a sleigh load home with me. One ewe lambed.
2nd Close, damp-like morning, rain came on about 11 AM and continued for about two hours. It then
cleared off, but late in the eavning it commenced raining again. Went to Dundalk today and put
my lands into the hands of Mr. A. G. Hunter* to sell for me. Nancy and I went to Mr. Lonsway’s
at night. [*A. G. Hunter, Commissioner in the Queen’s Bench, listed in 1877 Dundalk Guide, as
well as Rutherford & Hunter, General Agents, land, loan and insurance; see History of Dundalk,
p. 101. George Rutherford is mentioned frequently as insurance and mortgage agent: see 19 June
1876, 2 Mar., 5 Apr., 22 May, 30 Aug., 24 Sept. 1878, 10 June, 3 Sept. 1881, 19 July 1882.]
3rd Sabbath. A Slight drizzle of rain this morning and continued so to the afternoon when it turned to
snow, which it continued on to night. Nancy and I went to Melancthon. I went to see John Pat-
terson at his Brother James’.
4 Snow falling very slightly this morning, but the wind so high that it is blown off the roads. A
Strong wind and a little snow all day. Was at John Agnew’s helping him clean up grain. Sarah
Nethercut, a girl of about 15 years of age, daughter of William Nethercut, died this afternoon of
Billious fever.* [*Common diagnosis in 18th & 19th C. for fever accompanied by nausea. Bili-
ous fever is often stated as cause of death (e.g. A. Lincoln’s son, Willie, died of bilious fever); it
covers a wide range of conditions and diseases, including viral hepatitis and bacterial septice-
mia.]
5 A little sharp this morning, but the sun soon came out, accompanied by a thaw wind which took
the little mite of snow off the roads. Pretty high wind in the eavning. Jim and I took the team
and went to the Sawmill early in the morning, as I was to get this day’s sawing. But the shaft of
the machinery had got broken the eavning before and the Mill was not working. The boys and I
took out some logs for joice [=joists] in the eavning.
<Q1 folio 70 verso>
March 1878
6th A fine bright sunny morning. The day continued clear and beautiful to the afternoon, when signs
of rain began to appear. Rain fell after dark in a copious shower. The boys and I were hauling
home some sleepers for the proposed new house. Mrs. Russell went to Sarah Nethercut’s funer-
al. Brother John stopped here all night.
7 Rather cloudy this morning. The day was sultry all through. The roads are almost impassible on
account of the mud. The snow has almost dissappeared from the fields, and spring-like weather
to all appearances is on us. No open winter like this has occured in my memory in this part of
Ontario.
8 Bright sunny morning, the day continued fine and bright all through, such warm weather as
might be expected in the middle of April. We tapped 70 Maple trees today. Sap ran pretty well.
All hands were in the bush with the exception of Clark who was at school. [in margin] First ma-
ple trees tapped
9 Dull misty morning, but the sun came out after a little and the day got pretty hot. I was helping
in the Sugar bush to about 3. P.M., then went to Dundalk.
10th Sabbath. A very fine morning and the sun shone out very strong and warm. In fact, the day had
more of the warmth of June than March about it.
60
11 A little cool and misty in the morning, and got colder towards night, neither rain nor snow but a
cold wind. I helped John Agnew to clean grain.
<Q1 folio 71 recto>
March 1878
12th Misty morning, but the sun got out from behind the clouds now and then through the day. Close
and sultry towards noon. Misty, with a slight mizzle of rain at night. Pretty high wind after dark.
The snow is all gone from the roads, fields and bush, a little may be seen in the fence corners and
swamps. The ground is almost fit to plow. James and I were gathering stones and hauling them
in heaps. John and the others, except Clark (who was at school), were in the sugar bush.
13 Rain pretty steady all through the day. Boys went and got their boots mended. Nancy [wen
stricken, written above:] was at her brother John’s sowing. Brother John was here today.
14 Snow falling, morning, noon and night. The boys went to School today. Nancy was at her
brother John’s today. Mrs. John Agnew slept here this night.
15 Pretty deep snow on the ground this morning, but very soft and slushy. John Agnew and family
moved away today to the Township of Essa. I took home Brother Sam’s sleighs and brought
back my waggon. Mr. Thomas Arnold, that has got John Agnew’s place, stopped here this night.
16 Mild morning and the snow has pretty much disappeared, the roads are extremely bad. A slight
rain fell for about three hours during the day. I hauled a load of furniture from the Station to Mr.
Arnold’s. There were seven teams. Mr. Lonsway and wife were here this afternoon. All the
family but myself were in the Sugar bush.
<Q1 folio 71 verso>
March 1878
17th Sabbath. Mild morning and the sun shone all through the day, causing it to be pleasant and warm.
18 Rather hard frost this morning, but the sun soon got out, me[l]ting it. The day was very warm
about noon. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and in the afternoon I borrowed 274½ feet of
lumber from Mr. Lonsway. Jim and John were making molasses.
19 The ground covered with snow this morning, to the depth of about three inches. It melted away,
however, through the day and had entirely disappeared at night. There is, however, more snow
falling now (9:15 P[written on top of A]. M.). I was helping Brother Sam to clean oats. The
boys were making molasses.
20 Cold morning, but after the sun got up pretty high it became warm, especially in the sunshine.
The day was clear and pleasant all through. I was helping Brother Sam in the forenoon to clean
up oats, and in the afternoon, he came and made two grain boxes for me.
21 Dark morning, and the day continued dark and muggy all through. Cleaned up oats at home in
the forenoon and in the afternoon made a grain box. There is some snow falling this night.
22 The ground covered with snow this morning, but after the sun was up some time the snow gradu-
ally disappeared. The day was pleasant and fair all through. The boys and I cleaned up oats in
the forenoon and in the afternoon I made a grain box. I have about 240 bushels of oats. We fin-
ished cleaning them today.
<Q1 folio 72 recto>
March 1878
23rd Mild morning and the day continued warm all through. Maple sap ran well today. Jim and his
mother were in the Sugar bush. The others and I were cleaning up wheat. The Melancthon as-
sessor was with me today, and assessed my 50 acre Lot, $550.* I went to William Lonsway’s
this night and sat up with him, attending to him as he has the Diptheria. [*Lot 220 Melancthon.]
61
24th Sabbath. Very cold morning, with a slight, sharp snow falling, blowing strong and freezing fierce.
About as cold a day as came all winter.
25 A Sharp, cold morning, snowing and freezing. The Snow, however, don’t amount to much, as
the wind blows it into the fence corners about as soon as it falls. Mr. Lonsway and wife were
here this eavning.
26 Cold morning, but the sun got out and the snow disappeared about noon. There came on quite a
wind and snow storm about 9. P.M. I went to Dundalk today and purchased three pairs of gaiter
boots for the boys from Mr. Hanbury at $1.75 a pair. He is to take three cords of cordwood for
them next winter. Mrs. Russell and I were at Mr. Arnold’s this eavning. John Agnew and his
daughter, Annie, were here tonight.
27 About three inches of snow on the ground this morning. The sun got out and melted the snow all
away before noon. The boys and I were hauling cordwood out of the bush. John Agnew and
Annie here tonight.
28 Snow on the ground all day, after the snow storm last night. It is soft and not any good for
sleighing, the day mild. John Agnew went away today. I brought up his cupboard and put it into
our house. We had to cut some off it.
<Q1 folio 72 verso>
March 1878
29th Some snow on the ground this morning and the day continued a little cool, although the sun
melted some of the snow. I and Clark were in the sugar bush. Nancy was to see Mrs. Arnold in
the forenoon and in the afternoon came to the bush. Mrs. Mary Murphy* came here about 11
O’clock tonight. [in margin] First robbin [sic] seen / Canadian Bond / out. [*a cousin of Rob-
ert’s, visiting from Simcoe County.]
30 Cool morning, some snow still remains on the ground. There was a pretty sharp, cold wind
blowing mostly all day. I went to Dundalk and purchased 12½ bushels of barley at .40¢ per
bushel, the merchant to take oats for the barley and allow me .30¢ per bushel for them. The boys
were in the Sugar bush today.
31st Sabbath. Bright sunny morning, although a little sharp. The day continued fine all through. Nan-
cy and I went to Mr. Arnold’s and from thence in to Melancthon. Mrs. Mary Murphy here to-
night.
April 1878
1st Very beautiful morning, and the day was clear and warm all through, quite balmy and Spring-
like. A great many of the neighbours have started plowing. Mrs. Murphy left for home this
morning. Nancy and I were in the sugar bush, Jim and John were gathering stones. I went after
night to sit up with W. Lonsway’s sick*, but they had no need of me so I came home. [*see
above, 23 March. William Lonsway’s diphtheria may have been passed on to his wife Margaret
(Robert’s sister) or their children.]
2 Bright sunny morning and the day continued one of sunshine and warmth. Nancy and I were in
the sugar bush. Jim and John were gathering stones, and in the evening they went with the team
to Mr. May’s and bought two bushels of lime at 15¢ per B.
<Q1 folio 73 recto>
April 1878
3rd Bright sunny morning and the day continued dry and warm all through. The boys were gathering
stones on Lot [216 stricken] 220. I went to transact some business up the road in the forenoon
62
and in the afternoon pickled and limed 12 Bushels of wheat for seed. [in margin] One lamb to-
day
4 Bright sunny morning, and the day was beautiful all through. I sowed 12 bushels of wheat on
Lot 220, Jim harrowed. Nancy and John were in the sugar bush, and Clark at school. [in mar-
gin] First wheat sown
5 Bright sunny morning, and the day continued dry and warm all through. I sowed 8 bushels of
wheat today on Lot 220, which finishes my sowing of wheat for this season. Jim harrowed and
John & Clark gathered stones. The ground does not mould any with the harrows, as it is sod
which was plowed last fall, and the frost at nights wets [MS: weets] it so that it does not dry
soon. Mr. George Rutherford* was here in the eavning and transacted some business for me with
Mr. A. H. Hope of Hamilton. [*probably connected with the sale of land; see 2 March 1878,
above.]
I lost the best of my ewes [the stricken, insert] last night through her drinking a lot of salt and
water in which I had pickled the Seed wheat. I put the Sheep all into the barn and accidentally I
forgot to remove the brine. They all drank it and one of them died. The others are sick enough,
but very dry. I am keeping them shut up and giving them a little water occassionally.
6 Sharp frost this morning, and the day continued pretty cool all through, especially so in the
eavning. I went in the morning to Dundalk and purchased three bags of barley. I then went to
Archy McAulay’s Raising of a log barn. Jim was harrowing, and John gathering stones.
<Q1 folio 73 verso>
April 1878
7th Sabbath. Frost this morning, but the sun rose bright and clear, and the day continued fine all
through.
8 Frost this morning, but the sun rose bright and clear, the day got very warm about 10 A M. In the
eavning it got rather cloudy and chilly. Jim finished harrowing the wheat ground today. John
and I were gathering stones. Nancy in the bush.
9 Cloudy morning, the sky overcast and lowring, a slight rain came on about 10 AM, which in-
creased towards noon. It then faired up for a little and began again and kept at it pretty steady
tonight. It is now raining some (8:15) P.M. and all indications of a wet night. Jim was plowing
this forenoon, John and I were gathering stones. This was the first plowing we done this spring,
although the ground was fit to plow ten days ago, but we were busy putting in some wheat on
ground we had plowed last fall. The neighbours in general are all commenced seeding. It has
been splendid weather for so far, nothing at all to equal it for an early spring in my recollection.
Henry and James Lonsway were here this eavning. Nancy is Sick with Sore throat and pain in
her bones. [in margin] First plowing
10 Rather wet this morning, but the rain somewhat faired off about nine O’clock. There was a slight
mizzle throughout the day. Jim was plowing from about 9 AM., John and I were gathering
stones. Mrs. Arnold and Mrs. Lonsway were here a short time this eavning.
<Q1 folio 74 recto>
April 1878
11th Quite a cool morning and rather breezy throughout the day. A fine day for a team to work. Jim
was plowing, John and I were gathering stones. The ground is drying nicely.
12 A slight frost this morning and the day was quite cool all through. Jim was plowing, John and I
were gathering stones to about 5.0 P.M., when we started to look for a stray lamb, but we did not
find it. Mrs. Russell, in company with Mrs. [Lonsway stricken, inserted above] Arnold, visited
Mrs. Lonsway this eavning. James Patton and James Kinnear were with me this eavning for me
63
to sign a petition addressed to the Judge, asking him to be as lenient as possible in passing sen-
tence on Mr. James May. Poor May was convicted of perjury. His enemies have prevailed at
last against him. I am morally certain that he is not guilty of perjury, but his enemies, after years
of watching and annoying him in every shape, have at last entangled him in the meshes of the
law.
13 Cold morning, with a slight sprinkle of rain. The day continued cool all through, with pretty
high wind in the afternoon. Jim was plowing, John and I were gathering stones. Mr. Lonsway
and wife were here a short time this eavning. Another lamb was take[n] today, I think by the
wild cats, as I found fresh blood leading in to the swamp immediately after missing the lamb.
14th Sabbath. Rather cool morning, the day cool and dry. Mrs. S. Russell and Brother John and wife
and John Jackson were here and Mr. Arnold and his Father, and Brother John’s two boys. [in
margin] First cow calved
<Q1 folio 74 verso>
April 1878
15th Rather cool morning and the day continued cool and dry. Jim was plowing, John and I were
gathering stones.
16 Cool morning, but the day warmed up beautifully and was splendid all through. I went to the
Station and bought a ¾ inch auger for .40¢, coming home I also bought from a man who was go-
ing to Dundalk 7½ bushels of Early Rose potatoes at .35¢ per B., and 6 bushels of White caps*
for .30¢ per B. Jim was plowing. I was helping Mr. Arnold to put up a back Kitchen in the af-
ternoon. [* white caps are split peas with seedcoat attached; see http://www.spokaneseed.com/
corefiles
spokaneseed/products/SSCO_Product_Specification_for_SPLIT_PEAS.pdf]
17 Fine cool morning, but the day got warmer and continued very pleasant throughout. I shore
[=sheared] a ram and yearling lamb in the forenoon and John and I sorted our seed potatoes in
the afternoon. The ram’s fleece weighed 11 pounds and the lamb’s 6½. Jim was plowing.
18 Cool morning, dry sunny day with a moderate wind. Went to Mr. Lonsway’s in the morning for
6 Bushels of pease that I bought of him at .60¢ per Bushel. Brought them home and sowed them.
Jim was harrowing. John and I were picking stones in the eavning. The sky is overcast this
eavning and there are indications of rain. [in margin] First pease sown / Full moon yesterday
morning
19 Rain early this morning, but it soon faired up and the day became dry with a good growth, the
eavning got a little cool. Jim was plowing today, John and I were gathering stones in the fore-
noon and in the afternoon I went [to] help raise a frame barn at Mr. John Ludlow’s. One of the
men (Mr. William Gallaher) got badly hurt at it. He was on a plate pulling up rafters. He got one
drawn up partly then pulled and threw his weight on it to brake it, it broke, but did not catch on
the purline, as the purline was spliced, and the splices were not met. He fell and struck on a log
inside: his head, leg and body seem to be pretty bad.
<Q1 folio 75 recto>
April 1878
20th A wet morning, and a great pour of rain last night with thunder and lightening. The day cleared
up about 8 AM. and was dry and sultry to about noon. It then became cool with a very high wind
in the afternoon. The sky is overcast and the wind raising at present (9:55 P.M.). I went in the
morning to See Mr. Gallaher. He is scarcely any better. I was plowing in the afternoon, the boys
were choring around. I sent John to the Blacksmith’s for a wrench and bo[l]t for plow point. He
got me a monkey wrench, price .85¢.
64
21st Sabbath. Very cool morning and cloudy. The day continued cool all through. A man crippled with
rheumatism and who gave his name as John Patterson asked for to get stopping all night and we
kept him. Mr. Arnold was here this eavning. I went in to Melancthon this eavning. [in margin]
Esther [=Easter]
22 Dull cloudy morning and quite cold, rain commenced about 9 A.M. and stopped about 2 P.M. It
clouded up near night and a slight mizzle is now (8:30) falling. Jim was plowing in the dry part
of the day, John and I were picking stones.
23 Rather cold morning and cloudy with showers through the day. Sent Jim in the morning to the
blacksmith’s to get a bolt for plow share. Jim was plowing after that and John and I picking
stones. Nancy and I were at Mr. Lonsway’s at night. [in margin] Seen 3 swallows.
24 Cloudy morning with some rain falling. It cleared off, then came on about 11 A.M., cleared off,
then began about 2 P.M., when it rained very heavy to about 4. Jim was plowing in the dry
spells. I went to Dundalk in the eavning, bought a pick for $1.30, ½ bushel clover seed for
$2.80, got a parcel in the Express Office, marked $258. Brother Sam got 11 Bags oats from me
in trade for other oats.
<Q1 folio 75 verso>
April 1878
25th Dull cloudy morning, the sky overcast and every sign of rain. There were frequent showers
through the day. Jim was plowing, John and I were putting up fences and choring around gener-
ally.
26 Very showery day all through, and pretty heavy rain in the afternoon. Nancy and I went to Dun-
dalk after tea. Jim was plowing in the dry spells through the day. I paid Mr. Thos. Hanbury,
Shoemaker, balance of his ac[coun]t for 1877.
27 Misty morning and frequent showers through the day. Jim was plowing in the forenoon, and I
went to Mr. R. Campbell’s and paid him the balance of my blacksmith’s Bill for 1877. I went to
Brother John’s in the afternoon and got 800 pounds of hay from him at the rate of $12 per ton.
John Agnew stopped here tonight.
Sabbath
28th Cloudy morning and frequent showers of rain through the day. John Agnew left here today.
Brother John and wife were here in the afternoon.
29 Cloudy morning and frequent showers of rain through the day. Jim was plowing in the afternoon
to tea time, then he went to the blacksmith’s to get a bolt for co[l]ter. [in margin] Nelly calved
30 Misty morning and a little rain fell during the day. The boys and I were hauling out manure to
about 5. p.m., then Jim commenced plowing.
<Q1 folio 76 recto>
May 1878
1st Rather misty morning and a little rain through the day. Jim was plowing. John and I were gath-
ering stones and choring around. Mrs. Russell and I went to Mr. Arnold’s in the eavning. A
clock fixer repaired our clock today.
2 Very heavy rain this morning and it kept wet during most of the forenoon. I went in the after-
noon to Dundalk and posted some letters and renewed my subscription to the weekly Mail, price
$1.14 per annum. Jim was plowing in the afternoon. It came on to rain about 6:30 p.M., accom-
panied with thunder and lightening and it has poured down from then to now (9 P.M.) and is still
at it.
65
3 Very wet morning, but no rain fell during the day. Jim was plowing to noon. In the afternoon he
and I took the team and tried to open up some water furrows to carry off the water on a field that
I wish to Sow with oats. Four men came here this eavning, a-landbuying. One of them wanted
to purchase Lot 220 Melancthon from me. We could not come to terms. This has been a very
wet time for the past two weeks, the ground is completely water-soaked. Most people are
obliged to stop work on their farms, as a great many of them are so wet they cannot be plowed.
There is, however, a splendid growth: grass is about three weeks in advance of this time last
year. Nancy and all the family but me are at Tunkar [=Tunker*] Meeting at Mr. Clippard’s to-
night. [*the Tunker Church was a fundamentalist sect with German Baptist origins; see H. R.
Holsinger, Holsinger’s History of the Tunkers and The Brethern Church (Oakland, Calif., 1901),
at : https://archive.org/details/holsingershistor00hols]
<Q1 folio 76 verso>
May 1878
5th Sabbath. Very cool day all through but no rain. So cold, indeed, that it almost froze. Mrs. Russell
and I visited Mr. Arnold’s in the eavning.
6 Cool morning but the day was dry all through with a fine drying wind, indications of rain to-
night. Sowed about six bags of oats today, being the first oats I sowed this season. Jim har-
rowed. The ground was very wet and did not mould. Brother John was here this eavning. Nan-
cy was to Dundalk. [in margin] First oats sown
7 Heavy rain this morning, but cleared off about 8 AM, the day was dry but cloudy from that on. I
plowed in the dry part of the day. Jim took Lotty (a filly) to the blacksmith’s and got the lampers
cut in her mouth. Also got a wolf’s tooth knocked out of her. There were some holes of water
so deep where I was plowing that the[y] covered the mould board. Mrs. Russell was at Mrs. Ar-
nold’s.
8 Cool morning, but the day kept dry to about 4 P.M., when there came on a very heavy rain. I
sowed about 5 acres of oats today and Jim harrowed them, but did not get them finished. [in
margin] Elly calved.
9 The morning cloudy, but the day kept dry to about 6 P.M., when there was a pretty sharp shower.
Jim plowed the garden in the afternoon and harrowed from tea time till night. An old man
named Sam Allen is stopping here for charity tonight. He is a great talker, his tongue is going
now like a tuck mill* so that I can hardly write for the chatter he is keeping up! [* a tuck mill, or
fulling mill, was a water mill used to cleanse woolen cloth of oils and impurities, making it
thicker. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulling#Fulling_mills]
<Q1 folio 77 recto>
May 1878
10th Cold morning and a little rain through the day and exceedingly cold in the eavning. I sowed
three bags of oats in the afternoon, Jim was harrowing all day. I went to see George Kirby [this
stricken, above:] yesterday afternoon.
11 Very cold morning and the ground white with snow. It melted off in a little while but the day
was cloudy, cold, and windy. I sowed two bags of oats in the forenoon, and planted about a
bushel of potatoes in the afternoon. Jim harrowed. Nancy and I were at Mr. Lonsway’s at night.
[in margin] Mare colted. First potatoes planted. Snow this morning.
12th Sabbath. Cold morning with a little snow on the ground. The day was very cold and cloudy.
Nancy and I visited in Melancthon.
13 Cold morning, with ice on the rain barrel half an inch thick. The day was cold all through. Jim
was plowing. Nancy and I went to Dundalk.
66
14 Cold morning, with a heavy frost, the day cold all through. I sowed three bags of oats. Jim har-
rowed. I and Nancy were at Mr. Arnold’s.
15 Hard frost this morning, the plowed ground almost as hard as a brick. The sun came out thawing
the frost, the day dry. I sowed two bags of oats. Jim harrowed and then went in the eavning and
plowed on Lot 220 Melancthon. I sold 62 Bushels of oats to Mr. Bradan of Mono for .31¢ per
Bushel. [in margin] Finished sowing oats.
16 Frost this morning, the sun got out strong, the day dry and warm. Jim plowing, I choring around,
John harrowing at Sam’s. Nancy at Mrs. Lonsway’s picking bee.
<Q1 folio 77 verso>
May 1878
19th Bright sunny morning and the day continued fair and warm all through. The ground is drying up
pretty rapidly. Jim was plowing on Lot 220, I was clipping sheep. Nancy clipped two for me.
Mr. Arnold came up in the afternoon and ground his axe. Mr. Lonsway and William John Arnold
were here this eavning. Mr. Lonsway borrowed 7 Bags from me. John is helping Brother Samu-
el. I hear that the frost which done so much harm here was also bad in other parts about 30 miles
east of this.
18 Fine morning and the day continued dry and warm all through. Went to Dundalk in the forenoon
and purchased 10 Bushels of barley @ 35¢ per Bushel and ½ Bushel of clover seed @ 4.70 per
Bush[el] and 30 pounds of Timothy seed @ $2.25 per Bushel. Also bought 2 Butter tubs @ .40¢
each. Mr. Lonsway hauled the articles home. In the afternoon Clark and I planted about 2 Bush-
els of potatoes on Lot 220. Jim finished plowing for grain today. [in margin] Posted letter to
Bro. William.
19th Sabbath. Rainy morning and the day continued showery all through. Visited George Kirby in the
eavning. Mr. Arnold was at our place in the afternoon.
20 Cloudy morning, but warm, with a good growth. Went in the forenoon to Father’s, in the after-
noon I helped Jim to haul out manure into a potatoe patch. Mr. Cross came here and leveled the
posts for the new house. A heavy rain came on about noon, then cleared off. Came on again and
was very show[e]ry all afternoon. [in margin] old man Hunk don[?] indecipherable—these notes
are normally about deaths.]
21 Cool morning and a slight mizzle of rain fell frequently during the forenoon, the afternoon was
dry. The boys were hauling out manure. I fitted a handle to the pick in the forenoon and was
digging a cellar in the afternoon.
<Q1 folio 78 recto>
May 1878
22nd White frost this morning, but did not see any ice on the water. The day was dry and warm all
through. I sowed about 4¾ acres of Barley in the forenoon and in the afternoon dug in the cellar.
Jim was harrowing, John and Clark were planting potatoes. [in margin] Finished sowing grain.
G. Rutherford married.
23 White frost this morning, doing little harm. Fine day, dry and warm all through. Sowed 30
pounds of grass seed and 30 pounds of clover seed on about 4½ acres. Harrowed the ground
twice then sowed the Seeds, and harrowed them. I was digging celler [=cellar] in the afternoon.
24 Very heavy shower this morning about daylight, cleared off about 5 O’clock A.M. I went to help
Brother Sam to haul out manure. The boys went fishing. They were not very successful, fish did
not bite.
67
25 Fine morning, cloudy but dry all day and warm, good growth. I was digging celler. Jim and
Clark were hauling out manure. John was helping William Lonsway plant potatoes. I went to
Dundalk in the afternoon.
26th Sabbath. Very cool morning and the day continued dry and cold. Nancy and I visited William
Lonsway’s.
27 Frost this morning, the day continued cold and dry. I was digging cellar, Jim and John were
hauling manure.
<Q1 folio 78 verso>
May 1878
28th Frost this morning, the sky overcast and some appearance of rain. The sun shone out after a
while, the day dry but very cold. I was digging cellar, finished it. Jim was plowing and harrow-
ing potatoe patch. Mrs. Arnold visited us this afternoon, also William Lonsway was here, and al-
so a man taking orders for the London Herald newspaper.
20 White frost on the ground this morning, the sun got out bright and soon melted it. The day was
dry but chilly all through. I was around with a petition addressed to the Governor General of
Canada, in order to obtain signatures to it, to get him to pardon Mr. James May, who was sen-
tenced at the assizes to one year in gaol.* The boys were making a brush fence. [*see above, 12
April 1878, reference to guilty conviction for perjury.]
30 Fine morning, and the day was dry and warm all through. Was digging at Cellar drain in the
forenoon, and in the afternoon went round with petition. Obtained 43 signatures in both days.
Boys were working at fence.
31 Very fine warm morning, the day hot and dry. I was cutting seed potatoes, the boys were making
Brush fence.
<Q1 folio 79 recto>
June 1878
1st Very warm sunny morning, the day continued dry and hot all through. Went to Flesherton and
Priceville today to See the Doctor and the Inspector.* The boys were helping Br. Sam to plant
potatoes. [*to qualify for his annual pension.]
2nd Sabbath. Dry warm day all through. Nancy and I visited Mr. Lonsway’s.
3 Thunder and lightening this morning, accompanied by heavy rain. It cleared off about 8 AM.
All hands were planting potatoes. This has been the hottest day of the season for so far.
4 Cool cloudy morning, and the day continued quite cool all through. There came on a slight miz-
zle of rain about 6 P.M. and it is still raining now (10:10). We finished planting potatoes today. I
planted one potatoe: having first cut it into 19 pieces, I put one piece in a hill, till I planted all the
pieces. I did so for experience, to See how much I could grow from a single potatoe. The varie-
ty was Early Rose. We have planted in all about 16 Bushels this year. Mrs. May was here this
eavning. [in margin] Finished planting potatoes
5 Cool morning, but the sun got out and the day kept dry, though decidedly cool. I got Brother
Sam’s horse and put him along with one of mine and took 586 pounds of wheat to the Grist mill.
I got 390 pounds of flour. I hauled some shingle timber I had in the mill yard forward to the
saw. Bought a barell of salt. Mr. John Arnold and his brother Thomas were here tonight to make
a trade with me for his lot of land in Essa. Jim was [working stricken, above:] stopping at his
uncle John’s tonight.
<Q1 folio 79 verso>
June 1878
68
6th Cold morning and the ground covered with a white frost, ice on the water in some places. The
sun got out bright and strong, the day dry but not warm. I and Jim were at Brother John’s. [in
margin] Frost this morning.
7 Cool morning with a little rain falling, which increased during the day, which was wet all
through. Was on the back line to noon, then John and I went to Dundalk. Mr. & Mrs. Lonsway
were here this morning. Nancy and I went at night to Mrs. Arnold’s.
8 Cool morning, and the day cool to about noon, dry all day. Was getting timber cut at the [mill]
today, assisted by Brothers John and Sam. Had William Henders and his oxen hauling in logs.
Sabbath
9 Cool morning, frost on the ground, the day got warmer as it advanced. William Lonsway and
wife were here today. [in margin] Frost.
10 Cool morning, frost on the ground. The sun got out pretty strong about 9 A.M., the day got
cloudy and a slight rain fell. I was at the Sawmill getting logs sawed, assisted by Brother Sam
and my Johney.
Jim’s nose commenced to bleed today at his uncle John’s and bled several times. In the eavning
when he came home it started to blood again. We put wet cloths on the back of his head and af-
ter a good while the blood stopped. Jim appeared quite white and weak. Jim must be careful of
himself and not work nor exercise himself till he gets stronger, for fear that it might injure him.
<Q1 folio 80 recto>
June 1878
11th Bright sunny morning, but there came on some rain about noon. Went to See John Agnew in the
Township of Essa, also to see about exchanging any Lands for Mr. John Arnold’s of that Town-
ship. I did not like the place, so I did not trade.
12 Bright sunny morning and the day continued warm. John Agnew drove me up in his buggy,
about 14 miles. I got home tonight.
13 Bright sunny morning and the day continued fine. Warned out the men to do statute labor.
14 Bright sunny morning, the day fine and very warm. Was hauling lumber from the mill.
15 Bright sunny morning, the day very warm Was hauling lumber from the mill. A big thunder and
lightening storm accompanied by rain this night.
16th Sabbath. Bright sunny morning , the day dry but cool.
17 Warm sunny morning, the day hot with a good growth. Was overseeing statute labor in Melanc-
thon.
18 Very warm morning, the day continued hot and dry. Was overseeing statute labor in Melancthon.
19 Warm sunny morning, the day hot and dry. Was at a logging bee at Mr. A. Jacksons’s. [in mar-
gin] Frost.
20 Pretty warm morning, the forenoon dry, the afternoon a little wet with every appearance of it
being a wet night because the rain has now come on while I am writing. I and Johney were haul-
ing lumber from the mill.
<Q1 folio 80 verso>
June 1878
21st Misty morning, and the day was warm and showery all through. A very fine growing day.
Johney and I were hauling lumber from the Sawmill home. I got my cheque for superannuated
pension of $101.00* today. [*The amount is always $101., not an even $100.00 as one might
expect.]
22 Misty morning and a good deal of rain fell during the afternoon, and through the night. I was
hauling lumber and shingles from the mill. Settled with John McDowell for sawing and making
69
shingles, paid him $30. cash. I did not like the settlement. I brought home a butter firkin this
eavning. John Agnew and Brother John stopped here this night. Mr. Kirby was here a while this
night.
23rd Sabbath. Misty morning, and a slight mizzle of a rain fell during most of the day. Mr. Arnold
and his two sons were here today.
24 Misty morning, but the day cleared off and was dry and warm. Spent the forenoon at Mr. Ar-
nold’s, in the afternoon worked in the garden. Went to Mr. Lonsway’s, Nancy and I, in the
eavning. Then I went to Ge[o]rge Kirby’s to do some writing for him.
25 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and hot all through. Went to Dundalk in the forenoon and
purchased a pair of gaitars [=gaiters]. In the afternoon went with Mr. Sloan to W. Henders to get
a colt casterated. John Agnew is stopping here tonight.
26 Warm day all through. I and Nancy and Brother John and wife and Brother Sam’s wife went to
Essa.
<Q1 folio 81 recto>
June 1878
27th Bright sunny morning, the day exceedingly hot. Gave 150 acres of land in Melancthon and
$230.00 in money and value to John Arnold of Essa* for 109 acres there, being the west ½ of Lot
6 on the 6th Con. He, the said Arnold, to put me in 16 acres of fall wheat in good time and in
good order, and to find the seed, and I to summer fallow 5 acres here for him. [*see above, 23
February 1878, for John Agnew’s trade with Thomas Arnold of Essa.]
28 Very sultry day, melting hot. I stopped at John Agnew’s to the eavning, then came to Alliston
and finished up the writing. From thence I went to James Murphy’s* and stopped there all night.
The rest of our company had left John Agnew’s for home in the morning, calling at James Mur-
phy’s. [*Mary Russell Murphy, wife of James Murphy, is Robert’s cousin, as noted above, 16
Feb. 1877.]
29 Very warm day all through, the sun poring down hot. Left James Murphy’s and came home this
eavning.
30th Sabbath. Very hot day all through. I went to see father and mother.
July 1878
1st Very hot day all through. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon, did not do anything in the after-
noon.
2 Warm morning and the day continued fair till the afternoon, when there came on a very heavy
rain, accompanied with thunder and lightening. I went to back line in the eavning. Nancy had
some women helping pick wool.
<Q1 folio 81 verso>
July 1878
3rd Wet morning, but faired up about 9 A.M. Drove brother Sam and William Lonsway in the wag-
on, on their way to Muscoka [=Muskoka*], to within 9 miles of Collingwood. Also took the
wool to the Carding mill and got home the rolls with me. [*Muskoka is a region of lakes just
east of Georgian Bay, about 150 km north of Toronto, now cottage country for the urbanized area
around Lake Ontario].
4 Very hot morning and the day continued dry and warm. Hoed potatoes till 5. O’clock, then went
to Dundalk. Brother John was plowing for me on Lot 220.
70
5 Very warm morning, the day dry and hot all through, with a very fine growth. In fact, the pota-
toes are growing so rapidly that I cannot get them hoed quick enough. I was at Mrs. Gott’s plow-
ing bee.
6 Very warm dry day from morning till night. Was hoeing potatoes along with the boys. Went to
Dundalk in the eavning.
7th Sabbath. Very warm dry day all through.
8 Cloudy morning, looked a little like rain. A few drops fell through the day, but did not amount to
much. I was doeing [=doing] Statute labor for Proton Lots.
9 Very warm morning and the day continued hot all through. The sky clouded over towards night,
but no rain fell. I was doeing statute labor.
10 Bright sunny morning, the day pretty warm with rather strong wind. Got a little chilly at night.
The boys and I were hoeing potatoes.
<Q1 folio 82 recto>
July 1878
11th Showery day but very fine growing weather, heavy rain during the night. The boys and I were
hoeing potatoes, finished them.
12 Rainy morning, but cleared off in the forenoon. Roads very muddy. Nancy and the rest of the
family went to Melancthon. I stopped at home. Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the eavning.
13 Bright sunny morning, the day continued dry and hot with a great growth. I never remember
such splendid growing weather, the grain crop and the root crop for so far cannot be excelled. If
the frost don’t come, there will be a bountiful harvest! Clark and I were bugging potatoes and
pulling mustard.
14th Sabbath. Fine warm day all through. Nancy went to Mrs. William Talbot’s.
15 Dry day all through. Brother John came to help me with the celler, but had to go to Dundalk. I
done a day’s statute labor. [in margin] St. Swithin’s day. [According to traditional folklore, the
weather that comes on St. Swithin’s day (15 July) will continue for 40 days and nights.]
16 Dry, hot day from morning to night. Brother John and I were planking celler, and in the after-
noon put some Paris Green*on the potatoes that are on Lot 220. Nancy and the children took the
team and went to sister Sarah’s with the wool to be spun. [*Paris green, a poisonous inorganic
compound (copper arsenite and copper acetate), emerald green in colour, was used as an insecti-
cide, particularly on potatoes; see https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/paris-
green].
17 Very hot day. Brother John and I were taking out square timber.
<Q1 folio 82 verso>
July 1878
18th Cloudy morning and then came on a very heavy rain, accompanied by thunder and lightening
about 9 A.M. It cleared off in about two hours. Brothers Sam and John were helping me to take
out sleepers and sills for the new house. Very hot this day.
19 Very warm in the morning and got hotter through the day. Brother John was helping me to take
out sleepers for the house. Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the eavning.
20 Very hot morning, although a little cloudy, the day dry. A big storm of thunder and lightening
with rain about 10 P.M. The boys and I hauled the four sills today. Nancy and I visited Mr. Lon-
sway’s this eavning.
21st Sabbath. Cool morning with a pretty high wind. The day kept getting chillier all evening and
there were evident signs of frost, but happily there was none.
71
22 Cool morning, the day cold and dry all through, with a very high wind. Went to Dundalk in the
forenoon and got some Paris Green to put on the potatoes as I cannot keep the bugs off them.
Sprinkled those on Lot 220 in the afternoon. The boys were pulling mustard today on Lot 220.
23 Cool day all through, but dry. I was mowing grass. Jim was harrowing the summer fallow. [in
margin] First mowing.
<Q1 folio 83 recto>
July 1878
24th Cool morning and the day continued rather cool all through, pleasant enough for working. I was
mowing, the boys were making hay.
25 Cool morning, the day got overcast in the forenoon and rain began to fall about 2:30 P.M. Nancy
and Jim and Clark hauled in four loads of hay. Before the rain came on I was mowing. John
was helping his uncle Sam to make hay. It has been a pretty steady afternoon’s rain.
26 Rainy morning and continued wet all day to about 3 P.M., being about 24 hours steady rain.
Done nothing today, went in to Melancthon in the afternoon.
27 Cloudy morning, but no rain fell during the day. I was mowing to 4 P.M. Jim tried to cross plow
the summer fallow in Melancthon, but could not on account of the thistles not being rotted.
Nancy and I went to Dundalk this eavning.
28th Cool morning, but the day kept clear and dry, the eavning very cool with signs of frost, but there
was none. Nancy and I visited at Father’s today.
29 Cool cloudy morning, but no rain came on to the afternoon, when there was a slight sprinkling. I
mowed in the forenoon. Nancy and the boys raked. I hauled in in the afternoon.
<Q1 folio 83 verso>
July 1878
30th Rainy morning, but cleared off in the forenoon about 10 O’clock. I went to the Station in the
afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway were here today.
31st Bright sunny morning, but the day got overcast in the afternoon, and there came on a very heavy
rain storm about 6 P.M. I was putting Paris Green on the potatoes, the boys were making hay. I
went to the Station in the eavning.
August [1878]
1st Dry morning, but there came on a slight shower in the forenoon, and several showers in the mid-
dle of the day. A heavy rain storm accompanied by thunder and lightening is passing over now
(9) P.M., some hail is also mixed with the rain. I finished mowing today, except the fence cor-
ners. The boys were taking bugs off the potatoes.
2 Dry day all through, rather breezy in the afternoon, drying the hay good. I worked for Brother
Sam in the afternoon at hay making, the boys made hay at home.
3 Fine dry morning, the sun [dittog.: the sun] warm and bright all day. Jim, Clark and I helped
Sam at his hay. Nancy and Johney raked up some hay at home and hauled in three loads, which
was famous work, for the help which was at it!
<Q1 folio 84 recto>
August 1878
4th Sabbath. Fine day with a heavy thunder shower about noon.
5th Fine dry day. Was helping Brother Sam at hay-making. Slept at Father’s.
6th Heavy thunder, lightening and rain storm commenced about 3 A.M., continued for about three
hours. Was helping Brother Sam at his hay. Slept at Father’s.
7 Dry day all through. I was helping Brother Sam at his hay.
72
8 Dry day. I was helping Sam at his hay [heavy rain....early this, i.e. first lines of next entry,
stricken].
9 Very heavy thunder and rain storm with some hail early this morning. I came home and went to
Dundalk.
10 Fine dry day all through. I and the boys were helping Sam at his hay.
11th Sabbath. Fine morning and the day continued dry all through. William Lonsway, his wife and
family, were here today.
12 Fine morning, the day dry and warm all through. I was helping brother Sam at his hay.
13 Dry morning and the day dry and fine all through. I was helping Sam at his hay.
<Q1 folio 84 verso>
August 1878
14th Cloudy morning, but the day kept dry to about noon, when there came on a very heavy rain and
wind storm, accompanied with some thunder. I and the boys were helping Brother Sam at his
hay to the rain came on.
15 Bright morning and the day dry and warm all through. I was helping Mr. Lonsway to pile ma-
nure with the waggons. The boys finished pulling pease. [in margin] Finished pease pulling.
16 Cloudy morning and a rain and thunder storm came on about 9 A.M. It then cleared off and was
fine to about 3 P.M., when there came on a terrific rain storm, thunder and lightening and hail, or
more properly speaking, pieces of ice. In shape these pieces were circular like a little wheel with
a groove in the rim. Frequent showers throughout the afternoon. Thunder and lightening now,
so much that the cows could not be milked. I was helping Brother Sam today to bind some
wheat. Jim was plowing some between showers. The lightening was so sharp that it killed nine
sheep on Mr. William Millsop, about one mile and a quarter from here.
17 Dry day all through. Jim cut a swath with the scythe round the wheat and raked it up. In the
afternoon he went to Mr. Clippert’s and bound wheat. I did not work at anything as I had a se-
vere pain in my knee and side. Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the eavning.
<Q1 folio 85 recto>
August 1878
18th Sabbath. Fine morning and the day was dry all through. Nancy went to church. I went to see
Mr. James May in the afternoon.
19 A little rain fell this morning, but the day soon got dry and breezy. I was mowing wheat, assisted
by Brother Sam and W. Lonsway. The boys and their mother hauled in about 2½ acres of pease.
20 Fine morning and the day continued warm and breezy all through. I mowed wheat in the fore-
noon and helped to haul in in the afternoon. Nancy and the boys raked in the forenoon and
helped me haul in in the afternoon. The wheat is a very poor crop with me this year. I had sown
20 Bushels and I will not have much more than my seed that I sowed off it. I think that it must
have been the rust that injured it in the first place, cutting the enamel off the straw. Then some
very heavy rains came on and washed the rust off, but the harm had been done: the wheat fell
down and the heads did not fill. Plenty of wheat is in the Same condition. This has been a very
singular summer for great heat and frequent storms of thunder and lightening, also great hail and
rain storms, the like I cannot remember. A great deal of harm has been done to the standing
crops in several parts of Ontario. This neighborhood has escaped the devastation.
21 Fine morning, sun out bright and warm, dry day all through. I was mowing in the forenoon.
Nancy and the boys were raking and in the afternoon we hauled in. The Stuff is light and not
much good.
<Q1 folio 85 verso>
73
August 1878
22nd Dry, very hot. I was cutting wheat in the forenoon, Nancy and the boys raking. We were draw-
ing in in the afternoon.
23 Dry day, not so warm as yesterday. The sun got overcast in the eavning. I was mowing wheat
all day, except for part of the afternoon while I was forking on the wagon. Nancy and the boys
were raking up and hauling in. We finished cutting and hauling in our wheat today, and a very
miserable crop it is. [in margin] Finished wheat.
24 Rain this morning, and the day continued slightly wet all through. I and the boys done nothing
today, as the grain was not fit to work. I went to Sam’s in the eavning.
25th Sabbath. Dry day all through. Mrs. Russell visited Mrs. Arnold.
26 Fine dry day, warm and breezy. I was paying William Lonsway the day I owed him. Jim and
John were mowing barley. The three boys, Jim, John & Clark, went to Mr. Clippart’s at night to
help put in his wheat, as he is laid up with a sore foot.
27 Dry day all through. Jim and I were mowing barley. Nancy and the others were raking it. We
finished cutting it today.
28 Dry to about noon when there came on a very slight shower. We were hauling in Barley to the
rain prevented us.
<Q1 folio 86 recto>
August 1878
29 Dry warm day all through. We finished raking Barley and hauling it in. Jim cradled today.
30 Hot day all through. Brother Sam and William Adams and my Jim were craddling oats today.
They are a good crop, but very thistly. Nancy and I were binding and Johney was stooking. Mr.
George Rutherford, Agent, came here today and I signed a mortgage on the Essa lot for $2100.
The conditions of said mortgage are that it is due in twenty years from the first of August 1878.
The interest is 8½ per cent per annum, payable yearly. The first payment of interest to be due on
the first of March 1879, and each payment of interest after to be one year from that date. Any
part of the loan to be paid off at any time the borrower chooses, by giving the company three
month’s notice. The company is the North of Scotland. The mortgage is dated the 28th of Au-
gust 1878 and binds the borrower to keep the buildings insured in at least $700.
31 Rather cloudy morning and it commenced raining a little about noon, but increased as the after-
noon wore on, to at present (7:20) P.M. when it is coming down pretty brisk. Jim was craddling.
John and Clark hauled in a little load of hay, then stooked up some oats. Nancy and I bound, so
long as the rain would let us.
<Q1 folio 86 verso>
September 1878
1st Sabbath. Rainy all forenoon, faired up in the afternoon, when Nancy and I went to William Lon-
sway’s.
2 Rather dull morning, and the day was damp till the afternoon, when there came on some pretty
heavy rain, with thunder and lightening. William Adams and John Russell were craddling oats.
Nancy and I and the boys were binding.
3 Damp harvest morning, a great deal of wet on the grain. It could not be craddled, well to the
afternoon. John Russell and William Adams were craddling. Nancy, the boys and I were bind-
ing.
4 Wet in the forenoon, dry in the afternoon. The men were craddling in the afternoon. Nancy and
I were binding.
74
5 Very heavy dew in the morning, and misty most of the day. John Russell was craddling. Nancy
and I were binding. Jim was helping his uncle Sam.
6 Very heavy dew this morning. John Russell craddling, Nancy and I binding in the forenoon, and
hauling in, in the afternoon. Jim at his uncle Sam’s.
7 Very heavy dew this morning, but the sun got out and was warm. We had to open out about 100
stooks of oats. Brother John was craddling. Nancy, Jim and I and Johney hauled the oats in in
the afternoon.
<Q1 folio 87 recto>
September 1878
8th Sabbath. Dry day all through. Brother Sam and wife paid us a visit today.
9 Dry breezy day all through. We were all hauling in oats, they were fine and dry. We got in about
250 Stooks.
10 Misty morning with heavy clouds passing. We hauled in two small loads of oats, then bound
about 10 Stooks, when it commenced raining, slight at first, but it soon came down heavy
enough, and stopped our harvesting. The boys hauled a little jag of wood home, they then went
for the plow, and Jim plowed some in the afternoon, but he had to give up with the rain. [in mar-
gin] Nomination for the House of Commons.
11 Rainy morning and continued so all day. Went to Dundalk in the afternoon and bought 4½
Bushels of fall wheat from Mr. Charles McCormak at $1.05 per Bushel.
12 Rainy morning and continued so all day.
13 Rainy morning and continued so all day. Nancy and I were at Mr. Lonsway’s helping pare ap-
ples. Mr. Lonsway went to Dundalk in the afternoon and I went with him. I brought home the
wheat I had bought. Also I bought and fetched home a barell of flour: price $5.00.
14 Rainy forenoon, it cleared up in the afternoon. I went to Alexander Patterson’s logging bee on
William Lonsway’s Lot. I slept at Father’s this night.
<Q1 folio 87 verso>
September 1878
15th Sabbath. Dry sunny morning and the day continued fine and dry all through. [in margin] Frost.
16 Dry morning and the day continued dry and breezy. I was plowing for fall wheat in the fore-
noon, and in the afternoon Nancy and I bound and the boys hauled in some oats.
17 Fine dry morning and the day continued dry and breezy all through. Cloudy towards night, with
a pretty high wind, thunder clouds and lightening. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and voted
for an M. P. then came home and the boys, Nancy, and I worked at getting in our oats. Visited at
Mr. Lonsway’s this night. When I came home I wrote a letter for Josua Chambers (who is here)
to John Agnew.
18 Dry morning and the day continued dry and breezy. We finished harvesting today and I went in
the afternoon to see about a thrashing machine. [in margin] Finished Harvesting.
19 Wind and rain storm about 8 O’clock this morning. Jim plowed till noon after the rain was over.
Jim and Johney went to help Sam in the afternoon, and I plowed. There was a very violent wind
and rain storm at night.
20 Fair morning, but some rain fell before noon. There was a violent wind and rain storm about 4
O’clock in the eavning. I plowed in the forenoon and Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the after-
noon.
21 The day pretty dry. I sowed 4½ bushels fall wheat. Johney harrowed it. We pared some apples
at night. [in margin] Sowed Wheat.
<Q1 folio 88 recto>
75
September 1878
22nd Sabbath. Fine dry day with a pretty heavy frost this morning. Nancy and I visited at Father’s
today.
23 Dry morning, with a heavy frost, the day continued dry and breezy. I and the boys and Nancy
took up potatoes. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. [in margin] Date of cheque for Essa mort-
gage.
24 A little rain fell this morning before day. Nancy and Johney went to sister Sarah’s for the yarn
which she had spun. Brother John is here tonight. George Rutherford was here.
25 Dry morning, but there came on a heavy rain towards night. Nancy and I went to Dundalk.
26 A little rain fell this morning, but the day soon got dry. Nancy and I went to Toronto. I done
some business there and Nancy and I went out as far as Mr. Robert Moore’s, No. 1 York Town-
ship, and stopped there all night.
27 Very fine morning and the day continued dry. Mr. Moore drove us in to the city. I got some
more business done, but not in time to go to the exhibition.
28 Fine morning and the day continued fine all through. Nancy had an opperation performed on her
eyes by Dr. Reeve this morning. I left in the one o’clock train for home. Nancy stopped behind.
I got to Dundalk about 8:20 P.M.
29th Sabbath. Fine dry day.
<Q1 folio 88 verso>
September 1878
30th Dry morning and the day continued dry. Went to the Station in the afternoon for Nancy, who got
home from Toronto, where she had been to get her eyes operated on.
October
1st Dry morning and the day continued dry. The boys were raising potatoes. I went to see about
getting a thrashing machine to thrash. Father was here this eavning.
2 Dry morning and the day was charming, a few drops of rain fell about 11 A.M. I was plowing
today, the children were helping their Grandfather to raise potatoes. Brother John went to Essa
to begin his fall plowing.
4 Bright, Sunny morning and the day continued dry and warm all through. Jim was plowing,
Johney and I were burning stumps.
5 White frost this morning and a slight shower came on about 3 P.M. I went in the afternoon to get
hands for to attend the thrashing. Also I went to Dundalk and purchased a ticket for $1.00 for
the Show Fair. Jim was plowing today.
6th Sabbath. Very fine morning and the day continued fine but cool. Jim went with the wagon for
Father and Mother and they stopped till the afternoon.
<Q1 folio 89 recto>
October 1878
7th Fine morning and the day continued dry, though cool and cloudy. All of us went to the Union
Agricultural Show Fair at Dundalk. We showed a Spring colt, Two rolls of butter, six cabbages,
and six beets. We took first prize for cabbages. It was a very fine show, a great many people,
and a great deal of Stuff shown. The horses, especially the colts, were excellent. The day passed
off very pleasantly, without any misshaps of a serious nature. Some few tipsy lads created a dis-
turbance at night, but the melee did not amount to much.
8 Cool morning and the day continued dry and cool. It is raining now, 7:50 P.M., with every ap-
pearance of a wet night. Jim was plowing today. John and I were burning stumps in the fore-
noon and in the afternoon I went to engage a thrashing machine.
76
9 Very windy morning and frequent showers throughout the day. The wind was so strong that it
blowed the tops off several stacks in the neighbourhood. I went in the forenoon to Mr. W. Ache-
son’s and traded off four ram lambs for 4 Ewe lambs. In the afternoon I went to Dundalk.
10 Calm, cool morning and the day continued fair, dry and sunny. I levelled the earth I have thrown
out of the celler, and brought the sills and sleepers to their places. Jim was plowing.
11 Dry morning, but rain fell about 10 A.M. and the afternoon was pretty wet. Jim and the team
were at Mr. Mills’ thrashing. Johney and I were at Brother Sam’s thrashing. [in margin] Posted
letter to Bro. W. [? unclear, written very small.]
<Q1 folio 89 verso>
October 1878
12th [Sabbath stricken] Very fine sunshiny day all through. Johney and I were at Sam’s thrashing, Jim
was at James Mills’ thrashing. I stoppped at Sam’s all night.
13th Sabbath. Very fine day all through.
14 Fine dry, warm day all through. Johney and Jim with the team were at Mr. Lonsway’s thrashing.
I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
15 Very heavy rain last night, the morning dry and the day dry, cloudy and very sultry. John and
Jim were at Mr. Lonsway’s thrashing. I was preparing for thrashing at home. [in margin] Colt
weaned.
16 Fine dry day all through. Jim was with Mr. Lonsway in the forenoon. In the afternoon the
thrashing machine was with us.
17 Mizzly morning and the day kept getting wetter. We thrashed for about two hours this forenoon
and then had to [keep stricken] quit on account of the rain.
18 Slight mizzle of rain this morning and kept getting worse to about 10 A.M. We thrashed all day.
19 Snow this morning, then rain and the forenoon was very wet for thrashing. We thrashed, howev-
er, all day, the afternoon being dry. I had two oat stacks pretty damp. The thrashers were poor
muddlers, lazy in the morning, and would not get started before 8. Things were going wrong
with them all the time, and they were very slow in putting them to rights. In fact, they were the
very worst thrashers ever I had, and they wanted $20. for their work. I offered $18.
<Q1 folio 90 recto>
October 1878
The grain yield was good, except the wheat, which was very poor. From 10 acres of wheat I
have about 65 Bushels or 6½ Bushels to the acre, and very poor, shrivelled up wheat at that!
Pease, about 25 Bushels to the acre, or 55 bushels in all. Barl[e]y, about 10 Bushels to the acre,
or 50 Bushels in all, the grain dark and small. Oats, about 40 Bushels to the acre, or about 720
Bushels in all, the grain well filled and good. There was a great waste with me in the grain this
year on account of having to stack a good deal, and getting wet weather on the days of thrashing.
20th Sabbath. Fine dry day all through. Mr. Kirby and woman were here today.
21 Lovely day all through, the sun bright and warm, Sky hazy like Indian summer. Jim and John
were at Mr. Clippart’s thrashing. I and Nancy went to Dundalk in the forenoon and got some
nails and dye stuff. In the afternoon I went to the Sawmill and bought 3 pieces of joice, 2 x 10 –
22 feet long: cost me $1.00 cash.
22 Beautiful day (Indian summer), I think. The two eldest boys and I went with the team to Mr. W.
Kirby’s thrashing.
23 Wet day from morning to night. Nancy and I visited Mr. Lonsway’s in the afternoon.
77
24 Dry morning and the day continued dry all through. Jim and John, with the team, to Mr. Kirby’s
thrashing, finished at noon. Then they took two bags of wheat to the Mill and hauled a small
load of wood home in the afternoon. I was at Mr. Nickle’s thrashing. J. Agnew here tonight.
<Q1 folio 90 verso>
October 1878
25th Dry morning and the day continued dry and windy. I was at Mr. Nickle’s thrashing to 2:40 P.M.,
then Jim came and took my place. The boys had cleaned up 13 bags of Barley which I hauled to
Dundalk in the afternoon and got .50 per Bushel. It was dark Barkley. It commenced raining to-
night.
26 Rather drizzly morning, and it commenced raining pretty sharply about noon, and continued wet
all day. It is now (9 P.M.) snowing. Jim and I cleaned 5 Bags of Barl[e]y and 10 Bags of oats. I
took them to Dundalk, I got 45¢ per Bushel for the Barl[e]y and .20¢ for the oats. I bought and
fetched home 20 Bushels of first class fall wheat at .75¢ per Bushel. The market is very dull, a
poor price for all kinds of grain. The Americans have rushed in their grain while they have the
chance of putting it in duty free and glutted up the Markets. But we look forward to better times
when Sir J. A. McDonald, Premier of Canada, takes hold of the reins of government and puts on
a protective duty which will keep the American Stuff out of our Market, or, if send it they must,
we will have the benefit of the duty they will have to pay.
27th Sabbath. Cold day all through, with frequent showers of snow. Nancy and I went to Mr. Lon-
sway’s this eavning. John Agnew slept here this night.
28 Cold wintry morning, snow on the ground about four inches deep and plenty more falling. The
boys and I tid[i]ed up the barn and put in some chaff. The three eldest are at Mr. Lonsway’s
along with their mother. [in margin] Snow
<Q1 folio 91 recto>
October 1878
29th Snow on the ground this morning and a very hard frost last night The day continued pretty cold
all through. Andrew Lonsway Junior died yesterday eavning. John Agnew slept here [this night
and stricken] last night. Nancy and I stopped up all night at the wake.
30 Misty morning and rain came on about 11 AM and continued showery through the eavning.
Nancy, John, Jim and I went to the funeral and when we came home, Johney and I went to Dun-
dalk for some pine lumber for the new house.
31 Cold stormy morning, plenty of snow and slush on the ground, the wind piercing cold and freez-
ing, and kept so all day. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon for load of flooring, in the afternoon
Johney and I went to the bush for a load of firewood. We put on about ¼ cord, and the ground
was so very soft that it almost beat the horses to draw it home.
November
1st Chilly morning, but the day ameliorated and the sun shone out in the afternoon, melting the
snow. The boys and I fetched in about 12 Bushels of potatoes. James went to the Post Office for
me in the afternoon. Our family is all suffering from a severe cold, hard racking cough and head
ache. Some of them have also a sore throat. It seems to be a sickly time, especially with the
young. I think it must be on account of the sudden changes of weather from heat to cold. A
great many of the children of the neighbourhood are ailing. [in margin] Letter received from Br.
William
<Q1 folio 91 verso>
November 1878
78
2nd Cold rain[y] morning, the day got something warmer towards noon. In the afternoon there was
some rain fell. I went in to Father’s in the forenoon, and in the afternoon fixed up a place for the
pigs to fatten.
3rd Sabbath. Pretty cold day all through. Nancy and I went to Mr. Lonsway’s in the eavning.
4 The ground covered with snow this morning, very sharp freeze and continued cold all day. I
went to Dundalk in the forenoon and purchased some nails, matches, indigo and Magenta. In the
afternoon, the boys and I made a stable door, put it on and hauled out some half-rotted straw and
covered our potatoe pits, as we have not been able to get our potatoes sorted and put away for the
winter yet. Gave Mr. T. Hanbury the note which I held on W. Hend[e]rs for $23.00, to be applied
on my account.
5 Pretty cold morning, with a very hard frost. The day got something warmer in the afternoon and
some snow fell. We took up our cabbages today and pitted them. There were two carpenters
working at the new house. Mr. A. Lonsway was here and Eliza Russell also. Nancy went to the
back line in the afternoon.
6 Very wintry morning, snow on the ground about six inches deep. The day got mild towards
eavning, and the snow melted some. The boys and I were hauling firewood home out of the
bush. [in margin] First sleighing.
7 Cold morning, snowing and blowing and such was the state of the day throughout. I cleaned a
small grist and took it to the mill in the afternoon. Josua J. Chalmbers [sic] took the chop[p]ing
of 20 acres culled bush from me at $3 per acre, and board.
<Q1 folio 92 recto>
November 1878
8th Mild morning and the day continued fine all through. Sleighing is passibly good on the Gravel
Road. We took to Dundalk 226 pounds of Butter and sold it to Mr. D. Davidson for .13¢ per LB.
We had formerly sold 53 Lbs @ .15 per pound. We have not made much Butter this season as
three of our cows were farrow*. I brought home from the Mill the grist: there were 313 Lbs of
flour from 7½ Bushels of wheat. [*farrow, adj. (applying to cows only) not producing young in
a given year]
9 Mild morning and the day continued soft and inclined to thaw. There was a slight mizzle of
questionable Rain towards night. I was sent for by Mr. Andrew Lonsway in the morning to draw
his Will, which I done. The boys went in the forenoon to Dundalk and brought home the win-
dow frames for the new house. And in the afternoon they went to the Sawmill and hauled home
two loads of Sawdust which we intend putting in the new house between the outside and inside
boards.
10th Sabbath. Mild morning and the day continued pleasant with the snow disappearing fast. Nancy
and I visited Mr. Lonsway's this eavning.
11 Misty morning, with a slight mizzle of rain, which increased to a pretty heavy rain in the after-
noon, which was decidedly wet. The snow is mostly gone and the roads are getting very sloppy.
Josua J. Chambers commenced his job of chopping this morning. He broke his new axe in a
hemlock tree. I was helping Mr. Lonsway to butcher pigs in the forenoon and in the afternoon I
went to Dundalk. Johney and Jim were hauling home Sawdust in the forenoon.
<Q1 folio 92 verso>
November 1878
12th Misty morning and the day continued thawing to most of the snow disappeared. A very heavy
snow fall at night. I banked up the house today and took our beets out of the ground.
79
13 The ground covered pretty heavy with soft snow this morning. The sun shone out bright several
times during the forenoon, and in the afternoon there were frequent showers of snow. I went to
Dundalk in the forenoon and in the afternoon chored around. The boys set up the Sap troughs in
the bush and gathered the spiles.
14 Bright sunny morning and the day continued fine all through, with the snow melting. I attended
a Trustee meeting in No. 5 Melancthon. The boys were getting some logs for a pig pen.
15 Rather cloudy morning with a thaw wind through the day. The day was mild in the afternoon.
In the forenoon I cut some logs for the pig pen and in the afternoon the boys and I sorted some
potatoes and put them into pits for the winter.
16 Cloudy morning and the day showed some signs of rain. There was a thaw wind to about 3 P.M.,
when it commenced to freeze and became pretty cold in the eavning. Brothers John and Sam
were helping me to raise a hog pen.
17th Sabbath. Cloudy morning and the day remained rather damp.
18 Misty morning and there was slight showers all day. The day was close and warm. I had Josua
J. Chambers helping me at the Hog pen. Jim and John were helping Joe Bowler thrash.
<Q1 folio 93 recto>
November 1878
19th Misty morning, but there was no rain through [dittog.: through] the day. The weather is fine and
open but shocking bad roads. Some people were plowing today. Johney was helping Joe Bowler
thrash in the forenoon. Josua Chalmbers [sic] was helping me at the Hog pen to noon. Jim and I
were working at it all day. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway were here today.
20 Misty morning, the sky lowering. It cleared up a little towards noon, got overcast in the after-
noon, and began to rain about 4 P.M., and continued so to about 6. The boys and I were working
at the hog pen. Nancy went to Mr. Trugon's in the eavning.
21 Misty morning, but the fog soon cleared of[f] and the sun shone out a kind of hazy [sic]. The
day was very pleasant, resembling Indian Summer. John and I worked at the pig pen. Jim was at
James Mills' thrashing.
22 Wet morning and the day continued dripping all through, the rain turned to Snow during the af-
ternoon. The boys and I were chinking the pig pen. Mr. Lonsway and wife were here in the
eavning.
23 Snowy morning and the ground covered about eight inches deep. Snow fell incessantly all day, a
pretty strong breeze of wind blowing. The boys started with the team and sleigh for to haul saw-
dust, but the sleigh cut down so deep that they had to turn back. The boys fetched out the colt in
the eavning from Sam's.
24th Sabbath. Snowy morning with a good deal on the ground and some fell during the day. The day
was mild. John and Eliza were here today.
<Q1 folio 93 verso>
November 1878
25th Snow falling this morning and continued so most of the day. The air not very cold, but began to
freeze towards night. Jim went to Dundalk in the forenoon. I chored around at different things.
26 Mild morning and the day continued soft and inclined to thaw. Jim and John went to Dundalk in
the forenoon for window sashes, and in the afternoon they mudded the pig pen. Clark and I were
putting sawdust between the boards in the new house. Nancy was at Mrs. Kirby’s in the eavning.
27 Cold raw morning with a very hard frost. It began to sleet about 12 noon and the wind rose pret-
ty strong. The sleet has turned to snow now, 8 P.M., with wind still strong. The boys were
shooting today and were not successful. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and got some door
80
latches changed for locks and knobs for the doors of the new house. I also bought Clark a pair of
boots at $1.15.
28 Misty morning, the day rather inclined to thaw with a slight fall of snow at night. Nancy took
her geese to Dundalk in the eavning and sold them at 5½ cents per pound.
29 Mild morning with a tendency to thaw. The day continued soft and a little snow fell at night. I
took two small logs to the Sawmill to get some battens.
30 A little more snow this morning, but it soon thawed off the road. The day was pretty mild all
through. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon for pine lumber for the house and in the afternoon I
went to the Sawmill for some battens.
<Q1 folio 94 recto>
December 1878
1st Sabbath. A mild day, but very bad roads. I went to Father’s.
2 Wet morning. Soon the rain turned to soft snow and it kept at it all day. We Butchered two pigs
and a cow.
3 Mild morning and it kept thawing slight all day. It is now (10 P.M.) snowing. I went to Dundalk
this afternoon for some door casings. Sleighing is played out and mudding is the order of the
day.
4 Cold morning with a little more snow on the ground. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon for
doors for the new house and some other fixings. The boys were sawing rail timber. We visited
Mr. Lonsway’s.
5 Snow fell last [night], and there is some better sleighing this morning. The day was pretty cold
all through. The boys were sawing rail timber and I was splitting.
6 Pretty mild morning and the day continued fine. Poor sleighing. The boys were hauling rails
and I was fencing the straw stack and sheep yard. There was a man named Roos here selling
French coverlets for beds. Very beautiful goods. They were $8.00 each. I went to Dundalk in
the eavning for some pine lumber for the new house and Nancy went with me as far as Mrs. C.
Bell’s.
7 Mild morning, but got colder in the afternoon and there was a little snow fell. I went to Dundalk
with a log and got it cut into battens. My horses ran away from Mr. McGregor’s Sawmill. They
ran as far as D. Davidson’s store. Done no harm, the whistle started them. John Voden*, one of
the carpenters at the house, slipped on the upper floor and hurt his hip pretty bad. [*John Vodden
is listed as carriage maker in 1888 directory of Dundalk, History of Dundalk, p. 5]
<Q1 folio 94 verso>
December 1878
8th Sabbath. Mild morning, but the afternoon got rather stormy and commenced snowing. The boys
and Nancy went to prayer meeting at Mr. Nickel’s.
9 Stormy, snowy morning, and the snow continued to about 10 A.M., when it commenced to rain,
gradually at first, then increasing to the present hour (8 P.M.), when it is coming down pretty
brisk. I was boarding up the petitions [=partitions] in the new house. Josua Chambers helped
me in the afternoon. The boys, with their team, helped their uncle John to thrash.
10 Mild day, with the snow very soft and slushy. I and Nancy went to Flesherton and purchased a
new stove called the New Forest Beauty from Mr. William Strain for Twenty-seven dollars, pay-
able one year from the 31st of the present month, interest at the rate of six per cent per annum, to
be paid on the last six months of the note.
81
11 Pretty cold morning, with snow falling. The day kept getting colder and stormy. Nancy and I
went to Dundalk and purchased 19 Stove pipes, 2 elboes [=elbows], 1 pipe with two flanges on
[MS: “ont” with final “t” crossed] it to fit the roof, and one cruck for the pipes to go through, at
.15¢, .20¢, .35¢, and .20¢ each, respectively.
12 Pretty cold day all through. Nancy and I cleaned the rust off the stove. Jim made a wood box.
13 Pretty cold day, but good sleighing. I was splitting some stove wood in the bush. The boys
hauled it home.
14 Pretty sharp morning and the day kept getting colder towards eavning. I and the two eldest boys
and the three horses were at John Irvin’s thrashing. The machine was very hard on the horses.
Although the day was cold, all the teams were ringing wet with sweat.
<Q1 folio 95 recto>
December 1878
15th Sabbath. Pretty cold morning and the day continued cold all through.
16 Cold morning, but the day got a little warmer towards eavning. Capital sleighing on the roads
now! I went to the back line in the forenoon and in the afternoon I took 5 Bushels and 8 pounds
of wheat to the grist mill. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway here at night. [in margin] Posted a letter to Ire-
land.
17 Pretty cold morning and the day continued cold all through. I sold a sow, 14 months old, to
Brother Samuel for one ton of hay. I also took Mother in a little pig seven weeks old. The boys
were chopping wood in the bush.
18 Pretty cold morning and snow fell during the day. I chored around and put up a platform at the
back door of the new house. The boys were chopping in the bush.
19 Pretty cold morning and the day continued cold with some snow falling. I chored around home
in the forenoon and in the afternoon attended a trustee meeting. The boys were hauling logs in
the bush.
20 Cold morning and the day continued cold all through. The boys and I were hauling home wood
in the forenoon and in the afternoon I fixed the wood rack. John Agnew was here today.
21 Cold snowy morning and the snow kept coming down faster as the day wore on. There was a
very heavy fall of snow, the storm coming from the East. The storm is still going on (9:15) P.M.
I was helping Brother Sam to haul in a stack of hay today. The boys were chopping stove wood
at the house.
<Q1 folio 95 verso>
December 1878
22nd Sabbath. Rather a fine winter’s morning, but the afternoon got cold and a little stormy.
23 Very cold day and the wind high, a sharp freeze and a regular stinger at night. In the forenoon I
was fixing up a Board fence between the new house and the milk house to brake the north west
wind from the back door of the house. The boys were hauling manure, partly rotted, to bank the
house. In the afternoon Nancy and I went to Dundalk and She purchased a bedstead for $3.25
cash.
24 Very cold stormy day all through, from morning till night, the wind drifting the snow as high as
the fences. We moved into our new house this morning. Mr. Man of Artemesia and a fellow
called Philips of Dundalk came here at night, asking lodgings for themselves and horse as they
could not get through the drifts. We kept them. They acted Shabby enough, especially Philips.
Got oats & hay for their horse, and supper, bed and breakfast for themselves, and gave the chil-
dren .20 cents.
82
25 Christmas, and a cold stormy day all through. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway were here to dinner today.
I was to go for Father and Mother, but the drifts were so deep that I could not. Our boys were at
Mr. Lonsway’s in the forenoon, and their boys are now here and they and ours are amusing
themselves in the old house now (6:30) P.M.
<Q1 folio 96 recto>
December 1878
[Fragment, recto of last folio, left half of the folio next to binding edge is torn off]
[26] day, Snowing, blowing
..ds are impassible
man or animal on
Such a storm as there
..ys would be hard
I were choring around
[27] day continued cold
showers of snow
terrible storm has been
[28] storm has somewhat abated
day, Sharp freeze in the afternoon
I cleaned up 65 Bushels and 19 lbs
took them to Dundalk and got .22¢
shel for them.
[29] Sabbath. Very cold morning and the day
...ued sharp all through. Nancy and I visited on
line today.
[30] ...orning with a little snow falling through
..ay bitterly cold all through. I and
up 100 Bushels of Oats and I took
...k and sold three for .22¢ per bushel
wife were here today.
[31] and the day continued cold
and I cleaned up 100
...l took them to the Station
...2¢ per Bushel
oats and weighed
83
2¾ bushels each
with you.
<Q1 folio 96 verso is blank>
<end of Quire 1>
<Quire 2>
<Q2 folio 1 recto><Title page>
Memorandum
and
Diary Book
Begun January 1st 1879
by Robert Russell
of the Township of Proton
County of Grey
and Province of
Ontario
[bottom half of page has three recipes for cures:]
Cure for Consumption
Common mullein leaves steeped strong and sweetened with sugar
and drunk freely. The leaves should be gathered before the end of July
if convenient. The leaves of young or old plants are good dried in the
shade and kept in clean paper bags. The medecine must be continued
from three to six months.
Cure for stammering of your speech
Read aloud for two hours daily with your teeth shut
but keep your lips moving, do it two or three times a week.
Take care to read slowly and distinctly and without spray.
Do not get excited but take your time.
Cure for small pox or preventing it
One ounce cream of tartar dissolved in a pint of boi[ling; paper torn off]
water to be drunk when cold at short intervals
It can be taken at any time.
<end of Title page>
<Q2 folio 1 verso>
January 1879
1st Very fine morning and the sun shone out through the day, causing a pleasant feeling to the most
of us after having experienced so much cold, stormy weather. The boys and I cleaned up oats
and I went to Dundalk with two loads (100 Bushels) and sold them for .22¢ per Bushel.
Mr. Kirby and Misses [=Mrs., phonetic spelling?] George and the children were here tonight
84
and took tea with us. All of our children were spending the eavning with Mr. Lonsway’s chil-
dren.
2 Very stormy morning and the day continued cold and stormy all through. The boys and I
cleaned up about 100 Bushels of oats. We put 50 upstairs and bagged up 50 ready for market.
3 Fearfully cold stormy morning and the day continued blowing, snowing and freezing. Nothing
like it has come this winter, although we have experienced some very cold weather. The boys
and I chored around today. Josua J. Chalmbers quit chopping with me for the present. Mr.
Christopher Johnson was here tonight and I helped him make out his school returns to send to
the Inspector.
[4] Another stormy cold morning, but not quite so bad as yesterday. Blowing and freezing pretty
keenly all day. The boys and I were cleaning grain today.
[5]th Sabbath. Cold stormy day all through.
<Q2 folio 2 recto>
January 1879
6th Cold morning and the day continued snowing, blowing and freezing. I went to Dundalk in the
forenoon with a load of oats and in the afternoon I took 28 Bushels and 30 pounds of wheat to
get gristed to Dundalk Mills.
7th Very cold day, the snow very deep. Hard work to get firewood. The boys chopped up an elm
log that was in front of the house into stove wood. Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the after-
noon. I brought home the grist. I had not good yield, only about 39 pounds to the bushel. The
wheat was part fall [wheat] and remarkably good, the Spring wheat was also well cleaned. [in
margin] Mr. James Penny / died this morning.
8 Another cold day, snowing and freezing. I attended an annual School meeting in No. 5 Melanc-
thon, of which I am Sect. Treasurer. I intended resigning on account of being no longer a rate-
payer, but the people at the meeting all insisted on my retaining the office. They gave me a
vote of thanks for the way I had kept the books of the Section, and also made me a present of
$1.43, the balance in my hands, besides paying me my salary $5.00. In the afternoon Nancy
and I went to Mr. Penny’s wake and stopped most of the night.
9 Another cold day, snow to no end. I went to John McDowell’s Mill with four bags of mixed
[grain] to get chopped. I almost traded horses to a [gap, paper torn off] but finally backed out.
10 Another cold day, snowing and freezing, th[paper torn off: e boys] hauled up some wood in the
forenoon and in the afternoon we changed sleighs with brother Sam, as our family is going to
Essa tomorrow. I also got home the chopped stuff and got paid for the oats I sold last week 358
bushels and 20 lbs @ .22¢ per bushel.
<Q2 folio 2 verso>
January 1879
11 Pretty cold morning, but the day got something milder. All the family, myself excepted, went
to Essa. I went to the station in the afternoon and had a O. B. Jovial with Mr. D. Davidson’s
Clerks.* Home now, early on Sunday morning. I guess the clock has stopped, I cannot tell the
time. [*D. Davidson’s clerks are named in later entries, see 2 May 1879, 22 Dec. 1879, 18
Sept. 1880. “O. B. Jovial” =social drink; see also “O be jovial” on 8 Mar. 1876.]
12th Sabbath. Very fine sunny day all through. I am all alone today. Folks all in Essa. The clock
fixer that righted our clock last spring came here today, wanted to get stopping all night, said he
would clean the clock next morning. Did not keep him.
13 Rather stormy morning and the day continued cold and blowing. I am house keeper and chorer
today. The folks are all gone. Mr. Andrew Lonsway came here a while at night.
85
14 Mild day, from morning to the afternoon, when it commenced freezing pretty keenly. The folks
came home about 5:40 PM. Mr. Kirby borrowed the old mare today to take a grist to Dundalk.
[in margin] Daddy Johnson died today.
15 Cold, stormy morning, and the day continued blowing and freezing all through. Nancy and I
visited Mr. Lonsway’s this afternoon. Jim brought his colt home from brother Sam’s.
16 Pretty cold morning but the day got somewhat warmer towards noon. I was choring around.
The boys commenced going to school.
17 Rather cold morning, but the day got somewhat milder towards noon. The afternoon was pretty
moderate. Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the eavning. Jim went to brother Sam’s to do the
chores for him and to go to school.
<Q2 folio 3 recto>
Jan[uary] 1879
18th Mild morning and the day continued rather mild all through. Plenty of snow falling now 8:30
PM. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway were here this eavning. I was chopping firewood in the bush,
Johney hauled it in the afternoon. The snow is very deep, I had to shovel it away from the log I
was cutting before I could saw it. Had also to shovel a way for the team to get into the bush.
Never seen such deep snow at this time of the year.
19th Sabbath. Cold morning and the day continued so.
20 Cold morning, but the day ameliorated towards noon. In the afternoon it was quite mild. I was
taking the top off a straw stack and choring. Nancy and I went to Mr. Kirby’s at night.
21 Cold stormy morning and the day continued snowing and freezing. I went to Dundalk in the
forenoon and posted a letter to John Agnew. Mr. Kirby was here at noon to look at the young
mare’s mouth, thinking she had a wolf’s tooth. He could see none. Brother John was here at
night.
22 Mild morning and the day continued very moderate. I went to the Bush in the afternoon to cut
firewood. I only got one large maple cut down. The snow is something fearful to get through,
sinking up to the middle in some cases.––I read in the newspaper of the death of Mr. Robert
Moore, a farmer of the second concession of West York. He was threshing and fell off the mow
in his barn on the 10th inst. and was killed. I think that it is the same Mr. Moore I worked for
about the years 1853—54 & ’55, and a better man there could not exist. I liked him as I would
a brother, even when away from him my thoughts were continually on him. But he has gone to
a better world. He leaves a wife and eight children to mourn his loss. Ah, if I do not see him
any more in this world, I hope we shall meet in heaven!
<Q2 folio 3 verso>
January 1879
23rd Rather mild morning and the day continued fine for winter. Was chopping firewood in the
bush. Nancy and I visited Mr. Lonsway’s at night.
24 Mild morning and the day was pretty moderate with rather a high wind causing the snow to
drift. I was chopping stove wood in the bush.
25 Pretty moderate morning, but the day as it advanced got exceedingly rough and windy. Johney
and I were sawing stove wood in the bush in the forenoon and we were glad to leave the woods
on account of the high wind and snow drifting in on us. We were in great danger of falling tim-
ber, the wind was so strong. On our way home we could scarcely see the right way to go, the
snow was raised with the wind and blowing against us in blinding masses. The stormiest day
that has come for a long time. [in margin] Got a letter from Ireland.
86
26th Sabbath. Fine sunny morning, and the day continued mild to the afternoon, when it began to
freeze pretty sharply. I went with the sleigh to the back line in the morning and fetched Father
and Mother out. In the afternoon I took them home again.
27 Windy morning with sleet and rain, the day continued pretty windy all through and raining. It
seems that a thaw has set in. And I split stove wood in the bush in the forenoon and in the af-
ternoon hauled it home. Eliza Russell was here today. [in margin] Thaw.
28 Very fine morning, and the day continued sunny with a thaw wind. Nancy and I fetched in a
small pit of potatoes in the forenoon. There was a good many of them frozen. In the afternoon
I went to Dundalk and purchased an axe handle and some writing paper. Mrs. and Mr. Lon-
sway were here this eavning.
<Q2 folio 4 recto>
January 1879
29th Bright sunny morning, and the day continued splendid all through. Done nothing, only chores.
30 Bright sunny morning and the day continued fine to the afternoon, when it got overcast and a
pretty hard freeze set in. I was chopping stove wood in the bush.
31 Pretty cold morning and the day continued cold all day and pretty windy in the afternoon. I
was chopping stove wood in the bush.
<double line dividing sections>
February [1879]
1st Cold, blustery morning and snow fell during the forenoon, the afternoon windy and excessively
cold. It is now (7:20) P.M. Freezing like Greenland. Johney and I were sawing stove wood in
the bush.
2nd Sabbath. Cold day all through.
3 Pretty mild day, the sun came out pretty warm about 10 A.M. I was chopping firewood in the
bush. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway were here this eavning.
4 Nice morning, the sun shone out strong and bright, the day kept fine all through. I was hauling
firewood from the bush in the forenoon, and in the afternoon drove in to brother John’s for
Nancy and the two youngest, who had been there all day. Brother John borrowed my bay mare,
Gerty, to go to the township of Essa on tomorrow.
5 Rather cold morning, and the day continued pretty cold all through. I was chopping firewood
in the bush today.
<Q2 folio 4 verso>
February 1879
6th Pretty cold day, and I was chopping firewood in the bush.
7 Rather colder than yesterday, with frequent showers of snow. Done nothing today, only my
chores.
8 Rather cold this morning, but the day ameliorated and was sunny and pleasant towards noon.
Johney and I sawed stove wood in the bush till noon, and in the afternoon I took the harrows
and the plow colter to the blacksmith’s shop to get repaired. I also paid Richard Campbell,
blacksmith, his account in full.
9th Sabbath. Pretty cold day and very stormy, the wind blowing and drifting the snow greately
[=greatly].
10 Moderate weather this day, the snow inclined to be a little soft. I was cutting wood in the bush.
87
11 Mild morning with a good deal of soft snow falling. The snow kept coming down mostly all
day. I done no chopping today as it was wetting being outside. William Lonsway was here to-
day.
12 Very cold stormy day, from morning to night, the wind blowing and drifting the snow at a great
rate.
13 Sharp morning, very big freeze. It kept cold all day, and toward eavning the wind rose and
drifted the snow. I was at William Lonsway's bee with the team hauling cordwood to the sta-
tion. Miss Sarah Bell visited us today.
14 Very cold morning, and the day continued cold all through. There arose a wind and snow storm
about 6. PM, the fiercest snow storm I ever was out in. Nancy was at the back line.
<Q2 folio 5 recto>
February 1879
15th Very sharp cold morning, and the day continued piercing cold of all through. Johney, Clark,
and I cleaned up a grist and some wheat for seed.
16th Sabbath. Not quite so cold as yesterday, still there was a sharp enough freeze all day long.
17 Cold morning, but the day got something warmer towards noon. I took to the gristmill 26
bushels [of] wheat.
18 Cold morning, but the day got bright and sunny and was very fine from about 10 A.M. I was
hauling some firewood home from the bush. Mrs. Abraham Jackson* visited us this afternoon.
[*mother of Phoebe Jackson Russell.]
19 Very cold morning, and the day continued cold all day, and blowing with some snow falling. I
went to the back line, and also I went to the mill for a grist I had left there. Rev. Mr. Ward*, C.
[of E.] Minister, called here today. [*Rev. James Ward (Church of England), of Markdale, con-
ducted services every second Sunday at Dundalk, 1877-1880; see History of Dundalk, pp. 142-
43.]
20 Very cold morning, and the day continued cold and stormy all through, very sharp cold wind
and some snow falling. This night was the coldest that has came this winter. Mrs. Clements
Bell visited us today. [in margin] coldest night.
21 Sunshiny morning, and the day was nice and fine all through, with a bright sun. The eavning
was rather sharp. Nancy and two youngest and I went to Dundalk.
22 Rather sharp morning, and the wind continued getting up towards eavning, when it blew pretty
brisk and cold. Johney and I were hauling some hay which I had at W. Lonsway’s. It was clo-
ver hay, and being in a stack, was pretty badly musted.
<Q2 folio 5 verso>
February 1879
23rd Sabbath. Cold stormy day all through. The boys, John and Clark, took Jim in to Sam’s in the
afternoon in the sleigh.
24 Cold stormy day all through, blowing, snowing, and freezing.
25 Very cold stormy day, the wind blowing, and snow falling, and freezing. Johney and I hauled
two little loads of hay from W. Lonsway’s.
26 A very cold and stormy morning and the day continued very cold and stormy all through.
Johney and I hauled the last of our hay from the back line. Old Mr. Kirby was here a while this
afternoon. [in margin] First lamb came tonight.
27 Another snapping cold day, blowing, snowing and freezing. Nancy and I went to Mr. Kirby’s
this eavning.
88
28 Another very cold day, snowing, blowing, and freezing. I went to Dundalk in the eavning and
posted six letters. [in margin] Letter sent to Brother William.
March 1st, 1879
1st Brisk wind this morning, and snow fall, but with a tending to softness. The wind continued
pretty strong, but soft, all day. Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the forenoon. I paid John Nor-
vall, Jnr., $25.00 to be placed to my credit and put on the note which he holds against me for his
brother Tom. Said note being $50, with 0.2 per cent per annum interest. In the afternoon, I
opened a potato pit and brought in a Barell full, there was an odd one of them frozen.
2nd. Sabbath. Rather cold day, windy and freezing in the forenoon, the afternoon pretty mild and the
sun was fine. Nancy, Eliza, and I visited at Mr. James A. Mulholland’s.
<Q2 folio 6 recto>
March 1879
3rd Pretty cold in the morning, but the sun shone out about 10 AM, the day was nice and fine af-
terwards. Nancy and I went to the back line. I met brothers John and Sam coming to the mill
with saw logs. I turned and went back with them. James Murphy stopped here this night.
4 Soft-like morning with the wind pretty high. There came a [sic; delete] on quite a snow storm
of large soft snowflakes. This cleared off after a while, and the day was rather milder. Nancy’s
father was here.
5 Very fine morning, sun bright and warm. I and the family went to the back line to help brother
John to pack up his goods and furniture. James Murphy stopped here tonight.
6 Cold, raw morning, the roads were very heavy on account of the snow which had fallen last
night and drifted. The day got finer about noon, when the sun came out. Brother John moved
away this morning to the township of Essa, where he is going to live on a farm, 109 acres
which he and I have jointly. I sent my team, drive[n] by Jim, also I sent Johney to help drive
his cattle. This changing of places is at the best very troublesome. I hope he will do well in his
new home. He has done very badly in his old home. The wind is getting very strong tonight,
and whistling around the house at a pretty brisk rate.
7 Fine morning, and the day continued very fine all through, with quite a bright sun. I went to
Dundalk in the afternoon.
8 Moderately mild morning, sky overcast in the afternoon, thunder, lightening and some rain in
the eavning. Nancy and I went to Mr. Lonsway’s a while at night. [in margin] Thunder.
<Q2 folio 6 verso>
March 1879
9th Sabbath. Beautiful morning, the sun bright and warm, the day continued very fine all through
till night, when there came on a rain storm accompanied with pretty heavy thunder and a great
deal of lightening. The snow melted away today pretty rapidly. Mr. and Mrs. James A. Mul-
holland and two of their children visited us today.
10 Bright sunny morning, and the day continued beautiful all through, the sun extremely hot. The
sky got overcast at night and the wind rose. Nancy, I, Eliza and Willy went to the back line
about noon. Edward Thompson is stopping here tonight.
11 Cold, raw morning and the day continued very windy and cold all through. I went to Dundalk,
it being fair day. Cattle were very cheap, some milk cows fetching as little as $12.00.
89
12 Cold in the morning, but as the day advanced the sun shone out bright, making the day more
pleasant. The sky got overcast towards night and there fell quite a nice little bit of snow after
dark. Nancy and I visited J. Trugon's at night.
13 Blowing, stormy morning, snow falling at first, which turned to something like rain soon, the
wind very strong. In the afternoon a pretty sharp freeze set in. Nancy, I, Eliza and Willy were
at Mr. Lonsway’s in the afternoon.
14 Blustering day all through, snowing, blowing, and freezing from morning till night. Chopped a
little stove wood in the bush this afternoon.
15 Cold, raw morning, and the day continued very cold all through. I shovelled a way through the
snow in the forenoon in to some stove wood in the bush, and in the afternoon Johney and I
hauled it. Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the eavning.
<Q2 folio 7 recto>
March1879
16th Sabbath. Storm and sunshine alternately. Snow showers falling frequently throughout the day,
pretty cold in general. Brother Sam and his wife, with their three children, were here this after-
noon. Most of the company, myself excepted, went to protracted meeting at Dundalk at night.
17th Patrick's Day in the morning. Showers of snow accompanied by a pretty strong breeze, oc-
cassionally sunshine now and then, were the prevailing features of the day. J. Chalmbers here
today.
18 Much the same kind of weather as yesterday, blowing and snowing occasionally, with a little
sunshine now and then. Mrs. R. went to meeting tonight.
19 Pretty cold in the morning, then a little warmer as the sun got out. Some showers of snow
through the day, wind moderate. Brother John was here a while in the afternoon. Brother Sam
and wife also came here in the eavning on their way to Dundalk. Mrs. R. is off to the meetings
tonight again.
20 A little cold in the morning, but the sun came out during the forenoon, and the day was pleas-
ant. I was helping brother John cut saw logs.
21 Sunshiny day, the snow melting, although not rapidly. I was helping brother John cut saw logs.
22 Hard frost this morning, the day got mild about 10 AM. Snow began to fall and kept snowing
mostly all day. I was helping brother John with the saw logs today.
<Q2 folio 7 verso>
March 1879
23rd Sabbath. Rather stormy day, snowing and blowing, the snow somewhat soft.
24 Fine in the morning, but soon the day changed and blowing and snowing commenced and con-
tinued without intermission throughout the day. I sent Jim and the team to help brother John
cut his logs.
25 Sunny morning and the day was pleasant and fine all through, the snow melting considerably.
Jim was helping brother John with the saw logs.
26 Cold, raw morning for some time, then the sun shone out and the day was pleasant till after
dark, then some sleety rain fell. Jim was helping brother Sam in the afternoon to haul stove
wood to the school house. I was chopping stove wood in the bush.
27 Rather fine day, given to thaw in the afternoon. Jim was helping brother Sam to haul wood
with the team.
28 Mild morning and the day continued soft all through. Rain commenced at night. The spring
thaw appears to have set in. Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the eavning.
90
29 Misty morning, the snow melting rappidly, a shower of sleet fell about noon. The afternoon
soft and misty. Johney and I went to brother Sam’s in the eavning for some hay.
30th Sabbath. Cold, stormy day all through.
31 Cold in the morning, but got warmer and the snow melted some towards noon. I and Johney
hauled two small loads of hay from the back line. I went to Dundalk at night and paid John
McDowell $25.00 for sawing 10,000 feet lumber. Brother John was here this eavning and took
away three bags of his own wheat.
<Q2 folio 8 recto>
April 1879
1st Cold in the morning, but got much warmer as the day advanced. It was pretty warm about
noon, and the sun shone out bright. Brother Sam came here in the morning, about 2 O'clock in
the morning, with his team and a small load of grain for brother John. I got my horses har-
nessed and sent Jim and John with Sam’s load to Shelburne. Brother John being along with the
waggon, they put both loads on the waggon at Shelburne and then John started for Essa, as the
sleighing had all gone from Shelburne down. I was helping Sam at a wood bee. There were 12
men at the bee and he got about 13 cords of the stove wood cut and split. Mr. James Jack, as-
sessor, stopped here this night. He assessed me for real and personal property at $910.00.
2 Cold, stormy morning, blowing and snowing. It continued so all day with a pretty sharp freeze.
John and Jim were chopping stove wood in the bush.
3 Very cold morning, and the day kept getting colder all through, snowing, blowing, and freezing.
I went to brother Sam’s in the forenoon with the team and got John’s sugar kettle. The boys
were cutting stove wood in the bush in the forenoon. The afternoon was too stormy for them to
work. Mrs. Gott, Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway were here today.
4 Cold, stormy day all through, but not quite so much of a blow as was yesterday, snow falling
mostly all day, although in no great quantities. The boys were cutting stove wood in the bush.
5 Pretty cold morning, but the sun broke out at about noon, and the day was pleasant after. The
boys were chopping and I was hauling wood home, and in the eavning I brought in some pota-
toes out of the pit. John Agnew is stopping here tonight.
<Q2 folio 8 verso>
April 1879
6th Sabbath. Rather fine in the morning and the sun kept getting stronger and warmer as the day
advanced. The snow melted considerably. John Agnew was here to the afternoon.
7 Rather cool this morning and the wind blew coldly all day, although the sun shone out pretty
bright. The boys went in to brother Sam's for our bobsleighs, and took his long sleigh in to him
in the forenoon. They chopped stove wood in the bush in the afternoon. Father came out with
the boys and stopped all night with us.
8 Bright sunny morning, and the day was warm and fine all through, with plenty of sunshine. Fa-
ther went home this morning. Jim took him in in the sleigh. We tapped trees today for the first
this season. I made the cuts in the tree and Nancy put in the spiles and set the troughs. We
done 101 in the afternoon. I heard a Robin singing for the first this season. [in margin] First
trees tapped / First robin heard
9 Very fine bright morning, the Sun shone out strong all day and the day was quite pleasant. We
gathered and boiled down sap today. We made about ¾ of a pail of molasses.
91
10 Rainy morning which soon turned to sleet, then to snow, and the day was a tough one all
through. The ground was covered pretty well with snow towards night. [in margin] First cow /
calved.
11 The sun shone out this morning, but there was a very cold wind all day, everything outside cov-
ered with sleet and looking very dreary. The boys cut some stove wood. Nancy and I went to
Dundalk in the afternoon.
<Q2 folio 9 recto>
April 1879
12th Bright sunny morning, and the day was pretty fine, though rather cold. The boys were cutting
stove wood in the bush. I sowed 30 pounds (9 of clover & 21 of grass) seed on 3 acres of
ground. Henry Lonsway was here a while this afternoon. I went to John Irvin’s at night and
helped him carry in two pigs which he had butchered. The gravel road in front of this place is
now passible. It has been blocked up with snow since Christmas to about four days ago, when
some teams passed through. There is four feet of snow in some of the fence corners yet.
13 Pretty mild morning and the day was rather soft, with a snow shower. Mrs. Russell and I visit-
ed at Mrs. C. Bell’s. We had a five year old cow got her neck broke in the stable tonight. She
was near her calving. Loss, about $20.00.
14 Rather chilly this morning, but the sun shone out after some time and the day got nice and
warm. Mr. Lonsway came over in the forenoon and helped me skin the cow. I sent the hide in
to Mr. Hanbury’s, it weighed 54 lbs gross and was only worth .03¢ per pound. One cow calved
today. Nancy and I gathered 33 pails of sap in about an hour in the afternoon. Jim was helping
Henry Lonsway.
15 Rather sharp morning, but the sun got out in the afternoon. We were in the sugar bush in the af-
ternoon. I went in the eavning to Dundalk to hear Mr. Lauder, M.P.P.* [Abraham William
Lauder, MPP for Grey East, 3 Sept. 1867-8 Dec. 1871, 18 Jan. 1872-20 Feb. 1884. See
http://www.ontla.on.ca/web/members/members_detail.do?locale=en&ID=720].
16 Rather chilly morning, the afternoon fine. Were in the sugar bush in the eavning.
17 Cold in the forenoon, the afternoon fine. The boys swamped out wood. Nancy and I were in
the sugar bush in the afternoon.
<Q2 folio 9 verso>
April 1879
18th Frosty morning, the sun got out bright, and the sunshine strong in the evening. The boys
swamped out wood in the forenoon and in the afternoon gathered sap. I went to Flesherton, to
Division court, had no case. Wanted to see John Agnew. Owen Cassidy and Kenny Perry
stopped here tonight.
19 Frosty morning, and pretty chilly through the day, although the sun was shining. I went to Mr.
Hughes in the afternoon. Nancy and the boys were in the sugar bush. At night we went to Mr.
Lonsway’s.
20th Sabbath. Bright sunny morning, and the day was pleasant and fine all through. One of the
cows got sick this afternoon, apparently a stoppage in her urine. I sent to Dundalk and got
some spirits of sweet nitre. I gave her about one half ounce at a dose; it seemed to relieve her.
[in margin] Heard frogs.
21 Hard frost this morning, but the sun shone out strong, and the day was pleasant and warm.
Nancy gathered some sap in the morning. Jim started the pease today. The frost is not suffi-
92
ciently out of the ground for good plowing. The ground is also soft. Johney and I were picking
over a potatoe pit, there were a great many damaged ones among them. They had rotted, about
the one third of them, I think. I ought to have covered them in the fall with plenty of good dry
straw. In place of that I have put on fox tail and other stuff that I got amongst the potatoe hills
whilst digging them. The potatoes were all scabbed when I put them into the pit. The others
that I had covered with straw were sufficiently sound. [in the margin:] First plowing.
22nd Very fine morning and the day continued exceedingly hot for this season of the year, in fact it
was hazy, almost like Indian summer. Jim was plowing, John and I cleaned up about 23 bush-
els of pease. Bob Irvin was here today to see about buying an old stove from me. I sold him
one for $2.00.
<Q2 folio 10 recto>
April 1879
23rd Pretty mild morning with scarcely any frost, the day got clouded over with indications of rain,
although there was none fell. Jim was plowing, Johney and I cleaned up 110 bushels of oats.
Nancy and I went to Mr. Kirby’s at night. Mr. Kirby offered me two cows for a brood mare. I
declined.
24 Sharp frost this morning, the day got overcast, and was cool. The evening quite cloudy and
rainy like. The ground has dried up splendidly these last few days, plowing goes very well
now. Jim was plowing. A Frenchman named Roos, and a boy which was along with him, sell-
ing counterpanes, arrived and fed their horses here. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway were here this af-
ternoon.
25 Misty morning and the day kept getting cloudier. A little rain fell in the forenoon, and a slight
mizzle kept up to about 3 PM, when it began to rain heavier and wound up with a wet afternoon
and raining now (9:30) P.M. Jim was plowing so long as the day was fair. I sifted some seed
wheat in order to take wild mustard seed out of it. Mrs. Hannah Bowler was here this eavning.
Henry and Mariah Lonsway were here a while at night.
26 Rather cloudy morning, but the rain did not fall till about 6 P.M. Jim was plowing. I sifted
some seed wheat. Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the eavning.
27th Sabbath. Cool morning and the day continued rather cool all through. I went to see Father and
Mother today. [in margin] seen Swallow
28 Cool morning, although the sun shone out bright. The day was fair but cool. I plowed, and Jim
made a stone boat.
<Q2 folio 10 verso>
April 1879
29th Rather misty morning, and a slight rain fell throughout the day, but not enough to stop work. I
was plowing in the forenoon, Jim plowed in the afternoon.
30 Cold, raw morning and the day continued cold all through. Fine snow began to fall about 5 PM
and continued falling till after dark. It is freezing now pretty hard, the ground is quite stiff (9.)
P.M. Jim was plowing, I was sorting some potatoes. The ground where Jim was plowing was
very wet.
___________________________________________________________________
May
1st Cold morning, frost and snow, the ground frozen very hard, no harrowing this morning and but
little plowing. Jim and John went to Mr. Jackson for ½ ton of hay, which I had purchased @
93
the rate of $8. per ton. ½ ton is a pretty small load. We plowed the garden and the patch be-
tween the two houses in the eavning. Mr. W. Kirby came down in the afternoon and I wrote
him two letters.
2 Sharp frost this morning, the ground so hard that it would not harrow in the forenoon. I sowed
four bags of wheat in the eavning. Jim plowed in the forenoon and harrowed in the afternoon.
I then went to Dundalk, was late of getting through with my business. Mr. D. Davidson’s
Clerks* asked me to stop all night with them. I done so. [in margin] first wheat sowen. [*See
below, Neil Strachan and John Stubbings, two of Davidson’s clerks, visited the Russells, 22
Dec. 1879]
3 Bright sunny morning, and the day continued fine all through. I brought home six apple trees
which I had ordered from Chase Brothers & Bo[w]man, Rochester, and planted them. They
cost me twenty-five cents each. I also finished sowing wheat and Jim finished harrowing the
wheat. [in margin] planted fruit trees
<Q2 folio 11 recto>
May 1879
4th Sabbath. Rather misty morning, and some rain began to fall pretty early in the day and the day
continued pretty wet all through. Brother Samuel and wife and baby were here today.
5 Cold, wet morning, and continued wet to about 9 AM when it cleared off, and continued dry to
about 4 P.M. when it commenced to mizzle and was rather wet and cold at night. Jim plowed
from 9 AM till night. I chored around and staked the apple trees. The trees are planted and
named as follows: The Row contains 6 trees and is the third row of trees or 24 steps from the
boundary line between lots 214 and 215. The first tree in the row, counting from the Gravel
Road is named Rhode Island Greening, the second tree, 13½ feet from the first is a Baldwin.
The third, 13½ feet from the second, is a Red Astrachan. The fourth, 13½ feet from the third, is
a Talman Sweet. The fifth, 13½ feet from the fourth, is a Fameuse. The sixth, 13½ feet from
the fifth, is a Wagner. The first I’ll give to James, the second to John, the third to Clark, the
fourth to Eliza, the 5th to William, and 6th to their mother and me, between us.
6 Cold damp morning and there was a slight shower of snow about 10 AM, then a slight mizzle
of rain. The afternoon was a little more favorable. I sowed fifteen bushels of pease today. Jim
harrowed them. Nancy and I went to Mr. Lonsway’s at night. [in margin] Sowed pease / Full
moon in / the morning.
7 Sunshiny morning, and the day continued dry, although cool. Jim finished harrowing the pease
in the forenoon, and went to plowing sod in the afternoon. John and I picked up stones and
roots [dittog: and stones] where Jim was plowing. Eliza’s little lamb met its death this morning
by some of the animals laying upon it. Mr. Hanbury came here in the afternoon to lathe [=lath;
i.e. to put up lath prior to plastering the walls].
<Q2 folio 11 verso>
May 1879
8th Cold morning, with frost on the ground. The day got warmer. Jim plowed, I and John picked
stones and roots. I helped Nancy plant some onions in the afternoon. I went in to the back line
in the afternoon.
9 Pleasant sunny morning, and the day continued warm all through. Jim plowed, Johny picked
up and gathered stones. Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. I then attended a trus-
tee meeting.
94
10 A little chilly this morning, but the sun got out bright and warm, and the day was dry and warm
all through. I sowed two bags of oats in the forenoon, and in the afternoon went to buy some
cows: did not get any, the cows did not please me. Johney harrowed. [in margin] First oats
sown.
11th Sabbath. Very fine morning, and the day continued dry and warm all through.
12th Fine morning, and the day was very warm all through. I plowed today, John and Jim picked up
roots and stones. Mr. William Middleton stopped here at noon with his horse. Mr. Cross came
here in the afternoon to fix the windows.
13 Fine morning, and the day continued very close and warm, with some appearance of a thunder
storm in the eavning. There was some lightening. I plowed mostly all day. The ground is vey
dry and hard and it is very heavy work on the team.
14 Very warm morning and the day continued hot to about 4 P.M. when it got cloudy, then shortly
after there was lightening, thunder and rain. I was plowing, Jim and Johney were picking
stones. Brother Sam got the lend of the old mare to work, as his has colted. We planted some
potatoes this eavning. [in margin] First potatoes planted.
<Q2 folio 12 recto>
May 1879
15th Fine growing morning, the day cool and misty all through. I was plowing to noon, then I
sowed some oats. Jim harrowed. Nancy shore the sheep. John Hanbury and his two men were
working at the plastering of the house.
16 Fine morning, and the day continued dry all through. Jim was harrowing in the forenoon and in
the afternoon he and I hauled off stones and jerked out stumps from the ground we were going
to fallow.
17 Slight frost this morning, but did not hurt. I plowed to tea time, then I went to Dundalk. Called
at Mr. May’s old place to hear Dr. Barr* address the Electors. Jim and Johney were picking up.
[* MP for Grey, and later MPP; see above, 10 June 1876, 7 Aug. 1877, 20 Sept. 1877, re. med-
ical report to qualify for pension.]
18th Sabbath. Bright sunny morning, the day continued warm and dry. I and wife went to Brother
Samuel’s today.
19 Very warm morning and the day continued hot all through. Jim was plowing. I and Johney
were choring around, picking potatoes, planting them and doing other jobs.
20 Very fine morning and a beautiful day, sunshine all through. Jim was plowing, John was gath-
ering stones. I went to a Chattle [=chattel] Mortgage Sale at Mr. George Mann’s in the Town-
ship of Artemesia. I bought one cow for $19. and another for $22.50. They are both good
cows, one eight and the other seven years old. They are calved some time.
21 Fine day all through. Jim was plowing. Johney and I planted potatoes and gathered stones.
Nancy was at a picking bee at Mr. Lonsway’s. She and I went to Dundalk at night to Mr.
Thomas Talbot’s wake. There was a sharp frost this night. [in margin] Old T. Talbot /died.
<Q2 folio 12 verso>
May 1879
22nd Bright sunny morning, and the day continued dry but cool and windy. Jim harrowed, I sowed
oats and Johney and I gathered stones in the afternoon. Quite a frost this night. [in margin]
Finished sowing oats.
95
23 Fine morning, but quite cool, the day dry and pleasant all through. Jim plowed, I and Johney
planted some potatoes in the forenoon and cleaned some barley in the afternoon. Mr. Lonsway
and Mr. William Silk were here this afternoon. Mr. John Hanbury finished plastering the house.
24 Fine morning, and the day continued dry and breezy with clouds in the afternoon. The three
eldest boys went to see the sports at Dundalk.* Johney ran in the boys race and took first prize
(.75¢). Eliza and Willie went fishing and caught four fish 2½ inches long, big Sport for them.
Nancy went to Dundalk in the afternoon to do some shopping. I stopped at home all day and
plowed. [*Victoria Day holiday, 24th of May, celebrating Queen Victoria’s birthday.]
25th Sabbath. Cool, clear morning and the day continued cool and dry all through. [in margin]
Frost.
26 Cold morning, with quite a frost, ice on the water. The day was cold and clear all through. Jim
was plowing, John was gathering stones. I sifted some Barley for seed. Brother Sam was here
at noon. [in margin] Frost. / Lamb come.
27 Cool morning, the day continued cool and bright. Quite a frost this morning. I sowed 4½
acres of Barley. Johney harrowed it. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon and bought 18 pounds
of Timothy seed at 5 cents per pound, and 10 pounds Clover seed at 7½ cents per lb. [in mar-
gin] Frost / Finished sowing Barley.
28 Frost this morning, the day was clear and warm. John and I picked stones in the forenoon and I
sowed the clover seed in the afternoon, and Johney harrowed. The ground is remarkably dry
and hard. Water is getting scarce. No spring so dry in my memory. [in margin] Frost.
<Q2 folio 13 recto>
May 1879
29th Bright warm morning, and the day continued dry and warm. Johney was plowing a potatoe
patch, I was cutting seed potatoes. Mrs. Gott was helping Nancy pick wool.
30 Bright sunny morning, the day continued warm and very windy. There was a slight shower of
rain in the forenoon. Johney and I were hauling out manure. I went to a meeting at night of a
political nature at Mr. Atcheson’s School House.
31 Dry warm morning, the sun bright and hot. I went to Flesherton to see Dr. Christoe and from
thence to Priceville to see Mr. Ferguson.* P.S. I took the train at Flesherton Station coming
home and about that time 3 P.M. there came on a rain and wind storm which increased in vio-
lence as we came near Dundalk to nearly a tornado. The fences blew down in all directions.
Buildings were unroofed, the water poured in through the passanger [sic] car, the wind almost
blew the cars off the track. The rain ceased at about 6 P.M., the ground thoroughly wet, hail
stones fell in places. [in margin] Violent Storm. [*William Ferguson was Superintendant of
Schools (or Public School Inspector) for Grey South (which included Melancthon, Proton, Ar-
temesia and Osprey); see Belden, Historical Atlas of Counties of Grey and Bruce; Sawden, His-
tory of Dufferin County, 88, 124-25. In this entry, RR is taking a medical certificate from Dr.
Christoe to W. Ferguson in order to qualify for his annual pension.]
June 1st Sabbath
Rather misty morning, but the rain only came on in the eavning.
2 Misty morning and pretty cool. The day continued dry. Jim was plowing, Johney and I were
fixing up fences in the forenoon and in the afternoon were cleaning up the door yard.
3 Cloudy morning, the day continued fair during the forenoon. About 2 in the afternoon the rain
began to come down, at first slowly, then it increased in quantity till it got perfectly wetting. It
kept raining all afternoon and is at it still (9:30) P.M. We were planting potatoes in the dry part
96
of the day. Planted about 5 bags full. We put them in with the plow, plowed the ground in as
flat as if for grain. Mrs. Kirby was helping Nancy to pick wool. Wesley Lonsway was helping
to drop potatoes.
<Q2 folio 13 verso>
June 1879
4th Showery, cool day all through. Jim plowed, I cut some potatoes for seed.
5 Cool morning, but the day was dry from morning to night. Jim plowed. Mr. Lonsway fixed the
stove pipes on the roof of our house. I went to the Elections for M.P.P. at Dundalk. Mr. Lauder
(Conservative) member for East Grey re-elected. [in margin] Elections
6 Very cold morning, mizzling rain falling through the forenoon and pretty windy. Jim finished
plowing in the forenoon and in the afternoon we planted the remainder of our potatoes. [in
margin] Finished planting / potatoes.
7 Bright, sunny morning, with a very hard frost, ice on the water as thick as a penny. The day
continued cool and clear all through. I sowed 4 1/4 acres mixed oats and pease, John harrowed
them. Jim and Clark helped brother Sam plant potatoes. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon
and from thence to Father’s. [in margin] Hard frost.
8th Sabbath. Fine clear morning and the day continued nice and dry. Henry Lonsway and Joseph
Jackson were here today.
9 Clear, bright morning, the day very warm in the afternoon. The boys were hauling rails today.
I got 60 pounds of hay from Mr. Lonsway. He would not take any pay for it. Henry Lonsway
and Joseph Jackson started for Nippising [=Nipissing].* I was to accompany them on a land
hunting excursion, but I backed down, can’t say whether it was right or wrong. [*the major city
in Nipissing District is now North Bay, about 250 km north of Toronto; see, below, details of
later trip to Parry Sound, an area slighty south of Nipissing, and east of Georgian Bay, 19-24
June 1879].
10 Bright, sunny morning and the day was bright and pretty hot all through. I put up a fence. Jim
and John hauled rails. Jim went at noon to the blacksmith’s to get a hook put on one of the
tugs*, the former one being broken. [*synonym for “traces”, part of the horse harness, attach-
ing to the whiffletree, a pivoted crosspiece attached to the tongue of the wagon, allowing the
pulling forces to be distributed evenly.]
<Q2 folio 14 recto>
June 1879
11th Fine clear morning, and the day was pretty warm about noon. It got cloudy towards sunset and
the wind blew pretty strong after dark for about 30 minutes, with some rain. I was repairing
fences, Jim and John were hauling rails. Mrs. Samuel Russell and her sister Hannah were here
this afternoon.
12 Bright sunny morning and the day continued clear but cool in the afternoon. I was repairing
fences, the boys were hauling rails and cleaning up the ground where an old fence had been.
13 Fine morning, clear but a little cool. The day kept fine all through. I was repairing fences. Jim
plowed, and sowed some oats and pease (mixed) for sheep feed. John harrowed. Jim left with
T. J. Arnold for Essa this eavning.
14 Cool morning, and dry to about 3 P.M., when it commenced raining and is now (10) still rain-
ing. I cut some rail timber in the forenoon and in the afternoon cleaned oats: 19 19/34* Bush-
97
els, & took them to Dundalk and sold them for .3¢ per bushel. [* a bushel normally has 32
quarts, but here seems to have 34, hence the fraction 19/34]
15th Sabbath. Bright sunny morning, but the day got overcast and foggy with a slight sprinkling of
rain occassionally. Brother Sam was here today.
16 Cool, clear morning, the sky high and the day clear but cool, and very chilly towards night,
with signs of frost. I put up a shed for the waggon today. Hanlin* of Toronto beat Elliot of
England in England, at rowing a Race. [*Of Irish descent, born in Toronto, Ned Hanlan was a
famous Canadian rowing athlete, winning the English title in 1879, beating William Elliot by 11
lengths on a course of 5.76 km, on the Tyne at Newcastle; he earlier won the American champi-
onship, and was world champion in 1880, and continued a professional career in rowing for
many years; see http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/ned-hanlan/.]
17 Cool and bright morning, the day fair all through. Fixed [up a place for the wagon: stricken] up
fence in the forenoon and in the afternoon went to Dundalk.
<Q2 folio 14 verso>
June 1879
18th A slight frost this morning, but did not do any harm. The day was clear and cool all through.
Johney and I fixed fence today. Mother and brother Samuel were out here. Jim got home from
Essa, he is pretty sick and was very sick while away with a cold. He was laid up in bed for one
day or more. I start for Parry Sound District tonight, accompanied by brother Samuel, William
Lonsway and his brother Henry. Mr. Andrew Lonsway drives my team out as far as Singhamp-
ton and brings them home again. Hope he will take care of them, he is but a poor teamster, and
don’t hold his lines eaven [=even]. My object in going to Parry Sound is to get farms for my
sons. [in margin] Frost.
19th to 24th [June].
Frost this morning. Went to Parry Sound in company with Skeffington Bell, Sam Russell, H.
Lonsway, and W. Lonsway. Went about forty miles up the country: it is a wilderness of Rock
and Black lakes, never can become a farming country. We took up no land. Going through the
country was like passing through some horrible nightmare dream.
There is now a Blank in this Journal, as my son Jim was at the point of death almost, when I
came home. Dr. McWilliams visited him seven times and By God’s Mercy and the Dr.’s skill
Jim was saved. Inflamation on one lung and pleuresy [=pleurisy] was the sickness.
[This blank period is, then, three weeks, from 25 June to 16 July, when Robert returns to his
daily record.]
<Q2 folio 15 recto>
July 1879
16th Cool morning and the day continued dry but cool with a pretty strong breeze toward eavning. I
was at Mr. Nicoll’s raising of a frame barn this afternoon. The boys, Johney and Clark, were
hoeing potatoes.
17 Clear cool morning and the day fair all through. Spread some manure for Sam.
18 Clear cool day, without rain. Nancy took the rolls of wool to be spun today. [in margin] First
mail [double underline]
19 Clear cool day, no rain. I went to Dundalk on some business today.
20th Sabbath. Clear cool day all through.
98
21 Cloudy morning with some indications of rain, pretty warm about 2 P.M., a little thunder, no
rain. I was helping Brother Sam to mow, the boys Paris greened the potatoes and hauled home
some stove wood.
22 Cloudy morning and rain began to fall about 11 AM. The afternoon was showery all through.
It is now (9:15) P.M. raining. I was helping Sam at his hay in the forenoon.
23 Clear day in the afternoon, although there was a slight mizzle of rain early in the morning.
Went to Dundalk in the forenoon with a Ram I had sold for $5.00, also posted a letter to A. W.
Lauder, M.P.P., Toronto, and in the afternoon mowed for Sam.
24 Dry morning and the day continued dry and fine all through. I was helping Sam at his hay, the
boys helped in the afternoon.
25 Clear in the morning, but the afternoon became cloudy, no rain. The boys and I were helping
Sam at his hay today.
<Q2 folio 15 verso>
July 1879
26 Cloudy morning and looked very much like rain in the forenoon. The sun shone out in the af-
ternoon and the evening was dry and warm. I was helping Sam today and the boys were help-
ing him in the forenoon. Nancy drove the horses in for me at night.
27 Sabbath. Fine morning and the day continued dry all through. Mrs. John Gott and Husband
were here today.
28 A little cloudy this morning, but the sun shone out soon and the day got warm and bright to
about noon, when the sky began to get cloudy. A slight rain storm accompanied by thunder and
lightening came on about 6 PM. I was helping Sam at his hay, Johney was helping Mr. Kirby to
haul in hay.
29 Rather misty this morning, but the sun shone out soon and the day was pretty hot. I was mow-
ing at Sam's, the two boys were making hay with him in the afternoon.
30 Fine morning, the day clear and warm, beautiful hay weather. I and the two boys were helping
Sam.
31 Fine morning and the day very warm, dry all day. I and Jim and the team were doing statute
labor. I went to Mr. John McDowell’s raising of a frame barn in the afternoon. Johnny went to
do road work in my place.
<Q2 folio 16 recto>
August 1879
1st Bright morning, the day dry and very warm all through, with pretty high wind. I helped Sam at
his hay. John and Jim with the team were doing statute labor.
2 Fine morning, dry to about 5 PM when there came on a slight rain, accompanied by thunder
and lightening. I mowed some fence corners and Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the eavning.
3rd Sabbath. Pretty nice day, dry, clear and moderately warm. Nancy and I visited Mr. S. Bell.
4 Fine morning, the day continued dry and warm with the exception of a few drops of rain that
fell about 2 PM. I was mowing fence corners.
5 Fine dry morning and the day continued dry, and a little breezy with signs of rain, but none fell.
We and Mr. Lonsway’s went a-Berrying to the Huckleberry marsh in Osprey. Did not get
many, as there is a poor crop of berries this year.
6 Bright morning and the day was warm and dry though cloudy in the afternoon. I was mowing
some in forenoon and in the afternoon attended a trustee meeting.
99
7 Bright sunny morning, the day fine to the afternoon. There was some thunder in the evening
with a slight shower of rain. I and the boys were making hay.
8 Fine dry day, but pretty windy. The boys and I were haying.
9 Dry morning, the day dry, the boys berrying, I choring. Nancy and I visited Mr. Lonsway’s
this eavning. Great signs of frost now(11 PM). Northern lights and stars shooting.* [*No
doubt the Perseid meteors, which are seen every August; see
https://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/meteor-shower/perseid.html]
<Q2 folio 16 verso>
August 1879
10th Sabbath. Dry morning and the day was dry during the forenoon, in the afternoon there was a
slight shower. Nancy and I visited J. Trugon’s. There was a frost this morning but it done us
no harm. [in margin] Frost.
11 Bright sunny morning and the day continued dry and warm. I was cutting rail cuts, the boys
were picking stones. Nancy went with the team after dinner to Dundalk.
12 Fine morning and the day warm and hot all through. I took two cows to Dundalk fair, but did
not sell either, as they were milch cows and dry. Cattle or beef was what was wanted. There
was a vote of the ratepayers in Melancthon taken today to see if they would separate the town-
ship from the county of Grey and unite with others forming the County of Dufferin.
13 Rainy morning to about 7 A.M., when it cleared off and was dry to the afternoon when there
was a pretty heavy rain till night. The boys were picking stones and I was cutting rail timber.
Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway were here this eavning.
14th Cloudy morning, the day cloudy but dry and cool. I was chopping rail cuts, the boys were pick-
ing stones.
15 Cloudy morning and the day continued cloudy though dry. I was chopping rail timber, the boys
were picking stones.
16 Dark morning, the day dark, cool and dry. I was cutting roads to the rail timber in the forenoon
and in the afternoon the boys and I were hauling them out with the horses. Mr. Lonsway and
wife were here a while this night.
<Q2 folio 17 recto>
August 1879
17th Sabbath. Foggy morning but the sun soon shone out and the day was bright and warm. Mr.
Skeffington Bell and wife and brother Sam and wife were here
18 Clear morning, the day dry and pretty warm. The boys and I were pulling pease. [in margin]
First / Harvesting.
19 Dry, hazy morning, the sun bright to the afternoon, when it clouded over. The boys and I were
pulling pease. Alexander Irvin bargained with me to do 15 acres of chopping, fit for logging,
on lot 216, beginning at the back fence of lot 215 and chopping 40 rods across the breadth of
the lot and running towards the Gravel Road 60 rods. 5 acres of this to be done in time for me
to log it and put in Barley. The remainder to be finished during the month of May 1880. The
price of the work is $28 in cash, when I get money made of the crop in 1880, and the cow
called Reddy, valued at $22. The cow to be given any time we like this coming fall.
20 Hazy morning, but the sun rose bright and dispelled the clouds, the day was breezy, dry and
warm. Got clouded towards night and the sun went down under a bank of clouds. I was pull-
100
ing pease, Jim was craddling barley. Nancy and Johnny were binding. Mr. Lonsway had the
team, yesterday and this afternoon, working at his summer fallow.
21 Cloudy morning, the sun just showed at rising then went under the clouds. Rain came on about
6 AM and was a little wet during all forenoon. The afternoon was dry to about 8 PM when
there came on a rain storm with thunder and a great deal of lightening. Jim was craddling in the
afternoon, mother and Johnny were binding. I was pulling pease. Nancy and I were at Mr.
Lonsway’s a while in the forenoon.
<Q2 folio 17 verso>
August 1879
22nd Cloudy morning but the sun got out and the forenoon was dry, there was a slight shower about 4
PM and since there was a very heavy rain, accompanied with thunder and lightening, and a very
high wind from 6 PM to about 9. The boys were harvesting barley, Jim craddling, Johney and
mother binding. I was pulling pease.
24th Sabbath. Fine day all through. Mr. A. Lonsway and Henry and Mrs. Bowler were here this af-
ternoon.
25 Left home this morning, Nancy and I with the team, at 12:30* for Owen Sound. Got to that
place at 12 O'clock noon. Transacted some business, then drove out as far as Chatsworth and
stopped at Mr. A. Morrow’s hotel. The day was cloudy and cool all through. The boys cut
some wheat at home today. [in margin] First wheat cut. [*the distance is slightly more than 40
miles, and travelling at night would be slow.]
26 Bright sunny morning and the day fine all through. Left A. Morrow’s at 8 AM and was home at
4:20 PM. The boys borrowed their uncle Sam's team and hauled in the barley.
27 Bright sunny morning, and the day was clear, cool and bright. Got Mr. Kirby's horse and the
boys and I hauled in pease. John Gott was craddling some oats and some wheat in the fore-
noon. I only got half a day cutting done as the grain was not ripe enough.
<Q2 folio 18 recto>
August 1879
28th Cloudy morning, and the day was rather cloudy all through, but dry. Some thunder in the dis-
tance. We got Mr. Lonsway’s mare and the boys and I finished hauling in our pease. We had
15 loads. I bound some wheat after supper.
29 Rather cloudy morning but sun burst through the clouds and the day was pretty warm and dry.
The boys and I gathered stones in the forenoon, and the boys hauled out manure on the pea
ground in the afternoon. Nancy and I tied oats in the afternoon.
30 Hazy morning, but the sun got out strong and bright and the day was very warm. John Gott
was craddling wheat for us and Nancy and I were binding. John and Jim were hauling out ma-
nure.
31st Sabbath. Rather misty morning, but the sun got out and the day was warm and dry. Nancy and
I went to Father’s in the afternoon.
September 1879
1st Cloudy morning but the sun shone out and the day was dry and pretty warm. John Gott was
craddling wheat to 4 P.M., after that he was cutting oats. Nancy and I were binding, the boys,
John and Jim, were hauling out manure.
101
2 Cloudy morning and an appearance of rain, but the day was dry with the exception of a few
drops. The boys and I hauled in grain to 4 P.M., then Jim plowed. John Gott was craddling. I
hunted up some seed wheat, got it at Mr. Duncan’s of Proton. 7 Bushels of Seneca at $1.00 per
bushel. Mr. & Mrs. Lonsway were here this eavning.
<Q2 folio 18 verso>
September 1879
3rd Rather cloudy this morning and there was a shower or two in the afternoon. Nancy and I were
binding oats in the forenoon. Jim was plowing and he went for the seed wheat in the eavning.
4 Wet, windy morning, and the day continued windy and showery all through. Jim was plowing,
and Henry Lonsway was helping him with his team in the afternoon. Jim, Mother & I were at
Mr. Lonsway’s paring* tonight. [*An apple paring bee, presumably.]
5 Cloudy morning, but the day was dry and breezy. Jim was plowing to 4 P.M., when he finished
the piece for fall wheat. I sowed some fall wheat (Seneca) in the afternoon. Nancy went in the
eavning to Sister Sarah’s to see about the yarn she is spinning for us. I sold 3 R[am] lambs to
Mr. W. Acheson this eavning at $2.33 each. [in margin] Sowed fall wheat.
6 Bright morning, but the sun clouded over immediately after rising, then some rain fell and it
was showery generally through the forenoon, and also some came on after 8 P.M. I sowed the
remainder of the fall wheat. John harrowed. Clark picked stones with the old mare hitched to
the stone boat. Jim took a very long sleep this forenoon. I expect he was tired. I did not wake
him, he slept to about 10 A.M., then he worked at hanging a gate and putting in posts to tea
time. After that we all got to work, Mother and us, and put in the remainder of our wheat.* It
rained on us at the last load but we did not mind it. [*Put the wheat, cut by John Gott 5 days
earier, into the barn, finishing just as the rain begins.]
7th Sabbath. Mizzly morning and the day was cloudy with a slight sprinkling of rain.
8 Dark cloudy morning and the day was showery all through. I took 3 Lambs to Mr. Acheson’s
which he had bought of me. Came home and split a few rails. Jim was fixing up a gate. Mr.
and Mrs. Lonsway were here this eavning.
<Q2 folio 19 recto>
September 1879
9th Dark cloudy morning and a slight rain fell during the morning. I went with a fat cow to Dun-
dalk fair. Did not sell her, was only offered $20. The boys were hauling stove wood and in the
eavning they took a load of shingle timber to the mill. The frost killed every thing that was
green this night, except Canadian thistles.
10 Fine sunny morning and a very hard white frost, quite a thick ice on the water. The day dry and
sunny all through. I was helping Brother Sam to harvest. The boys were binding oats at home.
[in margin] Frost / Hard.
11 Fine sunny morning and the day bright and warm all through. A sharp frost this morning. I
was helping Brother Sam to harvest. Jim was also helping in the afternoon. Jim cradaled [sic]
some at home in the forenoon. [in margin] Frost.
12 White frost this morning, the sun rose bright and clear, the day began to get cloudy about noon.
Rain began to fall about 5:30 P.M. and is raining now, 7:30 P.M., quite lively. Brother Sam
craddled the remainder of my oats today. The boys and I hauled in oats to 4 P.M. Nancy
bound oats. The boys then took the team and went in with Sam to help him. [in margin] Frost.
102
13 Cloudy morning and the day got quite overcast about 2 P.M. It began to rain about 5:30 P.M.
and continued pouring down for a while. I was cutting mixed pease and oats for part of the
forenoon. The boys were helping their uncle Sam to harvest.
14th Sabbath. Rainy morning and the forenoon was hot. Nancy and Eliza and Willie went to Grand-
father’s.
15 Frost this morning. Cloudy, but dry till 6:30 P.M. when it commenced raining and kept at it for
a good while. I was splitting rails, the boys, Jim and John, were cutting mixed feed. Clark was
tramping out pease with the old mare. John Agnew slept here this night.
<Q2 folio 19 verso>
September 1879
16th Cloudy morning and the day was dark and lowering all through. Rain commenced about 6 P.M.
and is now (9 P.M.) raining steady. Jim and John hunted up the calves (which had gone astray)
in the forenoon and mowed in the afternoon. Clark thrashed pease and I split rails.
17 Cloudy morning and raining occassionally during the forenoon. The afternoon was dry. The
three eldest boys were helping Mr. Lonsway to thrash. Nancy was helping to cook. I cleaned
up some pease in the forenoon, and in the afternoon cut some oats.
18 Rainy morning and the day continued show[e]ry during the forenoon, the afternoon was gener-
ally dry. The three eldest boys were at A. Lonsway’s thrashing to 5 P.M. I cut some oats in the
dry spells in the forenoon and in the afternoon fixed at making a place to hold the grain in the
barn. Nancy and Jim took the team and went to Dundalk in the eavning.
19 Dark morning and the day was gloomy-like all through, though without rain. I cut some oats,
Jim went for a R. Lamb and four young pigs to John Irvin’s in the forenoon. John was at Mr.
Kirby’s thrashing in the forenoon and in the afternoon he and Jim helped John Irvin to bind.
John Agnew was here all night.
20 Sunny morning, the day dry. Jim and I cut oats in the forenoon and in the afternoon Jim and
Johney hauled in . The thrashers brought their machine here this eavning. Nancy and I went to
A. Lonsway’s a while this eavning. [in margin] Finished / cutting / grain.
<Q2 folio 20 recto>
September 1879
21st Sabbath. Bright sunny morning and the day continued dry all through.
22 Rather dark morning, but the sun got out dispelling the clouds. The forenoon was dry and clear,
the afternoon got cloudy and rain began to fall about 5 P.M. At 6 P.M. there was a very heavy
shower. We thrashed today. Andrew Stewart’s machine.
23 Cloudy morning, but no rain fell during the day. Finished thrashing at noon. $7.00 per day was
the cost of the machine. The grain yielded pretty fair: Spring Wheat about 20 bushels per acre
and a good sample. Barley about 19 Bushels per acre, very dark in colour. Pease about 23
Bushels per acre, good sample. Oats about 30 Bushels per acre, good sample. We put what
straw we had out of doors into the barn in the afternoon. Brother Sam and Wesley Lonsway
helped us.
24 Cloudy day all through, with alternate showers of rain and a few peeps of the sun now and then.
Nancy and Jim went to Sister Sarah’s to get the yarn she spun. John went and left his measure
for a pair of boots. Clark and I bearded the Barley and cleaned up about a load.
25 Very hard frost this morning. The sun got out pretty bright and the day got middling warm. I
took in to Dundalk 33 Bushels of Barley in the forenoon. Could not sell it, because it was very
103
dark. I left it in the grain house. The weigher said he could sell it for me. I sold a cow today
for $20., got $5.00 of earnest. Johney was helping John Irvin to harvest. Jim and Clark and I
raked up 1 1/4 acres of mixed feed and hauled it in this afternoon.
<Q2 folio 20 verso>
September 1879
26th Beautiful morning, the sun a little hazy, the day almost like Indian Summer. Jim, Clark and I
raked up mixed feed in the forenoon and hauled it in in the afternoon. Nancy was quilting at
mother’s. Johney was at Skeffington Bell’s thrashing.
27 Cloudy morning, but the day kept dry and breezy till about 5:30 P.M. when there was a small
sprinkling of rain. We were hauling in mixed feed today. Johney at Sam’s, thrashing. [in mar-
gin] Finished / harvesting.
28th Sabbath. Cloudy morning, but the day was dry and warm.
29 Cloudy morning, but the day continued breezy and dry, pretty warm with a little sunshine now
and then. I and Clark took the cow which I had sold into Dundalk in the forenoon. In the af-
ternoon I split rails. Jim and John hauled rails.
30 Fine morning, the day dry and pretty windy. I was making fence, Jim was plowing. Nancy
went in to the back line in the afternoon and helped mother to quilt a pet[t]icoat.
October 1879
1st Fine dry morning, the day dry all through, but cloudy in the afternoon. I was putting up fence
in the forenoon, assisted by John and Clark. In the afternoon I went to old Mr. Gott’s raising.
Jim was plowing.
2 Cloudy morning, and rain began to fall about 3 P.M. and was pretty wet during the balance of
the day. Jim was plowing. Clark, Johney and I were logging and stumping. Nancy and I, with
John and William, were at Mr. Lonsway’s helping pare apples this night.
<Q2 folio 21 recto>
October 1879
3rd Very fine morning, and the day was beautiful, dry and sunny. Jim was plowing. Clark, Johney
and I were logging and picking up.
4 Dry sunny morning, and the day was beautiful and dry all through. I was at James Trugon’s
thrashing. Johney was plowing. Clark and Jim were burning and picking up. Brother Sam
fetched his colt here to be weaned.
5th Sabbath. Very fine morning, the day dry and very warm. Nancy and I were in at Father’s.
6 Dry, sunny morning, and the day was beautiful all through. Jim and the team were at Mr. Clip-
part’s thrashing. Johney, Clark and I were picking up, stumping and logging. I got home the
calves which I had traded with Johney Irvin.
7 Beautiful morning, and the day was dry and hazy all through and very sultry. We all went to
the Show Fair at Dundalk. There was not such an exhibit this year as last. I sold 32 Bushels of
Barley at .30¢ per B.
8 Nice dry morning, and the day dry and warm. There came on a slight shower about dark. The
boys and I were raising potatoes, except Jim, who was with Mr. Clippert helping him to thrash.
9 Dry morning, the day dry and sultry all through. Jim was plowing. Johney was at Mr. Mill’s
thrashing. I and Clark were raising potatoes.
104
10 Dry morning, the day dry and very hot. Jim was plowing, Johney was at Mr. Mill’s thrashing. I
and Clark were taking up potatoes.
<Q2 folio 21 verso>
October 1879
11th Very fine morning and the day was dry, sunny and warm. Clark and I were raising potatoes.
Jim was plowing and Johney was helping James Mills to thrash.
12th Sabbath. Beautiful morning and the day was dry, sunny and very sultry. William Lonsway and
wife and Samuel Russell, wife and family, were here today.
13 Beautiful day, dry and sunny. Johney and I, with Clark, were raising potatoes. Jim was plow-
ing. Mr. W. Lonsway and wife were here this afternoon.
14 Very beautiful day all through, warm enough for summer. I was taking up potatoes, Clark was
gathering [stumps], Jim was plowing.
15 Very beautiful day, remarkably so for this season of the year. Jim was plowing, Clark was
burning stumps. I and Johney were taking up potatoes.
16 Beautiful day, the sun a little hazy, but the day very hot. I finished the potatoes this forenoon
and went to see about some bricks in the afternoon for building two chimneys. Jim was plow-
ing.
17 Cloudy morning and a slight sprinkling of rain fell about 11 A.M., the day dry and breezy af-
terwards. Jim and I went in the forenoon for a load of Bricks, $7. per M., and in the afternoon I
chopped a few logs where I was about to log. Nancy and I went at night to Mr. Lonsway’s.
18 Cool dark day, and windy. We logged today, had G. Johnston and his oxen. Jim did not work
today, had a cold. Nancy and I went at night to see Jimmy Irvin who is sick with, I think,
rheumatic fever. Johney & Clark got their new Boots.
<Q2 folio 22 recto>
October 1879
19th Sabbath. Very cool morning, and the day was cool but dry all through. Nancy, Eliza and I vis-
ited at Mr. W. Lonsway’s today.
20 Dry morning, the day cool, dry and breezy. I plowed sod in the forenoon, and quit it then on
account of the ground being so dry and hard. Johney plowed stubble in the afternoon. I then
went with John Irvin to Dundalk. John’s niece, Jane Eliza Irvin, daughter to Robert Irvin, aged
11 years and three months, died this afternoon of Bilious fever* after a sickness of about eight
days. [in margin] Jane E Irvin / died. [*See 4 Mar., 1878.]
21 Dry day, cool, cloudy and breezy. I went in the forenoon with J. Irvin to Dundalk [dittography
stricken: in the forenoon; “to Dundalk” repeated, but not stricken] and hauled home the coffin
for his niece. In the afternoon we went to the funeral.
22 Dry day but cool [stricken: first snow fell this afternoon very hard frost this eavning] I [strick-
en: digging a drain] was trying [to] burn brush this afternoon. [Jim stricken, John written
above] John was plowing. [stricken: John and Clark were picking stones] Jim went to Fever-
sham for the full cloth.
23 Cold morning and the day was dry but cool. There fell a shower of snow this afternoon. I was
digging a drain this afternoon, Jim was plowing, John and Clark were gathering stones. [in
margin] First / snow fall.
24 Very cold morning, quite white with snow, the day cold all through. John was plowing, Jim and
Clark were fixing barn doors. I was digging a cellar drain.
105
25 Very hard frosty morning, the sun got out and the day got milder. John was plowing, Jim and
Clark were fixing Barn doors and cleaning wheat. I was digging drain. Wife and I went to
Dundalk in the eavning.
<Q2 folio 22 verso>
October 1879
26th Sabbath. Fine, dry, breezy day, the sun bright and clear.
27 Bright sunny morning, and the day dry and warm. Jim was plowing, John and Clark banking
the house. I was digging a drain. Nancy and I went to Archy McAuly’s to bid them goodby[e]
as they are going to Red River.
28 Rainy morning, but cleared off, but the day was generally showery with a good deal of rain to-
wards night. I went to Dundalk in the morning for the carpenter, Mr. Cross. Took him home
again in the afternoon with the team. He was putting up stands for chimneys, I was digging a
drain part of the day. Poor Jim is laid up sick with a cold. Johney was with Johney Irvin
thrashing, Clark was banking the house, hauling clay with the stone boat and one horse.
29 Cold, raw morning, the day cool and windy all through. Mr. McMaster (stone mason) was
building chimneys for me. John at J. Irvin’s thrashing. Jim sick, poor boy. I and Clark were
working at the drain, hauling stones to it and putting in a pipe. Nancy took up her cabbages.
30 Showery forenoon, the afternoon a little snow fell. I and Clark were fixing at the drain. John at
J. Irvin’s th[rashing].
31 Cold, stormy morning, snow falling and continued so all day. John, Clark and I were working
at drain. Mr. Lonsway and wife, Maria and James, were here to supper, it being Hallow eve.
<division line>
[stricken September] November
1st Not quite so stormy as yesterday, but some snow fell. We were fixing our stables to put the an-
imals in. Delivered the old mare to Mr. Cross. I had sold her to him on last Tuesday for
$40.00, $30. to be taken in furniture.
<Q2 folio 23 recto>
November 1879
2nd Sabbath. Cloudy morning and a little snow fell during the day. I was in at the back line.
3 Cold, stormy morning and the day continued windy and cold with frequent showers of snow.
Johney, Clark and I were hauling clay and banking the house.
4 Pretty cold morning, but the day got milder towards noon, there is some sleighing, but bad. I
and the boys were hauling clay to bank the house. Alexander Irvin began the chopping of his
15 acres, which he had taken. [in margin] A. Irvin / commenced / chopping.
5 Mild morning and the day continued so all through, with a shower of snow at night. I helped
Mr. Lonsway to kill pigs in the forenoon. The boys were banking the house.
6 Mild day all through. I gave the Boys a holiday. Jim went to the back line and fetched out his
uncle John’s old sleigh. John and Clark went shooting, got one partridge. Nancy went to help
Mother pluck some geese. I worked at the cellar and put in the cabbages.
7 Mild morning, and quite a thaw wind, snow going away today rappidly. We took in our butter
to Dundalk and sold it to Mr. D. Davidson (406 pounds) at .17½ ¢ per pound.
8 Very mild morning, the [snow] entirely gone from the fields, the cattle out grazing like in sum-
mer, the day mild and balmy. Johney was plowing, I chored around.
9th Sabbath. Mild day all through. Fields clear of snow.
106
10 Mild day, no rain, the weather just like spring. I hauled Mr. J. J. Middleton a load of Bricks
from Proton Station to Dundalk. Johney was helping Mr. Kirby to haul manure.
<Q2 folio 23 verso>
November 1879
11th Wet morning, but cleared off about 9:30 A.M., was showery till eavning, came on a regular
pour at dark, is now, (7:15) P.M., raining quite lively. Johney was plowing during the fair part
of the day. I was fixing up potatoe pits for the winter.
12 Dark morning, and the day was pretty wet all through, with very heavy rain towards night.
Johney plowed in the dry part of the day.
13 Cloudy morning and a slight mizzle of rain fell during most of the day. Johney plowed in the
afternoon, in the forenoon I hewed some sticks [perhaps for building a manger?] for a cow sta-
ble, and in the afternoon attended a trustee meeting in No. 5 Melancthon.
14 Misty dark morning, and rain came on about 10 A.M. and poured down pretty constantly to
about 2 P.M. Jim and I were hewing logs in the dry part of the day. John was plowing. I
[stricken: attended a tr] went to Skeffington Bell’s at night and helped him to fill Township Col-
lector’s Receipts. Alexander Patterson was at our house during the rain.
15 Rather misty morning, but the day held up dry. James Mills was score hacking [?] with us to-
day. Skeffington Bell came here tonight and I helped him to make out some Receipts.
16th Sabbath. Showery day all through.
17 Misty morning, but no rain fell through the day. Jim went to School. John plowed. I hewed
timber. Skeffington Bell was here tonight. I helped him to fill Receipts.
<Q2 folio 24 recto>
November 1879
18th Sharp frosty morning, very cold, freezing all day. Jim and Clark went to school. John tried to
plow but the ground was too hard, had to stop. I was sawing and hewing timber for a cow sta-
ble.
19 Cold, stormy day all through. I was doing nothing, did not feel like working.
20 Very cold, stormy morning, and the day kept snowing, blowing and freezing. We were butcher-
ing hogs, assisted by Mr. Lonsway in the afternoon. [in margin] Butchered / Hogs.
21 Sharp freezing morning, but not quite so cold as yesterday. Some snow fell during the day. We
were choring around, the boys cleaned up a small grist in the afternoon, and I took it to the mill,
also took some barley to be chopped. We took in some cabbages to Dundalk and sold them for
.40¢ per doz.
22 Cold, stormy day, strong wind and some snow falling. I and Johney and Clark were cutting
some firewood in the bush. Jim was helping his mother to cut up the porkers. Mr. Lonsway
and wife were here a while tonight. A man on crutches, having had his feet frozen ten years
ago, had driven here today.
23 Sabbath. Quite blustery this morning, the day cold and stormy all through, with some snow
falling. Brother Sam and his family were here this afternoon.
24 Pretty sharp morning, but not so keen a freeze as yesterday. Johney, Clark and I were hauling
home firewood. Jim was at school.
25 Mild this morning, but a heavy snow storm came on about 8 AM. Soon cleared off and the day
was fine. Johney and Clark started this morning for Essa, a distance of about 40 miles, with 6
head of cattle to get wintered, as we are scarce of feed.
107
<Q2 folio 24 verso>
November 1879
26th Nice mild morning, and the snow melting. Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the afternoon and I
brought home 4½ squares of shingles from the mill. The sawing of them cost me .90¢ per
square, the timber was my own.
27 Mild morning, soft like, some rain in the forenoon and a good deal fell during the afternoon.
28 Some rain fell this morning, then it cleared off a little, there came on more about 11 AM. The
afternoon was quite showery.
29 Sharp frosty morning, cold wind and the roads very hard and rough. Went with the waggon to
Primrose, a distance of 18 miles, to meet the boys who were returning from Essa after leaving
the cattle there. Mr. James Murphy and Mr. John Russell were here tonight.
30th Sabbath. Cold, raw morning, and the day was pretty chilly all through. Nancy and I visited at
the Back line today.
December
1st Pretty mild morning, with some snow on the ground, the day was rather mild all through. I left
home this morning and went to the Township of Essa, stopped at J. Agnew’s.
2 Mild morning, thawing and most of the snow went. Snowed some at night. I stopped at John
Russell’s at night.
3 Ground covered with snow, but pretty soft and bad walking. Left John Russell’s this morning,
had dinner at John Agnew’s and stopped at James Murphy’s in Tossorontio [=Tosorontio]
Township this night.
<Q2 folio 25 recto>
December 1879
4th Rather soft morning, but a nice quantity of snow on the ground. I felt tired today and stopped
all day and night at James Murphy’s.
5 Mild morning, and the day got warmish towards noon, and in the afternoon there was quite a
thaw. I left James Murphy’s this morning and arrived home about 9 P.M.
6 Soft morning, and rain fell through the day, a general thaw in progress. John and James were at
John Irvin’s thrashing to about 2 P.M.
7th Sabbath. Soft morning and the day continued so all through, with a little snow fall.
8 Rather mild this morning, and the day showed some appearance of rain, something like a mist
fell occassionally. I and Johney were at John Irvin’s thrashing to about 2 P.M. when the ma-
chine broke.
9 Pretty sharp cold morning, the ground froze hard, the wind pretty high, the day cold and very
windy all through. There was a regular downpour of rain sett [=set] in about 9 P.M. and lasted
nearly all through the night. Johney and I were helping J. Irvin to thrash.
10 Wet morning, and the day was windy and showery all through. There is a regular deluge of wa-
ter on the ground now, and it is still raining, 8:45 P.M. Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Lonsway were
here this afternoon.
11 Cold morning, and hard frost, the ground hard. Cold wind all day. I was taking the School
census today, stopped at Father’s all night. Dined at Mr. William Nethercot’s [=Neithercut’s].
<Q2 folio 25 verso>
108
December 1879
12th Cold morning, with some snow on the ground, but not enough to make sleighing. I was taking
the School Census today.
13 Pretty cold day, the roads rough, no sleighing or waggoning either, of any account. Sister Sarah
stopped here tonight.
14th Sabbath. Cold morning and the day was cold all through, with a snowfall of about four inches
at night.
15 The ground covered with snow this morning, bad sleighing and bad waggoning. I and Nancy
started for Essa this morning and got to John Agnew’s at night.
16 Pretty cold morning, the day milder from about 10 AM. I sold the Essa farm today to Mr.
Abraham Hussey of Barrie for $(4200.00) Four thousand and two hundred dollars (subject to a
mortgage of $2100[)]. This leaves Brother John and I $2100 to be divided between us, which
we have done, I getting Mr. Hussey’s notes for $1000., $400 to be paid me 16th Feb. 1881, and
$600 to be paid me 16th Feb. 1882. John getting $1100 to be paid as follows: Feb 16th 1880,
$500.; Feb. 16th 1881, $400. and 16th Feb. 1882, $200. This transaction and sale arose out of a
former transaction and sale or trade of lands made by Brother John and I to John Arnold of Es-
sa, Viz. in June 1877 John put in his farm of 100 acres in Melancthon, valued at $3000. and I
put in my farm of 50 acres in the same township*, valued at $2000., against Arnold’s farm of
109 acres in Essa, valued at $5000. I paid Arnold $175. over and above my lot and John done
work on my 2/5ths of the place and otherwise, to about the same amount of money, which left
John and I about equal, viz. 2/5ths and 3/5ths shares in the place
—continued
<Q2 folio 26 recto>
December 1879
continued— After the trade was made I mortgaged the Essa Lot for $2100, of this sum John got to
pay off the mortgage on his Melancthon farm $1153, and $400 in cash to himself, and I got
$408. to pay off a mortgage which was on my lot in Melancthon and $25 in cash. In all, John
got out of the $2100 borrowed $1553 and I got $433. The remaining $114 was consumed in
paying $77. of interest in advance and $37 for insuring the buildings and expenses of the loan.
Nancy and I stopped at Brother John’s this night.
[*the lands in question: in June 1877 Robert Russell sells Lot 220, Con. 1, Melancthon (50
acres), John Russell sells Lot 236, Con. 1 Melancthon (100 acres), in exchange for west ½ of
Lot 6 on the 6th Con. Essa (109 acres), which Robert and John share, with John living on the
Essa farm. This Essa farm is now sold to Abraham Hussey.]
17 Pretty cold morning, snow on the ground and nice sleighing. John drove us in the sleigh to
Shelburne. There we took the cars [=train] and got home about 10 O’clock this night.
18 Mild morning. Nancy and I went to Father’s
19 Sharp, frosty morning. Jim and I went to Brother Sam to help him as he had the sawing ma-
chine. The old machine kept breaking all through the day, and made its final break the first cut
it attempted to take off after dinner.
20 Pretty mild morning, and the day was rather nice all through. The boys and I cleaned up 41
B[ushels]: 20 lbs oats and sold them in Dundalk for 30½ ¢ per Bushel.
21st Sabbath. Very cold morning, and the day kept getting colder as it advanced. The eavning was
something fearful, several people got nipped with the frost, and no wonder. [in margin] Very
cold.
109
22 Not near as cold as yesterday. The boys and I cleaned up 1635 pounds of pease and sold them
in Dundalk for 60¢ p. Bushel. Messrs Neil Strachan and John Stubbings, clerks* in Mr. D. Da-
vidson’s, and Mr. A. Lonsway and wife were here, and spent most of the night with us. [*Neil
Strachan, John Stubbings, clerks in Davidson’s general merchandise store, Dundalk, are friends
of Robert, with whom he stayed overnight on 2 May 1879, and are mentioned in 11 Jan. 1879
“O. B. Jovial” entry.]
<Q2 folio 26 verso>
December 1879
23rd Rather mild morning, the day pretty mild all through, capital sleighing now! The boys and I
cleaned up 1630 pounds of pease and sold them in Dundalk for 62¢ per Bushel in the afternoon.
Jim took the team to Mr. George Johns[t]on’s thrashing, but the thrashers did not come. Mr.
John Abbott was here today, canvassing me for to support him as Deputy Reeve. Jim took 2
saw logs to the mill.
24 Mild morning, and the day was very moderate all through, with a little sleet. Johney and I went
to Sam’s to help him at the sawing machine. The old thing worked middling, but he only sawed
about 5 hours for the day’s work. Jim went to G. Johnston’s with the team to thrash.
25 Rather sharp morning and the day was pretty cold all through. Willie, Eliza, Nancy, Jim and I
spent the most of the day at Mr. A. Lonsway’s. Jimmy, Johney and Clark went in the eavning to
Dundalk to a tea meeting.
26 Very sharp morning and the day was cold all through, with a little snow falling now and then.
Jim and Johney were hauling saw logs in the forenoon and in the afternoon they took some
grain to the mill to be chopped. Clark and I were cleaning up pease and bagging oats. Sam
McBratteny (a thrasher) was here for dinner. Mrs. Russell visited Mrs. Bell.
27 Sharp morning, but the day got somewhat milder. Jim and Johney were hauling saw logs.
Clark and I were cleaning and putting away our seed oats.
28th Pretty mild morning and the day was soft and nice all through. Father and Mother were here
today.
29 Soft morning and a little rain falling, it kept thawing all through the day. Jim and John were
hauling saw logs. Clark and I were cleaning up wheat. Brother Sam was here a little while this
eavning.
<between 26 verso and 27 recto, inserted half-page, with words to a song >
Come all you pretty maidens, for you know my tale is true
That never since my wedding-day have I made love to you.
The kisses and the blisses it was once our joy to win
Can never charm our married life, for it would be a sin.
They say that stolen fruit is sweet, but sour the grapes may grow,
As all who tread the sinful path of changing love may know,
Then all should heed the warning, and each gossip low defy
And never kiss another when your wife stands by.
Chorus- Then be a little careful, if you are a flirting man,
For you know that better half of yours will catch you if she can.
If stolen fruit is sweetest, why just taste it on the sly,
And never kiss another when your wife stands by!
You will find that it is better for to be a little meek
110
Than rashly, when your wife is near, a pretty maiden seek.
For if you live a quiet life and long for pleasure too,
Don’t let your dear one see the maid in converse sweet with you.
You cannot be too careful, she will catch you if she can
And then in bitter truth you’ll know that you’re a married man.
If you are sorely tempted, why just meet her on the sly,
But never kiss another when your wife stands by. — chorus.
You need not get in trouble if the right way you pursue
And leave alone the pretty girls who once were sweet on you
For if your love is pure and true, all jealous strife will cease,
And though you sigh for bygone bliss, your heart will be at ease.
Oh then be strong if you should meet the tempter in the way
And do not from the fold of bliss to sin and sorrow stray.
But if you want to flirt just once, why do it on the sly,
And never kiss another when your wife stands by!
<end of song>
<Q2 folio 27 recto>
December 1879
30th Sharp morning and the day was pretty cold all through. Jim and Clark went with a small grist
to Osprey Mill. I went to Dundalk to transact some business.
31 Very sharp morning, wind in the east and some snow falling. The wind veered around to the
north-west in the afternoon and there was a heavy fall of snow. I attended the annual School
meeting at S.S. 5 Melancthon in the forenoon and in the afternoon visited Mr. Henry Hewett
who is in bed, sick of pleuresy and inflamation. Jim and Johney hauled saw logs to the mill.
January 1880
1st Not very cold this morning, the day was bright and sunny till the afternoon, when it clouded
over and got pretty windy towards eavning. Nancy, Jim, and Eliza visited at W. Lonsway’s.
Johney helped Brother Sam to clean grain. Clark and I cleaned and put away our seed wheat.
[in margin] Borrowed Sam’s / T. Sheep [read R=ram?]
2 Mild morning, but very heavy sleighing as the snow had drifted through the night. The day was
fine all through. I visited Miss S. Jackson and Mr. H. Hewett in the forenoon, as they are sick.
In the afternoon I took 9 B[ushels]: 17 pounds of spring wheat to Dundalk and exchanged it for
the same amount of fall wheat, paying .05 a bushel difference. The boys hauled a load of saw
logs to the Mill in the forenoon.
3 Some sleet falling this morning, which kept increasing through the day and on at night, the rain
came pouring down. Jim and Johney went to the Sawmill in the forenoon with logs. Clark and
I cleaned up some oats and bagged them fit for market. [in margin] Rain.
<Q2 folio 27 verso>
January 1880
4th Sabbath. Soft morning, but the wind got pretty strong and cold in the afternoon, and was rather
cold at night.
111
5 Fine, mild morning and the day was pretty warm and sunny all through till night, when the
wind rose and was very cold and blustery. I took in 10 Bags of oats to Dundalk and sold them
for .30¢ per bushel. They weighed 28 bushels less 10 pounds.
6 Mild morning, the snow going away. The day pretty mild all through. Mrs. Russell and I went
to Dundalk in the afternoon and bought 23 pounds of tea @ .45¢ per lb. [in margin] Posted /
Letter to / William / (Dickson P.O.)
7 Hard morning, the roads very slippery. It got soft about noon, the sun came out pretty strong.
Mrs. Russell and I visited Miss Sarah Jackson (who is sick) in the forenoon, and in the after-
noon Jim and his mother went to Dundalk. Skeffington Bell was here this eavning and traded
me 1½ tons of hay for three spring calves.
8 Soft morning, the snow going away rapidly, some rain in the afternoon. Willie and I took the
calves to Skeffington Bell in the forenoon and in the afternoon I went to the back line and Sam
and I inspected a Bush Lot that I have some notion of purchasing. [This is Con. 4, Melancthon;
see below, 12 Jan. entry]
9 Misty morning, the thaw still continues, rain in the afternoon and pretty wet at night. I walked
to Flesherton to see William Strain on some business.
10 Soft morning and the day mild, like spring, colder towards night. Clark and I brought in a pota-
to pit. Jim and John cut firewood in the bush. Jim cut his great toe. I went to Dundalk towards
night.
<Q2 folio 28 recto>
January 1880
11th Sabbath. Mild morning, thawing in the forenoon. Raining in the afternoon.
12 Mild morning although the ground is hard with the frost. Sleighing all gone, the day pretty
mild all through. I went to Dundalk and saw Mr. Thos. McKee, who is up from Sandhill. I
tried to bargain with him for 100 acres of Bush land which he has on the 4 Con. Melancthon. I
could not do it: he asked $1000 in five equal annual payments with 6 per cent per annum inter-
est. I offered him 5½ per cent, therefore there was no bargain between us.
13 Hard morning, sharp frost, a showery snow fell, did not amount to much, no sleighing. Nancy
and I went to Dundalk, took back our tea which we had got. It was bad, price .45¢ per pound.
Exchanged it for some at .70¢ per pound, pretty good tea this time. Saw McKee in the after-
noon. He opened the Bargain again, but nothing came of it.
14 Hard, cold morning, the ground pretty bare of snow, except in the fence corners. The day got
milder about 10 AM. I was chopping firewood in the bush, broke my axe handle just at night.
Jim is in at his uncle Sam’s tonight.
15 Mild morning, and the day very fine and warm all through. Went to Dundalk in the forenoon
and bought an axe handle for .20¢. Went to see brother Sam in the afternoon, he is sick of
Quinsy.* Went from his place to Dundalk for some medecine. Slept at Father’s this night.
[*complication of tonsillitis—peritonsillar abscess—infection between tonsil and wall of
throat.]
<Q2 folio 28 verso>
January 1880
16th Mild morning and the day soft all through. Went to the Doctor’s today for medicine for Sam.
Went at night to a Surprise party* held at Mr. Skeffington Bell’s. [This must be a surprise
112
birthday party for Robert, who is 44 the next day. He has helped Skeffington Bell numerous
times with his township rolls and receipts.]
17 Rainy morning and the day continued showery all through. I was at Brother Sam’s most of the
day. This is my 44th Birthday. [in margin] Birthday.
18 Sabbath. Soft morning and the day continued mild.
19 Very mild morning and the day was one of remarkable fineness, like a day in April. I went to
Dundalk today.
20 Snow on the ground again, but poor sleighing. I went to see Brother Sam in the forenoon,
chored around home in the eavning.
21 Rather cold this morning, but the day got milder. I went in the forenoon to see Mr. W. Henders’
son who is very sick, and in the afternoon Nancy and I went to Dundalk.
22 Fine morning, and the day continued fine all through. Nancy and I went to Melancthon in the
afternoon.
23 A little cool in the morning, but the day got milder as it advanced. I hauled some drags of wood
from the swail* in the forenoon, and in the afternoon Brother Sam and his family were here. [*
“Swail”, or more fequently “swale” = low lying or marshy land, which Robert is clearing for
cultivation. See 29 July 1880, 9, 10, 16 Aug. 1880, and repeatedly in June, July, Aug. 1881.]
24 Very fine day all through. I cut some wood in the Bush and Johney and Clark hauled it in the
forenoon, and in the afternoon they took 2 Bags of potatoes to John Morrow’s and brought
home the grist which was at the mill.
<Q2 folio 29 recto>
January 1880
25th Sabbath. Very fine day all through. The sun came out bright like a day in spring. Nancy and I
were a while at Mr. Lonsway’s.
26 Beautiful day all through, the snow is pretty much gone off the roads and the waggons are run-
ning. I was chopping firewood in the bush to about 4 P.M., when I took a pair of boots (miss-
fits) which I had got and returned them. I stopped at Skeffington Bell’s coming home and
helped him with his Roll.
27 Beautiful day all through. I was cutting firewood in the Bush.
28 Very fine day all through. I did not work today.
29 Chilly morning, but the day got milder towards noon. I went in the forenoon with the team for
Mrs. C. Bell. She stopped with us till about 4 P.M. I then took her home. The night was very
cold and stormy.
30 Rather milder this morning, and about noon it began to rain. Ceased raining before night and
began to freeze. The night was very cold. [in margin] Got letter / from / William.
31 Quite a cold morning, storming, freezing and snowing. The day was cold and freezing all
through. I chopped some firewood in the bush in the afternoon.
<Q2 folio 29 verso>
February 1880
1st Sabbath. Very cold morning and the day was extremely cold all through. [in margin] Very
cold.
2 Cold morning, and the day was sharp and freezing all through, with a strong wind. I was chop-
ping firewood in the bush.
113
3 Snowing, blowing, and freezing all day long. I was chopping firewood in the bush. William
Henders’ son, of about 14 years of age, was buried today.
4 Very cold day all through, freezing and snowing. I was chopping firewood in the Bush.
5 Cold, stormy day all through, snowing and freezing. I hauled home about 2500 pounds of hay
from Skeffington Bell’s, which I had got from him in trade for two calves. Skeffington helped
me.
6 Cold morning and the day was pretty cold all through. I made a way in the forenoon through
the bush to the wood which I had cut, and in the afternoon Nancy and I went to Sam’s, and
from thence to Dundalk.
7 Very stormy morning, and the day continued blowing and freezing. Johney and I hauled fire-
wood. I went to Dundalk in the eavning. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway were here a while today.
Sabbath
8 Very stormy morning, blowing and snowing, drifting a good deal all through the day. Mrs.
Russell and I visited Mrs. C. Bell.
9 Cold morning, and the day pretty sharp all through. I took some barley to the mill in the after-
noon to get chopped.
<Q2 folio 30 recto>
February 1880
10th Stormy morning and the day continued cold to about noon, when it ameliorated. There was
snow fell in the morning. I was hauling saw logs for James Patterson today, and I stopped at his
place all night.
11 Very fine morning, and the day continued fine all through. The snow melted considerably in
the afternoon. I was hauling saw logs for James Patterson today.
12 Soft morning and the day continued thawing all through. I went to the Back Line. I met Mr.
Thomas Norvall when I was coming home.
13 Fine morning, the day continued soft and mild. Brought Jim home from Sam’s today, as he is
not well.
14 Mild morning and the day continued pretty fine all through. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon
to see Mr. Hanbury, Bootmaker, who had made a number of mistakes in my Boot Bill. I also
posted two papers to Brother William. In the afternoon I chopped some firewood in the bush.
Brother Sam and William Lonsway were here today, so also were Mr. Andrew Lonsway and
wife.
15th Sabbath. Fine morning and the day continued fine, though cloudy. Brother Sam and family
were here.
16 Fine mild morning and the day continued fine with sunshine just like spring. The snow is pret-
ty much gone off the gravel and the waggons are running. I was cutting firewood in the bush to
about 4 P.M., then Jim and I took the wagon to the mill for some chopped barley. It was not
done for us.
<Q2 folio 30 verso>
February 1880
17th Very fine morning and the day continued soft, with sunshine mostly all day. I was cutting fire-
wood.
114
18 Rain this morning, then it faired off for a while, and came on again. After the rain there was
frequent showers of snow, with pretty hard frost in the afternoon. It is blowing, snowing and
freezing now (8 P.M.). I was cutting firewood in the bush today.
19 Very cold morning, blowing, freezing and snowing. The day continued remarkably cold all
through. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon with the waggon and some wheat to get gristed
and some barley to be chopped. The roads were fearfully rough. Brother Sam was here a while
this night.
20 Another cold morning, freezing, the day was quite cold all through. I was cutting firewood in
the Bush.
21 Stormy morning and the day was one of alternate snow showers with strong wind. I was chop-
ping firewood.
22nd Sabbath. Rather mild day all through, sunshine some of the time. Nancy and I were in at Fa-
ther’s.
23 Cold, stormy morning, snowing, blowing and freezing were the principal features of the day. I
was cutting firewood.
24 Rather mild morning and the day was pretty fine to the afternoon, when there came on several
showers of sleet and rain. Very heavy rain at about 8:30 P.M. I took 23 Bushels and 15 pounds
of wheat, partly fall and spring, to Mr. Wright’s Mill, Osprey. I only got 35 pounds of flour to
the Bushel, the smallest return I ever got at any mill, and the wheat was very good. I guess I
won’t go back! [in margin] Went to Mill.
<Q2 folio 31 recto>
February 1880
25th Wet morning and the day continued showe[r]y all through. I done nothing of work-kind today.
26 Fine morning, and the day was like a day in spring, sunshiny and mild. We took in a pit of po-
tatoes in the forenoon and in the afternoon went to Dundalk.
27 Rather wet early in the morning, but the day got fine soon and was pleasant and mild. Jim and I
cut roads to some firewood in the Bush and hewed some stable logs. [in margin] Good / Reso-
lutions
28 Rather wet this morning and the day continued slightly damp. Jim and I were hewing stable
logs. I went at night to Skeffington Bell’s to help him with his roll. Severe wind storm this
night.
29th Sabbath. Frosty morning, snowing and blowing, very cold all day long.
March [1880]
1st Sunny this morning, which it kept up at intervals all through the day. Jim and I were hauling
home stove wood, the ground is very soft and the sleigh sinks deep in the mud. There is only a
slight sprinkling of snow on the ground.
2 Snow this morning, a nice quantity on the ground and more falling, but it did not last long, as
the day came out soft and warm, and in the afternoon the sleighing was gone. Jim and I, with
the team, helped Brother Sam to haul 38 saw logs from Mr. Doyle’s Sawmill to Mr. McGreg-
or’s. He had them there for two years and more.
3 Mild morning, but the sky got overcast and rain came on about 1:30 P.M. The eavning was
wet. Johney and Jim hauled some stable logs. Mother and I tapped some trees but the sap did
not run. I was subpeaned [=subpoenaed] to attend an arbitration on tomorrow between Robert
115
Patterson and John McDowell. William Lonsway and family were here today. [in margin]
First / tapping.
<Q2 folio 31 verso>
March 1880
4th Slight mizzle of rain this morning, but finally the day became dry and continued so. I attended
an arbitration between John McDowell and Robert Patterson relating to a grist mill which R.
Patterson had rented from J. McDowell. I was a witness in the case but did not stop to see how
the case ended. Brother John is stopping here tonight. Brother Sam brought a load of hay to
me this eavning.
5 Stormy morning, raining and blowing. The rain turned to snow in the afternoon, with a strong
freezing wind. Brother Sam brought a load of hay to me this forenoon, making in all, I think,
about 2500 pounds which he gave me for helping him some in this last haying. I went to Dun-
dalk in the eavning, paid the Blacksmith in full and also one sho[e]-maker. Also gave a new
note to J. Norval for $34.72 , with 12 per cent interest, the old one was for $31.00*. Also paid
up interest $6.60 to D. Davidson, Esq., on a note which he holds against me. Lifted the old
note and gave a new one. This note is now of my true indebitness [=indebtedness] as I gave it
to return another. [*$31.00 + 12% = $34.72]
6 Rather sharp morning, but the day got milder as it advanced. The boys and I were getting out
stable logs. John Agnew was here tonight.
7th Sabbath. Sharp morning, and the day was pretty cold all through. John Agnew stopped here
tonight and so did Brother John.
8 Sharp, cold morning and the day was pretty chilly all along, although the sun shone out bright.
Brother John and John Agnew left here this morning for Essa. Miss Cherry and Miss Nicol
were here this forenoon. Brother Sam was here a while at night. The boys and I were getting
out sleepers and beams for the cow stable.
<Q2 folio 32 recto>
March 1880
9th Very cold morning and the day continued cold with a slight snow fall. I was helping brother
Sam to saw stove wood. Jim and Johney were getting rafters. I slept at Father’s this night.
Nancy was at Mrs. Bell’s.
10 Very sharp morning, and the day very cold from morning to night. Brother Sam was helping us
to lay the foundation of a cow stable.
11 Cold day from morning to night, sharp frost and cold south wind. Scarcely any snow on the
ground, although a very little fell today. The boys were swamping out firewood. I was prepar-
ing Bulls [clearly written, but meaning?], Skids and overlays for the cow stable.
12 Very cold morning, but towards noon the sun shone out clear and the day was warmer in the af-
ternoon. I was asking hands for the Raising of Stable.
13 Cold, raw morning, wind in the South East, the day very cold from morning to night. I raised a
log stable, 20 x 16 in the clear [meaning?]. The corner men were Samuel Russell, William
Lonsway, Alexander Patterson and Joseph Bowler. The others were William Kirby, John Irvin,
Andrew Lonsway, James Trugon and William John Arnold.
14th Sabbath. Sharp morning, keen freeze, the day cold all through.
116
15 Sharp morning, but the day got milder as the sun got higher. The afternoon was pretty mild.
Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the afternoon, in the forenoon Jim and John swamped out
wood. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway were here a while this night.
<Q2 folio 32 verso>
March 1880
16th Mild morning with a pretty heavy snow fall, and the snow kept coming down pretty lively all
day. I was chinking a goose house. The boys were chopping wood in the bush in the forenoon
and in the afternoon they hauled stove wood to the house.
17th Patrick’s day in the morning, and a very cold morning at that! The day kept chilly, a little
sleighing. Jim went in the forenoon to James Patterson’s for six hundred of hay which I had
earned with him. I got the hay but it was poor, dirty rubbish! I was helping brother Sam to cut
stove wood and I slept at Father’s all night. Poor Father and Mother are both pretty sick with a
severe cold.
18 A little milder this morning, and the day got a good deal warmer after dinner. The boys were
chopping. Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. A. Lonsway went with us. I pur-
chased 4 Barrels of salt to sow again [in] spring on the wheat. I am told that it is excellent
thing for grain of any kind. I purchased [it] for $1.10 per Barell.
19 Mild morning and the day was sunny and warm in the afternoon. Mrs. Nickel was here visiting
today. Johney and I took out some flooring for cow stable. Jim was helping A. Irvin to chop.
20 Some snow fell this morning and kept increasing in quantity to now, when it is a pretty severe
storm, and continued at it, Blowing and snowing incessantly to near night. Jim was helping A.
Irvin to chop in the forenoon. Johney and I were hewing logs for flooring cow stable.
21st Sabbath. Mild morning, and the day was pretty genial all through. Nancy and I went with the
sleigh to Melancthon to see Father and Mother.
<Q2 folio 33 recto>
March1880
22nd The ground covered with snow this morning, which fell last night. The sun came out strong,
melting the snow all off the roads about noon. Some little sleighing in the morning. Jim,
Johney and I were getting saw logs out of the bush to the gravel [=the gravel road, now High-
way 10] in the forenoon. In the afternoon I tapped 62 trees. Nancy put in the spiles, then Jim
and I made some troughs for catching the sap. We all took a hand at whittling out some spiles
after night. [in margin] First trees tapped / which ran.
23 Rather fine morning, but there were some snow [flakes] in the forenoon and in the afternoon
there were frequent showers of snow with heavy wind. It is at present (7:20) P.M. snowing and
blowing. The boys were making sap troughs. [in margin] Coldest / night this / winter.
24 Very sharp, cold morning, the previous night was the coldest, I think, which has came this win-
ter. The day continued cold all through. Nancy and I were at Mr. Lonsway’s a while this
eavning.
25 Bright sunny morning, though a sharp freeze. The day got milder in the afternoon, and was
pretty pleasant and warm. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and bought 2 Hats and 2 pair of
Gaiters for the Boys. In the afternoon I hauled some sap troughs to the sugar Bush. Jim and
Johny chopped stove wood in the bush.
26 Rather chilly this morning, but the day got fine in the afternoon, and continued fine. I was
placing troughs at the trees in the forenoon. In the afternoon I helped the boys to chop stove
117
wood. The boys went after tea to Dundalk and Jim got Johney’s hat at $1.00 changed for a soft
one at .75. I’ll make him take it back, as I do not like it. Mrs. Clippert was here this afternoon.
27 A slight mizzle of rain this morning, which turned to snow in the afternoon, with a very strong
wind. It is snowing and blowing now, 8 P.M., like fury. Jim an[d] I were notching stove wood.
We lost an old Ewe today. She was crossing a deep furrow with ice on the water. She broke
through the ice, breaking her leg and could not struggle out of the water, as she was very heavy
with lamb. [in margin] one sheep / lost.
<Q2 folio 33 verso>
March 1880
28th Sabbath. Nice quantity of snow on the ground this morning, and the air was quite chilly. The
day remained cool, or rather, cold, all through, although the sun shone out bright. I went to Fa-
ther’s. Brother Sam and family came here in the afternoon. [in margin] Easther [=Easter].
29 Rather cold morning, and the day was sunny though chilly. The boys and I were cutting stove
wood.
30 Cool this morning, the sun shone out all day, yet the air was keen and bracing, but the day was
chilly throughout. The boys and I were cutting stove wood in the bush. [in the margin:] First
Robbin / seen.
31 Beautiful morning, the sun out warm and bright, the day most pleasant of any for so far this
season. Nancy, Eliza and I attended a Quarterly Examination in Sch. Sect. 5 Melancthon. Jim
and John were cutting stove wood in the bush. [in margin] First lamb / came.
April [1880]
1st Fine morning, the day pleasant all through, the sun shone out bright most of the day. We
tapped some trees today and made about a gallon of molasses, Mrs. Russell helping in the bush.
Jim notched wood in the forenoon. Eliza climbed a sapling in the bush, it broke with her, she
fell about eight feet and got badly shaken.
2 Fine morning and the day was dry to about noon, when there came on a slight mizzle of rain,
which increased to a regular Rain storm at night. Johney and I were hauling wood to the camp
in the forenoon, in the afternoon we gathered what sap there was. Jim was at J. Arnold’s saw-
ing.
3 Wet morning and the day was dry in the middle and wet at both ends. Nancy and I went to
James Trugon’s about 3 P.M. and stopped to about 7. P.M.
<Promissory note inserted between pages 33 verso and 34 recto>
Proton April 3rd 1880
I the undersigned Alexander Irvin agree and bargain to finish the ten acres of chopping which I am
working at for Robert Russell by the 30th of the present month. I to underbrush and cut all snags and
small timber of four inches in diameter level with the ground, to pile up all the Brush in a tidy manner,
to cut all the laying logs on the said ten acres, except those which the said Robert Russell may reserve
for saw logs, or Rail timber. The saw logs to be pointed out to me by the said R. Russell and I to cut
them off at the root of the trees and at the top where said R. Russell may show me. The said cuts to be
butted or put in straight next the saw log. The laying rail timber to be cut off at the root . And I to re-
ceive the sum of $33.33 [Fifty is stricken; $33.33 written above line] dollars for the job completed, a
cow valued at $22.00 last fall, and $11.33 in January 1881. And in default of completing the job, or
piling up the Brush on any part of the acres in suitable manner fit to burn, I agree to forfeit the $11.33
118
Balance, and also to pay over to the said Robert Russell anything more it may take to finish the job.
And I agree further that he may either finish the job himself, or employ another, if I fail in doing it.
his
Alexander X Irwin
mark
<end of promissory note>
<Q2 folio 34 recto>
April 1880
Sabbath. 4th. Muggy day all through. Roads dreadful heavy. [in margin] First cow calved / Vio-
let
5 Cloudy morning, but the day brightened up and was dry all through. Jim and Johney started for
the Township of Essa this morning, to bring home the cattle which we had wintering there. I
was cutting stove wood.
6 Snowing this morning and continued snowing a little all through the day. I was cutting stove
wood. [in margin] A. McAuley’s / lot Sale.
7 Pretty cold morning, sharp, raw wind all day, though the sun shone out bright in the afternoon.
8 Cold morning, wind sharp, the ground froze [=frozen] very hard, the day somewhat milder in
the afternoon. I cut some stove wood at the house in the forenoon, and in the afternoon boiled
down some sap. [in margin] T. Talbot and / Miss Leach / married.
9 Pretty hard frost this morning, but the day got milder towards 10 A.M. and was soft and mild in
the afternoon. I went to J. McDowell’s Sawmill in the forenoon, and traded him a hemlock log
16 feet long scaling 359 feet for two smaller ones 16 feet 5 inches long and scaling 325, the dif-
ference of 34 feet I allowed him for hauling the logs forward to the gangway. In the afternoon I
went with the team for it, the roads were very heavy and the horses had to pull hard. The boys
got home tonight with the 5 head of cattle we had wintering in Essa. They came from Sister-
ville, a distance of about 30 Miles and were home about 11:30 P.M.
10 Beautiful morning, the sun shone out warm and strong, the air balmy like a morning in June.
The day got cooler about 11 A.M. At 1 P.M. some snow began to fall, which kept increasing,
also the wind rose till finally a fearful snow was raging, and it is still (7:45), blowing and snow-
ing at a terrific rate. The snow is blowing into every crevice in the outbuildings, rendering
them very uncomfortable for the cattle. [in margin] Great snow storm.
<Q2 folio 34 verso>
April 1880
11th Sabbath. Ground covered with snow this morning, the wind blowing and drifting strongly, the
day pretty chilly all through.
12 Quite cold morning, but the day got somewhat warmer towards noon, with a little softening of
the ground towards eavning. The boys were cutting wood.
13 Fine morning, the sun warm and bright, the day sunny from morning to night. Johney and I
sawed wood in the forenoon, and in the afternoon I helped in the sugar Bush.
14 Bright sunny morning, the day warm and clear all through. We were working in the sugar Bush
and putting up stove pipes today. Splendid sap day, the best we have had for the season. One
of the cows got down in the stable last night. We had some trouble in getting her up. We had to
get A. Lonsway and his son James to help us. [in margin] Heard frogs.
119
15 Bright sunny morning, high wind, the day dry and warm all through. The boys sawed stove
wood in the forenoon and in the afternoon Jim started to plow. It turned over well, scarcely any
frost in the ground. It was stubble ground we were plowing. I was working at the Sugar camp
in the forenoon and in the afternoon I was letting water off the low places in the fields. Mr.
Lonsway and wife were here this night for a while. Mrs. Russell boiled down 60 pails of sap
into molasses today. [in margin] First plowing / First in 1879 April 21st
16 Hard frost this morning, the day changed about 10 AM. There was some sleet and in the after-
noon considerable [quantity] of rain. Johney was helping Mr. Kirby to log in the dry part of the
day.
<two documents between folio 34 verso and 35 recto>
<one is a detailed sketch of the human brain, divided into 43 faculties, with detailed description of
each faculty, and combinations of faculties, as either large or small: e.g. “A man with large Re-
ligious organs and small intellectual organs is inclined to be devotional, but cares nothing for
Philosophy and Science. The largest organs form the strongest elements of Character. The
larger the organ the more it influences the other organs. Leading traits of Character Result from
large organs….”>
<the second is a detailed bill from R. Cross for the balances due on two accounts, one, the account for
1878 for building the house, the second, for 1880, for plastering, building steps, partitions: total
due: $4.97>
Account of 1878 with R. Russell Esq.
Contract for Building house 137.00
glazing sash 2.00
Extra work on cornices 1.50 Extra pins $2.00 3.50
cutting glass .35¢. paint .30¢ lights of glass 60 1.25
6 lights of glass 96 paper of brads 25 pulls 5 1.26
145.01
Received on the above 143.14 143.14
Balance 1.87
Account of 1880
Plastering by J. Hanbury 35.35
Building steps for front doors .75
Building partitions upstairs 2.00
38.10
Received on the above account 35.00
Ballance 3.10
1.87
Total $4.97
Mr. Russell
Please Oblige me by letting me have this small ballance
as soon as possible, as I have some money to make up,
by so doeing
you will greatly Oblige
Yours Respectfully
R. Cross
120
<end of bill>
<Q2 folio 35 recto>
April 1880
17th Snow this morning, and pretty high wind drifting the snow as it fell. The forenoon pretty
stormy, the afternoon somewhat milder. The snow mostly all melted away. The boys were
chopping stove wood at the house in the afternoon. [in margin] Molly calved.
18th Sabbath. Rather chilly morning, but the day broke out fine and was pleasant in the afternoon.
Thunder and lightening and a little rain at night.
19 A little frost this morning, but it soon thawed. The wind rose about 10 A.M. and increased in
violence till it was something fearful. Great Black Clouds gathered in the west towards night,
but not much snow fell. We gathered 55 pails of Sap in the forenoon and started to boil but the
wind storm was so great, blowing down the limbs, so that Mrs. Russell got frightened and left
the bush. She and I went to Dundalk in the eavning. Jim was plowing all day.
20 Fine morning, with a slight bit of frost. The day was very breezy, drying up the roads and
ground considerably. Mrs. Russell boiled down 60 pails of sap. I opened out some water
courses. Jim was plowing. There was a man named Anderson from Markdale, moving down to
Melancthon, called and left off part of his load, as the roads were so bad the team could not
haul it. [in margin] Saw swallow / 1879: on the 26th.
21 Fine mild morning, the sun out bright and warm, the day breezy and drying all through. Johney
and I were terracing around the house, Jim was plowing.
22 Cloudy morning, with a slight shower about 10 AM. The boys and I hauled a ton of hay from
Skeffington Bell’s, which I had bought at $7.00 . Poor enough hay at any money, musty and a
great deal of wild grass with it.
<Q2 folio 35 verso>
April 1880
23rd Hard frost this morning, the ground softened after 9 AM., so that the plow worked. The day
was chilly all through. Mr. Vandusen* paid me a visit today, the first visit of the kind that was
ever paid to me before. [*J. F. VanDusen had a jewellery store, and was a town councilor 1906-
11; History of Dundalk, pp.17, 19, 95. The purpose of this mysterious visit is unclear.]
24 Pretty hard frost this morning, but the sun shone out bright and the day was pleasant and pretty
warm all through. Jim was plowing. Johney and I sorted potatoes in the cellar in the forenoon.
We had just 33 Bushels. In the afternoon we terraced one end of the house, and sowed some
cabbage seed. [in margin] Sowed cabbage / seed / out doors.
25 Sabbath. Slight rain this morning and the day continued mizzling all through.
26 Cloudy morning, but the sun got a little out in the forenoon. There was rain for about two
hours in the afternoon. Some snow among the rain. There was two beautiful Rainbows ap-
peared this eavning. Jim was plowing. Johney and I split some stove wood and cleared a tree
top out of our way and took out some stumps.
27 Some snow on the ground this morning, but it soon went off and the day continued breezy and
dry. I sowed some pease in the forenoon and in the afternoon went on business to Flesherton.
Jim harrowed in the forenoon and in the afternoon he sowed the remainder of the pease. [in
margin] First grain sown / pease / 2 days after full moon.
28 Fine morning, although a little chilly. The day kept dry and pretty breezy in the afternoon. Jim
was harrowing [plowing stricken, “harrowing” written above] in the forenoon and plowing in
121
the afternoon. I was letting off some water in the afternoon. Johney was picking up. Mr. and
Mrs. Lonsway were here a while this eavning.
<Q2 folio 36 recto>
April 1880
29th Rather cloudy this morning and the sun kept shady all day. The clouds gathered up to about 11
AM when the[y] burst, and the afternoon was wet, a steady come-down all the time. I sowed
Six Bushels of wheat in the afternoon. Jim harrowed and Johney sowed salt on the harrowed
ground at about the rate of a Barell to three acres. I am trying salt this year on the wheat, think-
ing perhaps that it will be beneficial. [in margin] First wheat sown.
30 Wet morning, then snow, which continued during the forenoon. The afternoon was fair. I split
some stove wood in the Bush in the afternoon and Jim plowed. Heavy snow at night.
May [1880]
1st Ground covered with snow this morning and more falling. Snow and rain alternated during the
forenoon. The afternoon was dry. Brother Sam took away 28 Bushels of seed oats which he
had purchased from me some time ago. Jim and John split some wood in the afternoon and Jim
plowed some, from 3 P.M. I digged around the apple trees. [in margin] Snow.
2nd Sabbath. Fine morning, the sun out bright and clear, the day warm all through. Mrs. R. & I
went to Father’s.
3 Cloudy morning and the day had little sunshine, except from 1 to 4 P.M. The afternoon Breezy
and very warm. I sowed near 6 Bushels of wheat. Jim harrowed it. Also he finished harrowing
the wheat that was sown on last Thursday. Miss Emma Bowler was here this eavning.
4 Fine morning, a very heavy dew on the grass, the sun out strong in the middle of the day and in
the afternoon the day very warm and a fine growth. I was hunting up hay in the forenoon and
in the afternoon I sowed some wheat and placed a sett of steps at the front door. I borrowed
Brother Sam’s 2 year old colt and Jim harrowed with his own and him [i.e. the colt] part of the
day.
<Q2 folio 36 verso>
May 1880
5th Fine day all through, great growth, very warm. I sowed some wheat. Jim harrowed, John
sowed salt. Got ½ ton hay from Mr. A. Jackson in the afternoon: price $4.00.
6 Nice morning, but a trifle cool. Got warmer towards noon, the day rather cloudy. I finished
sowing wheat. Jim harrowed and John sowed salt and picked up roots. Nancy and I went to
Dundalk in the afternoon. I brought home 7 cherry trees: price $1.40 (One of them an English
cherry, price .40) and 13 Apple trees, price $2.00. The cherry trees are poor ones, very dry, like
as if they had been raised last fall. [in margin] Finished sowing wheat.
7 Thunder, lightening and heavy Rain this morning, about 2 A.M. The day continued showery all
through, with more thunder and lightening about 11 A.M. The ground is soaking with wet and
it is impossible to get on the low lands to work. Jim harrowed a little between showers. I
planted some of the cherry trees. John chored around. I up all night to watch the mares.*
[*Waiting for them to foal.]
8 Fine morning and the day continued very warm and dry, fine growth. I finished planting the
fruit trees. Jim finished harrowing the wheat. In the afternoon he took Sam’s colt home. I up
all night to watch the mares.
122
9th Sabbath. Fine morning, the sun shone out bright in the middle of the day, nice growing day. I
up all night to watch the mares.
10 Rain, heavy in the morning, rain light in the eavning, fair in the middle of the day. I sowed the
first oats for the season today. The ground is very wet, we can only harrow the spots here and
there through[ou]t the field. Nancy up all night to watch the mares. [in margin] First oats
/sown.
11 Fine morning, sun out bright and clear, the day fine all through, dry and breezy. I sowed some
oats. Jim harrowed, then he and Johney picked up stones when he was done harrowing. Nancy
and I went to Dundalk in the eavning. It is very slow work with us putting in our crops. Our
team is very heavy with foals and our ground is very wet and we have to work them very care-
fully and easy, in order not to hurt them.
<centrefold of Quire 2>
<Q2 folio 37 recto>
May 1880
12th Dry cool morning and the [day] continued dry, cool and breezy. Jim plowed, I let water off the
low places on Lot 216. I sat up at night watching the mares that have to colt.
13 Cool in the morning and cool all day, sun shone out clear but there was a cold wind. There was
frost early this morning. I planted a Bushel of Early Rose potatoes this afternoon, Willie
dropped them. Jim plowed in the forenoon and hauled out manure in the afternoon on the pota-
toe patch. John harrowed for W. J. Arnold. Mrs. Bowler and Mrs. Lonsway were here this
eavning. I sat up all night watching the mares. [in margin] Frost this morning. First potatos
[sic] planted.
14 Dry cool morning, the day dry, breezy and cool. I slept in the forenoon and in the afternoon
raised some hop roots from around the old house and planted them around the milk house. Jim
and Johney were hauling out manure part of the day and plowing in the afternoon. I sat up all
night. [in margin] Frost.
15 Cool morning, the sun came out bright, the day dry and cool all through. I sowed some oats to-
day. Jim harrowed with his two year old colt and Gerty. Johny picked up roots, stones and
sticks. Mr. G. Anderson, the man that left his furniture here about four weeks ago, took it away
today. [in margin] Frost.
16th Sabbath. Fine morning, bright, sunshiny, the day clear, warm and dry. Brother Sam and family
were here today. I was up all night.
17 Sunny morning, pretty warm about noon, sultry in the afternoon. I sowed two bags of oats, Jim
harrowed, John picked up. Wife and daughter were at Dundalk a-shopping in the eavning.
<Q2 folio 37 verso>
May 1880
18th Heavy shower this morning before daylight, another shower about 6 A.M., the remainder of the
day was dry and pretty warm. Jim was harrowing and plowing. I sowed two bags of oats.
Johny picked up roots and stones. Mrs. Russell went to Dundalk in the afternoon. I sat up all
night watching the mares. I bought 500 pounds of hay from J. Irwin at $8.00 per ton. [in mar-
gin] Washed sheep.
19 Fine morning, dry and warm, heavy clouds began to appear in the West and north about 10
A.M. At 11 there came on a very heavy rain with some hail stones, thunder and lightening.
More rain again in the afternoon. Jim was plowing, sowing, and harrowing some in the fore-
123
noon. [He] hewed the plates* of the stable in the afternoon, then went to Dundalk and changed
his $1.25 hat for a .75¢ one. Widdow [sic] Armstrong was here this afternoon. Gerty, a seven
year old mare, colted this eavning about 7:30. Time she took: Eleven months and seventeen
days. Mare colt. Sire Young Lord Haddon, owner William Middleton. [in margin] Gerty
colted. [*Plates are square-hewed timbers, the length of the stable building, placed on the top
of posts. The bottoms of rafters are held on the plates.]
20 Fine morning, dry and warm with a splendid growth. Thunder clouds began to gather about 10
A.M. and a pretty sharp rain storm came on about 11, accompanied with thunder and lighten-
ing. The afternoon pretty showery. Jim and John fastened the plates on the stable in the fore-
noon. I went to Dundalk in the morning, got some Castor Oil for the colt and some clover and
grass seed to sow a calves park which I done in the afternoon. Jim sat up this night.
21 Rainy this morning but cleared off soon and was dry to about 3 P.M. when it began to rain
which it done pretty steadily and is still (8:00) at it. I turned the potatoes in the forenoon and
Nancy and I clipped the sheep in the afternoon. Miss Sarah Bell was here a while this after-
noon, I sat up all night watching the mares. I[t] rained incessantly all night.
<Q2 folio 38 recto>
May 1880
22nd Rainy morning and continued so for most of the forenoon, the latter part of the afternoon was
dry. The boys hauled some rails with Jim’s colt in the dry part of the day and put up a small bit
of fence. I was up all night watching mares.
23 Sabbath Fine morning, the day nice and growing. W. J. Arnold and wife were here today. I was
up all night watching the mare.
24 Shower of rain this morning, but the day was warm and cloudy afterwards. Great growing day.
Jim plowed, Johney and Clark chopped rail cuts. A. Lonsway’s boys were over after tea and
mine and theirs played ball to dark. I was up all night.
25 Fine morning and the day continued dry and warm. Jim was plowing. John and I made fence.
I was up all night watching the mare. She colted about 12 O’clock night. Mare colt. Time she
took: Eleven months and twenty-four days. Sire of the colt: Lord Haddon.
26 Fine morning and the day was cloudy though pretty breezy, dry and warm. Jim plowed, then
harrowed after he was done plowing. I finished sowing grain (oats and pease mixed). John
built fence. [in margin] Finished sowing grain.
27 Cool, breezy morning and the day continued cloudy, dry and breezy. Jim finished harrowing,
then hauled out some manure on the potatoe patch and ploughed it under. John helped haul out
manure and spread it. Mrs. John Gott was here today. I sowed some Grass seed on a piece of
low land. Some old bummer stopped here and had his supper. Lots of tramps spunging [sic]
around.
<Q2 folio 38 verso>
May 1880
28 Fine morning, the day continued dry and cool. Jim and John helped Mr. Lonsway plant pota-
toes in the afternoon. Nancy and I went to Dundalk. [in margin] Got papers from Toronto.
29 Fine morning, the day dry but very cool in the afternoon. The three boys went a-fishing along
with Mr. Lonsway’s boys. They caught a quantity of small fry, varying from 2 to 8 inches in
length. Eliza and Willie also went a-fishing. They were not very successful. I went in the af-
ternoon to Mr. John Duncan’s Barn Raising.
30 Cool morning with a slight rain, the middle of the day dry. A big rain fall about 5 P.M. Nancy
and I were in at Father’s.
124
31 Cool, dark morning, the day dry to about 6 P.M. when it began to rain and kept it up for about
an hour. Jim and Johney chopped in the swail. I cut seed potatoes, we planted out about 150
cabbage plants and some cucumbers in the afternoon. [in margin] put out some cabbage plants.
June [1880]
1st Fine morning, and the day continued dry but chilly. I was cutting seed potaotes. John and Jim
were chopping in the forenoon and in the afternoon Jim harrowed and picked stones.
2 Bright sunny morning, the forenoon dry, the afternoon pretty wet. We were planting our pota-
toes, assisted by Wesl[e]y and James Lonsway. In the afternoon we planted about 16 Bushels
with the hoes. Sister Sarah was here this afternoon and all night. [in margin] Finished First
planting of potatoes.
<Q2 folio 39 recto>
June 1880
3rd Bright sunny morning, and the day continued dry and fine all through. Jim and Johney went to
help their uncle Samuel to plant potatoes.
4 Rainy morning, but soon got dry. The day was cloudy and cool afterwards. John and Jim were
helping Sam to plant potatoes. I was helping Mr. H. Clippert raise an end to his log barn in the
afternoon.
5 Fine morning but the day got very rainy about 10 A.M. and continued so for about two hours. I
went to Flesherton. Jim and John were helping their uncle Sam to plant potatoes.
6th Sabbath. Fine morning and the day continued dry. Brother Sam and wife were here.
7 Wet morning but cleared up about 8 A.M., the day dry after. The boys and I were pulling down
the old house which had sheltered us for many a day. It is hard to remove old landmarks. [in
margin] Resolved forever.
8 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and cool. The boys and I pulling down old hous[e] and
hauling logs away. [in margin] Frost.
9 Bright sunny morning, the day dry, cool and cloudy. I was cleaning up the ground of the old
house. The boys were putting up horse stable with the logs that were in the room. Mrs. W.
Bowler was here this eavning.
10 Rather cloudy morning but the day kept dry to the afternoon when there came on a thunder
storm. Brother Sam framed the rafters and raised them on the cow stable for us.
<Q2 folio 39 verso>
June 1880
11th Cloudy morning, the forenoon dry, showery in the afernoon, some thunder and lightening.
Brother Sam was helping us to put the old room roof on a little building for a horse stable.
12 Fine morning and the day continued dry though cool and cloudy. The boys were sheeting the
stable. Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
13th Sabbath. Quite a cold morning and the day was chilly from morning to night. Nancy and Jim
visited on the back line.
14 Cool cloudy morning and the day cool and cloudy all through. I was cleaning out cellar. The
boys were working at the cow stable, sheeting it. Nancy and I set out some cabbage plants in
the afternoon.
15 Fine morning, the day dry but cool. Jim and John were shingling, I was weeding in the garden.
16 Sunshiny morning, the day hot and dry. The boys were shingling, I was working in the garden.
17 Nice bright morning, the day was very fine and hot. The boys were shingling, I was working in
garden.
125
18 Fine morning, the day very warm and dry. Vegetation is progressing very rapidly under the
stimulant of the hot weather. Johney and I were chinking [correction/overwritten]. Jim and his
mother took the team in the afternoon and went to Dundalk. F. T. Carr, Apple tree agent, was
here this afternoon. I did not order any trees.
19 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and warm to about 2 P.M. when there came on a pretty sharp
shower. John and I were chinking. Brother Sam takes our wool and cloth to Feversham Mills
today.
<Q2 folio 40 recto>
June 1880
20th Sabbath. Bright sunny morning, the day was warm and dry. I with the family went to Church.
After that Mrs. Russell and [I] went to John Gott’s.
21 Fine morning, and the day was pretty warm and cloudy in the afternoon. I hoed some potatoes
in the forenoon and in the afternoon chinked the horse stable.
22 Fine morning, though cloudy, the day was dry and warm with the exception of a shower about
noon. We all attended a C. E. Sunday School picknick held on the rear end of Lot 211, 1st
Range, Proton. A very pleasant day was spent. The crowd was not large but social, the tables
were spread with everything good, and the day passed pleasantly.
23 Cloudy morning, the day dry and a little breezy in the afternoon. Warm all through. Two of
Mr. Crosses men were here from 9 A.M. fixing the studding upstairs for the plasterers. Jim,
John and I were working at the stables.
24 Cloudy morning and the day was one of alternately sunshine and shade, being also remarkably
warm. Jim and John were working at fixing the stables. I was hoeing thistles from among the
potatotes.
25 Sunny morning and the day was bright till the afternoon when there came on a copious rain.
The boys were working at the stables. I was hoeing thistles from among the potatoes in the dry
part of the day. In the eavning I warned out the men in my beat to do statute labor.
<Q2 folio 40 verso>
June 1880
26th Bright sunny morning, the day was a little cloudy but dry and very warm. Jim and his mother
were at Dundalk in the forenoon and traded off some old castings. Johney and I were fixing
fence in the forenoon and in the afternoon were cutting thistles out of the potatoes.
27th Sabbath. Showery during the forenoon, most of the afternoon was dry. I went to Father’s in the
eavning.
28 Dry in the morning to about 10 O’clock when there came on rain and was very showery the re-
mainder of the day. Johney and I were cutting thistles out of the potatoes. Jim was working at
stable.
29 Fine morning, the day dry, cloudy and cool. Jim and John were helping their uncle Sam to put
some logs on his stable. I was cutting thistles. James Trugon and wife were here this eavning.
30 Fine day all through. Jim was helping his uncle Sam, Johney and I were hoeing potatoes. I at-
tended a trustee meeting in the eavning.
July [1880]
1st Cloudy morning with a very slight shower during the day. I and the family went to see the
sports at Dundalk.
2 Fine morning, the day cool, breezy and dry. I was overseeing the men doing statute labor in
this beat.
126
3 Fine breezy morning, the day warm and clear all through. I was overseeing the men doing stat-
ute labor. John Hanbury brought the lath and sand here to fix the upstairs.
<Q2 folio 41 recto>
July 1880
4th Beautiful morning, the day fine and dry all through. Mr. W. Robinson and Miss S. Bell were
here today.
5 Rainy morning for about two hours, then cleared off and the day was dry. I was doing work on
the road, had two teams and two shovellers under me. Mr. John Agnew and wife and child
were here this night.
6 Fine morning and the day continued dry and pretty warm all through. I was helping brother
Sam to saw stove wood in the afternoon.
7 Fine morning, the day very hot. Nancy and I went with Skeffington Bell and his wife to Tosso-
rontio and stopped all night at brother John’s. The plasterers were working at our place today.
8 Beautiful morning, the day exceedingly warm. Left John’s this morning and went to John Ag-
new’s in Essa. The Fall wheat crops in Essa look splendid, so does the meadows. Their spring
crops are a little earlier but not much better than in Proton. Stopped at John Agnew’s all night.
9 Warm, dry morning, the sky clear till the afternoon when some thunder clouds came up. There
was only a sprinkling of rain with some sharp thunder and a little lightening. We left John Ag-
new’s this morning and came home.
10 Warm day and dry all through. Went to Dundalk in the forenoon and got my cheque for $101.
Mr. D. Davidson cashed it. Came home and the boys and I repaired a culvert. Nancy and I
went to Dundalk after 6 P.M. and transacted some business.
<Q2 folio 41 verso>
July 1880
11th Sabbath. Dry morning and the day continued cloudy, dry and exceedingly hot. Mr. John Gott,
wife and child were here today.
12th Cloudy morning, the day was cloudy with frequent light showers. We all attended a picknick at
William Lonsway’s.
13 Rather cloudy this morning, but the day was dry. I went to Dundalk on business in the fore-
noon and in the afternoon wheeled some manure out of the old Barn. The boys made pokes for
the horses in the forenoon and mowed in the afternoon. [in margin] commenced mowing.
14 Cloudy morning and some clouds during the day, but the heat was very great. I think the hot-
test day during the summer for so far. I was mowing. Jim fixed the waggon, Clark and John
wheeled manure.
15th Dry day and very hot with considerable [gathering] of clouds. There was a heavy thunder
storm in the forepart of the night. I was mowing.
16 Wet morning and the forenoon was showery, the afternoon was dry and very chilly, almost like
frost. Wife and I went to Dundalk in the afternoon and purchased a bedstead at $2.25 and also
some painting material. [in margin] Mail paper received.
17 Cloudy morning but the clouds disappated [=dissipated] about noon and the afternoon was
breezy and dry. I was mowing in the afternoon. Jim was dressing some timber for upstairs.
John & Clark were hoeing potatoes.
18th. Sabbath. Clear day without any rain. Mrs. James Mills was here this eavning
<Q2 folio 42 recto>
July 1880
127
19th Cloudy morning and a very heavy dew on the ground. Rain come on about 9 A.M. and there
were frequent showers through the day. I mowed some in the forenoon. Nancy and I painted
some in the afternoon and I went to Dundalk for some paint after 5 P.M. Jim mowed some in
the afternoon.
20 Cloudy morning, the day was pretty showery all through. Nancy and I painted the kitchen in
part. Jim went with his uncle Sam in the afternoon to help load saw logs.
21 Dry morning, though cloudy, a slight rain in the forenoon, the afternoon dry and breezy. I went
to Dundalk in the forenoon for some oil for painting and hauled in hay in the afternoon. The
boys raked up hay in the forenoon.
22 Dry morning, but cool and cloudy, the day dry but rain at night. I helped paint the kitchen floor
in the forenoon and hauled in hay in the afternoon. Jim mowed all day. Johney and Clark
raked up hay in the forenoon and helped to haul in in the afternoon.
23 Rainy morning but not very heavy, it cleared up about 7 A.M. and the remainder of the day was
dry, cool and cloudy. Jim mowed, I painted floor, assisted by Nancy in the forenoon. John and
Clark picked berries assisted by Eliza and William. I mowed in the eavning. John Gott’s wife
is sick tonight. Jim and his mother are gone to see her.
24 Dry sunny morning and very warm during the forenoon, the afternoon was rather breezy, the
day dry throughout. We raked hay in the forenoon and hauled in during the afternoon.
25th Sabbath. Rather cloudy this morning, the day hot about noon. A thunder storm in the eavning.
Mrs. Russell and I were in at Brother Sam’s.
<Q2 folio 42 verso>
July 1880
26th Wet morning, it cleared off about 9 A.M. and was dry the remainder of the day. I was helping
Brother Sam at his hay and slept at Father’s that night. The boys were picking huckleberries in
the marsh.
27 A slight mizzle early this morning, dry and breezy the remainder of the day. I was helping Sam
at haying, the boys were choring around home. I slept at Father’s.
28 Fine dry morning, the day hot all through. I was helping Sam to haul in hay. Jim was helping
Skeffington Bell.
29 Dry morning, the day dry, warm and breezy. I was straightening up school accounts in the
forenoon and in the afternoon attended a trustee’s meeting in No. 5 Melancthon. Jim and John
were chopping in the swale.
30 Dry morning, the day dry and hot. I cut some stake timber for the hay rack and ground the cra-
dle scythe in the forenoon. In the afternoon the boys and I commenced to cut our fall wheat. It
is a pretty fair crop, slightly rusted, nothing scarcely to hurt. It is the Seneca or Clawson varie-
ty. We have four acres and I think it will yield about 20 bushels per acre. I sowed it on the 5th
of last September on a piece of pea ground slightly manured. Some of it got winter killed but it
is a great deal better than any Spring wheat I have. Jim craddled. Johney and I bound. [in
margin] First wheat cut.
31st Fine morning, dry and warm, the day dry and hot. We were cutting wheat. Jim craddling,
Johney and I binding. Clark sold his calve [=calf] for $1.25. It is just a month old.
<Q2 folio 43 recto>
August 1880
1st Sabbath. Rather dark cloudy morning, but the day continued dry. Father and mother, Samuel and
Phoebe were here today.
128
2 Cloudy morning. It came on to rain about 9 A.M. and was slightly showery from that to night.
We cut wheat in the dry part of the day. In the afternoon Jim made a rake for raking the stub-
ble. I fixed the waggon rack.
3 Damp, cold morning, with considerable wet on the grain. It dried off about 8 A.M. and contin-
ued fine the remainder of the day. We finished cutting fall wheat, then took some shingle tim-
ber to the mill and brought home half a square of shingles.
4 Bright sunny morning, the day [dry] all through although there were some signs of rain in the
afternoon. We were choring round. Jim fixed the roof of the cow stable. Mrs. Russell and I
went to Dundalk in the eavning. Some people say there was a frost this morning. I did not see
any signs of one. [in margin] Frost.
5 Very fine morning and the day continued dry, breezy and warm. Johney and I were chopping
and burning on Lot 216. Jim went in the eavning to the picknick at Dundalk. Mrs. C. Bell vis-
ited us today. Mr. John Hanbury measured the part of the upstairs which he had lathed and
plastered. There were 143 4/9 square yards at .25¢ per yard which is $35.87. Mrs. Jane
Westacote passed along here today. This eavning is chilly enough for frost. [in margin] slight
frost.
6 Beautiful morning, the day [dry] and warm. The boys and I were picking up and burning in the
forenoon, in the afternoon we hauled in wheat. [in margin] Posted a letter to John Stubbings
7 Dry, warm morning, the day dry and hot, but cloudy towards night. We finished hauling in
wheat in the forenoon. In the afternoon Johny raked the stubble. Jim and Clark fixed fence. I
threshed wheat with the flail.
<Q2 folio 43 verso>
August 1880
8th Sabbath. Dry morning, the day dry, hot and breezy.
9 Bright sunny morning, the day dry, warm and pretty breezy. Jim and Clark went with a small
grist (4¾ Bushels) to Wright’s Mill, Osprey. It was excellent fall wheat without a particle of
any dirt in it and the[y] only got 34 pounds of flour to the bushel. Either Wright or his mill is a
fraud. Johney and I were picking up and burning in the swale. Mrs. H. Bowler and Mrs. James
Reid were here today.
10 Dry morning, although rather cloudy, the day dry and breezy, with a good many clouds towards
eavning. The boys and I were picking up and burning in the swale, good time for it.
11 Very heavy rain this morning before daylight, also thunder and lightening. Through the day it
was dry and cloudy. The boys and I were getting logs sawed at John McDowell’s mill. John
McDowell’s boy with his horses hauled the logs to the gangway and for d[ump]ing[?]. I and
my Johney helped him to roll the logs on the car and I tail sawed. Jim hauled home the lumber:
there were cut of mine today 2130 feet.
12 A little cloudy this morning, the day dry and cool. Jim went to the mill for a load of lumber in
the forenoon, in the afternoon the boys and I pulled pease. There was a quilting here today.
The quilters were Mrs. C. Bell, Mrs. S. Bell, Mrs. J. Gott, Mrs. Nickle, Miss Kate Johnson,
Miss Jane Johnson, Miss Sarah Bell and Miss Maria Lonsway.
13 Breezy dry day all through, although cloudy in the afternoon. The boys and I were pulling
pease.
14 Black letter day. Cloudy, breezy and dry. We finished pea pulling today.
<Q2 folio 44 recto>
August 1880
129
15th Sabbath. Rain very early this morning, the day afterwards dry and pretty warm till the afternoon
when it got very chilly.
16 Bright sunny morning, but a frost all over the ground killling the potatoes and doing other inju-
ry. The heaviest summer frost that has come this long time. The day was dry and the sun
bright, doing all the more injury after the frost. The boys, Jim and John,were helping their un-
cle Sam to pull pease. I was picking up and burning in the swale. [in margin] very heavy frost.
17 Rather cloudy this morning, but the day was dry and breezy to about 6 P.M. when there came
on a slight mizzle of rain, but it did not amount to much. The boys and I were hauling in pease.
We hauled in nine loads out of the back field. [in margin] Finished Hauling in pease.
18 Cloudy this morning, the day dry and breezy, the afternoon pretty much like rain. Jim, Clark
and I were picking stones to 3 P.M. when Jim and I went to little Johney Irwin’s Raising.
Johney was helping his uncle Sam to haul in pease.
19 Fierce wind storm accompanied by a little rain very early this morning before day. The day
breezy and cloudy and dry. Johney was helping his uncle Sam to [i.e. until] noon. Jim and I
were taking off stones. Jim craddled some oats in the afternoon but he gave it up as they were
scarcely ripe enough. [in margin] First oats cut.
20 Sunny morning, the day very warm all through. John and Jim were hauling out manure in the
forenoon, in the afternoon they were helping their uncle Sam thresh. I was hauling out manure
in the afternoon.
21 Sharp shower very early this morning, the day dry after sunrise and moderately warm. I bor-
rowed Sam’s waggon. In the morning John and Clark were hauling out manure, Jim craddled
wheat, I bound.
So rolls round the time.
[in margin] First spring wheat cut.
<Q2 folio 44 verso>
August 1880
22nd Sabbath. Dry cloudy morning. Soon the sun broke through the clouds dispelling them, the day
dry, warm and breezy.
23 Bright morning at sunrise, then cloudy for a while. Sunshine and cloud throughout the day, ex-
cessively hot for about 15 minutes at or near 10 A.M. Jim was craddling wheat, I was binding,
Johney was binding oats.
24 Bright morning, the day got cloudy towards noon, there was a slight mizzle of rain about 1
P.M., then cleared off and was fair to 8 P.M., when it began to thunder and rain slightly with
every appearance of a wet night. Jim was craddling oats. Johney and I cleaned out a drinking
place for the cattle in the forenoon, and in the afternoon I threshed some fall wheat for seed.
25 Cloudy morning and a slight mizzle of rain fell. It soon got dry and the afternoon was fine and
breezy. Jim started the plow in the morning but broke the share, then he got one from Skeffing-
ton Bell, but it did not fit. Johney hauled out manure. I threshed some seed wheat in the fore-
noon, and in the afternoon Jim cut wheat and I bound.
26 Sun rose clear, but clouded over, no rain during the forenoon, but pretty breezy and dry. A
slight rain came on in the afternoon about 5 P.M. Jim cut wheat. Nancy and I tied it. Johney
hauled out manure.
27 Dry morning, and the day remained dry to about 3 P.M. when there came on a thunder shower.
The remainder of the day was dry with excessive lightening at night, and very heavy rain
through the night. Jim craddled in the forenoon, and hauled out manure in the afternoon.
Johney hauled out manure in the forenoon and craddled in the afternoon. Mother and I bound.
130
<inserted letter>
<letterhead> Toronto Grey & Bruce Railways</letterhead>
Toronto 31st Mch 1881
Robert Russell Esq.
Dundalk
Dear Sir,
In reply to your letter of the 29th inst. I would say that I will give you 18¢ for these ties, subject
to inspection.
Should you accept this please sign the Enclosed, and return to me, when I will give our Inspec-
tor instructions to inspect them.
Yours truly, Edmund Wragge*
[under letterhead 15 | 417,
31 | 283,
presumably meaning 15th of month delivered 417 ties, 30th of month delivered 283 ]
[*Edmund Wragge was chief engineer of the Toronto Grey & Bruce Railway, and was general man-
ager in 1875; see Sawden, History of Dufferin County, p. 77.]
</inserted letter>
<Q2 folio 45 recto>
August 1880
28 Dry morning, the day dry, cloudy and sultry. Jim and Clark went with the team to Maxwell to
get the cloth that had been left at the fulling mill, also to get two plow points. They got 2 at for-
ty cents each. Johney craddled oats today. I mowed some thistley wheat. Nancy and I went to
Dundalk in the eavning.
29th Sabbath. Misty morning and there came on a slight rain about 10 A.M. It continued to about 2
P.M., not very heavy though, the afternoon was dry. Nancy and I went to Brother Sam’s in the
eavning.
30 Fine morning, the day continued dry and cool. I borrowed 5 1/6 Bushels of fall wheat from
Brother Sam. Johney went after it and took it to the Reid Mill, Dundalk. It made 200 pounds
flour. Jim was cutting oats in the forenoon, his mother was binding. I threshed seed wheat in
the forenoon, in the afternoon Jim cut wheat, his mother and I bound.
31 Dark morning, the day was cloudy but dry. Jim and Johney were cutting oats in the forenoon
and wheat in the afternoon. Nancy and I tied.
September [1880]
1st Dark morning and there was a slight shower about noon. The afternoon was dry and very sul-
try. Johney and Jim cut wheat to tea time, when they finished it. Johney then cut oats. I bound
all day. Nancy helped from noon. I sold one dry Ewe for four dollars and a half.
2 Dry morning, but there came on a slight shower about noon and very heavy rain about 4 P.M. It
faired off later in the eavning. Johney, Clark and I hauled in wheat in the dry part of the day,
and I took in a sheep I had sold in the eavning. Nancy was at Mrs. Nickle’s quilting.
<Q2 folio 45 verso>
September 1880
3rd Rainy morning but there was not a great deal fell. The afternoon was dry. I was rigging up my
plow for work in the forenoon and in the afternoon I was plowing. I had very hard work to get
a share to fit the plow. John was spreading manure in the afternoon. Jim is laid up sick. I
think he has been working too hard craddling, as there came a pain in his back at first.
131
4 Murky morning and thunder in the distance, a little rain fell but not much, the afternoon was
dry. I plowed in the forenoon with Jim’s two year old colt and one of the mares. In the after-
noon Nancy and I tied oats. Johney is sick today, they have all been sick in their turn, pains in
their heads and stomachs and shifting pains in their backs and sides. It is rather a trying time.
Jim seems the worst and is the longest of recovering. We had to put a mustard blister to him
tonight.
5th Sabbath. Dry morning and the day was dry and breezy. Jim had still sever[e] pains today, some-
thing like inflamation. We put another mustard blister to him, he is easier this afternoon.
6 Dry breezy morning and the day continued dry and breezy all through. Jim still continues
mending, his pains are pretty much all gone. I think he will get over it this time without the
doctor. Johney, Clark and I were hauling in wheat. John and Clark built and I forked the
sheaves. Nancy helped us in the mow. We hauled in nine loads. The wheat is a miserably poor
crop with me this year. I mean the spring wheat. It first rusted, then midged, lastly, the frost
hit it hard. It will not yield, I think, six bushels to the acre of the most miserable stuff. Poor
country this for growing wheat, and I had venture[d] sowing twenty-two bushels of such. I
think this crop has taught me a lesson, that is not to sow much more wheat in future on this lot.
I think the soil is not calculated for wheat.
<Q2 folio 46 recto>
September 1880
7th Dark morning with a very heavy dew. The clouds scattered after a while and the day was dry
till dark when there came on a slight mizzle of rain. We hauled in grain. John and Clark built
the loads, I forked on. Nancy helped us to noon. We hauled two loads of tied wheat and two
loads of loose wheat, also six loads of oats.
8 Cloudy morning, the day dry, breezy and cool. Nancy and I bound some oats from 10 A.M. to
3 P.M. Johney and Clark hauled them in. We helped to mow them. Johney was rather unwell
in the forenoon, pain in his head. [in margin] Frost.
9 Rather cloudy this morning, but the day was dry, breezy and cool. Johney craddled oats, I tied
and we hauled them off the ground, all that were cut to noon, this leaving the field for the cattle
to get in. Jim raked and hauled in some loose wheat in the forenoon. In the afternoon he
plowed. I had John Gott craddling. I went in the afternoon and engaged John Brinkman to
thrash for me this day week. I then went to Dundalk and sold our butter for .20¢ per pound and
a cent a pound extra to be paid in tobacco.
10 Cool cloudy morning with a heavy frost on the ground. The day was dry, breezy and cool.
Nancy and I bound grain to 4 P.M., then we took our butter to Dundalk and delivered it to Mr.
D. Davidson. Jim plowed, Johney craddled, and Clark went to Mr. Lonsway’s threshing. [in
margin] Frost. Finished cutting grain.
11 Sunny morning, the day was breezy and dry. John plowed in the forenoon. Nancy and I bound
oats in the forenoon. After dinner we all, except Clark, went and lit the 10 acres of fallow
which I got chopped last winter. We got a splendid burn, never seen better. After supper
Johney, Jim and I hauled in two loads of oats. Clark was at Lonsway’s thrashing.
<Q2 folio 46 verso>
September 1880
12th Sabbath. Dry breezy morning, the day was dry and pretty windy to about 6 P.M. when there
came on a sharp rain.
132
13 Dry morning, the day dry and cool all through, the rain fell at no great distance as we could see
the showers a piece off. Jim was asking hands for the thrashing for Thursday. Johney was cut-
ting logs for a straw pen. I plowed and Willie drove the horses.
14 Fine dry morning, the day continued dry and sunny all through. Johney was at Clippert’s
threshing, Jim and Willie picked stones, I sowed about six acres of Seneca fall wheat, Clark
harrowed. [in margin] Sowed wheat 2nd quarter of moon.
15 Fine morning and the day continued dry all through with a slight mizzle of rain in the forepart
of the night. We finished harrowing the wheat, Johney was at Clippert’s thrashing to about 3
P.M. The threshers came here tonight with their machine.
16 Fine dry morning and the day dry, although cloudy. In the afternoon there was a very slight
mizzle but nothing to hurt. We threshed today but did not finish. The threshers are stopping
here tonight. [stricken text and dates corrected.]
17th Misty morning, but the mist soon cleared off and the sun came out bright and warm. There was
some thunder and lightening about 7:30 P.M., also a very sharp shower. We finished threshing
at 8:40 A.M.. The wheat turned out very poorly. Fall wheat about 12 Bushels per acre (Sene-
ca), first class sample. Spring wheat about 8 Bushels per acre, very poor sample. The rust first
affected it, then the midge and lastly the frost. Pease about 25 Bushels per acre, good sample,
and oats 40 or near to it per acre, good sample. The threshers (Brinkmans) done good work and
threshed clean and charged me $8.00 for their time, which I think was reaasonable enough. We
put the straw into the mow in the afternoon, tramping it with Jim’s colt. We also hauled in four
loads of oats, thus finishing harvesting. [in margin] Finished harvesting. Thrashed.
<Q2 folio 47 recto>
Sept[ember] 1880
18th [date corrected from 19th in margin] Misty morning, but the day was dry and pretty warm. I
dug a hole in the forenoon to get water for the cattle and in the afternoon chored around. Jim
helped his uncle Sam to plow. Johney was with Skeffington Bell threshing. [in margin]
Weaned colts. Got letter from J. Stubbings.* [*Clerk at Davidson’s store, Dundalk].
19th [20th stricken] Sabbath. Damp morning, the day continued cool and cloudy with a little rain
falling now and then.
20 [21 stricken] Slight rain this morning, but cleared off about 9 A.M., the remainder of the day was
dry and cool and breezy. Jim was at J. Mills’ threshing. Johney was helping Sam to plow. I
was choring around. I borrowed Brother Sam’s ram, also I got two sucking [sic] pigs from him.
[in margin] Borrowed ram.
21 [22 stricken] Showery morning and the day was one of alternate rain and shine with pretty high
wind. I was fixing up some grain in the granary. Clark was helping me, Johney was at J. Mills’
threshing. Jim was helping J. Irvin to haul in oats.
22 [23 stricken] Fine morning and the day continued dry, cloudy and very cool. Clark was at J.
Mills’ threshing, Jim, John and I packed straw in the mow. We put Jim’s two year old colt on it
and made him tramp it.
23 [24 stricken] Fine morning, dry and warm, the day sunny and warm. We put in the remainder of
the straw, then cleaned up a small grist. I took it to the mill in the afternoon, the boys raised
about five bushels of their potatoes after 5 P.M. Ch. Mills was helping us today. Wife and son
Jim left for Tossorontio & Essa this morning, they went with Father and brother Sam who are
going to see John.
24 [25 stricken] Bright sunny morning and the day was dry and pretty warm. John, Clark and I were
fencing the fall wheat. We hauled the rails and built about 52 rods, some five and some six rails
133
high. Eliza and Willie were keeping house. [Notes at bottom of page on 4 bank drafts (1x1,
1x1, 1x2, 1x4=8$) posted to manager, Bank of Montreal at Toronto, Sept. 25th 1880]
<Q2 folio 47 verso>
September 1880
25th [26th stricken] A little cloudy this morning, but the clouds dispersed and the sun shone out
bright for some time. The sky got overcast towards noon and there was a sharp shower at noon.
Johney, Clark, Willie and I were raising potatoes which belonged to them. We took them to
Dundalk in the afternoon and sold them (17½) Bushels to T. Hanbury at .42¢ per Bag. Also
sold two Bushels to G.R. Middleton for .45¢ per Bag, cash. The boys and Eliza took boots
from Mr. Hanbury for theirs.
26th [27th stricken] Sabbath. Dull morning with an appearance of rain which came on pretty sharply
in the afternoon. All of us, with the exception of Jim and Clark, were on the Back line at Fa-
ther’s.
27th [28 stricken] Rather misty morning and there was a slight mizzle of rain now and then through
the day. Jim and I were cutting logs in the follow. John was at Arnold’s threshing.
28 Rainy morning to about 9 O’clock, then cleared off, the day was dark and cloudy all through.
Jim was at Jim Trugon’s threshing. Johney and I cut logs in the fallow.
29 Rainy morning and the day continued showery all through. Jim and I were asking hands for a
logging bee. Johney was at James Trugon’s thrashing to noon. In the afternoon he and Eliza
and William gathered the apples on (two) 2 trees, there were (Sixteen) 16 bushels of splendid
apples. In the afternoon Nancy, Jim, John and I went to Father’s to a paring bee. I stopped
there all night.
30 Very cold morning and several showers of snow fell during the forenoon. The afternoon was
dry but cold. I cut some handspikes* in the forenoon in C. McDow[e]ll’s Bush. Jim brought
some hay from Sam’s, also the handspikes. John cut logs in the fallow, I asked some more
hands in the afternoon. [in margin] Snow. [*handspikes were wooden rods used as crowbars,
could have metal points on tips, like pikes]
<Q2 folio 48 recto>
October 1880
1st Dark morning and the day continued cool and cloudy. Jim and I were cutting logs in the fol-
low. Johney butchered a sheep, raised some potatoes and dressed some handspikes.
2 Rather cloudy morning but the sun got out about 9 A.M. and the day was warm afterwards. I
had a logging bee today. We got about seven acres logged. There were four horse teams and
an ox team. The hands at the bee were: Sam McDowell and horses, Skeffington Bell and hors-
es, Johney Irvin and horses, —- Buyer and horses. Rollers were: James Mulholland, W. J. Ar-
nold, John Irvin, Mr. Nickle, John Gott, Henry Johnson, Joseph Jackson, James Atcheson, Wil-
liam Talbot, —- —- Curtin, —-Sauder, John Allen and Thomas Carson. Also Tom Mills and
his oxen. Also Mrs. Russell had a quilting today. [blanks are in original- missing first names].
[in margin] Logging Bee.
3rd Sabbath. Rainy morning and the day very wet all through.
4 Wet morning and pretty showery during the forenoon. The afternoon was dry. We fixed at the
horse stable and put our hogs up to fat. All the family with the exception of Jim and John went
this night to a paring bee at brother Sam’s. Got home at 2:30 in the morning. [in margin] Hogs
put up.
134
5 Dry morning, the sun shone out for a while, pretty breezy and dry during most of the day.
There came on a thunder storm accompanied by lightening and heavy rain about 5:30 P.M. The
night is wet and windy. We were logging with our horses.
6 Bright, sunny morning for a short spell, then showers of cold rain throughout the day. I took in
some pease and sold them for .50¢ per Bushel, also I took 470 pounds small [?] wheat to the
mill to be chopped. We all attended show fair, the day was very much against it, very sloppy,
bad roads etc. I bought three sucking [sic] pigs from T. Hanbury at $2.50 for the three.
<Q2 folio 48 verso>
October 1880
7th Fine dry morning, and the day was dry and pretty warm, with a very heavy frost at night.
Brother Sam was helping us to log with his horses. Jim traded his colt (2½ years old) for a
splendid looking new democrat waggon (platform spring) which had been shown at Dundalk
show fair the day previous. We had a paring bee this night.
8th Beautiful dry sunny day all through. I was at W. J. Arnold’s logging bee. The boys were pick-
ing up in the fallow.
9 Beautiful day from morning to night, just like Indian Summer. I hired Mr. Goodfellow and his
oxen to log for me today at $1.50 for his day’s work. He is a good smart worker and so is his
oxen.
10th Sabbath. Dry day, Nancy and family drove in to the back line.
11 Dry morning, the day dry, breezy and warm. We kindled log heaps and picked up in the fallow.
12th Rain this morning before daylight, the day was dry and cold with a pretty stiff breeze. We were
lighting log heap[s], branding, etc. in the fallow.
13 Bright sunny morning and the day continued dry and fine. We were working in the new fallow,
Branding, burning, etc.
14 Very fine morning and the day was dry to about 3:30 P.M. when it began to rain and continued
showery to about 9. Clark and I were working in the new fallow, Jim and John were helping
their uncle Sam to thresh. I went in the afternoon to Dundalk and became one of Skeffington
Bell’s sureties for collecting the municipal tax of Proton.
<Q2 folio 49 recto>
October 1880
15th Dry, sunny morning, the day dry and warm all through. Jim was plowing, the rest of us were
taking up ’tatoes.
16 Rainy morning and continued so to about noon. Jim was plowing in the afternoon, Johney and
Willie were raising potatoes, Clark and I cleaned up wheat. I took a sample of it to Dundalk in
the eavning, the quality was so poor they would not purchase.
17th [18th stricken] Sabbath. Cold morning and the day was cold all through, with showers of snow
occasionally. Snowed steady towards night.
18 [19 stricken] Ground covered with snow and plenty more falling. Continued snowing all day
long, the snow is about four or five inches deep on the level, the heaviest snow storm that I re-
member for so early in the season. We worked at putting in a floor in the new cow stable. Got
the floor in and the cows housed quite comfortable like, the first time they have been in for the
season. [in margin] Big snow storm.
19 Cold morning, some snow fell, the day rather cool throughout. Jim and Clark were hauling
rails and putting a fence round part of the garden in the forenoon, in the afternoon we were [cut-
ting] posts etc. for a cow shed.
135
20 Rather milder this morning, but plenty of snow on the ground. The sun shone out a little in the
afternoon. John Agnew was here today. We cleaned up some oats and pease for chopping, also
two bags of wheat for gristing and Jim took it to the mill in the afternoon. In the forenoon we
were working at the shed.
21 Soft morning, the snow going away, the sun got out and the day was pretty mild. We worked at
the shed till the eavning then Jim went for the stuff to the mill. Mr. Neil Strachan and Willie
Shaw were here a while tonight. [in margin] Sent letter to N. McAulay.
<Q2 folio 49 verso>
October 1880
22nd Mild morning, the snow mostly all gone. Then it began snowing about noon and continued so
all day and night. Jim was plowing in the forenoon, John, Clark and I were pulling down and
burning the old house on Lot 216. In the afternoon Nancy, Eliza and I went with the yarn to be
woven to Mrs. Montgomerie’s in Proton.
23 Sunny morning and very soft. Continued sunny all day. We were binding in the shed, fixing
the pig pen, etc.
24th Sabbath. Quite a quantity of snow on the ground, the roads very bad, the day rather cold.
25 Snow on the ground this morning, but kept melting, rain came on about noon. Very heavy rain
about 5 P.M., rainy night. We borrowed John Irvin’s cutting [box. It] Broke. Jim took it to the
Blacksmith’s to be repaired. Johney and I got some timber in the bush in the forenoon for
flooring for a colt stable. In the afternoon Jim, Johney and Mrs. Russell went to Dundalk. I
went to Father’s and slept there all night.
26 Rainy morning and the day continued pretty wet all through, with a change from rain to snow in
the night. Jim tried the plow for a short spell. Johny and Clark raised some potatoes when it
was partly dry. In the afternoon we cut some oat sheaves. Jim fixed a feeding place in the
horses’ manger for them to eat their oats out of.
27 A nice quantity of snow on the ground this morning, but the sun shone out and the snow pretty
much all vanished before night. We were taking up the remainder of our potatoes (25) Bushels.
28 Cold raw morning, and the day very chilly all through. Jim was plowing, Johney and Clark
were mudding the horse stable. I attended K. McAulay’s sale of stock and farming implements.
Things went very high. I thought to purchase some hay but it sold too high.
<Q2 folio 50 recto>
October 1880
29th Very fine morning, the day continued sunny, mild and dry. Jim was plowing, Johny was at A.
Patterson’s bee, Clark chinked and plastered the goose pen. I let off some water of one of the
fields.
30 Mizzly morning and the day was a slight mizzle from morning to night. The boys butchered
our hog, then piled some stove wood in the bush. I took a load of wheat to Flesherton, could
not sell it as it was frozen and a good many oats in it. Left the bags with Mr. Sproul. Am to go
back next Friday and clean it.
31st Mild, fair day. Wife and I went to the back line.
November [1880]
1st Pretty cold morning and some snow on the ground. I was fixing a bridge on Bowler’s side line.
Jim was plowing, the other two were plast[er]ing the cow stable. [Stricken passage: piling
wood and lifting troughs]. The day was blustry and snowey.
136
2 A little chilly this morning, but the day got pretty mild and was very fine in the afternoon. I
was working at the bridge, and also carried in some potatoes in the afternoon, then went to
Dundalk at night. Jim plowed.
3 Fine morning, and the day beautiful all through, like Indian Summer. I worked a little at a Cel-
lar drain, also went to A. Patterson’s and purchased one ton of hay at $5.00 cash, he to haul it.
Jim was plowing, John and Clark were at Johney Irvin’s thrashing. Nancy and the two young-
est were at Mother’s helping to pluck geese.
4 Fine morning, and pretty warm. The day changed about 3 P.M. and rain came on. It is still
(7:30) raining. Jim was plowing, Johney and Clark were at Johney Irvin’s thrashing. I went in
the forenoon and helped A. Patterson to weigh ½ ton of hay, he hauled it for me. In the after-
noon I done a small job on the road and worked at the drain from cellar. Mrs. W. Bowler was
here since noon and is stopping here tonight.
<Q2 folio 50 verso>
Novermber 1880
5th Misty morning, and the day was a little showery all through. I and Clark took the team and
went to Flesherton and cleaned over again with Mr. Sproul’s mill a load of wheat which I had
left there the Saturday previous. We got a good many oats taken out and sold the wheat for .
91¢ per Bushel. It was poor wheat and frozen. Jim kept Guy Fawk[e]’s day.* Johney helped
his uncle Sam to butcher some swine. [*Traditional Protestant celebration in England, with
bonfires and fireworks on 5 Nov. to commemorate the Gunpowder Plot of 1605; Guy Fawkes
was executed for his part in the thwarted plot by Catholics to blow up the Parliament at West-
minster.]
6 Rainy morning and the day was very wet all through and a continual pour at night. We butch-
ered our hogs today. Brother Sam helped us, he also brought out his sheep to his ram which is
here with mine.
7th Sabbath. Stormy day with a good deal of snow falling. Jim went to Dundalk for a gargle for his
uncle Sam who has a bad turn of the Quinsey.* [*Tonsilitis]
8 Nice mild day, the snow disappearing, the air balmy. Mr. Skeffington Bell came for me this
morning. I went with him and assisted him to make out Collector’s Receipts for Collecting. In
the eavning I went to Dundalk and got a gargle from the Doctor for Brother Sam. I went in
with it and stopped at Father’s all night.
9 Mild morning, the day sunny, the air balmy, just like Spring. I split some wood for Sam in the
forenoon, in the afternoon I went to the doctor’s and got another gargle for Sam. I took it in
and stopped all night with him, kept fires on, and woke him for his gargle.
10 Rather nice morning, dry and mild. It kept getting breezy and cool till the afternoon when there
came on a sleeting cold rain. It kept at it all the afternoon. Jim was opening water furrows in
the dry part of the day. Johney went to Sam’s in the afternoon. Mrs. J. Mills and Miss Cham-
bers were here a while this afternoon.
<Q2 folio 51 recto>
November 1880
11th Showery day all through, cold rain at that. Jim and I were putting up a colt stable. John was at
his uncle Sam’s.
12 The ground covered with snow this morning and it kept snowing and blowing all day. Jim and
I were working at the colt stable.
13 Fine morning, but a little chilly. Snow on the ground, pretty sharp frost, sun shone out during
the day, no snow fell today. Jim and I were fixing stables. John is in at his uncle Sam’s.
137
14th Sabbath. Rather cool morning, snow on the ground and more falling. I went to the Back line.
15 Cold morning, some snow fell during the day, pretty cold all through the day. Mrs. Russell and
Eliza, Jim and I were at Miss Hannah Mills’ wed[d]ing. She was married to Mr. Hector
McKay. [in margin] Hannah Mills married.
16th Pretty cool morning, and snow kept falling during most of the day. I went to Dundalk and
bought a pair of boots for Johny at $3.50, also some awls, needles, thread, tacks etc., for mend-
ing harness. Also got the Blacksmith to make me some hasps and staples for doors.
17 Cold morning, and the day was pretty cold all through, with some snow falling. We cleaned up
two bags of wheat and Jim took that and two bags of mixed grain for chopping to the mill.
18 Very sharp morning and the day was cold all through with some snow falling. Jim went to
Dundalk for the grist and chop. Mrs. Russell visited Mrs. C. Bell, and I banked the stables.
<Q2 folio 51 verso>
November 1880
19th Rather cold this morning and the day all through was cold wth a little snow falling. Jim and I
got some saw logs cut and in the afternoon Jim took a load to the mill.
20 Another chilly morning, a little milder towards noon, with increasing cold towards night, very
sharp at night, with very high blustering wind. Jim was hauling saw logs.
21th Sabbath. Very cold stormy morning and the day continued snowing, blowing and freezing like
Greenland.
22 Sharp morning, very hard freeze, a good deal of snow fell in the eavning and during the night. I
went to Dundalk to get some lumber sawn, but the mill was not in running order. Jim and
Johny were cutting some oat sheaves for the horses.
23 Another sharp morning, but not quite so cold as yesterday, a little milder towards noon, but
colder in the eavning. Johny and I cut some saw logs in the forenoon, and Jim got a handle for
the broad ax and put it in. In the afternoon I took two cherry logs to John McDowell’s mill and
brought home 788 feet of hemlock lumber.
24 Cold morning with some snow falling, the day pretty cold all through, snow coming down rap-
idly now (7 P.M.) and also drifting. Jim was putting up a porch to the house. John was chop-
ping some cordwood for himself to pay for his boots.
25 Cold morning and the day was pretty chilly with a little snow falling. Jim was putting up the
stoop. John chopping cordwood, I helped Jim for a while and attended a Railroad meeting in
Dundalk at night.
26 Mild morning, the day sunny and fine. I was driving Mr. D. Davidson around to gain voters for
the R. Road bonus. Jim was fixing stoop, Johny chopping wood.
<Q2 folio 52 recto>
November 1880
27th Rather cold morning, but the day got somewhat milder in the afternoon. We were getting some
dry cedar for Melancthon School.
28th Sabbath. Very mild morning, and the day was soft-like till night when there came on a snow
storm. Nancy and I went to the back line to see the folks, then I had to drive out for Mrs. C.
Bell on behalf of Mrs. Samuel Russell who needed her assistance. My wife stopped there all
night. We heard very bad news this eavning, viz. that one of brother John’s little ones* had
died of diptheria and that his wife and most all the rest were ailing with it. Hard, very hard on
John. [*William Henry Russell, b. 23 Jan. 1877.]
29 Moderate morning and the day was rather mild with a sharp shower of snow in the eavning.
Jim hauled some dry cedar to Melancthon School in the forenoon and in the afternoon helped
138
Johney and I to cut some shingle timber. Mr. John H. Palmer was here tonight and I gave him
his agreement made between the trustees of S.S. 5 Melancthon and himself.
30 Rather cold morning and the day was cold all through with an increasing freeze towards five
O’clock. Jim and Johney were getting out shingle timber. I attended the voting for the bonus.
[in margin] Bonus voting.
December [1880]
1st Quite a heavy fall of snow this morning, but it cleared off about 10 A.M. The day was mild af-
terwards. Jim and Johney cut some oat sheaves in the forenoon. I took Mrs. Russell in to the
back line. In the afternoon the boys and I got some shingle timber and took [it to] Mr. McDow-
ell.
2 Mild morning with a good depth of snow that had fallen during the night. The day was mild
with a sharp blow a while in the eavning. Jim, John and I cut two cords of dry cedar (stove
wood) and Jim took it in to Mr. D. Davidson’s in the afternoon.
<Q2 folio 52 verso>
December 1880
3rd Mild morning and the day was soft like a thaw. Jim was hauling cordwood for his uncle Sam.
Johney and I cut cordwood in the forenoon, and in the afternoon I attended a trustee meeting at
No. 5 Melancthon.
4 Mild morning and the day continued soft and balmy all through. Brother Sam was helping to
make me a barn door. Jim hauled a load of cordwood for him with our team to Dundalk. Clark
and I cleaned up a grist of about 35 Bushels. Johny hauled out about 2 cords of green wood
that he had cut.
5th Sabbath. Mild morning with a drizzle of rain falling during the forenoon. The afernoon was very
windy and [a] sharp freeze.
6 A little snow falling this morning, and less or more snow fell all through the day, pretty sharp
freeze at night. I was helping Brother Sam to saw stove wood, Jim and John at J. Irvin’s thrash-
ing.
7 Cold stormy morning, and the day kept snowing, blowing and freezing. Jim fixed the barn
doors, Johney and I ground the knives of the cutting box in the forenoon and cut some feed.
Nancy and I went to Dundalk in the eavning and I sold some dry cedar 2 feet long at $1.00 per
cord.
8 Cold stormy day from morning till night, wind high, snow falling and a very keen freeze. We
were getting out some dry cedar. Sold one cord to James Reid of Dundalk for $2.00. We took
it out in the afternoon. Miss S. Bell was here today.
9 Very cold, stormy morning, the day exceedingly cold all through. The boys and I cut dry cedar
to noon and then gave up on account of the cold.
10 Very sharp morning, keen freeze, the day pretty cold all through. Johney and I took a grist to
Hornings Mills, Jim chored at home. It was 9:30 P.M when we got home.
<Q2 folio 53 recto>
December 1880
11th Cold morning and the day pretty chilly all through. We cut 2 cords of dry cedar 2 feet long and
I took it to Mr. G. R. Middleton, Dundalk. He gave me $1.00 per cord for it.
12th Sabbath. Mild day with a very slight mizzle of rain. Mrs. R. and I were at Mrs. C. Bell’s this af-
ternoon.
13 Mild morning, the day was pretty mild all through, with the exception of a strong blow now and
then. Eliza, Willie, and I cleaned wheat. Jim and Johney were at Dan Boyer’s sawing timber.
139
14 Rather stormy morning, a good deal of soft snow falling and drifting, and continued in this
manner most all day. Jim, Johney and I were cutting dry cedar.
15 Stormy morning, the day very cold, snowing, blowing and freezing. The roads badly drifted.
Clark and I took 30 bushels of wheat to Huxtable’s Mills (Melancthon) to be gristed. We got
about 38½ pounds pretty good flour to the bushel. Jim and John cut some dry cedar.
16 Cold stormy morning, and the day continued cold and snowy all through. The boys and I were
cutting dry cedar.
17 Cold stormy morning, the day cold and snowing all through. The boys and I cut dry cedar. Jim
took in a load of 2 feet wood, 2 cords, and sold it to the [druggist, stricken: above] John Con-
ners for $2.00.
18 Another cold stormy day from morning to night. Jim took in 2 cords of dry cedar in the fore-
noon and sold it to the druggist for $2.00 cash. I took in 2 cords in the afternoon and sold it to
Mr. Nixon for one half cash and one half trade. Nancy went to Dundalk this afternoon. John
and Clark took home Sam’s sheep. [in margin] Returned Sam’s Ram.
<Q2 folio 53 verso>
December 1880
19th Sabbath. Very mild morning, the day pleasant all through. Nancy, Eliza and I visited at W. Lon-
sway’s.
20 Mild morning, the day pretty foggy, but soft. In the forenoon I helped J. Mills to weigh a load
of hay. He hauled it for me. I bought 5 tons from him at $6.00 per ton. The boys, Jim and
John, cut a cord of dry cedar 2 feet long, took it to Dundalk and sold it for $1.00 cash for
Christmas money. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon, tried around to sell posts, ties or tele-
graph poles. Helped to put up two bents* of J. Hanbury’s skating rink. Had tea at Mr. Donald
McAulay’s. Attended a meeting at the Orange hall. Messrs. Middleton, Nelson, Doyle and
McMillin were the speakers on Municipal Matters. I was chosen chairman. It was a pretty
rough meeting. [*a bent or section of the hoarding around the rink.]
21 Mild morning, the day mild all through, good sleighing, snow about a foot deep in the bush. I
took to Dundalk 6½ bushels Splendid fall wheat and sold it for $1.03 per bushel. In the after-
noon I sp[l]it a cord of dry cedar which Jim and John had cut in the forenoon. Jim then took it
to Dundalk and sold it to Mr. T. Hanbury for $1.00. Jim and John went to a tea meeting in the
English Church, Dundalk, at night.
22 Mild morning, with a very heavy hoar frost on the bushes, the day pretty mild all through. Jim
went to a bee to W. Lonsway to haul saw logs. John and I cleaned up five bags of mixed grain
to get chopped. We then cut some oat sheaves for the horses.
23 Mild morning and the day mild all through, good sleighing. Jim took five bags of chop to the
mill in the forenoon, and swamped out wood in the afternoon, assisted by John. The remainder
of us were at an Examination in No. 5 Melancthon, D. McAulay teacher. It was a grand day. I
paid for the tea and sugar $1.10. The scholars brought splendid baskets filled with delicacies.
They also answered their questions readily and accurately. R. C. Russell got first prize for writ-
ing and also another prize. There were prizes in all amounting to $12.00. [This entry ends with
very cramped writing at bottom of page]
<Q2 folio 54 recto>
December 1880
24th Pleasant morning and the day mild all through. First class sleighing. I attended an Examina-
tion of Proton School No. 2. The pupils are not near so well posted on some of the branches as
the scholars in Melancthon. I dined at Mr. William Talbot’s on the Master Given’s invitation.
140
Jim was hauling in stove wood to Dundalk. Mr. D. McAulay, teacher, was here at night. I paid
him part of his salary, viz. $150.
25 Mild morning, the day pleasant. Jim went in the forenoon for a sleigh ride with Tom Arnold,
and in the afternoon he and Johney and Clark went to a tea meeting at Dundalk. Brother Sam
and family were here today and William Lonsway and family in the afternoon.
26th Sabbath. Mild day all through. Nancy and Eliza were at J. Trugon’s.
27 Rough morning, snowing and blowing, the wind and snow kept increasing all through the day,
and it was very stormy at night. I attended the nomination [MS nimination] for the Melancthon
Municipal Council at the town hall and got $190. School moneys from John Mills, treasurer.
28 Very cold morning and the day kept getting colder all through, a terribly sharp freeze with a
strong wind. The coldest day that has come, I think, during the winter. I went to Dundalk and
from thence to the School House of No. 5 Melancthon and left the books and vouchers before
the S[chool] auditors, I being S[chool] treasurer. John went to a sawing at Mr. Clippert’s, they
only sawed part of the day on account of the cold, as most of the men were getting some part of
them frozen. [in margin] Cold.
<Q2 folio 54 verso>
December 1880
29th Very cold morning and the cold kept increasing to about two O’clock in the afternoon, when it
was fearful, a strong wind, the snow drifting and the air fairly hissing with frost. This night al-
so was fearfully cold, the water froze in the house (which is pretty warm at most times) about
half an inch thick. I attended an annual meeting of S.S. 5 Melancthon, the trustees appointed
another in my place as Sect. Treasurer, the other offered to transact the business for nothing. I
was getting Eight dollars per annum. I delivered up to the new treasurer (R. Oliver) $208.22,
being the full amount of Cash in my hands belonging to the Section. Also I gave him the Mi-
nute Book and Sect. treasurer’s Book. Jim was driving Sam’s team at a bee for Jim Patterson,
hauling saw logs. John and Clark cut some oat sheaves. Sister Margaret gave birth to a child
this morning, it died in the afternoon. [in margin] Remarkably cold day [double underline].
30 Another cold morning, but not quite so cold as yesterday. Still, it was a very sharp day all
through. Nancy and I went in the afternoon to W. Lonsway’s. The boys chored around.
31 Another cold day, but not quite so cold as yesterday. Sharp freeze all day long. John and I cut
cordwood in the bush. [Stricken: and in the afternoon I went with Nancy to Dundalk]. Jim
hauled stovewood.
The old year is gone with its joys and sorrows and who amongst us can tell whether [MS
whither] we will see the end of the next or not. Taking it on the whole, we have nothing to
complain of, we have all had our health, sickness has not visited our home, accidents have not
befallen us, neither have we had any pecuniary losses. So that we have more reason to rejoice
than to complain.
<Q2 folio 55 recto>
January 1881
1st Another cold day, very sharp frost all day through. Jim, John and I cut cordwood in the bush
and in the afternoon Nancy and I went to Dundalk.
2nd Sabbath. Rather milder than yesterday. Brother John came here about 10 A.M. We went with
him after dinner to see the folks in Melancthon. He stopped here at night.
3 Pretty mild morning. Brother John left for home this morning. The boys and I chopped cord-
wood in the bush in the forenoon, and in the afternoon, I went to the Municipal Elections at
Dundalk and voted for J. J. Middleton.
141
4 Pretty chilly this morning, and the day continued cold. I had Mr. D. Davidson’s horse and cut-
ter and was around collecting for said gentleman. John Agnew of Essa was here with his wife
and two children and stopped all night. He brought us up a barrel of flour, thinking ours was
frozen, and made a present of it to us. It was kind, but not needed.
5 Rather milder than yesterday, the day pleasant. I was out collecting for D. Davidson, Esq. Jim
was helping brother Sam, Johny was swamping out cordwood. John Agnew and wife and chil-
dren went away this morning.
6 Pretty chilly this morning, but the day got somewhat milder towards noon. Jim was helping
Sam, I was out collecting for D. Davidson.
7 Rather stormy morning, and the day continued cold all through. I was helping weigh hay which
James Mills hauled to me. Johney fell out of bed last night in his sleep and blackened and
bruised his face rather badly. Jim was helping Brother Sam today.
<Q2 folio 55 verso>
January 1881
8th Rather chilly this morning, but not so cold as yesterday, the day got pretty mild about noon. We
were weighing and stowing away hay today. Jim was at Jona[h] Sauder’s hauling saw logs for
him. He had a bee some time ago and I could not send him a hand so I sent Jim today. Old Mr.
Patrick Conners died this morning, aged, it is said, about 93 years. [in margin] Patrick Conners
died
9th. Sabbath. Pretty sharp morning, but the day got milder towards noon.
10 Rather chilly this morning, but the afternoon was a little milder. Nancy, James and I attended
the funeral of Mr. Conners. I then went into Melancthon on Mr. D. Davidson’s business.
11 Fine sunny morning and the day was bright and clear, though sharp frost in the afternoon. I
went to Hornings Mills on Mr. D. Davidson’s business. Jim and John were chopping.
12 Fine morning and the forenoon was sunny, the afternoon cloudy with a snow storm at night.
Jim and John chopped. I went for Mrs. C. Bell in the forenoon and in the afternoon took her
home. Also I drove down to Widow Mulholland’s. James Mills brought home the balance
(700) of the five tons of hay which I had purchased from him some time ago at $6.00 per ton.
13 A cold morning and the day was cold all through with a snow storm at night. Jim and Johney
were chopping.
14 Very cold morning and the day was exceedingly sharp and frosty. Jim and John chopped dur-
ing the forenoon. I was out collecting for Mr. D. Davidson. [in margin] Very cold.
<Q2 folio 56 recto>
January 1881
15th Pretty sharp morning and the day continued cold all through. Jim went to the blacksmith’s to
get a little fixing done to a sleigh, Johney cut Sam some stove wood at the house.
16th Sabbath. Pretty mild morning and the day was fine. Nancy and I were at Brother Sam’s.
17 Mild day all through, snow pretty deep, bad passing teams on the road. I was collecting for Mr.
Davidson, the boys were chopping. [in margin] This is my 45th birthday.
18 Beautiful morning and the day was very pleasant, the sun shone out bright, the sky was clear
and blue. I was collecting, the boys were chopping. I slept at Mr. Davidson’s this night.
19 Beautiful day all through, from morning to night. Clear sky and bright sun. I was collecting,
Jim and John were chopping.
20 Beautiful day all through from morning to night. I was collecting for Mr. Davidson and slept at
his place all night. Jim was at Skeffington Bell’s sawing.
142
21 Stormy morning, snowing and blowing, the day clearing off somewhat towards noon, but the
snow began to come down again. The day was a stormy one all through. I was collecting for
Mr. Davidson during the forenoon. The boys were swamping wood.
22 Pretty stormy day all through, snowing and blowing. Jim and John chopped during the fore-
noon. I done nothing.
23rd Sabbath. Pretty chilly day all through, deep snow and nothing but cold weather.
<Q2 folio 56 verso>
January 1881
24th Not so cold as yesterday, yet cold enough to be disagreeable. I attended a council meeting of
Proton Council held in Mr. S. McCulough’s. [in margin] Sent letter to William / Dickson P.O. /
Tenn.
25 Very sharp morning and the day continued cold all through. I was collecting for D. D., Esq. I
slept at Mr. Davidson’s this night.
26 Another cold day, blowing and snowing. I was collecting and slept at night at Mr. Davidson’s.
27 Very sharp morning and the day continued, blowing and freezing. I collected in Dundalk in the
forenoon and in the afternoon went to W. Egerton’s Sale and collected there. I slept this night
at Mr. Davidson’s.
28 Cold again but not so cold as yesterday. Sun shone out a little while today. I was collecting
and slept at Mr. Davidson’s at night.
29 Something milder than the previous days. About 5 P.M., however, it started snowing and blow-
ing and continued so most of the night. I was collecting and came home this night.
30th Sabbath. Quite cold this morning and the roads very heavy, the day cold all through. Nancy and
Eliza hitched up the team and drove in to Melancthon to Sam’s.
31st Roads heavy this morning and the day cold from morning to night. Mr. Skeffington Bell, his
wife and sister, came here in the afternoon and I helped him at his collector’s Roll.
<Q2 folio 57 recto>
February 1881
1st Extremely sharp morning and the day was one of intense coldness, from morning to night.
Nancy and I went to Dundalk. [in margin] very cold
2 Extrremely cold morning and the day was piercing cold from morning to night. I was collect-
ing. [in margin] very cold
3 Not quite so cold as yesterday, still the freeze was quite sharp. I was collecting. [in margin]
cold.
4 Bright sunny morning and the day continued clear and sunny all through. I was collecting.
5 Very pleasant day, sun out bright and strong from morning to night. I was collecting.
6th Sabbath. Mild morning, but the day was cloudy and not so pleasant as yesterday, the eavning was
quite sharp. Brother Sam and William Lonsway with their wives were here. Nancy and I visit-
ed Mr. S. Bell’s at night.
7 Pretty chilly morning and the day was cold all through. Mrs. Hannah Bowler was here today.
8 Mizzle of rain falling this morning and a thaw on a small scale has set in. Slightly raining all
day. Jim went this morning to drive his aunt Phoebe to Mulmur. Johny and I cleaned up some
pease.
9 Soft morning, a little rain falling throughout the day and a general thaw in progress. I took two
bags of pease to Dundalk.
143
10 Soft morning and the day kept thawing all through till night when it began to freeze. The boys
were cutting some stove wood. The children went at night to a Sunday School tea meeting held
in the Orange hall on Lot 211 Gravel Road.
<Q2 folio 57 verso>
February 1881
11th Still soft, and the day kept thawing a little on to the eavning, when there fell a little snow, also
the wind rose and blew a strong gale at night. Jim and John were cutting stove wood in the
bush.
12 Blustery morning, a mixture of rain and snow falling and blowing a strong gale. This was the
general character of the day. I started for Essa this morning but was too late for the train and
had to come home again. I moved some grain in the afternoon which was getting wet in the
bin, the snow had drifted in above it and was melting and coming down. Jim and John cut
stove wood during the forenoon. Miss Sarah Bell was here this afternoon.
13th Sabbath. Very cold stormy day all through.
14 Milder this morning and the day got bright and warm, very pleasant in the afternoon. I started
for Essa this morning to get $400.00 due me on a farm I sold, this last December was a year. I
took the car at Dundalk for Shelburne, from there I went to James Murphy’s, Tossorontio, and
stopped there all night.
15 Very fine morning and the day was one of sunshine and mild weather. The waggons are run-
ning in this part of the country. I left Mr. Murphy’s in the morning and went to Brother John’s,
had dinner there. I then walked to John Agnew’s in Essa and stopped there all night.
16 Fine morning and the day continued fine all through. I stopped at John’s and he drove me over
to Mr. Hussay’s in the afternoon to get my money. Mr. Hussay was not at home. John then
drove me to a farm which he wanted me to buy. I do not like the farm, it is hilly and swampy.
I stopped at John’s this night.
<Q2 folio 58 recto>
February 1881
17th Fine morning but cold, the day continued chilly all through but clear. The Messrs Hussay came
to John Agnew’s this afternoon and paid me the $400.00 which they owed me. I stopped this
night at John Agnew’s.
18 Quite a fall of snow on the ground this morning and it kept snowing all day. John Agnew drove
me to John Russell’s, then John Russell drove me to Primrose. John Agnew came along in the
sleigh. I got a ride from there to Shelburne, took the cars for Dundalk. Nancy and John met me
at the station with the team and so I got home.
19 Fine day all through, cold, clear and bracing. James and Henry Lonsway were helping my boys
to chop in the bush, as they helped them yesterday. I and Nancy went to Mr. Mark Dawson’s in
the afternoon. I bargained with him to winter some cattle for me at .50¢ per month.
20th Sabbath. Mild day all through. We visited W. Lonsway.
21 Mild day, sunshiny and inclined to be soft. I went to Dundalk and settled some bills. Jim
hauled a cord of wood to J. Hanbury. We took four head of cattle to Mr. Dawson’s to be board-
ed at .50¢ p. head a month.
22 Mild morning and the day continued mild all through with a thaw wind. I went and viewed
Modland’s farm, assisted by Thomas Carson, as I had a notion of purchasing said farm. I did
not like it. Jim hauled in some wood to Dundalk.
144
23 Very cold morning and the day continued extremely cold from morning to night. Johny hauled
cordwood to Dundalk. Jim was helping Joseph Jackson to make ties. [in margin] Extremely
cold day.
<Q2 folio 58 verso>
February 1881
24th Something milder than yesterday, not near so sharp a freeze, still cold enough to suit any per-
son. Johney hauled wood to Dundalk. Brother Sam and I made ties in my swamp in the after-
noon. We made twenty.
25 Pretty sharp frost in the morning, but the day got somewhat milder in the afternoon. Sam and I
were making ties. We made twenty-three. Johny hauled wood.
26 Pretty cold morning, warm about noon, chilly at night. Sam and I made 17 ties. Johny hauled
wood.
27th Sabbath. Rain pour this morning, faired up about ten O’clock A.M. then began to rain about
5:30 P.M. Nancy visited Father’s.
28 Cold morning, freezing, the roads very icy. Johny and I hauled the remainder of the cordwood
to Dundalk. It was extremely hard to get along as the horses had no shoes on. I sold the wood,
it being green, to Thos. Hanbury, ten cords nearly, at $1.85 per cord. Heavy fall of snow at
night.
March 1881
1st Very cold stormy day, blowing, snowing and freezing. Mrs. Russell, Eliza and I visited Mr.
John Ludlow.
2 More moderate today than yesterday, not much wind, the freeze not so great, milder generally.
Brother John was here for a while this forenoon.
3 Rather breezy this morning, and some snow falling. The wind kept increasing all through the
day and in the afternoon especially. At night it blew almost a hurricane. Johney and I made
Fourteen ties today.
<Q2 folio 59 recto>
March 1881
4th Snow falling this morning and it kept increasing in density all through the day. The snow was
very soft and wetting, and there was a pretty strong wind. Johny and I made five ties in the
forenoon. Mr. Boyd, Township assessor, was here and valued as follows: Real Property Lot
215 Assessment $600., Lot 216 ditto $150, Personal property $130, [total] $830. No. of days
Statue Labor 4. [in margin] Assessor here.
5 Rather windy this morning, with some snow falling, there was a little snow fell also during the
day and about 4 P.M. there was quite a snow storm. Johney and I made ties. Jim helped us in
the afternoon: we made 20.
6th Sabbath. Fine mild day from morning to night. I went to Father’s.
7 Beautiful morning, the sun rose bright and clear, the day was one of sunshine and warmth, the
sap ran out of the maples. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and in the afternoon I cut roads to
the ties in the swamp. Nancy was helping mother to sow [=sew]. I got a letter from Brother
William. His Post Office is Batson’s Store, Dickson County, St. of Tennessee. [in margin] W.
Russell / Sawmill and lumberman/ Batson’s Store P. O. / Dickson Co. Tenn.
8 Beautiful morning and the sun shone out bright and clear all day long. Clark and I were sawing
ties in the bush and Johney was hauling stove wood from the bush. [in margin] First lamb came
145
9 Very beautiful morning, sunshiny and warm, the day warm all through, the snow thawing rapid-
ly. Spring weather to all appearances, the day could not be nicer. Brother Sam brought his
horse out and swamped ties for us. We just swamped out one hundred.
<Q2 folio 59 verso>
March 1881
10th Rather fine day all through. Clark, Johny and I were sawing ties and piling them up.
11 Very cold raw morning and the day was sharp and a keen freeze all through. Jim and Johney
were hauling ties. I was making roads for them, they hauled 60 ties.
12 Another cold morning and the day was chilly all through with a heavy snow storm in the
eavning which continued all through the night. Jim and Johney finished hauling ties, they
hauled 40. I went in the forenoon to look at a lot of land in Melancthon and in the afternoon I
helped brother Sam to make ties. I slept at Father’s all night.
13th Sabbath. Pretty deep snow this morning, and the day cold in the forenoon, something milder in
the afternoon. Mrs. Bowler and her son Giles were here this eavning.
14 Hazy morning, but not very cold, the day got pretty warm in the afternoon. Jim, Clark and I
were making ties. Johny was laid up with a cold. We made 25.
15 Bright morning, the sun rose clear and beautiful, the snow melted during the day, the sun was
so hot. Johny, Clark and I were making ties. We made 18. Jim was at Alexander Patterson’s
making ties.
16 Fine morning and the day continued mild all through, cloudy and sunshine, just like the life of
man. I went to Dundalk to attend an auction sale of land. I did not purchase as I thought it
went too high. I sold 200 ties to Mr. C. Johnston for .16 1/4 ¢ per tie. The boys were making
ties. They made 20. Mrs. R. was at Mr. Mark Dawson’s. Their little boy of about four years of
age died this morning. [in margin] Sent a letter to Br. William
<Q2 folio 60 recto>
March 1881
17th Fine mild morning, the day mild and balmy all through, the snow going away fast. The boys
and I made ties. We made 43. Miss Jane Johnson was here this afternoon.
18 Mild morning, the sun came out pretty strong and warm and the day was warm. The boys and I
swamped out ties. We hauled out 81 and piled and sawed them.
19 Soft, mild morning and a storm of slushy snow came on in the afternoon and continued all
evening. The boys and I hauled out ties in the forenoon, and in the afternoon they hauled to the
track. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon and bought 106 sheet iron spiles for the maple trees
@ $1.15
20th Sabbath. Rather mild morning, but frequent showers of snow throughout the day.
21 Snowing this morning and the day was very unpleasant with a good deal of soft snow falling.
The boys were hauling ties to the track. I helped Br. Sam to saw some ties.
22 Cold stormy morning, blowing and snowing which it varied through the day by freezing at
night. The boys were making ties in the afternoon. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and in
the afternoon got Skeffington Bell to haul me home a ton of hay which I purchased from him
for Eight dollars.
23 Pretty cold frosty morning and the day continued chilly all through, although the sun shone out
brightly most of the time. Jim was helping his uncle Sam with the team to haul ties to Dundalk.
Johney, Clark and I were making ties: we made 20. Miss Sarah Bell was here today, so also
were Miss Sarah Jackson and her brother Sam. Jim with the team is stopping at his uncle
Sam’s during this night.
146
<Q2 folio 60 verso>
March 1881
24th Rather sharp cold morning, the sun shone out through the day, making it rather pleasanter, still,
the wind was raw. Keen freeze at dark. Johny, Clark and I were making ties: we made 20. Jim
was helping Sam to haul ties to Dundalk. Mrs. Mark Dawson was here this afternoon.
25 Clear morning, but chilly and the day was cold but clear all through. We were making ties to-
day, assisted by Brother Sam and William John Arnold. We made 66. I went to Mr. Skeffing-
ton Bell’s at night and T. Hanbury and I calculated up his Collector’s Roll.
26 Clear cold day from morning to night. Sun shone out bright. We were swamping out ties. We
swamped out 69. Old Mr. Kirby was here a while tonight.
27th Sabbath. Cold clear day all through. Mr. Mark Dawson and family visited us today.
28 Clear and cold all day, in fact very cold. We finished swamping ties (41) and the boys then
took a load (14) to the track. Mrs. Russell and I paid old Mr. W. Kirby a visit this night as he is
leaving the neighbourhood tomorrow and moving to Owen Sound. He was a good neighbour
and I believe a truthful, honest man.
29 Cold and clear all the day. The boys and I finished hauling ties today. They hauled six loads at
Sixteen in each load, that is 96. This makes 300 ties that we have made.
30 Cold morning, freezing like fun, the day kept chilly all through. Jim took home Sam’s Ewe and
Borrowed his sugar kettle and barrel. Phoebe came in the eavning. I went to Dundalk in the
forenoon.
<Q2 folio 61 recto>
March 1881
31st Another cold morning and the day was chilly all through, with snow in the afternoon. The boys
hauled stove wood in the forenoon and in the afternoon made sap troughs.
April 1881
1st Very cold morning and the day was cold all through with some snow falling. Jim and John
were making sap troughs. Mrs. R. visited at Mrs. C. Bell’s.
2 Pretty cold morning, although the sun rose bright and clear, the day was clear and cold all
through. Mr. Skeffington Bell and I went to look at a farm in Proton which I had some thoughts
of purchasing. We travelled around the lot. I do not like it well, therefore I think I will not buy
it. Jim and John were helping their uncle Sam.
3rd Sabbath. Cold morning and the day was chilly all through.
4 Very cold morning and the day kept getting colder all through. The afternoon was piercing
cold. Jim and John hauled some sap troughs they had made to the sugar bush. The[y] also took
out the barrels and kettles. In the afternoon they made a place to boil. I went to Mr. Brattings
sale to buy a logging chain. There was none sold. [in margin] very cold.
5 Cold morning, and the day kept getting colder all through, with a strong wind accompanied by
a snow storm. I think this has been one of the coldest days that we have had during the winter.
Jim was helping W. J. Arnold to saw wood. The others of us done nothing. [in margin] Ex-
tremely cold.
6 Another cold stormy day with some snow falling, the day got somewhat milder towards night.
Jim and Johney went with the team to Dundalk in the forenoon and got three Barells of salt at
$1.20 per Barell, and a Lance-tooth saw* at $6.00. Mr. Skeffington Bell and wife were here a
while at night. [in margin] Posted a letter to Ireland. [*type of cross-cut saw, usually for soft-
wood]
147
7 Milder day than yesterday, the sun shone out pretty strong in the afternoon. Mrs. R. and I went
to Dundalk in the afternoon. Jim and John helped their uncle Sam.
<Q2 folio 61 verso>
April 1881
8th Bright sunny morning and the day continued warm and bright. The boys and I were in the sug-
ar bush tapping trees. We tapped and put the spiles in 105, and in the evening we went for a
heifer we had boarding at Mr. Dawson’s and brought her home as she is rather weak. [in mar-
gin] First trees tapped.
9 Bright sunny morning and the day continued very fine all through with a bright warm sun. Jim,
Clark and I were in the sugar bush. We tapped and put the spiles in 31 trees. We then hauled
some logs with the horses forward to the camp. After that we gathered about 10 pails of sap.
The snow is very deep in the bush, almost 2 feet on an average and so soft in the afternoon that
we would sink to the bottom every step. Very tiresome work. Johney was at a wood sawing at
Jim Trugon’s. [in margin] Heard first robin.
10th Sabbath. Fine morning and the day continued nice. Mrs. R. and I went to Father’s.
11 Fine morning and the day continued sunny and bright. We tapped some trees, gathered sap, and
boiled down 30 pails. Jim went for two Bushels of white winter wheat for seed. Got it from
Mr. Dover of Melancthon at $1.20 per bushel. Then in the afternoon he went to Dundalk for
the harrows which were getting repaired.
12 A little chilly this morning and the day got somewhat warmer about noon. Johney was in the
sugar bush working. Jim is laid up with a sprained hand. I went to look about purchasing a lot
of land in the 5th Range Melancthon. From thence I went to Dundalk. Mr. Dawson came here
about the middle of the night and told us that a two year old heifer of ours which was wintering
with him had got cast at the straw stack. Johney and Clark and I hitched up the horses, went for
her and brought her home in the sleigh. Her neck seems to have got twisted.
13 Fine morning, although a little chilly, the day got warmer towards noon. Mrs. R., Johney and I
were in the sugar bush. Mrs. R. boiled down fifty pails of sap from Eleven O’clock A.M.
<Q2 folio 62 recto>
April 1881
14th Beautiful morning, and the day continued sunny and fair but with a cold wind towards night.
Johny and I gathered sap.
15 A little cloudy this morning, but the sun shone out after a while and the day was pretty mild.
There is plenty of snow to be melted yet before plowing commences. Mrs. R., Johny and Clark
were making sugar. They boiled into syrup sixty pails of sap.
16 Hard frost this morning and the forenoon was pretty chilly, but the afternoon was warmer wth a
bright sun and thaw wind. Johny and Clark were gathering sap. Mrs. R. sugared off the syrup
of 110 pails of sap. There were 52 pounds of sugar. It was rather soft as it has been her first
venture in sugaring off. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and posted a letter to William Clark,
Springville P.O., Ontario. The letter was asking him if he would sell Lot 34, Con. 4 Melanc-
thon. [in margin] Posted a letter to William Clark/ Springville P.O., Ont.
17th Esther Sabbath. Mild morning and the day continued sunny and springlike all through. [in
margin] 1st cow calved. Heard Frogs.
18 Fine morning and the day was pretty warm all through with a bright sun shining. Mrs. R.,
Johney and I were in the sugar bush. We boiled down 52 pails of sap, part of which was gath-
ered on Saturday previous. Jim started the plow. There was some frost in the ground. Brother
148
Sam was here tonight a spell. In 1879 first plowing April 21st, in 1880 —April 15th [in mar-
gin] First plowing / Saw first Robbin.
19 Pretty hard frost this morning, but the sun got out bright after a little and the day was pretty
warm about noon. Cloudy in the afternoon with some signs of rain. Jim was plowing, Johney
was helping at his uncle Sam’s to saw wood. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk in the forenoon
and when we came home I went to the bush and gathered 25 pails of sap from 3:30 P.M.
<Q2 folio 62 verso>
April 1881
20th Beautiful morning, the day sunshiny and warm all through. People have nearly all started
plowing. There is plenty of snow in the fence corners yet and also plenty in some of the woods,
on the edges of swamp. The roads are drying up fast. In the field in which Jim is plowing there
is banks of snow almost three feet deep in the corners of the Northwest fence. Still, the ground
plows well. Johney and I were cleaning our seed wheat. We put it twice through the separa-
tors, still there are a great many oats in it yet. We went out after tea and gathered eleven pails
of sap. There was very little sap in the troughs. Mrs. or Miss Perce, a religious fanatic, stopped
here over night. The impression on me about her is one of deep disgust.
21 Another fine morning, and the day was one of sunshine and mildness. Jim was plowing. Mrs.
R. boiled down into syrup 36 pails of sap. Done it all alone without any help. Rolled the back
log. Rolled in the front Log. Put up the crotches. Swung the sugar kettles on the fire. She is
as strong as horse, especially when mad, and the fit was on her today. Johney and I cut out
snags and small stumps in the new fallow and Johney gathered 10 pails of sap in the eavning.
22 Frosty morning, but nothing to stop plowing. The day was cloudy and rather cool. Jim was
plowing. Johney, Clark and I were picking up in the new fallow.
23 A little frost this morning, but the ground soon got thawed out, the day was pretty warm and a
little cloudy in the afternoon. I sowed about nine bushels of pease and two of wheat. Jim har-
rowed to about 3 P.M. when one of the team (Gerty) took sick with belly ache or stop[p]age of
the urine. We gave her ginger and a spoonful of spirits of sweet nitre. She seemed something
better after, but she is not real well yet. Jim and I went to Dundalk in the eavning. [in margin]
First wheat sown / First pease sown / 5 days before new moon.
<Q2 folio 63 recto>
April 1881
24th Sabbath. Pretty warm day, quite hazy in the afternoon, like summer. James Trugon and wife
and Brother Sam were here ths eavning.
25 Cloudy morning and a slight rain in the forenoon, also a heavier shower in the afternoon.
Cloudy at night. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and in the afternoon I and
Johny cut snags. Jim was harrowing and plowing. [in margin] Saw first swallow.
26 Slight rain early this morning, which increased as the day advanced, and became pretty heavy
about 8:30 A.M. It faired off before noon and the afternoon was dry. Jim was plowing during
the dry part of the day. Johney yoked up his steers and he and I picked Rocks.
27 White frost this morning and the day got cloudy but kept dry to about 5 P.M. when there came
on a pretty sharp shower of rain and kept raining less or more to about 8 P.M. Jim was plow-
ing, Johney and I were picking stones. Mrs. R. boiled into vinegar [?-MS: vinengar] Syrup 13
pails of Sap.
28 A little frost this morning and the day was cloudy all through. There came on some rain about
5 P.M. and continued slightly raining to near dark. I sowed about six bushels of wheat. Jim
149
harrowed and Johny sowed salt on the ground. He sowed two barrels on four acres. John Ab-
bott, Dominion Census taker, was here today.
29 Cold frosty morning and the day was chilly but dry all through. Jim, Johney and I branded up
in the forenoon and in the afternoon we attempted to plow the new fallow, but broke the land-
side* off our plow. I then went to W. Lonway’s and bought an old plow from him for $1.00. It
is not much of a plow, still it may root over the fallow for us. [*bottom plate, part of a plow,
helps stabilize, resists sideways pressure of mouldboard]
<Q2 folio 63 verso>
April 1881
30th Very hard frost this morning and the day was very cold from morning to night. Jim plowed,
Johney took his steers and the stone boat and went to W. Lonsway’s for the plow which I
bought from him yesterday. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk in the eavning. There was some
old tramp stopped here all night. [in margin] Posted a letter to / Matthew Knox / South Dum-
mer.
May [1881]
1st. Sabbath. Very cold frosty morning and the day was dark and cold all through.
2 Frosty morning and the day was cloudy and cold. Jim plowed, Johney picked stones. I went in
the forenoon to W. Lonsway’s to get the colter of the plow. When I came home I helped
Johney to gather stones. After tea John and I cleaned up ten bags of oats.
3 Hard frost this morning, so hard that we could not harrow early in the morning. The day was
cool all through and dry. I sowed about 12½ bushels of oats. Johney harrowed, Jim made a
merry-go-round to hang clothes on. In the afternoon I went to the blacksmith’s to get some
bolts made. [in margin] First oats sown
4 Frost this morning and the morning was cloudy but the sun got out after some time and the day
was pretty warm. Jim and Johney plowed in the new fallow. I picked over a pit of potatoes in
the forenoon and in the afternoon I picked sticks and roots in the fallow. I also went to Mr.
Dawson’s at night to see about some hay.
5 Frost this morning and the air pretty chilly. The afternoon was cloudy and cool. The boys and
I were working in the fallow. Jim plowing, Johney driving and I picking up.
6 Slight shower of rain early this morning, soon cleared off and the day was remarkably fine,
splendid growth. The boys plowed and I levelled several knolls with the spade and chopped
down some scrubby trees.
<Q2 folio 64 recto>
May 1881
7th Slight frost this morning, the day dry and warm with a good growth. The boys finished plow-
ing in the new fallow. I took out some small stumps and levelled some [k]nolls. Clark took the
spoils out of the trees after supper, and Jim and I went to Mr. Dawson’s for some hay.
8th Sabbath. Sultry morning and the day was warm, dry and cloudy. Mrs. R. and I visited Mr. M.
Dawson’s.
9 Cloudy morning and the day warm, there was a shower of rain about 6 P.M., then another big
shower between 8 and 10 P.M., also thunder and lightening. Mr. Skeffington Bell came here
this eavning and changed seven bags of white oats with me for seven bags of Black ones which
he wanted for seed. Jim plowed today. Johney dug knolls in the new fallow. I planted some
potatoes. [in margin] First potatoes planted.
10 Cloudy morning and there were frequent showers throughout the day. Jim plowed to noon then
he fixed the V-drag. Johney and I cleaned oats in the forenoon and in the afternoon I sowed
and Johney harrowed.
150
11 Dry morning, but the day was cloudy and showery, especially the afternoon, when there was
pretty heavy thunder and rain. I sowed oats in the new fallow. Jim harrowed in the forenoon
and in the afternoon made a drag. Johney picked up in the forenoon and harrowed in the after-
noon. I got the three apple trees which I had ordered from the Georgetown nursery. They are
poor, dry, scrubby trees. It’s only a fraud dealing there. [in margin] Got fruit trees.
12 Fine morning, very hot and dry through the day with a good deal of clouds. Jim harrowed,
John picked up. I sowed grass and clover seed in the forenoon and went to Dundalk after din-
ner. Got half a bushel more of clover seed at 5.50 per Bushel. Sowed some when I got home.
Then washed 12 sheep. I purchased 18 Apple trees, 3 plum trees and got a present of a cherry
tree, all to be delivered next spring from Chase Brothers and Bowman, Rochester. Full price
$6.80. [in margin] Ordered trees.
<Q2 folio 64 verso>
May 1881
13th Very fine morning, though cloudy, the day was dry, cloudy and warm with a very fine growth.
Jim harrowed, Johney made slash fence*, I sowed grass and clover seed. Also sowed about
five bags of oats. Johney and his mother went to Dundalk after supper. They have not got
home yet (9 O’clock). [*slash fence: made with unlimbed trees and brush, over rough terrain;
not a rail fence; called a brush fence, 3 days later]
14 Cloudy morning and pretty heavy rain in the forenoon. It cleared off about 9 A.M. and contin-
ued fair to 7 P.M. when there came on thunder and lightening with more rain. Jim harrowed,
John clipped the sheep, and I sowed grass seed in the forenoon, and in the afternoon let off
some water on a new sown field. Johney drove his mother to the graveyard* ten miles down
the gravel from 4 O’clock. She planted a weeping willow, which her brother John Agnew had
purchased and sent to Dundalk, at her mother’s grave. [in margin] Shore sheep. [*See above,
11 Oct. 1877.]
15th Sabbath. Cloudy morning and the day was showery in the afternoon. Mrs. R. and I went to
Brother Sam’s.
16 Cloudy, cold morning with some rain very early. The day dry afterwards and pretty chilly. Jim
plowed and harrowed a potatoe patch, John made a Brush fence, I cut seed potatoes.
17 Cool morning and the day was dry, cool and cloudy. I sorted potatoes in the cellar in the fore-
noon. Jim and John hauled out manure. Clark spread it, and in the afternoon we all planted ten
bushels of potatoes. We put them in with the plow. Plowed them in, dropped the sets in every
third furrow. Raked in the manure first with a rake, then dropped the set on top.
18 Cloudy, cool morning and the day was cool, cloudy and dry. Jim was plowing, Johney and I
were cutting poles to fence a calf park. Mrs. William Bowler was here today.
19 Cool, cloudy and dry from morning to night. Jim was plowing, Johney and I were getting poles
to make a calf park.
<Q2 folio 65 recto>
May 1881
20th Cool, cloudy morning and the day was dry and cool all through. Johney was pulling rail cuts
off the fallow with his steers. Jim was plowing. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon for some
nails and in the afternoon made part of [the fence] of the calf park.
21 Cool, cloudy day all through. I sowed five bags of oats in the forenoon and in the afternoon ti-
died up the door yard. Jim finished fencing calf park and Johney harrowed the oats which I had
sown.
151
22nd Sabbath. Very fine sunshiny day all through. William John Arnold and his wife and Mother
were here today.
23 Fine morning, bright and sunny, the day warm, clear and pleasant. The boys and I were brand-
ing.* [*branding=burning brush or scrub wood on recently logged land]
24 Fine morning, sun bright and warm, the day clear, warm and dry. Good growing weather. The
boys and I were picking up and branding.
25 Warm morning, sun shone out clear and strong. The boys, Jim and John, hauled rails and I built
them in a fence in the forenoon and in the afternoon I went with a Mr. Knox to look at his Lot
No. 31, 5th Con., Melancthon. He offered it to me for $1450. I offered him $1300. The Lot is
a pretty good one and I think perhaps I will yet buy it.
26 Hazy morning, the sun red and fiery like, the day was hot. Jim plowed and harrowed some-
thing more than an acre, which I had sown with fall wheat. The wheat is a failure. I sowed it in
oats. I was putting up fence most of the day. Johney and Clark were picking up.
<Q2 folio 65 verso>
May 1881
27th Hazy morning, the sun came out quite red and hot like. The day was very warm in the fore-
noon. It got pretty windy in the afternoon and there was a very stiff gale about 5 P.M. There
came on a slight shower and the wind ceased. I sowed some oats and grass seed on the new fal-
low. Jim harrowed and Johney picked up. Mrs. John Gott was here spending part of the day.
28 Dry very early in the morning, but there came on rain about 9 A.M. and rained all forenoon, and
a great deal of the afternoon. I and Jim and Brother Sam went to Lot 31, 5 Con. Melancthon
and took a good look at it. The Lot is a good one. I purchased it this Eavning from the owner,
Mr. Mathew Knox (South Dummer) for $1300., $200 down, $200 1st of next March and $200
yearly to the principal is all paid, with interest at the rate of six per cent per annum on each
payment as it becomes due. Jim went to Mr. White’s Raising in the afternoon. John harrowed
and Clark picked up. [in margin] Got papers from Toronto.
29th Sabbath. A little cloudy this morning, but the sun soon shone out bright and warm. The day
was sultry. Brother Sam and wife were here today.
30 Warm sunny morning, the day got cloudy about 10 A.M. and was cool and cloudy to dark. I
went to meet Mr. Knox in the forenoon and paid him $200 on the land I had bought. In the af-
ternoon I picked up in the fallow. Jim sowed the remainder of the oats. Johny harrowed, Clark
and Willie were helping Grandfather plant potatoes. [in margin] Finished sowing.
31 A little cool this morning, the day cloudy in the afternoon. Jim harrowed, Johney and I built
fences.
<Q2 folio 66 recto>
June 1881
1st Dry cool morning, the day rather cool all through, with but a little sunshine. Jim and Johney
hauled out manure. I cut seed potatoes.
2 Very chilly morning, so much so that a good many people said there was a frost. The day was
cool, dry and cloudy. We were planting potatoes. We planted about ten bushels. I went to
Dundalk after dinner and got a pair of leather lines, price $2.75. After supper Mrs. Russell and
I with the three youngest went to look at lot 31, Con. 5, Melancthon, which I have bought. The
lot pleased well. [in margin] Finished planting potatoes
3 Cool, cloudy morning and the day continued cloudy and cold all through. Pretty chilly at night.
The three eldest boys went a-fishing. I washed and oiled the harness.
152
4 Pretty cool this morning, but the sun shone out bright, the day was rather cool but sunny all
through. Mrs. R. and I went to Priceville. When we came home I went to Dundalk.
5th Sabbath. Cool morning and the day was very chilly, especially in the eavning. Father and Moth-
er and Miss S. Bell were here.
6 Cold morning and a tremendous frost, good thick ice on the water, the potatoes above ground
all killed, a great many pease bleached white, the clover and grass badly hurt. I have some oats
on new land. They were about four inches high; they are flattened down to the ground. Almost
every thing has suffered. I don’t remember of ever seeing such a frost this time of the year. I
went to Dundalk in the morning to Gordon’s* with the Black mare. When I came home I and
the boys made a brush fence. [in margin] Very hard frost. [*butcher shop in Dundalk, History
of Dundalk, p. 101]
<Q2 folio 66 verso>
June 1881
7th Cool morning, the day cool, cloudy and dry. Jim, Johney and I were making brush fence. Mr.
Clippert was here.
8 Cool cloudy morning and the day cool and cloudy all through. Jim and I were chopping in the
swale. Johney cleaned up a piece of ground in the bush and planted some potatoes for himself.
W. Lonsway and family were here.
9 Cool dark morning, the day cool and dark all through. Jim, Johney and I were chopping in the
swale.
10 Hazy morning, the day pretty warm in the afternoon. The sun red, indicating heat. Jim, Johney
and I were chopping and sawing in the swale. We intend cleaning it up this summer. Mr. Geo.
Rutherford was here this eavning transacting business.
11 Hazy morning, but the sun soon dissipated the mist and came out bright. The day was pretty
warm all through. Mrs. Russell, Jim, John, and Eliza left home this morning to pay their rela-
tions in Tossorontio and Essa a visit. Miss Sarah Bell accompanied them. Clark and I put up a
Sett [sic] of Bars to the pasture field.
12th Sabbath. Pretty warm and windy all through, a very slight shower at dark.
13 Cloudy morning, with indications of rain. A few drops fell about 10 A.M. The afternoon was
pretty breezy. About 7 P.M. there came on a pretty sharp wind storm. The sky also darkened
all over. There was thunder and lightening, hail and rain. The wind blew pretty violent for a
while, but was not of long duration. Some of the hail stones were as large as small marbles. I
was fixing fence, cleaning out cellar and choring around generally. The absentees were to be
home this night, but have not come yet (10 P.M.). [in margin] Hail
<Q2 folio 67 recto>
June 1881
14th Cool morning, although the sun shone out bright, the day was cool, dry and breezy and very
chilly in the afternoon. We were chopping in the swale. The folks got home last night.
15 Cool morning, the day dry and cool, with a tendancy to frost in the night. We were chopping in
the swale.
16 Cool morning, the day dry, cool and breezy and very chilly in the afternoon. Jim, John and I
were chopping in the swale. There was quite a rain fall this night.
17 Slight mizzle of rain this morning, the day was cloudy with an occassional [sic] sprinkling of
rain to about 6 P.M. when the sun came out. Jim was hauling ties to Dundalk for his uncle Sam.
Johney and I were chopping in swale.
153
18 Rather cloudy morning, but the sun got out and there was no rain during the day. There was a
small quantity fell at night. Jim was helping Sam to haul ties. Johney and I were chopping in
the swale to noon. In the afternoon we cut some thistles out of the wheat. I went to Dundalk
after tea.
19th Sabbath. Cool dry day. Mrs. R. and I went to Father’s.
20 Cool, dry day. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon.
21 Cold, dry day. I went to Tossorontio, thence to Alliston, stopped at Brother John’s all night.
Very hard frost this night. [in margin ] Frost.
22 Cool, dry day. Left brother John’s this morning and came home.
23 Cool, cloudy and dry. The children went to the Sunday School picknick.
<Q2 folio 67 verso>
June 1881
24th Cool morning, the day cloudy, cold and dry. We had a logging bee in the swale. There were
three teams and fourteen rollers. [in margin] Frost.
25 Cool morning, the day cloudy and cool with a slight rain in the eavning. The boys and I were
fencing.
26th Sabbath. Cool, cloudy day. I visited at Father’s.
27 Pretty cool morning, the day got overcast towards 11 A.M. and it began to rain. The afternoon
was wet, with thunder and lightening. I was bossing the Statue labor on my beat. The boys
were picking up in the swale.
28 Cloudy morning, but the sun got out, and the day was pretty warm during part of the forenoon.
There came on some rain about noon. I was taskmaster today. The boys were picking up in the
swale.
29 Bright, sunny morning with a slight sprinkling of rain towards noon, the afternoon dry and
breezy. Jim was picking up in the swale, Johney was logging at J. Mills’. I was bossing the
Statute labor.
30 Bright, sunny morning, the day dry, cool and breezy. Jim and Johney with the team were doing
four day’s statute labor for Lot 31, Con. 5 Melancthon. I was fixing fences, pulling mustard,
etc. Mrs. Abraham Jackson* and her daughter, Mrs. H. Galaugher, were here this afternoon.
This has been a remarkably cold month. There has been very heavy frosts many times through
the month, which done a great deal of injury, in this and other places of Ontario. All my grain,
grass and potatoes have been froze, less or more, which has retarded their growth. Some of the
oats were froze so badly that they never sprouted again. The crops in general are very back-
ward. There are some blossoms on my pease. [in margin] Pease Blossomed. [*mother of
Phoebe Jackson Russell.]
<Q2 folio 68 recto>
July 1881
1st Bright morning and the day was sunny and warm all through. The boys and I picked up in the
swale in the forenoon and in the afternoon Mrs. R. and Phoebe, Willliam Lonsway and I and
Clark went to see the Melancthon Lot [31, Con. 5]. Jim and John went to Dundalk. John
Westacott stopped here this night.
2 Bright warm morning, the day was dry and pretty warm with the exception of a few drops of
rain that fell about 3 P.M. Jim and John were hoeing thistles out of the potatoes. Clark and I
were picking up in the swale.
3rd Sabbath. Bright morning, but the sun clouded over in the afternoon.
154
4 Bright morning, the day very warm, although a little cloudy now and then. I picked up in the
forenoon and in the afternoon Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk. Jim and John were cutting this-
tles out of the potatoes.
5 Bright sunny morning, the day very hot although there was a breeze occasionally. Mrs. R. and
I took our wool to Feversham Mills to be carded. We then met with Mr. Walter Bell and wife.
We went home with them and stopped to the eavning. Jim started to mow today. John Agnew
stopped here all night.
6 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and hot. Jim was mowing, John mowed some in the after-
noon. I cut tops off thistles in the afternoon. Brother John and his daughter Nancy were here a
while today. He is rather embarassed financially. I gave him a note of hand, made by A. Hus-
say [MS Hussy] in my favor for $200.00 in order for him to get it discounted so that it might
help him out of his difficulties. Brother John gave me in lieu thereof a note on himself for
$200.00 paybable in three days from this date.
<Q2 folio 68 verso>
July 1881
7th Cloudy morning, and it commenced raining about 9 A.M. and continued raining pretty steadily
all through the day. The boys and I straightened up things in the barn. Jim went to Dundalk in
the afternoon.
8 Cloudy morning and the forenoon was overcast, the sun came out in the afternoon, very hot. I
was logging at Skeffington Bell’s. Jim and John were mowing, Clark was hoeing cabbage.
9 Bright sunny morning, and the day was dry and very hot. Jim and I mowed in the forenoon. I
topped thistles in the afternoon and went to Dundalk. John and Clark hoed thistles out of the
potatoes in the forenoon and in the afternoon raked hay.
10th Sabbath. Dry in the forenoon, a shower of rain in the afternoon. Mr. Dawson and wife and Jo-
seph Jackson were here in the afternoon.
11 Dry cloudy day, not much sunshine. We tore up the old crossway in the swale, and hauled in
two loads of hay.
12 Cloudy morning, the forenoon dry and vey warm, a pretty sharp shower in the afternoon. Jim,
John, and Clark went to Shelburne. The remainder of us went to Dundalk. [Orange Lodge cel-
ebrations for 12th of July.]
13 Dry forenoon, the afternoon dry, cool and breezy, cold at night. We sawed some stove wood in
the forenoon and in the afternoon I went to Sam McDowell’s raising. The boys hoed potatoes
in the afternoon.
14 Dry day, cloudy and cool. We molded up the potatoes and worked among them. Old Mr. Kirby
was here a while this eavning.
15 Cloudy morning and a slight shower of rain, the remainder of the day dry and breezy. We were
cutting stove wood in the swale.
16 Cool dry forenoon, the afternoon cold, dry and breezy. We cut stove wood to tea time then
Mrs. R., Jim and I went to Dundalk. Subscribed, or renewed my subscription rather, for the
Mail.* [*Toronto newspaper, now Globe & Mail]
<Q2 folio 69 recto>
July 1881
17th Sabbath. Cool, breezy morning, the day very cool and windy, cold, in fact, in the eavning. We
visited at Sam’s.
18 Cool morning, the day cool and very windy. Jim mowed, John and I sawed in the swale. Clark
hoed potatoes. Mr. Gowan (teacher) was here trying to sell me a Reaper.
155
19 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and breezy. Jim, Johney and I with the team were helping
Brother Sam to do a road job.
20 Rainy morning, cleared off about 8 A.M., the day dry and pretty cool afterwards. Rain in the
afternoon from 5:30. Johney and I were cutting stove wood, Jim was hauling stove wood from
the swale.
21 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and clear to the afternoon when it clouded over. Jim went in
the forenoon to Dundalk and got his boots sowed [=sewed]. John and I cut stove wood in the
swale. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk after supper. The boys raked up some hay.
22 Cloudy morning, the forenoon cloudy, the afternoon clear and bright. We hauled in some hay
in the forenoon, also hauled home some stove wood, and logged in the afternoon.
23 Bright sunny morning, the day clear, sunny and pretty warm. We finished logging in the swale.
24th Sabbath. Bright sunny morning and the day continued dry and warm. Brother Sam and wife
were here today.
25 Rather cloudy this morning. Jim, John and I started for Tossorontio township to help brother
John to harvest. We got a pretty good shower on our journey. We arrived at 5 P.M. and helped
him to bind some wheat.
<Q2 folio 69 verso>
July 1881
26th Cloudy morning, but the day was dry and warm. We were helping Brother John to harvest
wheat.
27 Some clouds this morning, the day dry all through. We helped Br. John to harvest.
28 A little foggy this morning, but the day was very hot. John took the boys and helped Mr. Sar-
gent to harvest. I went to James Murphy’s after supper.
29 Misty morning, but scorching hot through the day. We helped Brother John to harvest.
30 Bright sunny morning, the sun very strong today, lots of showers going round at a distance,
none came near us. We were harvesting.
31st Sabbath. Cloudy morning, the boys with John’s wife and son and I went to John Agnew’s to Es-
sa. There was a heavy rain there.
August 1881
1st Bright sunny morning, the boys and I left Brother John’s and came home. There was a tremen-
dous heavy rain came on when we were about six miles from home. There were creeks of wa-
ter running on the sides of the road when the rain was over. [in margin] Very heavy rain.
2 Sunny morning, the day dry and warm. Jim hauled rail cuts from among the log heap. John
and Clark sawed rail cuts. I went to see about a ram, also to let the clearing and fencing of part
of lot 31 Melancthon. I did not succeed. [in margin] Letter from Ireland.
3 Bright morning, the middle of the day very hot. The boys and I were helping Brother Sam at
his hay.
4 Hazy morning, and the day extremely hot. John and Jim were picking stones a part of the day.
[in margin] Very hot.
<Q2 folio 70 recto>
August 1881
5th Close, warm morning, and the day very sultry all through. There was a very strong gale of
wind in the afternoon about 6 O’clock, then a little after that the clouds got very black and there
was terrific thunder and lightening, and a very heavy rain during most of the night. The boys
and I were picking stones. Mrs. C. Bell was here.
156
6 Rainy morning, thunder and lightening also, the forenoon wet and part of the afternoon. The
boys picked stones a little while in the afternoon. I went to Dundalk.
7th Sabbath. Cloudy morning, but the day was dry. Very chilly in the afternoon, seemed very much
like frost. Mr. Skeffington Bell and wife were here in the eavning.
8 Clear cool morning, the day dry and cool all through, although very cloudy towards night. Jim
and John were pulling pease. I and Mr. J. J. Middleton, Reeve of Proton, went on business* to
Priceville. [in margin] First pease pulled. [*Middleton visited W. Ferguson, School Inspector,
Priveville, to lobby in favour of Robert’s pension, which was granted later that year. See L18.8
in Letters.Documents; and below, 24 Nov. 1881.]
9 Dark cloudy morning, and some slight rain fell. The day was generally dry, cloudy and cool.
Jim, John and I were pulling pease. Clark was hunting up some lost sheep.
10 A little cloudy this morning, but the sun got out and the day was dry but cool. The boys and I
were pulling pease. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon and bought two pairs of Binding Gloves
@ .45¢ per pair.
11 Cloudy this morning, and pretty cloudy all through the day, and warm, no rain, but strong signs
of it towards night. Jim was craddling fall wheat. John and I were binding. It is a very poor
crop on account of being winter killed.
12th Rainy morning to about 8 A.M., from that on the day was dry and cloudy and very sultry in the
afternoon. Jim, John and I were raising stones in the dry part of the forenoon. In the afternoon
we finished cutting our fall wheat. Nancy and Jim with the team went to Dundalk in the after-
noon.
<Q2 folio 70 verso>
August 1881
13th Dark cloudy morning, but there was only a slight shower in the forenoon. The afternoon was
dry and windy to about dark, when there came on some rain. Johney craddled oats in the fore-
noon, and in the afternoon he and Clark and I hauled in pease. Jim was helping Skeffington
Bell to pull pease. [in margin] First oats cut
14th Sabbath. Clear cool day.
15 Clear and cool all through the day, with tendancy to frost at night. Johney, Clark and I hauled
in pease in the forenoon. In the afternoon we bound some spring wheat. I then went to Dun-
dalk and bought a craddle blade for $1.00. Jim cut wheat in the afternoon and oats in the fore-
noon. [in margin] First spring wheat cut.
16 Cool clear day with a clouding over of the sun towards night. Jim craddled oats, Johney and I
bound oats in the forenoon and in the afternoon, Johney, Clark and I hauled in fall wheat.
17 Sunny morning and the day was dry and pretty warm, the sky got overcast in the afternoon,
threatening rain. Jim fixed his craddle in the forenoon and in the afternoon helped A. Lonsway
to bind grain. Johney and I tied oats today.
18 Bright sunny morning and the day was dry and breezy. Jim was helping A. Lonsway. Johney
and I tied oats in the forenoon, and in the afternoon we hauled oats in.
19 Bright warm morning and the day dry and breezy. Johney and Clark helped their uncle Sam to
harvest. Jim craddled oats in the forenoon, in the afternoon he helped me to burn log heaps in
the swale.
20 Bright sunny morning and the day was dry but sometimes cloudy. Jim and I branded in the
forenoon, and in the afternoon we hauled in some wheat and oats. Mrs. R. and I went to Dun-
dalk after tea. Johney and Clark were helping their uncle Sam.
<Q2 folio 71 recto>
157
August 1881
21st Sabbath. Cool, clear morning, the day cool and bright.
22 Misty morning, but the sun shone out scattering the fog. The day was bright, cool and dry. Jim
craddled wheat, Johney and I tied up.
23 Rather misty morning, but the sun got out strong and the day was dry and pretty warm. Jim fin-
ished cutting spring wheat in the forenoon, and in the afternoon he cut oats. Johney and I tied
the wheat, then we branded up some log heaps. I bought a barell of flour from Mr. Wright for
$5.50. [in margin] Finished cutting spring wheat.
24 Hazy morning, the day beautiful, bright and warm. Jim craddled oats, John and I punched* up
log heaps. [Pushed outer-edge unburned ends of logs into the centre of the fire?]
25 Hazy morning, the day bright and hot. James Lonsway was here helping Jim to craddle oats. I
bound. Johney was helping Alexander Patterson to bind wheat.
26 Misty morning, and the day was hazy all through and pretty sultry. There was a slight mizzle
of rain about 5 P.M. Johney was helping his uncle Sam. Jim and Clark hauled in wheat and
oats. I bound oats between loads. Jim and Clark hitched [Gerty?] to the Democrat and went to
Dundalk in the eavning.
27 Cloudy morning and a few drops of rain fell, the day was dry and very sultry. The boys and I
tied oats. Mrs. R. and I went to see Mother, who is a[i]ling with neuralgia, in the eavning.
28th Sabbath. Hazy morning and the day dry and warm. Mrs. R. and I were at Mr. S. Bell’s in the af-
ternoon.
29 Hazy morning, the sun shone out bright and the day was extremely hot. I went with mother to
Dr. Norton’s at Hornings Mills. Jim helped W. J. Arnold to bind. John helped his uncle Sam to
harvest.
<Q2 folio 71 verso>
August 1881
30th Hazy morning and the sun shone out bright, the day was very hot and dry. Johney, Clark and I
hauled in oats. Jim craddled oats in the afternoon, assisted by James Lonsway.
31st Hazy morning, but the sun soon got out and was bright and warm. Johney, Clark and I bound
oats. Jim was at W. J. Arnold’s threshing.
September [1881]
1st Hazy morning, but the sun got out and the day was pretty sultry. There was some thunder and
lightening and a good deal of rain from about 3:30 P.M. Jim craddled oats in the dry part of the
day. Johney, Clark and I hauled in some oats and tied some.
2 Cloudy morning and the day was dark, pretty much all through. Jim craddled oats, Johney,
Clark and I picked stones. We tried binding after dinner but the grain was damp.
3 Dark morning and the forenoon was pretty damp although no rain fell. The afternoon was
something dour [MS duir]. Jim cut oats, Clark and I tied in the afternoon. Johney was at Mr.
Mark Dawson’s threshing.
4th Sabbath. Hazy morning and the day was dry and warm all through. Mrs. R., Jim, John and Eliza
went to the funeral of Charles Abbott, a young man of 28 years of age who got killed by being
thrown off a waggon while going home from Dundalk on Friday night. I went to see W. Bow-
ler who got his leg broke some days ago.
5 Hazy morning, and the day dry all through. The sky assumed a peculiar appearance about 3
P.M. It first got very dark, then assumed a bright copper colour and it alternated between these
colours till dark. It was so dark that people had to light their lamps at four o’clock in the after-
158
noon. There was a great quantity of ashes fell. I think there must have been a great fire. Jim
craddled, John, Clark and I bound and hauled in. [in margin] Phenomenon.
<Q2 folio 72 recto>
September 1881
6th Hazy, d[r]y hot day all through. Jim cut oats, John, Clark and I hauled in.
7 Misty morning, but the day clouded up soon and was dry and fine, with a tendancy of coldness
towards night. Johney craddled a piece of oats in the forenoon, and helped Clark and I to bind
in the afternoon. Jim helped his uncle Sam to haul in some, and then went to Dundalk.
8 Dark morning, the day continued cloudy to about 9 A.M., then cleared off, and was sunny and
warm. We bound and hauled in oats today. We put away about 43 dozen sheaves for the cows
in the spring.
9 Hazy morning, but the day cleared off and the sun got out and was bright and warm. The boys
hauled out manure. I gave Mr. Clippert a ram lamb and $2.25 cash in exchange for a young
ram of sixteen months of […. right edge of bottom half of the page is torn off, leaving incom-
plete lines of text] a good one with splendid wool. We put up a pig [… torn]
10 Some clouds this morning but there was no ra[in … torn] kept fine to night came on when there
was […torn] for a while some rain also some thunder and […torn] Brother Sam, Alexander Pat-
terson and Jim[…torn] for me, Johney, Clark and I were hauling […torn] the lend of Sam’s
waggon. I went in the […torn] Skeffington Bell’s Bail Bonds for $16.00 […torn] for 1881.
Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway […torn] boys have gone to help Alexander Patterson.
11th Sabbath. Rather cloudy this morning, but there was no rain [..torn] Mrs. R., Eliza and I went in
to father’s.
12 Cloudy morning, and the day was cloudy all through with some rain […torn] in the afternoon
Jim and Bill Brinkman finished cutting oats. Johney, Clark and I bound in the dry part of the
day. Jim started the plow this afternoon. W. Brinkman and I raised some stones. There was a
frost this morning. [in margin] Frost / Finished cutting grain.
<Q2 folio 72 verso>
September 1881
[covered in black deposit (from oil cloth?), and has a series of recipes, noted in material description
of diaries….]
<end of Quire 2>
<Quire 3>
<Q3 folio 1 recto>
September 1881
13th Rather dark morning with a very heavy dew, but the sun shone out about 9 A.M., and the day was
dry and fine. John and I spread some manure in the morning, and then tied oats from that to night.
Jim plowed to noon, and then helped us to bind. Mr. George Rutherford was here in the afternoon
and insured the dwelling house and contents and the outbuildings and contents for the sum of
$1100.00. The insurance premium is $9.90 and agents fees .90¢. The company is the Victoria
Mutual.
14 A little cloudy this morning, but the sun soon got out and the day was dry and pretty warm. Jim,
Johney and I finished binding oats in the afternoon, and then the boys hauled in three loads. There
was a slight frost this morning. [in margin] Frost.
15 Cloudy morning and very windy through the day. Rain came on about 6 P.M. There was not a
great quantity fell. We finished hauling in oats at about 1:30 P.M. Jim drove the team, Johney and
159
Clark built and I forked on. It was a new fallow we were hauling from. After we finished Jim
asked hands for the threshing. Mrs. R. and I went with the yarn to the weavers. [in margin] Fin-
ished harvesting
16 Dark morning and the day cloudy and pretty windy. Jim plowed, Johney spread manure. There
was rain in the afternoon.
17 Cloudy morning, and the day kept dark with a slight mizzle of rain all through. We built a straw
pen in the forenoon, and in the afternoon Jim plowed, and John spread manure.
18th Sabbath. Clear and fine all day.
19 A little cloudy this morning, and some frost. The sun shone out and the day was dry and pretty
warm. Jim was at W. Bowler’s manure bee. Johney plowed. I spread manure. The two eldest
went to Dundalk in the eavning and left their measures for boots.
<Q3 folio 1 verso>
September 1881
20th Fine morning, the day fine all through. Jim was at Mr. Clippert’s threshing. Johney and I tidied
[MS tieded] up things at home for the thrashing. The thrashers came here tonight.
21 Rather cloudy this morning, but the day was dry and windy. We thrashed today. Had a bad he[a]d
wind.
22 Rather gloomy this morning and there was a smart shower in the forenoon. We finished thrashing
in the forenoon. Some of the new land oats did not yield well. They were rusted and did not fill.
My oats yielded about 30 bushels to the acre, pretty good sample, wheat about 10 B. p. acre, good
sample, and pease about 16 B. p. acre, good sample. The thrashers done good work. Charged ten
dollars. Sam helped us put in straw in the eavning. Jim went to Lonswa[y]’s threshing in the af-
ternoon.
23 Pretty fine morning, the day fine all through. Jim was at Lonsway’s thrashing in the forenoon and
at Nickle’s in the afternoon. Johney, Clark and I put in straw in the forenoon, and I took in a load
of oats to Dundalk in the afternoon, 55 Bushels, got thirty-five cents per Bushel.
24 Heavy rain this morning before daylight. The day dry afterwards. I took in two loads of oats: first
load 21 Bushels 26 pounds at 34½ ¢ per Bushel, the second 64 Bushels 12 lbs @ 34½ ¢ per Bush-
el. The boys at home cleaned oats. Put up some of the pigs to fat, and separated the rams from the
sheep. [in margin] Parted rams from sheep.
25th Sabbath. Fine morning, the day dry, warm and breezy. Mrs. R. and I went to Osprey to see Mrs.
Walter Fletcher, daughter to Mrs. C. Bell. She is pretty sick, almost dangerously ill, with Rheu-
matic pains and fever. I think, though, that she has the worst of it over. She has been ill for three
weeks.
26 Fine morning, the day dry and warm with a few drops of rain about noon. I hauled two loads of
oats to Dundalk. Got 34½ cts per bushel. Jim and John chored around home, helped me to bag
and load.
<insert>[between folios 1 verso and 2 recto] Harbaugh the Peerless Ventriloquist ticket, Friday night Jan
2 at S.S. no 5 Melancthon</insert>
<Q3 folio 2 recto>
September 1881
27th Rather cloudy morning, and there was a sharp shower about 1 P.M. The afternoon was dry. I took
in two loads of oats and three hundred and fourteen pounds of butter to Dundalk. I got 20¢ per
pound for the butter and 34½ + 35 ¢ for the oats. Jim and John helped at filling oats and raised
potatoes in the afternoon. Clark was helping W. J. Arnold take up potatoes.
160
28 Beautiful morning, the day dry and warm with a tendancy to frost in the afternoon. I hauled in a
load of oats in the forenoon (72 B: 11 pounds), got 35¢ per bushel, and in the afternoon Jim took
in the potatoes belonging to the juveniles (21 bags and 50 pounds) and sold them for 55¢ per bag.
Johney and Clark were helping Sam to take up potatoes.
29 Fine day all through, dry and very pleasant. The boys, Jim and John, took up their potatoes (18
bags) and sold them in Dundalk for 60¢ per bag, cash. Clark was helping Father raise his potatoes.
30 Fine morning and the day dry and fine to about 5 P.M. when there came on a very heavy rain and
kept raining most of the night. Some of us were raising potatoes and others of us were moving
some oat sheaves from the shed to the barn. Miss S. Bell and Mrs. Scott (a Chicago lady) were
here this afternoon.
Oct. 1881
1 Rather dark this morning, but the day was dry although cloudy. We took in 27 bags of potatoes
and sold them for .65¢ per bag. Jim hauled some rails to fence the cabbage when he came home,
then he plowed till night.
2nd Sabbath. Dry day, but cool and cloudy. Mrs. R. and I visited Mrs. C. Bell in the afternoon.
<Q3 folio 2 verso>
October 1881
3rd Quite cloudy and dark this morning, still there was no rain through the day. We were raising pota-
toes, we got up 66 Bushels. Jim plowed after he was done plowing out the potatoes. Mrs. Clip-
pert was here in the afternoon. Mr. Samuel McDowell brought home our democrat which he had
borrowed Eleven days ago. He took a pretty long loan of it and broke one of the springs, but he
got a new spring put in. I think it will be some time [f]or I lend it again.
4 Cloudy cold day from morning to night. We were raising potatoes. Jim plowed them out of the
rows and we then dug them and gathered them. Mrs. R., Jim, Eliza and Willie went to Dundalk in
the eavning with some cabbage. We took up 43 Bushels.
5 Very hard frost this morning, quite a crust on the ground. The day was mostly clear, but very chil-
ly all through. We were raising potatoes, we took up about 40 Bushels. This finished our potatoe
raising. They were an exceedingly good crop with us this year, large and dry and a good many in
the ground. The boys first sold about 22 bags belonging to the Co. 5 [all five of the children?],
then Jim and John sold 19 Bags belonging to themselves. I then sold for the general good 27
Bags, in all for so far we have sold 68 Bags, or 102 Bushels. I have about 150 Bushels left. I
think I can sell about 20 of these. I put 15 Bushels in the cellar, the rest I have pitted in the field
where I will let them remain for about two weeks to they steam.* I had about 200 Bushels or a lit-
tle more to the acre. [in margin] Hard frost / Finished digging potatoes. [*=until they steam, i.e.
until they cool off in the pit?]
6 Dry, chilly morning, the day dry, cool and clear. The boys were branding* up in the swale. I had a
sore back and had to quit work. Mrs. Sam Russell and Mrs. John Gott were here today. [*burning
off brush wood; swale = low-lying, marshy land; see
<Q3 folio 3 recto>
October 1881
7th Dark morning, and the day cloudy and showery. Jim and Clark went to the show fair at Flesh-
erton. John went to Mr. Dawson’s threshing. Mrs. R. went to help Mrs. D. I stopped at home and
sold pigs. In the afternoon I went to Mr. R. Oliver’s and from thence to Dundalk.
8 Very heavy rain early this morning, and the day was dark and showery. Brother Sam helped us to
Brand up in the swale.
9th Sabbath. Cool and cloudy all day.
161
10 Raw cold morning, with snow falling. There were several showers of snow during the forenoon.
The afternoon was dry. We cleaned a small grist and Jim took it to the mill in the forenoon. In the
afternoon we picked stones. [in margin] First snow.
11 Very hard frost this morning, the sun, however, got out and softened the ground. We were picking
stones in the forenoon. Jim plowed in the afternoon. The others of us gathered stones.
12 Mizzly morning and the day continued wet all through, a fine close rain falling, not a heavy show-
er. We tried plowing and picking stones after dinner, but there was too much wet. Mr. Christo-
pher Johnson came here in the forenoon and took away a ram lamb which had strayed into my
flock during the summer. I told him the lamb was not mine and that it belonged to him, he could
take it. Mr. Walter Morrow, a former pupil of mine who went to Cleaveland, St. of Ohio, some
sixteen years ago, and who is now practicing law in that City, called in to see us as he was passing.
Clark went to help his uncle Sam to raise potatotes after dinner.
13 Cool dark morning, with a slight rain. The remainder of the day dry. Jim was plowing, Johney
and I were picking stones. Clark was helping Sam to take up potatotes.
<Q3 folio 3 verso>
October 1881
14th Rather chilly this morning, with a pretty hard frost, the sun got out and made things more agreea-
ble. The day was bright. Jim was plowing, Johney and Clark and I were picking stones. Jim burst
the colter board and I took it to the shop and got a new one made after a different pattern. I think it
is better than the old one. Johney, Clark, Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk in the eavning and the
boys bought some clothing for themselves.
15 Rainy morning, the day showery all through. Jim was plowing in the dry part of the day. Clark
and I were picking up stones. John was at Lonsway’s threshing. Mrs. R. went to Mrs. W. J. Ar-
nold’s to sew a shirt on her machine.
16th Sabbath. Fine morning and the day clear and fine to the afternoon about 4 P.M. when there came
on a slight shower of rain, and rained most of the night. Mrs. R. and I were at Father’s.
17 Rainy morning and the day showery all through, very unpleasant. Johney was at Lonsway’s
threshing. Mrs. R. and family caught and plucked sixty chickens and hens and took them to Dun-
dalk and solf them for .25¢ per pair.
18 A little rain in the forenoon and a good deal in the after part of the day. Jim plowed. Clark and I
went in the afternoon to help Sam to thrash. I took Sam’s place at Jim Patterson’s thrashing while
he prepared his barn. John was helping A. Lonsway to thresh.
19 Fine morning, with a hard frost. Clark and I were helping Sam to thrash. Jim plowed. Johny was
at J. Trugon’s threshing.
20 Fine morning, the day dry. Clark and I helped Sam a little while in the morning to put in straw
then we came and worked at home. Johny was at Jim Trugon’s thrashing to noon. Jim plowed.
<Q3 folio 4 recto>
October 1881
21st Fine morning, the day dry and fine all through. Jim plowed, Johny, Clark and I took out stumps
and roots. Mrs. R. went to the carding mill at Feversham. Phoebe and she took Sam’s team and
W. Lonsway’s wagon. I went to Dundalk in the eavning. [in margin] Got letter from Ireland.
22 Fine morning, the day dry till about 3 P.M. when there was a slight rian. Jim plowed. John and
Clark picked stones. I went to Tossorontio Township.
23rd Sabbath. Misty morning, the day inclined to rain. I was stopping at brother John’s.
162
24 Inclined to rain this morning, the middle of the day dry, the afternoon a little wet. Jim plowed,
Johny was at Mr. W. Bowler’s [MS Boweler’s] threshing. I went to John Agnew’s in the eavning
and stopped there all night.
25 Rather nice morning, the day dry till about 3 P.M. when there came on a slight rian. Jim plowed,
John was at Bowler’s threshing till noon. I stopped at Brother John’s.
26 Very hard frost this morning, but the sun soon got out and the day was fine. I stopped at Brother
John’s and picked eleven bags of apples, assisted by his little ones. Jim plowed, John and Clark
picked stones.
27 Fine morning, the day sunny and warm. I left John’s and came home. Jim plowed. Johny and
Clark picked stones.
28 Very fine morning, the day beautiful, dry and warm. Jim plowed. Johny, Clark and I brought in
75 bags of potatoes and put them in the Cellar.
29th Rainy morning, the day cleared up about 10 A.M. We butchered a swine in the forenoon. In the
afternoon Jim plowed, Johny and Clark picked stones. I went to Dundalk after 3 P.M.
<Q3 folio 4 verso>
October 1881
30th Sabbath. Rather misty this morning, but the day was dry and mild. Brother Sam and Phoebe, also
Mark Dawson and wife, were here.
31 A little misty this morning, with a very slight mizzle of rain. The day afterwards dry. Jim was
plowing in the forenoon, and in the afternoon he took eight bags of potatoes, one tub of butter and
five dead geese to Dundalk. Sold them for .55¢ per bag, .20¢ per pound for the butter and .06¢ per
pound for the geese. Mrs. R. went along. I went to a raising in the afternoon in Dundalk (Mr.
Dean’s stone house). Jim bought himself a coat at $6.50. Mrs. R., Jim and I had supper at Mr. S.
Bell’s.
November [1881]
1st Fine morning, the day nice and mild with sunshine in the afternoon. Jim plowed. John and Clark
picked stones.
2 Fine morning and the day fine all through. Jim plowed, Johney and Clark picked stones.
3 Fine morning, but the day got overcast about noon and snow began to fall about 4:30 P.M. Jim
plowed. Johney and Clark picked stones. I helped.
4 Snow on the ground this morning and more falling. Jim opened up some water furrows in the
forenoon, and in the afternoon plowed and harrowed some in front of the house. We brought in
the remainder of our potatoes this afternoon and I banked up the house.
5th Stormy morning, blowing and snowing, which it kept up incessantly till the afternoon, when it
varied the snow for rain. The three eldest boys went with the Orangemen to Caswell’s.* When
they came home they fixed up the cow stable and put the cows in, being the first night the cattle
have been stabled for the winter. I went to Father’s in the afternoon. A. Patterson brought 3½
bushels of pease here for 3 sucking pigs which I had sold him. [*Guy Fawke’s day, seen by Or-
angemen as Protestant celebration.]
<Q3 folio 5 recto>
November 1881
Sabbath. 6th Snow on the ground this morning, but the sun melted a good deal of it off before night.
The day was rather chilly, the eavning nice and sunny.
7 Not much frost or snow this morning, the snow nearly all disappeared about noon, the eavning
pretty mild with a slight mizzle of rain. The three boys, Jim, John and Clark, started for Tossoron-
tio this morning with the team and two yoke of steers. One yoke belonged to Brother Sam. The
163
steers to be wintered at Brother John’s, the team to haul up some apples which I had picked at
John’s two weeks ago.
8 Mild day, but rather dark, little sunshine but no rain. Willie and I took to Dundalk fair a small
mully* cow, three years old and with calve, and a two year old heifer. We sold the cow to Mr.
Philips for ($17.) seventeen dollars. [*for “mully” see 24 Oct. 1876.]
9 Rather fine for this season of the year, a little sun now and then through the day, and the day mild.
I sowed some grass seed in the forenoon, and in the afternoon went to Lot 31 Melancthon. The
boys got home this eavning. They had eleven bags of apples with them. Skeffington Bell was
here at night. [in margin] Anthony Trugon married.
10 Rather rough day, cold generally. Johney has a sore throat, contracted on his journey to Tossoron-
tio. Jim went to Dundalk and posted a card to his uncle John.
11 Fine morning and the day was generally fine all through. We fitted some handles in some axes
and ground the axes in the forenoon, and in the afternoon Jim, Clark and I chopped. Mrs. Skeff-
ington Bell was here today.
12 Very stormy morning, the storm came on long before day, blowing, sleeting, freezing, raining,
sending the storm in through the cracks and crannies. It kept it up till noon then subsided. The af-
ternoon was pretty dry but very windy.
<Q3 folio 5 verso>
November 1881
13th Sabbath. Rather sloppy cold day.
14 Raining some early this morning, but it cleared off about 9 A.M. We butchered two pigs in the
forenoon and in the afternoon borrowed Johney Irvin’s cutting box and cut some oat sheaves. Mr.
William Bowler, aged 71, and a resident of this neighbourhood for about 33 years died this morn-
ing. Mrs. R. and I went to the wake this night. There was a very heavy snow storm this night. [in
margin] W. Bowler died.
15 Ground covered with snow almost a foot deep. Snow drifted in every crevice of the buildings. We
tried to cut some sheaves this morning, but broke one of the bolts that holds the knives. Had to
send to Dundalk for another bolt.
16 The snow melting this morning and the day soft all through. The boys were cutting sheaves as-
sisted by Johney Irvin. Mrs. R. and I went to Mr. Bowler’s funeral in the afternoon. They buried
him on the rear end of one of his own lots in Proton.
17 A good deal of rain fell this forenoon, also the afternoon was wet. The two boys, John and Clark,
chopped with me in the bush in the forenoon. In the afternoon I went to Dundalk. Jim borrowed
some lumber from his uncle Sam and fixed the horse stable.
18 Cloudy day all through, with chilly weather towards night. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon.
The boys were fixing at the stables. Mrs. R. was sewing at Mrs. S. Bell’s.
19 Snowy morning, and the day continued snowy all through. We were putting handles in a couple of
axes, grinding some axes and fixing the stables for the animals.
20th Sabbath. Pretty cold morning, the day chilly all through. Some snow on the ground and some
more falling.
<Q3 folio 6 recto>
November 1881
21st Cold morning, the day pretty wintery like, but the snow got a little soft in the afternoon. Jim was
fixing stables, Johney, Clark and I chopping.
22 Sharp frosty morning, the day beautiful with plenty of sunshine. Keen freeze towards night. We
were chopping a follow on lot 216 Proton.
164
23 Rather cloudy this morning, and little sunshine through the day, but there was a thaw wind. John
was at Mr. Nickle’s thrashing, Jim, Clark and I were chopping fallow on Lot 216 Proton. Mr.
Thos. Hanbury sent a new sewing machine (Wanzer C)* here about 2 P.M. He came after night
and set it a-going. We will pay him $28.00 or $30.00 cash for the machine if we like it after trial.
[*R. M. Wanzer Co., Hamilton, was the most successful sewing machine manufacturer in Ontario.
Active 1860-90, it exported machines around the world, and was awarded many prizes. The Wan-
zer C, a deluxe model, was the last produced, introduced 1877-81. Overproduction and drop in
demand led to the demise of the company. See Brent, Martha. “A Stitch in Time: Sewing Machine
Industry of Ontario, 1860-1897,” Material Culture Review / Revue de la culture matérielle
[Online], 10 (1980): n. pag. Web. 21 Feb. 2018.]
24 Sharp cold morning, with some snow falling, the day was cold all through. Jim was at Mr. Nick-
le’s threshing during the forenoon, in the afternoon the three boys chopped at a fallow on Lot 216.
Mrs. R., Eliza, Willie and I went to Dundalk. I paid Mr. Hanbury $29.00 for the sewing machine.
I also received my cheque for $101.00 supperannuated pension, [which] I believe I would not have
got, only for the influence and perseverance of J. J. Middleton, Esq., Reeve of Proton, who went to
the Education Office four times in my behalf. The money ought to have been paid me in July.
Miss Sarah Bell stopped here this night.
25 Stormy morning, the day cold and stormy all through. We only done the chores today.
26 Windy this morning and some snow falling through the day. We chopped in the fallow, all but
Jim, who has a slight cold and I wouldn’t let him work in the bush. He done the chores at home.
<Q3 folio 6 verso>
November 1881
27th Sabbath. Cold morning, blowing pretty strong and snowing some. Mrs. R. and I went to Father’s.
28 Bright sunny morning, the day was fine all through. We butchered two pigs in the forenoon, and
in the afternoon chopped in the fallow. I went at night to John Gott’s and bargained with him to
put me up a first-class frame barn, 40 x 60 feet for the sum of ($85.00) Eight[y]-five dollars. In
the barn there is to be a granary, a horse stable and a feed room. The barn to be up in time for my
hay and grain in 1882.
29 Soft thawing morning, the day continued soft all through, with a thaw wind and a slight rain in the
afternoon. We were chopping fallow. We put the pump in the well at noon.
30 Damp morning, the day continued soft, a slight mizzle of rain falling now and then. The snow has
almost disappeared, except in the fence corners. Jim was at W. J. Arnold’s threshing. The rest of
us were chopping fallow.
December [1881]
1st Windy morning, then a little snow towards noon. A pretty sharp frost and strong wind in the
eavning. Jim was at W. J. Arnold’s thrashing to about 10 A.M. After that he and the other two
boys were chopping. Mrs. John Gott was here today.
2 Mild morning, although the ground is pretty hard with frost. The day was mild all through. The
boys were cutting a road through the swamp on lot 216 to where there is some timber that will an-
swer for the barn. I went to Dundalk and bargained with John McDowell to saw for me 20,000
feet hemlock lumber at 2.50 per M. and to make me 32 squares of shingles at .90 per square. He
to take any plank I do not need and pay me at the rate of $3.00 per M. and not charge for the saw-
ing of it. Mrs. R. was at Mrs. C. Bell’s.
<Q3 folio 7 recto>
December 1881
165
3rd Soft morning, although the ground is frozen pretty hard. The day mild, with a little snow falling.
The boys were chopping a sleigh road in the swamp. I was hunting up cattle feed and buying
stove for keeping shanty in the bush.
4th Sabbath. Mild morning, the day continued very mild all through. Henry Hewett, Junior, was here.
5 The ground hard with frost this morning, but the day was pretty mild for this season of the year.
Cloudy, and a slight skiff of snow in the morning. John went to Widow Bowler’s thrashing. I
went to Mr. McGurr’s and agreed with him to board five head of cattle for me for three months:
one cow at .75¢ per month, one two year old heifer at .62½ ¢ per month, and three yearlings at
.50¢ each per month. If he ties the yearlings in at nights I am to give him .62½¢ each per month.
Jim and Clark were putting straw out of the bottom of a stack in the barn. Wesley Lonsway helped
them. I also helped them in the afternoon. I heard today that Mr. George R. Middleton’s store and
Post Office had been burned yesterday morning at 2 A.M. [in margin] Dundalk P.O. Burned.
6 Soft morning, the day continued soft with a little snow falling now and then. We sent four head of
cattle to Mr. McGurr’s this afternoon. The boys and I chopped in the follow.
7 Rain very early this morning, then from rain to snow. Very high winds prevailed through the day,
accompanied by a blinding snow storm. Jim, John, and I went to Lot 31 Melancthon and cut about
31 logs for a house.
8 Pretty cold morning and the day continued cold all through. Jim, John and I were cutting stable
logs on lot 31 Melancthon.
<Q3 folio 7 verso>
December 1881
9th Sharp morning, pretty keen freeze most of the day, with smart showers of snow. John was at John
Irvin’s thrashing. Jim off work on accont of a cold. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk with the team.
10 Pretty sharp morning, but the day got milder, a little sunshine now and then, just like the life of
man. Pretty chilly in the afternoon. We raised our shanty on lot 31 Melancthon. Brother Sam
helped us. John Gott and wife were here this night. He gave me a bill of the lumber required for
my barn, it is 19,137 feet.
11th Sabbath. Mild morning and the day continued soft.
12 Soft morning, inclined to [dittog.: to] rain which came on about 9 A.M. The day was showery, the
sleighing is gone. The boys cut a road in the forenoon to some post timber in the swamp and in
the afternoon they got the lend of some lumber from Brother Sam (42 Boards) and hauled them to
the shanty on Lot 31. I went in the forenoon to Mr. Duncan’s to hire him to cut some oats with his
cutting box.
13 Rain this morning. Rain at noon. Rain at night, in fact, a perfectly wet day! I filed the saw in the
forenoon and in the afternoon went to Dundalk. The boys made a Beetle* [*=maul, or large
wooden hammer, similar to a sledge hammer].
14 Rather sharp morning, the day pretty cold all through. Jim, John and I were at Brother Sam’s
wood bee. I slept at father’s at night.
15 Another pretty cold morning, the ground white with snow again. We went to our shanty, put on
the floor and roof and cut out the door and window.
16 Sharp morning, the day sharp all through, cold wind. We were chinking the shanty and plastering
it. We borrowed 4 boards from Sam.
<Q3 folio 8 recto>
December 1881
17th Mild morning, the day pretty mild all through, the snow disappearing, the waggons running. Jim
went and fixed at the shanty, the rest of us cleaned wheat. There was a gentleman named Garrett
166
here seeing to get patrons to engage to supply him with milk for a cheese factory that he contem-
plates building 4 miles north of here.
18th Sabbath. Cold wind this morning, sharp frost. Scarcely any snow, even in the fence corners.
19 Hard frost this morning, the day got milder towards noon, the afternoon sunshiny and balmy. I
went in the morning to Dundalk with a small grist to the mill. Bought some nails, hinges, came
home about 10 A.M. Then Mr. John Duncan cut feed for us till night. He made an excellent piece
of cutting, and only charged $3.00.
20 Mild morning, misty, the day soft and balmy. We raised our horse stable on lot 31. Brother Sam
helped us.
21 Rather mild morning and the day pleasant. We borrowed 42 Boards from Sam and fixed our sta-
ble.
22 Rainy morning, the day cleared off about 10 A.M. The boys went to Melancthon and worked at
the stable. I stopped at home and split knots.
23 Pretty hard frosty morning, the day chilly all through, very cold, cutting wind. We were fixing at
the stable. Sam Lonsway got his face badly cut by Henry Hewett’s axe glancing. They were mak-
ing ties for H. Hewett. I bought an old stove from W. Lonsway for $1.25 and took it to the shanty.
24 Cold morning, and the day was pretty chilly, although the sun shone out bright all day long. The
boys cut stove wood at home. Jim went to Dundalk in the eavning. Mr. Lonsway’s family were
here this eavning.
<Q3 folio 8 verso>
December 1881
25th Sabbath. Bright sunny morning, the day very fine, almost like Indian summer. W. Lonsway and
family were here today.
26 Mild morning, the day pleasant and mild all through, not much sunshine but a soft air. I went to
Dundalk to the Township nomination. Jim and John hauled our bed clothes, etc., to the shanty in
the forenoon. All the family, with the exception of the old woman and I, are now (8:15 P.M.) at
the tea party in Dundalk.
27 Mild through the day, although there was a sharp frost and a cold wind this morning. We moved
to the Melancthon Lot and commenced cutting saw logs for Barn. Mr. Kirby and Mr. A. Lonsway
were here a while this night.
28 Mild day all through, in fact more like a day in April than in the middle of winter. John, Jim and I
were cutting saw logs. Clark is cook in the shanty.
29 Mild balmy morning, the day continued misty and mild all through, with a change to the freeze at
night. We were cutting saw logs today. Nancy brought us a supply of bread.
30 Cold morning with a slight shower of snow. The ground very hard frozen, the day cold all
through. I went to Mr. Glazier’s and bought six bushels of Lost Nation wheat for seed at $1.20 per
bushel. The boys were cutting saw logs. I slept at the shanty this night.
31 Sharp morning, a good deal of snow fell through the night, and it kept snowing all day and was
also pretty cold. I and the boys were cutting saw logs in Melancthon.
The old year is passing, almost past, and in casting a retrospective glance, I have nothing to com-
plain of, but many things to be thankful for. We have had good health. Good crops and good
prices. Hoping that the New Year will be as favorable as the old has been, I bring my story to an
end.
<Q3 folio 9 recto>
January 1882
1st Sabbath. Sharp cold day from morning to night.
167
2nd Cold morning, the day sharp, but a little sunshine now and then. The boys hauled some stove
wood home in the forenoon, and in the afternoon took 52 Bushels of wheat, less 4 pounds, to Mr.
Cloughly’s grist mill, Dundalk. I went to the Township voting at Dundalk in the afternoon.
3 Very cold morning, snowing, blowing and freezing, which was the prevailing character of the day.
I took a drive through Proton to see the newly elected council on business.
4 Another cold morning, the day pretty sharp all through. I helped Sam to skid logs in the afternoon.
The boys worked at plastering the horse stable in Melancthon.
5 Not quite so cold as yesterday, still sharp enough to suit. Sam built a log boat for us in the bush.
The rest of us made skidways.
6 Something milder this morning, and there was some snow fell in the afternoon. William John Ar-
nold, with his team, skidded 58 saw logs for us on the Melancthon lot.
7 Mild morning and the day was pretty soft all through. W. J. Arnold skidded 31 saw logs and was
done at about 2 P.M. I hired him for $1.50 per dime [=diem], and board. He hauled in the old
stove to Dundalk and hauled me home part of my grist.
8th Sabbath. Soft morning and the day continued thawing, scarcely leaving any snow. Mr. A. Lonsway
was here this forenoon. Mrs. R. and I went [to] his house in the afternoon.
9 Sunny morning and snow fell pretty steadily through the day. Pretty good sleighing in the after-
noon. Jim brought home the remainder of the grist in the forenoon. John took a cord of dry cedar
to Dundalk and sold it for $1.50. We went to the Melancthon lot in the afternoon.
<Q3 folio 9 verso>
January 1882
10th Some snow fell this morning, and it kept falling a little during the day. We fixed the bunks in our
sleigh then went to Melancthon and made a start at hauling our saw logs to the mill.
11 Snowing some today, pretty mild, almost like a thaw. Jim was hauling saw logs. John and I were
helping him to load, cutting roads, sawing logs, etc.
12 Slight snow fall, the day mild throughout the day. Very good sleighing. Jim hauled logs, John and
I worked in the bush.
13 Some snow fall this morning, and also a little during the day, with a slight shower of rain in the
eavning. Jim hauled logs, John and I worked in the bush.
14 Snow fall this morning, snowing through the day. The snow is now about eight inches deep. Jim
hauled logs, John and I cut down trees that were in close proximity to our shanty. John Russell,
John Agnew and son were here tonight.
15th Sabbath. Cold stormy morning, the day was pretty chilly all through. The folks went to the funeral
of James Kinnear’s daughter. John Agnew stopped here tonight.
16 Cold morning, snow falling, the day cold, some snow fell. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon,
thought I would have a chance to get the Office of Township Clerk, but did not. The boys and
their uncle John were going to cut me some oat sheaves. Could not get the fixings up for the horse
power, therefore did not cut. Johnny went to W. J. Arnold’s sawing in the afternoon.
<Q3 folio 10 recto>
January 1882
17th Cold morning, the day cold all through. Johney was at W. J. Arnold’s sawing. Jim hauled saw
logs. I helped load and cut roads.
18 Fine morning and the day was pleasant, with grand sleighing. Jim hauled logs. John and I worked
in the bush.
19 Fine morning, but the afternoon was sharp, good sleighing. Jim hauled logs. John and I worked in
the bush.
168
20 Fine day all through, grand sleighing. Jim hauled logs. John and I finished cutting saw logs. We
have now cut over twenty-one thousand feet, which is two thousand more than the framer’s bill
calls for.
21 Snow falling very thick this morning, and it kept coming down pretty close all day. Jim hauled
logs. John and I worked in the bush, cutting roads, helping to load, and cutting stove wood.
22nd Sabbath. Snow storm, pretty high wind at night.
23 Extremely cold morning, blowing and freezing. The afternoon and especially the night is said to
be the coldest for a great number of years past. Mr. John McDowell lay out all night about five
miles from home and was badly frozen, his hands, feet and face. We went to Lot 31 Melancthon
this afternoon, but done nothing, the cold was so extreme. [in margin] John McDowell froze.
24 Extremely cold morning, the day cold all through. We skidded saw logs in the afternoon.
25 Something milder than yesterday, the roads are badly drifted, especially those running North and
South. Jim hauled logs. Johney chopped stove wood. I, with some others, shovelled a passage
through the drifts on Side Line 230, Melancthon.
<Q3 folio 10 verso>
January 1882
26th Very mild morning, the day warm with strong sunshine about noon, rain in the afternoon and very
high wind at night. Jim hauled logs. I fixed some pitch holes in the road. Johney stopped in the
bush. The boys left the shanty at night and went to their uncle Sam’s. The wind rose very strong
about 11 P.M. I got afraid that it would blow down some trees on the horse stable, so I took them
out and came home. I got home at 2:10 A.M. Mother fell today and broke one of her ribs. [in
margin] Mother fell and broke one of her ribs.
27 Started this morning with the horses for the shanty. Stopped at Mother’s this eavning. Jim went
to Mr. Oliver’s [MS Olliver’s] bee. Johney and Jim went to the spree at night.
28 A little soft this forenoon, the afternoon got colder and the wind rose at night. Jim was hauling
logs, John, Sam and I made cedar ties.
29th Sabbath. Cold stormy day. I sat up with Mother all night. Poor mother is badly hurt.
30 Blowing considerable in the forenoon and cold, the afternoon milder. Jim was at Mr. Oliver’s
hauling cedar logs. I and Johney were working in the bush.
31 Mild day all through, sun strong and warm. John and I were working in the bush. Jim hauled saw
logs. I went to a supper in Dundalk in honor of Mr. H. Graham*. [*Member of first Board of
Managers for Erskine Presbyterian Church, 1878; History of Dundalk, p. 139.]
<Q3 folio 11 recto>
February 1882
1st Pretty mild day all through, the sleighing is very bad. Jim was hauling logs. John worked in the
bush. I was at mother’s this night. Poor mother is suffering badly.
2nd Pretty mild morning, and the day mild. Jim was hauling logs. Sam telegraphed to Brother John
Mother’s condition this morn[in]g. John and his wife got to mother’s in the afternoon. I was at
mother’s all night.
3 Stormy morning, blowing and snowing some. Jim was hauling logs. Johney worked at Brother
Sam’s, hauled him some wood. I was at mother’s all night. The last night I ever had a mother on
earth—poor dear, dear mother died about ten minutes after midnight. She departed calm[l]y as a
baby going to sleep, not a quiver, not a groan. She died so easy that we scarce could tell when the
spirit took its flight. She was quite sensible all through her sickness and could speak some words,
though low, till within about thirty minutes of her death. She died as doth the just and good, with
her trust and hope in Jesus Christ the Saviour of mankind. Poor dear darling mother, how I will
169
miss the dear old form and the kindly look that always welcomed me. Ah mother, mother, mother,
may thy loving spirit guide me to the Saviour’s side. [in margin] Mother died this night.
4 Blowing in the morning. Blowing and snowing in the afternoon. Poor father is stopping with me
this night.
<Q3 folio 11 verso>
February 1882
5th Sabbath. A little snow fell this morning, the wind pretty high. We buried Mother about Four
O’clock this afternoon in the church yard of the Union Church on rear end of Lot 36, 4 Range,
N.E. Toronto and Sydenham Road, Township of Melancthon, Co. Grey, Ontario. There was a
large funeral, about 150 persons I think. Mr. Potter, W. Methodist minister, preached the funeral
sermon.
6 Mild morning, the day mild all through, the sun melting the snow in the afternoon. Father went
down with brother John to Tossorontio to stop a while. I sent Johney with the sleigh with him as
John had a wagon up. Johney only got as far as Primrose when the sleighing gave out and he had
to return. John then took father on the wagon home.
7 Mild day, with some rain in the afternoon. The sleighing is almost gone. Jim hauled two loads of
logs to the mill.
8 A little skiff of snow fell last night, but not enough to be of any service to the sleighing. Jim and I
skidded 17 saw logs and he hauled one to the mill in the afternoon. Johney was helping his uncle
Sam to pick potatoes.
9 Sunny morning, the day mild and balmy all through. We cut some stove wood in the forenoon.
Jim hauled the moving home out of the shanty and hauled the wood in the afternoon. John helped
his uncle Sam at the potatoes. Mr. Kirby stopped here this night.
10 Cold raw day all through, blowing and freezing. I done nothing today, did not feel well, got a
cold. The boys chored around, split wood, etc. Jim went to Dundalk in the afternoon for some
flour. I took the cross-cut to John Gott’s and got her sharp[en]ed and sett.
11 Cold morning, the day chilly all through. Sleighing gone on the leading roads. Wagons are run-
ning. John, Clark and I cut shingle timber on the Melancthon lot. Jim was helping Henry Lon-
sway to make ties.
<Q3 folio 12 recto>
February 1882
12th Sabbath. Fine sunny day, spring-like and mild. Mrs. C. Bell and W. Lonsway, wife and family
were here.
13 Mild soft morning, raining early in the morning but cleared off about 8 A.M. Johney went to W.
McKay’s to help him hew ties. Jim went to Dundalk to get his boots made [? last word minutely
written]
14 Frost this morning, but the sun shone out bright and warm and the day was very pleasant and
spring-like. The snow is pretty much gone out of the fields and the sheep and cattle are out nib-
bling the grass. Jim is helping H. Lonsway to make ties, Johney is helping W. McKay. I sent a
letter to Brother William. Mrs. R. and I were in Dundalk, I twice. [in margin] W. Russell/
Sawmill and lumber man / Batson’s Store P.O / Dickson Co. / St. of Tennessee
15 Mild morning, the day soft and mild all through. I went to Brother John’s to Tossorontio. Jim was
helping H. Lonsway make ties. John was helping W. McKay make ties.
16 Pretty sharp morning. Rain in the afternoon, snow at night. John and I went to John Agnew’s.
Mr. Hussay paid me on the road near Alliston, $400.00. Land payment. John and I stopped all
night at John Agnew’s
170
17 Very cold morning, the day cold all through. I stopped at Brother John’s all night. Father was
there. Poor father is quite lonesome.
18 Very cold raw morning, the day piercing cold all through, and colder still at night, the wind pierc-
ing cold at night. Poor father would have liked [to] come home with me this morning, but I had no
team with me.
19th Sabbath. Pretty cold day all through. Mrs. R., John, Clark and I went to church on Lot 36, 4th
Range, Melancthon.
<Q3 folio 12 verso>
February 1882
20th Sharp morning, the day pretty chilly all through. We were taking out barn timber.
21 Plenty of sleet and snow falling this morning and continued snowing all day. We were taking out
barn timber. I was unable to work with a cold.
22 A little snow fell this morning, there is pretty fair sleighing. We were taking out barn timber.
23 Fine day, but growing softer. We were taking out barn timber. I was unable to work.
24 Soft day all through. We were taking out barn timber. I am unable to work.
25 Pretty cold morning and the forenoon was chilly all through. We went to the Melancthon lot and
finished taking out square timber. I cooked for the men in the shanty.
26th Sabbath. Mild day all through. Mrs. Sam Russell and family were here today.
27 Soft morning, the snow melting fast, sleighing nearly all gone off the roads. Jim and Johney were
swamping out Barn timber. Nancy and I went to Dundalk. I sent Mr. Mathew Knox (South
Dummer) $209.00, being a payment on the lot of land which I bought from him on 28th of last
May. I sent Post Office money orders for that amount and they cost me $1.05.
28 Soft morning, a complete thaw set in, the snow almost all dissappeared. Jim, John and Clark
swamping out Barn timber. They finished all but one beam of our make in Proton. The swamps
have broke up.
<insert>[loose note, between folios 12 verso, 13 recto]
Eden Grove the 8th Mar 1882
To Mr John McAulay and Mother.
Please Pay the bearer, James Russell,
My claim for Horse $7. and $2. for
Interest making $9.
And oblige yours truly
John Agnew
</insert>
<Q3 folio 13 recto>
March 1882
1st Wet morning and most of the day was rainy. Jim went to Dundalk to get his boots fixed.
2 Very fine morning, with a little frost in the morning, the day sunshiny all through, just like spring.
The boys and I took the team and went to the Melancthon lot and hauled out four sticks of timber,
2 sills 60 feet long, 1 sill 40 feet and a splice tr??? sill 37.
3 A fine morning, the day fine all through, but a little cold, very windy in the afternoon. Jim and
Johney were cutting sleepers at home, did not get many.
4 Hard frost this morning, the day pretty chilly, although the sun shone out bright. Jim and John
were cutting sleepers on the Melancthon lot.
5th Sabbath. Hard frost this morning, but the afternoon was soft and thawing. Mrs. R. and family were
at church. [in margin] First lamb came.
171
6 Hard frost this morning, and pretty cold through the day. There was a slight snow fall about 5
P.M. Jim and John were cutting sleepers on the Melancthon Lot.
7 Snow this morning, although not enough to make sleighing. The sun shone out in the afternoon
and melted most of it. Jim hauled two sticks of timber from Lot 31 Melancthon. Johney cut roads
in the bush. Jim hauled the timber on the Log Boat. It was very hard work with the last log and
wore the runner of the boat down.
8 Cold raw morning, the day pretty chilly all through. Jim and John were swamping out Barn sleep-
ers on Lot 31 Melancthon. Mrs. R. and Eliza went to Dundalk. Miss Johnson and Miss Jackson
were here this eavning.
9 Snow fell this morning and the day was snowey [=snowy] all through. The boys were swamping
out sleepers and Jim hauled home the two 60 feet sills.
<Q3 folio 13 verso>
March 1882
10th Nice quantity of snow on the ground and the sleighing was pretty good in the afternoon. Jim was
hauling logs to the mill. Johny was helping in the bush.
11 Dark morning and there were several showers of snow fell during the day. Jim was hauling logs to
the mill. Johny and Clark helped in the bush.
12th Sabbath. Nice quantity of snow on the ground this morning and there were several snow showers
throughout the day.
13 Very heavy snow storm this morning and a good deal of snow fell through the day. There is good
sleighing. Jim was hauling sleepers from the Melancthon lot. Johney helped in the bush. [in
margin] Heavy snow.
14 Sunny morning, but sharp frost. The day was pretty cold in the shade. There is capital sleighing
now, the boys were hauling sleepers from Melancthon. They are gone tonight to H. Hewitt’s
spree. Father came home from Tossorontio last night.
15 Pretty chilly morning, but the day got milder towards noon. Pretty cold again towards night. We
were cutting and hauling sleepers from the Melancthon lot
16 Nice sunny morning, the day continued bright and pretty warm, the snow melted some. We cut
some sleepers at home in the forenoon, and in the afternoon cut some spruce for Barn doors and
hauled it to the mill.
17 Fine sunny morning, but the afternoon got overcast and very cold and windy. Johney gathered
troughs in the bush and Jim hauled them (150) to Lot 31 Melancthon. Father came out here this
afternoon.
18 Very windy, cold morning, some sleet in the forenoon, rain in the afternoon, some thunder and
lightening at night. Jim hauled the remainder of the square timber in the forenoon. Johney
chopped firewood. Jim hauled it in the afternoon. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
<Q3 folio 14 recto>
March 1882
19th Sabbath. Pretty fine day all through, the forenoon had some sunshine. Mrs. R., some of the family
and I went to meeting.
20 Mild, but cloudy through the day, frost at night. The boys and I were tapping trees on the Melanc-
thon Lot. [in margin] First trees tapped.
21 Stormy morning, blowing and snowing, very high winds, the day one of wind and snow, too
stormy to do any outside work.
22 Some snow this morning, pretty cold all day. The boys were cutting shingle timber on Lot 31
Melancthon.
172
23 Pretty sharp morning, the day got sunny towards noon. The boys were cutting shingle timber on
Lot 31 Melancthon.
24 Bright sunny morning, the day clouded over and the afternoon was stormy snow and wind. I was
helping the boys to cut shingle timber on Lot 31.
25 Nice sunny morning, the day pretty warm, but chilly [in the afternoon]. The boys were getting
shingle timber. I went to Dundalk and gave my bond for $10,000.00 as treasurer for the Township
of Proton. My sureties are Samuel Russell, Skeffington Bell, John Irwin and Thomas Carson.
26th Sabbath. Soft morning and the day mild, a pretty sharp rain came on about 6 P.M.
27 Wet morning, the day showery all through, cold after dark and freezing pretty sharp. The day was
too wet for outdoor work. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
28 Pretty cold morning, the afternoon milder. The boys were hauling out shingle timber out of the
swamp.
<Q3 folio 14 verso>
March 1882
29th Cold but fair in the forenoon, the afternoon rainy. The boys were hauling shingle timber. Proton
assessor stopped here this night.
30 Cold windy morning, the ground frozen hard. Johney went to Tossorontio for his steers. The as-
sessor assessed me for Lot 215 $650.00, Lot 216 $150.00, Personal property $140.00, five days
statute labor. Jim brought two of the cattle home from Mr. McGurr’s. [in margin] assessor here /
John went for his steers.
31 Pretty cold morning, very hard frost, the afternoon something milder with some sunshine. Jim and
I went in the morning to Dundalk and got 500 pounds of Bran at $.85 per cwt. Jim then got some
shoes put on the horses and I went to the examination in School Section 5, Melancthon.
April [1882]
1st Very fine mild morning, the day sunny and warm, very springlike, remarkably balmy in the after-
noon. Clark and I ground the axes in the forenoon, and Jim went to Melancthon Lot for an axe we
had left at the shanty. Jim and I made a stick of timber for the barn (a girt that we had broke). In
the eavning I then went to Dundalk and bought Johney a pair of Sunday lace boots for $2.75. [in
margin] Seen the first / Robin for this season.
2 Bright sunny day from morning till night, fine springlike weather.
<Q3 folio 15 recto>
April 1882
3rd Pretty hard frost this morning, the sun soon got out and the day was warm and springlike after-
wards. John Gott hewed the sleepers (38, 20 feet long) and overlays (13, 23 feet long). Mrs. R.
and Willie went to the Melancthon Lot and fixed the troughs at the maple trees. [in margin]
Johney got home / the steers.
4 Dark morning and it began to rain about 9 A.M. and continued pretty wet throughout the day. I
attended a Council meeting at Cedarville, about 18 miles from here. I went on horseback and got
completely soaked through with the rain. I left Cedarville about dark and came as far as Hopeville
where I stopped all night. The country approaching Cedarville from here is a miserably swampy
spot and also very stoney. It is a poor section of country. The boys were in the sugar bush gather-
ing sap.
5 Pretty hard frost this morning, but at about 10 A.M. the sun began to appear and the frozen roads
got softened. The afternoon was chilly, and frosty at night. I left Hopeville Hotel this morning
and came as far as Mr. Cavanaugh’s, Township clerk. Stopped there on business till about 2:30
P.M. then came home. The boys (John and Clark) were in the sugar bush a while in the forenoon.
173
They then came home and Mrs. Russell, Eliza, Jim and John went to Miss Maria Lonsway’s wed-
ding. I also went to the wedding when I got home about 8 P.M. A fine industrious girl is Maria,
and Mr. Broughton got a prize in the lottery of marriage when he got her. [in margin] Miss Maria
Lonsway married to Mr. Broughton.
<Q3 folio 15 verso>
April 1882
6th Sleety morning and most of the day was very unpleasant and wet. Jim was at William Lonsway's
wood bee. Mrs. Skeffington Bell was here.
7 Dark misty morning, the day dark and mizzling, the roads fearfully bad. Jim helped James Lon-
sway make ties. Johnny and Clark boiled down sap.
8 Rather misty morning, but the sun got out and the day got very warm about noon. I took the team
and went to Mr. Cavanagh’s, late treasurer of Proton, and got the Books, papers, etc. belonging to
his Office. Jim was at Joseph Jackson’s raising. Mrs. R. and Johney were in the Sugar bush. [in
margin] heard lizzards.
9th Sabbath. Cold this morning, but the day got something warmer. Changed to very cold in the
eavning. Mrs. Russell and I visited at Mrs. C. Bell’s.
10th Very cold morning, hard frost, the roads as rough as can be imagined. Frequent showers of snow
through the day and snowing all night, piercing cold day all through. We were getting our barn
lumber sawn.
11 Cold raw morning, snow on the ground and some now falling. Freezing through the day, the roads
very rough. We were getting lumber cut at the mill.
12 Sharp morning with a sprinkling of snow on the ground. The day chilly, and more snow fell at
night. I was piling lumber at the mill. The boys were getting some firewood. [in margin] First
cow calved / Lady.
13 Cold morning with a nice sprinkling of snow which melted about 12 noon. Jim and I were hauling
lumber from the saw. Johney was helping his uncle Sam to saw stove wood.
<Q3 folio 16 recto>
April 1882
14th Hard morning with plenty of frost, the forenoon pretty chilly. The afternoon something milder,
with frost again at night. We were piling lumber at the mill.
15 Hard frost this morning, the roads very rough. The sun shone out soon, the day got mild and very
nice. We (Jim and I) were at the sawmill in the forenoon. We only got about 600 feet sawn, then
they began to grind. Johney and Clark were in the sugar bush.
16th Sabbath. Nice bright morning, the sun clear all day, very springlike. Mrs. R and family were at
church.
17 Bright sunny morning, the day warm, dry and beautiful. Jim and I were at the sawmill. Johney
was gathering sap in the Sugar bush.
18[=19] Wet morning, but the day got dry about 10 A.M. and was fair to about 6 P.M. when it com-
menced raining and was very wet. Jim started to plow this afternoon. There was no frost, but the
ground was very wet. I attended a Council meeting Dundalk in the evening. [in margin] First
plowing / Muly heifer came home.
[written different script, left slanted, at end of entry] The above entry belongs to the 19th day of
the month.
18 Very fine morning, the day beautiful and bright, very springlike. Jim and I hauled lumber from the
saw. John and Clark were in the S[ugar] bush. [This entry is written in same left-leaning hand as
preceding note. Other entries are in normal hand, slanted right.]
174
20 Kind of wet morning, but it got dry for a while, then came on wet again and finally turned to snow.
Jim was plowing, the others chored around, mostly doing nothing. I was studying out the Town-
ship Treasurer’s Books from morning till night.
21 Ground covered with snow this morning, cold and wintry-like. Snow melted soon and the after-
noon was milder. Jim and John went to the shanty for some molasses with the wagon. Then
Johney thrashed some oats in the eavning.
<Q3 folio 16 verso>
April 1882
22nd Hard frosty morning, the day milder, though rather cold wind. Jim plowed part of the day. Johnny
and Clark went to the Sugar bush and gathered sap. I went to J. J. Middleton's sale. Things sold
very dear.
23rd Sabbath. Frosty morning, but the day turned out nice and warm in the afternoon.
24 Sharp frosty morning, but the day got warm and Springlike. Johney and I repiled about 5000 feet
of lumber at the mill. Then I went to the Sugar bush where Mrs. R. was boiling down sap. Jim
plowed. Johnny thrashed some oats in the afternoon.
25 Frost this morning, but the sun got out and the day got warmer. Johney chored around, Jim
plowed. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk in the afternoon and I got the 22 fruit trees which I had
ordered from the Rochester nursery.
26 Frosty morning, the air chilly all day, freezing again at night. Jim plowed, Johney and I planted
out the fruit trees. Mrs. R. and Clark went to the Sugar bush in Melancthon. [in margin] Planted
Fruit trees.
27 Frost this morning, but not very hard. Plowing soon commenced and the day was pretty fine. Jim
plowed, Johney split rails, Clark went to the sugar bush and boiled down sap. I chored around fix-
ing trees, etc.
28 Raw cold morning, the day chilly all through, although the sun shone out. There was a slight rain
about noon. Jim plowed, Johney split rails, Clark went to Mr. Ros[e]borough’s for some plum
trees which he had promised me. They were a very poor sample that he sent.
<Q3 folio 17 recto>
April 1882
29th Hard white frost this morning, the ground so white that it appeared almost like snow. The day had
a chilly air all through, although the sun shone out clear. I sold about 7 bushels of wheat. Jim har-
rowed, Johney split rails. Mrs. R went to Dundalk in the afternoon. She and I went to Mr. Lon-
sway’s at night. I borrowed Skeffington Bell’s gangplow this afternoon. W. John Arnold brought
home the fanning mill which he had the loan of. Brother Sam borrowed some bags of me. [in
margin] First Grain Sown / Wheat.
30th Sabbath. Cold, Raw morning with a slight shower of snow. The day was chilly all through. Mrs.
R. and I went to Melancthon.
May [1882]
1st Cold morning, frost on the ground. There was some rain in the afternoon, then it turned to snow,
and a fierce snow storm took place, covering the ground with a white mantle. Jim was ganging till
it got too wet for him. Johney was splitting rails. Clark and I cleaned grain. Eliza and Willie
were at school. Jim took home Skeffington Bell’s gangplow. [in margin] Snow storm.
2 Cold morning, frost and snow on the ground. The day very wintry-like. The snow melted on in
the day. Jim and John went to Melancthon and brought home three pails of molasses, also the
sugar kettles, barrels, pots, etc. Made a general sweep and finished sugar making. It has been a
poor year with us for the business. We are too far from the bush and could not attend at all times.
I went to Dundalk and transacted some business.
175
<Q3 folio 17 verso>
May 1882
3rd Hard frost this morning, but the sun came out and the frost dissappeared. The day was cool and
sunny. I sowed the remainder of the wheat, about five bushels. Jim plowed till noon and Johney
split rails. Johney harrowed in the afternoon and Jim went to the blacksmith’s to get a bolt for the
mouldboard of the plow. [in margin] Finished sowing wheat / Seen first swallow.
4 Nice morning, sun bright and warm, beautiful day all through. Things growing nicely. I sowed
about 14 bushels of pease. Jim harrowed in the afternoon and split rails in the forenoon. Johney
harrowed in the forenoon and split rails in the afternoon. Clark went to his uncle Sam's and har-
rowed for him. [in margin] Sowed pease / full moon / yesterday.
5 Hard frost this morning, but not hard enough to prevent plowing. The day was chilly all through,
but the sun shone out bright. Jim harrowed in the forenoon and sowed oats in the afternoon.
Johney and I cleaned some oats in the forenoon, then John split rails till dinner time, and harrowed
in the afternoon. I picked potatoes in the cellar, and I went to Dundalk after tea time. [in margin]
First oats sown.
6 Hard frost this morning, the day clear and cold. Very little growth at present. Jim harrowed till
noon. Then he and I took in 8 bags of potatoes to Dundalk and sold them for $1.00 per bag. We
also got 1200 pounds of hay from Skeffington Bell for $6.00. Johney split rails, Clark chored
around.
7th Sabbath. Frost this morning, the day was sunny but chilly. Father and Sam and Phoebe were here.
We took father up to the teacher doctor* to see what he would say about his sore foot. He said the
bone of the big toe was [diseased? writing unclear]. [*No doubt Dr. Thomas Norton, who was
first a teacher at Hornings Mills, then studied medicine at McGill, returning to a joint medical
practice with Dr. Barr at Hornings Mills and Shelburne; see S. Sawden, History of Dufferin Coun-
ty, n. d. [1939], n. p. [Orangeville or Toronto], pp. 139-40; and above, 10 June 1876, 29 August
1881.]
<Q3 folio 18 recto>
May 1882
8th Frost this morning, but not very hard, the day pretty warm, the afternoon cloudy with a slight
sprinkling of rain, and a heavier shower at night fall. John harrowed some, then plowed the re-
mainder of the day. Johney yoked up his steers and tried to harrow some but did not succeed.
Clark took a sow pig to the back line. I went in the forenoon to Lot 31 to let the chopping and
clearing of some bush to a man. He is to tell me tomorrow whether or not he will take the job. It
is about 10 acres of culled bush with a good deal of underbrush in some parts of it, and I offered
him $50.00/00 to clear it and leave it ready for plowing. Also he is to rid up all the timber on the
old clearing, so as to form a twenty acre field. The whole work to be done for the said fifty dol-
lars.
9 Fine morning, warm day, sunny, with a good growth, the evening cloudy with indications of rain.
I went to Dundalk and purchased the nails and hinges for the frame barn. I paid $3.00 per hundred
for the cut nails and eight cents per pound for the wrought nails. The small hinges were eight
cents per pound, and the large, six cents per pound. Jim plowed. Johney split rails.
10 Cold morning, the forenoon cloudy and cold, the afternoon cold and wet. Jim plowed till tea time.
Johney split rails. The eavning was very cold and wet, the night pouring wet and cold. [in mar-
gin] Wet.
176
11 Cold, raw morning, a drizzling rain falling, cold as winter almost. It kept showery all day, a mis-
erably cold day all through. Jim plowed a little after dinner. There wasn't much work of any kind
done here today. [in margin] Wet.
<Q3 folio 18 verso>
May 1882
12th Wet morning, wet at noon, wet at night, nothing but rain all day, and very cold sleety rain at that.
There has been three days rain almost without intermission. A fearful wet time. Jim and John
went to Skeffington Bell’s to get a load of hay, but it was so windy and wet they could not weigh
it. Nothing doing at home, so wet. [in margin] Very wet.
13 Mizzle of rain this morning, and the day was rather damp and cold. I went to Dundalk. Jim
plowed. Johney split wood. Mrs. R went to Dundalk in the eavning. Miss Sarah Bell was here a
while.
14th Sabbath. Cold, clear morning, the day clear and cold all through. Father and Sam were here, Sam
took father up to the doctor to have his foot seen to.
15th Frost this morning, the day clear and cold. Jim plowed, Johney cut wood. Jim and John went in
the forenoon to Skeffington Bell’s for a load of hay. Mrs. R. and I went to the auction sale at Nel-
son’s in Dundalk this evening. [in margin] Frost.
16 Frost this morning, the day clear and cold. I attended a Council meeting at Hopeville. Jim
plowed. Johnny split rails. Jim broke his plow pretty badly, the head is split in two. [in margin]
Frost
17 Frost this morning, the day cool, clear and dry. Sowed oats in the afternoon. Johney plowed in
the forenoon and harrowed in the afternoon. Jim helped William John Arnold to sow oats. [in
margin] Frost.
18 Clear, cool morning, the day cool but dry. Jim harrowed after he had hauled out some manure and
plowed it under for some early potatoes. Johney planted the potatoes. Mrs. R. helped Mrs. Nickle
to cook for her raising. [in margin] Frost / First potatoes planted.
<Q3 folio 19 recto>
May 1882
19th Frost this morning, the day cool but dry. Jim harrowed, Johnny clipped the sheep. I went to a
raising of a barn at Mr. Nickle’s in the afternoon. Mrs. R. was helping Mrs. Nickle to cook. I
sowed oats in the forenoon.
20 Frost this morning, but the day got pretty warm. I was letting water off the low places in the fore-
noon, and in the afternoon went to Lot 31 Melancthon. Johnny finished clipping sheep.
21st Sabbath. Clear morning, the day fine and pretty warm. I had the doctor call in to see Johney who
has a severe pain in his side.
22 Cloudy morning, the forenoon overcast, the afternoon rainy. I went to John Irvin's and bought 14
bushels of oats at .40¢ per bushel. Jim hauled them home at noon. Jim sowed oats. Clark har-
rowed. Johney is on the sick list. I helped Mrs. R. to clean out the milk house.
23 Pretty chilly morning, and the day cloudy and cold all through. Jim harrowed, Clark picked up, I
fixed fences. Mrs. R. and I went to John Gott’s a while tonight. W. McMurdo of Proton came
here today and offered $100.00 dollars apiece for a span of two years old colts. [in margin] Frost.
24 Hard frost this morning, ice on the water in the sugar kettle, more than half an inch thick. [In] the
[forenoon] Jim plowed some and sowed some. Clark harrowed some. I did a drain in the swale to
let off the water so that I could get it sown. The boys went in for father but he did not come out
with them. [in margin] Frost.
<Q3 folio 19 verso>
177
May 1882
25th Cool, dry morning, the day dry and cool. Jim and I were gathering stones in the forenoon, and in
the afternoon Jim was plowing.
26 Dry, cool morning, the day cool and clear. Jim was plowing a potato patch in the forenoon, and in
the afternoon he sowed a bag of oats, being the last of the seeding of grain for this season. Clark
harrowed with one of the mares, as the ground was so soft we could not put the mare that’s near
foaling on it. [in margin] Finished sowing grain (oats) / Got papers from Toronto.
27 Cloudy but cool this morning, the forenoon dry, but rain came on in the afternoon. There was not
a great deal fell, although it kept at it a good while. Johney finished harrowing in the forenoon.
Clark picked up roots and sticks. Jim split rails. I shoveled out a ditch through the low part of the
last sown grain. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk with the team in the afternoon. We had a splendid
ewe die this eavning, I think from the effects of the cold rains on her, she being shorn. She acted
as if she had cramps.
28th Sabbath. Cool morning, the day cool and clear and cold in the afternoon. W. John Arnold and wife
visited us today.
29 Frost this morning, the day bright and warm. Jim, John and I went to the Melancthon lot and got
out 20 rafters, 25 feet long, 4 inches at the top end. We peeled them and hauled them home. It
was a very heavy load, especially as one of our mares is very near the foaling. [in margin] Frost.
<Q3 folio 20 recto>
May 1882
30th Dry sunny morning, the day pretty warm all through. Jim harrowed in the forenoon and in the
afternoon borrowed his uncle Sam’s horse and skidded timber here for the framers who have come
to work this afternoon. I cut rafters in the forenoon. Johney cut rafters all day.
31st Cloudy morning, the day cloudy all through, with frequent showers and pretty sharp rain about
dark. The framers were working here today. Jim hauled two loads of lumber from the mill.
Johney cut rafters. I sent the cattle (5) to John Gott’s to be pastured at .50 cents each per month.
June [1882]
1st Cold morning, drizzling rain falling, something like a genuine Scotch mist, very cold, so much so
that the framers had to keep on their mittens while at work during the forenoon. The afternoon
cleared off and was something milder. Jim and John hauled rafters. Jim fetched home a load of
lumber in the afternoon and Johney and I cut stove wood in the bush. Clark is on the sick list.
2 Frost this morning, then a little shower of rain. The day cleared up and was dry till about 12 noon,
the afternoon very wet. Jim hauled two loads of lumber in the forenoon, and in the afternoon he
hauled some stove wood home. I went to a Council meeting at Dundalk. [in margin] Frost.
3 Rainy morning, rainy at noon, rainy at night, a complete wet day all through. I went in the morn-
ing to R. Mil[l]’s and bought a 60 foot sill from him at 2.50. Hired D. Reid to haul it home for
1.50. Then I went to Priceville and from thence home.
<Q3 folio 20 verso>
June 1882
4th Sabbath. Rainy day, except in the afternoon, which was moderately dry.
5 Dry this morning, but the day was chilly all through. The sun shone out most of the time. I went
to the Court of Revision at Melancthon. Brother Sam helped to haul posts with his horses, then
him and the boys planted potatoes.
6 Fine morning, dry and pretty warm, the day dry all through, and some vegetation. Jim was asking
hands for the raising on next Thursday evening. Johny and [I] took down the old shed and dug
post holes in the afternoon. [in margin] Sent colts to pasture.
178
7 Fine morning, though a little cloudy, the day was dry and warm but very windy in the afternoon.
John was asking hands for the raising. John and I were sawing off posts and placing them in posi-
tion. I went to Dundalk after supper and posted my papers to the Dep. Minister of Education. [in
margin] Sent papers to D. M. of Education.
8 Cloudy morning, very like a thunder storm, the day cloudy, warm and threatening for rain, but
there fell none, very fortunately for me, I think, as I had a Barn raising. There were about sixty-
four men present: the five framers, and ourselves, three. The Barn is 40 x 60 feet. It went together
well and the men were done about 5:30 P.M. Mrs. R. had a wool picking bee of women. [in mar-
gin, double underline, Gothic script] Barn Raised.
9 Very fine morning, the day dry and warm all through. Jim was hauling lumber with one of our
own mares and one of W. J. Arnold’s. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and in the afternoon
chored around. Johney was helping W. J. Arnold to plant potatoes. Willie also helped. Old Mrs.
Johnson, Henry Johnson’s mother, was buried today.
<Q3 folio 21 recto>
June 1882
10th Wet morning to about 7 O’clock, then the rain ceased and the remainder of the day was dry and
warm. Brother Sam and Jim were hauling lumber. Johney was helping Mr. McGurr to haul out
manure. I sold 16 lambs to Mr. James Best for $2.70 per lamb. He paid me $20.00 on them, and
is to pay me the full price when he takes them away.
11th Sabbath. Frost this morning, the day fine and warm with a good deal of sunshine. [in margin]
Frost.
12 Frost this morning, the day pretty warm and bright. Jim borrowed his uncle Sam’s horse and
hauled out manure with him and one of our own. Johney helped him. I piled the loose lumber that
was laying round the Barn. I also attended a political meeting at Dundalk at night. The meeting
was called by Dr. Sproul, M.P. for East Grey. [in margin] Frost.
13 Fine morning, the day warm and bright. Cloudy at night. We were hauling out manure in the
forenoon, and planting potatoes in the afternoon. We finished planting. We planted 12½ bushels
this afternoon and we had planted before 7 bushels, making in all 19½ bushels. [in margin] Fin-
ished planting potatoes.
14 Cloudy morning, the day cloudy, dry and warm, every indication of a rain storm at night. I went in
the forenoon to Dundalk and got some S[wede] turnip seed. In the afternoon I sowed some of
them. Jim and John were preparing the ground.
<Q3 folio 21 verso>
June 1882
15th Very rainy morning and the forenoon was pretty wet. The afternoon was [MS a] kind of mizzly.
Jim hauled a load of lumber in the afternoon. Johney planted some potatoes for himself. Clark
and I sowed some Swede turnip seed.
16 Fine morning, the day dry, warm and very fine growth. Jim borrowed W. J. Arnold’s waggon and
rack and hauled shingle timber to the mill, and lumber from it. Johney is laid up sick today, very
feverish and a pain over his left eye. Very bad, he was, this morning, quite delirious for a while.
Is a good deal better at night. I and Clark planted some potatoes for Jim as he was working the
team and could not attend to it.
17 Nice morning, but cloudy. The clouds soon dispersed before the sun and the day was dry and
warm. Jim hauled a load of shingle timber and a load of lumber in the forenoon. In the afternoon
he made some drills and we sowed some turnip seed. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk after tea and
met with a slight accident going. We were riding in Henry Lonsway’s waggon: the iron came off
179
the end of the neck yoke, the horses started to run. Henry tried to hold them. I caught a line and
was helping. The lines broke, the horses ran into the shed of the tavern on Lot 230 Gravel Road,
Melancthon. The horses turned so short that the three of us who sat in the Spring Seat were
pitched out, falling pretty hard on the ground. Mrs. R. had 7 dozen of eggs with her, they were
smashed to smithereens. We were not hurt seriously, but all of us were pretty badly jar[r]ed. [in
margin] Sent letter to Brother William / Batson’s Store P. O. Dickson Co. / Tenn. US.
18th Sabbath. Morning bright and fine, the afternoon cloudy and windy with a rain storm accompanied
by thunder and lightening.
<Q3 folio 22 recto>
June 1882
19th Cool, cloudy morning, the forenoon a little wet, the afternoon cold but dry. I was at a Bee for
Skeffington Bell’s, helping haul out manure. Jim hauled a load of shingle timber to the mill in the
forenoon, and also a load of lumber home. He went in the afternoon to Mr. Christopher Johnson’s
Raising. Johney went to the Dr.’s to see to get some relief for his eye which is exceedingly pain-
ful.
20 Fine morning, the day fine all through, pretty warm and dry. I went in the forenoon and helped
Jim load a load of shingle timber in Melancthon. In the afternoon I went to the poll at Dundalk
and polled my vote for Dr. Sproul, the Conservative Candidate. The state of the poll in Dundalk
was Dr. Sproul 63, Mr. Christie 48. Majority for the Dr. 15. Jim hauled three loads of shingle
timber to the mill and one load of lumber home. [in margin] Frost this morning / Frost the night of
the 21st June 1881 / Dominion Elections.
21 Fine morning, the day dry and warm, pretty hot in the afternoon. I hauled two loads of lumber
from the mill: 1000 feet on each load. We borrowed W. J. Arnold’s team and John drove them do-
ing Statute Labor. Jim shoveled on the road.
22 Fine morning, the day clear, bright and warm. Jim was hauling lumber. I was doing S[tatute].
Labor.
23 [F stricken] Cloudy morning, some thunder and a little rain, the day was cloudy generally, but very
close and warm, and a fine growth. Jim hauled home thirty-six bunches of shingles. Mrs. McGurr
came here in the afternoon and I wrote two letters for her, one to a son of hers in Winnipeg, the
other to her granddaughter in Toronto.
<Q3 folio 22 verso>
June 1882
24th Bright morning, sun rose clear, the day was rather cloudy but very sultry, the afternoon clouded
over, some thunder and a little shower of rain. Jim hauled two loads of lumber, and after tea took
the team to Sam’s to haul some firewood for him.
25th Sabbath. Fine morning, the day dry and warm.
26 Fine morning, the day dry and very sultry. Jim hauled shingles and lumber, also some rails to
mend a fence.
27 Dry morning, the day a little cloudy, but dry and sultry with a slight sprinkling of rain at near
night. Jim hauled lumber. Henry Hewitt brought one load of shingles.
28 Dry morning, the day dry though cloudy, also pretty sultry. Jim brought home one barrel of salt
and seven bunches of shingles in the forenoon, and in the afternoon he harrowed the potatoes.
Then he took home his uncle Sam’s horse. We have had the loan of him quite a while, hauled all
our lumber, nearly, with him. Johney and I put up fence.
180
29 Fine morning, but chilly, the day dry and middling warm, good growth. Jim was helping his uncle
Sam to log. Johney and I built fence. Gerty colted, time: Eleven months and sixteen days. Horse
colt, very feeble on its legs, cannot stand.
30 Dark morning, a slight rain in the forenoon and heavier in the afternoon. I went to see father who
is sick. Jim helped Sam to drive a yoke of steers to Dundalk. Johney put some locks on the fence
in the dry part of the day. I went to Dundalk in the eavning.
<insert>[between folio 22 verso and 23 recto, now item L.12 in Letters.Documents directory] Letter
from George Hodgins, Dep. Minister of Education, Education Department Ontario, May 20,1879.
[States rules re. pension]: “if under sixty years of age, one must present a medical report each year,
and present himself to County or City Inspector, who will report….. before pension will be paid.”
[handwritten on back of official letter:] “Heart disease causing extreme palpitations at the slightest
exertion, also fits of vertigo, and renders concentration of thought for public school teaching very
difficult, if not impossible. It first manifested itself during extreme study about 12 years ago.”]
</insert>
<Q3 folio 23 recto>
July 1882
1st Rainy morning, not very heavy, but just a mizzle that was the prevailing feature of the day. All the
family, except Mrs. R. and I, went to Dundalk to see the sports.* [*Dominion Day festivities.]
2nd Sabbath. Fine day all through. I went to Melancthon to see poor father who is sick.
3 Fine morning, the day dry and warm. I went with Brother Sam to a Council Meeting in Melanc-
thon. Came home and went to Father’s, sat up all night with him. He is very sick. Mrs. Eliza
Russell* is up here. [*wife of John Russell, sister of Nancy Agnew Russell and John Agnew]
4 Fine day all through, dry and warm.
5 Dry morning, the day dry, and fine growth. Brother John came up tonight. He and I were at Fa-
ther’s. Poor father is worse.
6 Dry morning, the day dry and fine all through. My dear old Father died just as the clock struck 12
at midnight. The doctor said his disease was pleuresy. Darling Father only lived 3 months and 3
days after mother. Oh, the agony of parting from a beloved parent. My Father was the best of Fa-
thers, no kinder could have been. Father was about 71 years of age. [in margin, double underline]
Father died.
7 Dry warm day all through, rain at night.
8 Cloudy morning, appearance of rain, a little sprinkling fell. We buried poor Father about 3
O’Clock this afternoon alongside of Mother in the Graveyard on Lot 36, 4th Range Melancthon.
Mr. Snowdon, W. Minister, preached the funeral.
<Q3 folio 23 verso>
July 1882
9th Sabbath. Fine day all through. Brother John stopped here today. John Agnew was here a while.
10 Cloudy morning and a little rain fell through the day. Jim and John with the team were doing
Statute Labor for Lot 31 Melancthon. I pulled some mustard in the afternoon. Brother John left
for home in the morning.
11 Fine morning, the day fine all through. John took his steers in the forenoon to the fair. Did not
sell them. In the afternoon he and Clark cut thistles from among the potatoes.
12 Cloudy morning, and pretty windy, the day cloudy and windy all through, with a very slight sprin-
kling of rain a little after 12 noon. Jim went to Horning’s Mills, Melancthon, to play the fife for
the Orangemen there. John beat the drum for Irwin’s lodge, Proton. Clark, Willie and Eliza went
181
to Dundalk to witness the gathering. Even Mrs. R. hurried off after dinner to join the pageant.
Stopped at home alone, as being more consistent with my feelings.
13 Cloudy, windy and cool, all through the day. Jim came home about 10 A.M. from Horning’s
Mills. In the afternoon he re-drilled some turnip ground. I went to Dundalk after dinner. Clark
hoed potatoes at John Gott’s.
14 Dry, cloudy morning, the day dry and pretty windy, especially in the afternoon. Clark, Willie and I
re-sowed some turnip seed which the flies had eaten, before John and Jim went to work on the
drains under their uncle Sam.
<Q3 folio 24 recto>
July 1882
15th Warm day all through, and a little breezy. There was frost this morning, done little harm to ap-
pearance. Jim and John were on the drains with Sam. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon and
done some Township business. [in margin] Frost.
16th Sabbath. Cloudy and cool this morning, the day dry and windy, but threatening rain, which came
after night. Mrs. R., W. J. Arnold and Mrs. Arnold, and I took my team and went to Mulmer.
17 Dry morning, but showed signs of rain. The day dry all through. Mrs. R. and the whole caboodle
went to a picknick or tea party on Lot 36–4th Range Melancthon. My family are all wild geese,
run-run-run for evermore. No stop at home. Some of them has arrived now 10 P.M., others are on
the scoot.
18 Rather misty morning, the forenoon got overcast and there was a heavy rain with some hail and a
little thunder in the afternoon. The framers have started work again at the Barn. Mrs. R. took the
team and she and Willie went to Feversham with the wool. Jim was at Mr. Hewitt’s logging bee.
Johney and I dug drains. [in margin] 76¾ lbs Gross / 65¾ net. [weight of wool.]
19 Very heavy dew this morning, the day got overcast and there was a shower about 11 A.M. The
afternoon was fine. I was digging drain, Jim was with Sam on his drain. Johney was doing Stat-
ute Labor for Sam. Mr. George Rutherford was here this afternoon and I got the new Barn insured
in the Western for $380.00 and Contents $120.00. I also had the insurance $100., and part of the
Contents $250., in all $350., taken off the old buildings which are in the Victoria Mutual, and
placed on the new. Sum total $850.00 on building and contents.
<Q3 folio 24 verso>
July 1882
20th Cool, cloudy morning, the forenoon cold, the afternoon warmer. Jim was working on the drains.
Johney was doing Statute Labor for Sam. I went to the back line in the forenoon and in the after-
noon I dug a piece more of the drain where I intend for a lane.
21 Cool morning, the forenoon cool, the afternoon warmer. John and Jim were working with Sam on
the drains. I cut the way to the overlays and W. J. Arnold hauled them out with one horse.
22 Bright sunny morning, the day pretty warm all through. I dug at the ditch for lane. Jim and John
worked at the drains with Sam. Christopher Johnson bought a yoke of small two year old steers
from me for $32.50.
23rd Sabbath. Bright sunny morning, the day fine all through.
24 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and hot. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and got 15 lbs.
spikes for the Barn, also a bottle of medecine from the doctor for the cough. Jim and John helped
John Gott at the Barn. Clark and Willie took home the steers to Mr. Johnson.
25 Dry, sunny morning, the day dry and pretty warm, with rather a strong wind. John and I ditched.
Jim and Clark took the mares to “Justice”* in the forenoon and in the afternoon went to Lot 31
Melancthon and brought home the Bobsleighs. [*stud horse.]
182
26 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and pretty hot, with a stiff breeze. Jim and Johney were taking
out logs to make an approach to the barn. I was ditching.
<Q3 folio 25 recto>
July 1882
27th Fine morning, the day dry to about noon, then there was some rain with thunder. There was more
rain about 2 P.M. with heavy wind, then a heavy rain about 9:30 P.M. The boys were making an
approach to the frame barn. I was ditching. Mr. & Mrs. Lonsway here at night.
28 Dark, cloudy morning, the day cloudy, cool and windy, the eavning chilly. Johney and I put in a
culvert and levelled a waggon track for hauling hay, grain, etc. Jim finished the approach to the
barn, then he repaired the hay rack to haul in.
29 Dry morning, the day dry and breezy. Jim finished the waggon rack, then he went with W. J. Ar-
nold, who borrowed my waggon, to Mulmer. Johney drilled up the potatoes and hoed his own
patch in the afternoon. I looked over the Township Books and went to Dundalk in the afternoon
and deposited $100.00 @ 6 percent in Mr. Lucas’ Bank. I had deposited $100.00 in the beginning
of the month. Mrs. R. went to Dundalk in the afternoon and bought some paints and oils. [in
margin] Renewed subscription to Mail.
30th Sabbath. Dry morning, the day hot mostly, and pretty breezy. Mrs. R. and I went to brother
Sam’s. The place where poor Father and Mother lived is quite lonesome. Their dear old faces are
no more there to welcome me, their voices are hushed forever, sad is the recollection!
31 Cloudy morning, the day cool and cloudy. Jim and John started mowing. The grass is pretty tall
but very thin, it being the first seeding-down on new ground. I was picking around.
<Q3 folio 25 verso>
August 1882
1st Mizzly morning, the day a little wet all through. Jim and Johney mowed till noon. They went to
Dundalk after tea. Mrs. R., Eliza and Willie went to Osprey woolen Mills for the yarn.
2 Misty morning, and the day was cloudy all through and cool. Jim, John and I went to Lot 31
Melancthon and made and brought home some overlays.
3 Cloudy morning, the day cloudy and cool all through. Jim and John were mowing. W. J. Arnold
helped them. I was in Dundalk in the forenoon on business. In the afternoon Clark and I raked
and put up some hay.
4 Cloudy morning, the day cloudy and very sultry. Jim and John mowed in the forenoon and in the
afternoon hauled in four small loads. Clark and I raked. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon, post-
ed and Registered the following letters: one to Miss West of Orangeville containing $33.00, one to
Miss Rogers of Mount Forest containing $29.00, one to W. Ferguson, Esq., Inspector of P. S., con-
taining money order for $4.00, one to the Manager of the Merchants Bank, Toronto, Receipt for
$24.00 Coupon. Came home and raked hay after that.
5 Cloudy morning, the day several times appeared like rain, still, none fell. The afternoon especially
appear[ed] like thunder, the day was pretty sultry. Jim went to W. J. Arnold to help him at his hay.
We raked hay in the forenoon and hauled in, in the afternoon. Mrs. R. also raked. We hauled in
six small loads. We had to load small, the ground was so rough and stumpy and knolly. Miss Sa-
rah Bell was here a short while this eavning.
6th Sabbath. Cloudy morning, the forenoon dry but a good deal of rain fell in the afternoon. Brother
Sam and family were here today.
<Q3 folio 26 recto>
August 1882
183
7th Dark morning, the day cloudy pretty much all through. Jim and Johney were digging on the drain.
I mowed part of the day, and in the afternoon I went to John Brinkman's and bought a small pig,
about ten pounds weight, from him for $2.00.
8 Rather cloudy morning, the day dark generally. There was a slight rain, both in the forenoon and
afternoon. Jim and John worked on the drain for lane. I mowed in the forenoon and in the after-
noon worked at the Township books.
9 Cold morning, the day chilly, mostly, and cloudy. There was quite a rain accompanied with thun-
der and lightening in the eavning. I was working on Sam's drain till about 4 P.M., when the rain
prevented us working any longer. Jim and John went this morning on an excursion to Owen
Sound. Mrs. C. Bell was here today. [in margin] Boys on an excursion.
10 Dark, cloudy morning, the day cloudy all through, with every appearance of rain, but scarcely any
fell in this neighborhood. The two boys were with Sam on the drain. Clark was with A. Patterson
on his drain. A sad calamity happened yesterday in Osprey. At a picknick six boys went out in a
small boat to have a sail. The boat upset and four of the boys were drowned. Two of the boys
were sons of Mr. Mills of Osprey. I was cleaning out the cellar in the forenoon and in the after-
noon I went to Dundalk.
11 Bright morning, the day dry all through. Mrs. R. and I raked hay in the forenoon and hauled it
home in the afternoon. Jim and John were at Sam's on the drain. Clark was on A. Patterson’s
drain.
12 Wet morning, the day showery all through. I made out the half yearly statement of the finances of
the Township in the forenoon, and in the afternoon all of us, with the exception of the two eldest,
went to Dundalk. Jim and John worked half a day on the drain. Clark worked the same time.
<Q3 folio 26 verso>
August 1882
13th Sabbath. Cloudy morning, the day cloudy all through, though not wet. Skeffington Bell and wife
were here this afternoon.
14 Cloudy morning, the day cloudy with every appearance of rain, but none fell. Jim was ½ day at
drain, John nearly full day. Clark with A. Patterson. Mrs. R., Eliza and I Paris greened our pota-
toes.
15 Cloudy day all through, with a slight shower of rain in the afternoon. I mowed a little in the fore-
noon. Jim and John were on the drains, Clark was with A. Patterson.
16 Cloudy morning, the day cloudy and wet-like. I mowed some in the afternoon. There was a quite
a shower of rain in the forenoon. Jim and John were on the drains.
17 Misty morning, a slight rain falling, which continued most of the forenoon. The afternoon was
dry. I attended council meeting at Dundalk. Jim and John were working on the drain with Sam.
Clark was part of the day with Alex Patterson.
18 Fine morning, the day dry all through. I cut some swale grass in the forenoon and in the afternoon
went to inspect the cleaning of Lot 31 Melancthon. From thence I went to Dundalk. Mrs. R., Eli-
za and I had tea at Mrs. Joseph Neithercut’s. The boys were on the drains. There was a pretty stiff
frost this morning but no harm can be seen yet in this part. [in margin] Frost.
19 Sunny morning, the day clear and bright. I wed [=weeded] turnips in the forenoon. The boys
worked on the drains in the forenoon. There was a very heavy frost this morning but I can't see
any damage done, except some pumpkin leaves wilted. [in margin] Frost.
<Q3 folio 27 recto>
August 1882
20th Sabbath. Fine morning, the day fine all through. Mrs. R., Eliza and I visited at Mr. W. Lonsway’s.
184
21 Cloudy morning, the day dry till about 2:30 PM when there came on a thunder and rain storm.
The afternoon was pretty showery. It is now (7:45) raining pretty sharp. Jim and John were work-
ing at Sam's. Clark was with A. Patterson full day, less half an hour, on drains. I put up some hay
in the swale in the forenoon and in the afternoon wed among the turnips in the dry spells.
22 Showery morning, the day showery all through, with a perfect rain pour during the night. Jim and
his mother went to Flesherton. John was with Sam on the drain. Clark was with A. Patterson.
23 Fine morning, and the day fine all through. Jim was in at Sam's pulling pease. John was on the
drain. Clark made ¾ day with A. Patterson. I was weeding turnips. [in margin] First new pota-
toes.
24 Misty morning, but the sun got out and the day was dry and pretty warm. I was ditching at home,
Jim and John were with Sam. Clark was at A. Patterson’s.
25 Fine morning, the day dry and excessively hot. I pulled pease in the forenoon and went to a Coun-
cil meeting at Dundalk in the afternoon. The boys were on the drains. [in margin] First harvest-
ing.
26 Fine morning, the day dry and warm. Johney, Clark and I pulled pease. Jim was at Sam’s.
<Q3 folio 27 verso>
August 1882
27th Sabbath. Fine morning, the day was generally cloudy, but no rain fell.
28 Rather misty morning, but the sun got out and the day was dry and pretty warm. The three boys
and I were pulling pease. John Gott was working at the barn.
29 Fine morning, the day dry and very warm. I was helping brother Sam at his pease. Jim hauled a
load of bricks from Flesherton for Mister Thomas Hanbury to Dundalk. Then he hauled another
load of bricks for John Irwin from Skeffington Bell’s. Clark and Johney pulled pease.
30 Dry warm day all through. C[l]oudy in the afternoon. Jim craddled oats in the forenoon and in the
afternoon he and Johney and Willie hauled in pease. I pulled pease. Clark was helping Sam at his
pease. [in margin] First oats cut.
31 Misty morning, and a very slight skiff of rain fell. The day cleared off about 9 AM and it was dry
afterwards. We put in a load of pease, then Jim and John craddled oats. I fixed the road a little
and went to Dundalk after supper.
September [1882]
1st Cloudy morning, with the appearance of rain. We worked in the turnip patch during the forenoon.
In the afternoon the boys cut and tied some wheat. I hoed turnips. [in margin] First wheat cut.
2 Cloudy morning, but the sun shone out once in a while. The day was dry till about 5:40 PM when
there came on rain, accompanied by thunder and lightening. The boys hauled in the remainder of
the pease in the forenooon, and cut wheat in the afternoon. I hoed turnips in the forenoon, and in
the afternoon went to Melancthon and measured Faucet’s job. It lacked more than ¾ of an acre in
measurement, also there was raking and cutting of snags to be done. Mrs. R. gathered spoils.
[writing cramped]
<Q3 folio 28 recto>
September 1882
3rd Sabbath. Misty morning but no rain fell during the day. There was some rain at night.
4 Dark morning, very like rain, but none fell. The day was dry all through. Jim and I took 16 lambs
in the forenoon to the man that had bought them (James Best). In the afternoon Jim craddled,
John and Clark bound. I hoed turnips and went to Dundalk after tea.
185
5 Fine morning, the day dry all through, but an exceedingly heavy dew this morning which kept the
grain wet and unfit for handling quite a while. I raked up oats, the three boys craddled and bound
wheat.
6 Fine morning, the day dry all through. Jim cut wheat in the forenoon. His mother and John tied.
And in the afternoon we hauled in five loads of loose oats. Clark was working with W. Lonsway
for $1.00.
7 Misty morning, and a very heavy dew. The sun shone out after some time and the day was dry
and fine, but got cloudy towards night with indications of rain. Jim and John were craddling oats.
Clark and I hauled in five loads of wheat in the afternoon.
8 Cloudy morning, and the day appeared very much like rain, but none fell. The sun got out and the
day was dry. I helped Sam to bind and haul in. Jim and Johney cradled oats at home. Clark raked
together some oats into sheaves.
9 Very fine morning, the day dry and fine all through, and very warm about 2 PM. Clark and I
hauled in two loads of oats in the forenoon, and three loads of wheat in the afternoon. Jim and
Johney craddled oats.
<Q3 folio 28 verso>
Sept. 1882
10th Sabbath. Misty morning, but the day was dry all through. Miss Sarah Bell was here. Mrs. R. went
to see Mrs. G. Broughton in the afternoon.
11 Dry morning, the day dry and pretty windy. Jim craddled oats. Mrs. R., Johney and I hauled in in
the forenoon. In the afternoon Mrs. R. and I visited at S. Bell’s.
12 Dry morning, and some frost, but apparently it done no harm. The day dry. Jim craddled, Mrs. R.,
John and I hauled in.
13 Cloudy morning, and very much like rain, which came on about 12:30 after noon, and was consid-
erably wet during the afternoon. Jim, Johney and Willie went to help Sam harvest in the morning.
I had to go to Dundalk in the morning for nails. I then went with the team to Sam's and we all
helped him. The rain stopped us. Sam has out about two loads of grain.
14 Wet morning, the forenoon showery, the day very wind[y] from morning to night, especially so in
the afternoon. There was some hail during the forenoon. The boys tried to craddle some oats but
it was too windy. We tied a load of oats in the afternoon and hauled them in. We also hauled in
some swale grass that I had stacked up. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon. W. J. Arnold bor-
rowed the democrat. [in margin] Very high wind.
15 Cloudy morning, but the sun shone out and the day was dry and breezy. Jim and John craddled
oats. Mrs. R., Clark and I tied oats.
16 Very heavy dew this morning, but the sun got out and the day was dry and pretty warm. Brother
Sam helped us to harvest oats. Jim mowed them but they were greatly broken down. John and
Clark hauled in ten loads. Mrs. R and I bound oats.
<Q3 folio 29 recto>
Sept. 1882
17th Sabbath. Cloudy morning, the day cloudy all through, thunder and lightening with a slight sprin-
kling rain in the afternoon. Mrs. R and I were at Mr. Lonsway’s.
18 Cloudy morning, but the sun got out about 11 AM. The day was dry and breezy. We hauled in five
loads of oats in the forenoon and this wound up our harvest. Will we all live to see another harvest
finished? Who can tell? We fired our fallow in the afternoon, got a very poor burn. Jim went to
the mill in the afternoon for some plank to finish the horse stable. Did not get any. Will get them
tomorrow morning. [in margin, double underline] Finished Harvesting.
186
19th Rather misty morning, the day cloudy in the forenoon and a pretty sharp shower of rain. The af-
ternoon was dry. The boys were picking up in the fallow in the afternoon. Jim went to the mill in
the forenoon and got some plank to finish the horse stable. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and
got some hinges. Miss S. Bell was here a while today.
20 Misty morning, but the day was dry but cloudy. Jim, John and I picked up in the fallow. Jim went
to see Henry Gallaher in the afternoon, as he wished to get him and his oxen to log.
21 Dark morning, the day cloudy and cool all through. John was piling brush in the fallow, Jim and
his Uncle Sam were making door casings for the upstairs. I was in Dundalk in the forenoon for
staples and bolts, in the afternoon I piled brush.
22 Rainy morning, and the forenoon was showery, the afternoon dry. Jim fixed some door casings.
John went with the team to Mr. H. Hewitt's thrashing. John Gott finished the Barn. Price paid
$90.00. He was 34 days and his men were 57 days of a single man. [in margin] J. Gott / finished /
the Barn / Frost.
<Q3 folio 29 verso>
September 1882
23rd Misty morning, the day dry but cool. Frost this morning. John Gott got the lend of the team and
democrat to take his wife to Maxwell to the doctor. We were piling brush in the fallow. Mr. Lon-
sway and wife were here this afternoon. [in margin] Frost.
24th Sabbath. Frost this morning, the day dry but rather chilly. Mrs. R. and I were at Brother Sam's in
the afternoon.
25 Frost this morning, but the day was dry and breezy. The boys and I were working in the wood fal-
low piling brush, etc. James Mills borrowed the democrat to take his daughter Hannah to the doc-
tor at Shelburne. [in margin] Frost.
26 Frost this morning, the day dry but very chilly. The boys working on the chopping. Mrs. R. and I
went to the funeral of Mr. Robert Oliver’s infant in the forenoon, and in the afternoon went to
Flesherton and purchased a Wilkinson's plow (1 no. 3, Stiff) for $13.00 cash and our old plow val-
ued at $4.00. Mrs. R. bought herself a new bureau for $11.00 cash and a mirror for $4.00. [in
margin] Frost
27 Frost this morning, the day rather warm and dry. Jim, with the team, was at Mr. Lonsway’s thresh-
ing. Johney, Clark and I chopped in the fallow. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
28 Not quite so chilly this morning, the day pretty warm with a few drops of rain about noon. Johney
is at Mr. Lonsway’s threshing, Jim and Clark worked in the fallow. I went to a Council meeting at
Hopeville. I took my team and drove the Reeve (Peter McGregor) out. They had a very long
meeting and it was two O’clock in the morning when I got home.
<Q3 folio 30 recto>
Sept[ember]1882
29th Bright sunny morning, the day dry and warm all through. We were logging with the horses in the
fallow.
30 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and pretty warm all through. We were logging with the horses
in the fallow. W. J. Arnold helped us to roll. Mr. Muir bought a span of colts, both mares sired by
Lord Haddon and twenty-eight months old, from me for Two hundred and five dollars cash. [in
margin] Sold colts.
October [1882]
1st Sabbath. Very fine morning, the day dry and hot all through. W. Lonsway and family were here to-
day.
2 Dry morning, but misty, the day remained cloudy all through and rather cool. We were logging
today. Henry Galllaher had his oxen with us, and W. J. Arnold helped to roll.
187
3 Dry morning, the day dry and pretty warm all through. We had Henry Gallaher and his oxen, and
Brother Sam, logging.
4 Dry morning, the day dry all through, but cloudy in the afternoon. Johney and I fired the log
heaps and kept them punched up. Jim and Clark helped their uncle Sam to raise potatoes. Mrs. R.
and Johney went to Dundalk in the afternoon. Mr. Muir took his colts [MS coalts] away today.
5 Fine morning, but the day got cloudy, although there was no rain fell. We punched up the log
heaps in the morning and went to the Show Fair in Dundalk in the afternoon. There was a fine
turnout at the fair, a very large crowd. James White of Melancthon got badly hurt by R. Mont-
gomerie’s bull.
<Q3 folio 30 verso>
Oct[ober] 1882
6th Fine morning, the day dry and very warm. We were picking up and branding. I went to Dundalk
to Council meeting in the afternoon.
7 Dry morning, the day dry and breezy. We were picking up and firing heaps in the fallow. Mrs.
Lonsway and husband were here a while at night.
8th Sabbath. Dry morning, the day dry all through and very windy. Mrs. R. and I were at Mr. Lon-
sway’s.
9th Rather cloudy this morning, and the day chilly all through. There were several slight showers of
rain. We were taking up potatoes. Mrs. R. and I went to Mrs. Montgomerie’s with the woolen
yarn to be woven. There were 72 skeins and 2 more to send, or about 41½ lbs.
10 Cool morning, the day rather chilly all through. We finished raising potatoes. They were a very
poor crop in comparison with last year. The ground was too dry in the part of the season when
they ought to be growing. The potatoes were large enough, but very few in the ground. We had
about 80 bushels off an acre of ground. Mrs. W. John Arnold and baby were here a while this af-
ternoon. Yesterday I settled with J. Gardiner* and paid him the balance which Mrs. R. owed him.
I gave him one sheep skin @ .60¢ and returned one horse poke @ .70¢, 14½ pounds shingle nails
@ .03¼ ¢ per pound, and .25¢ worth of screw nails. I gave him .10¢ cash to straighten the account
between us. [in margin] Finished raising potatoes. [*John Gardiner, hardware store in Dundalk.]
11 Cool morning, the day pretty chilly but dry. I chored around, the boys put out manure. Mrs. R.
went to Melancthon to see Mrs. Sam Russell, who has been mourning her family.
12 Fine dry day all through, but rather chilly. Jim and I put out manure. We borrowed Mr. Lon-
sway’s waggon. John, Clark and William helped Brother Sam to take up potatoes.
<Q3 folio 31 recto>
Oct[ober] 1882
13th Fine morning, and the day was dry till the afternoon, when there came on a slight rain which in-
creased in volume till it was a terrible heavy shower just at dark. Jim and I hauled home some
firewood in the forenoon and in the afternoon I went to Dundalk. John was helping Henry Gal-
laher to clean grain. Clark and William helped Mr. Lonsway raise potatoes. [in margin] Posted
letter to / William Russell / Sawmill and lumber man / Batson’s Store P.O. / Dickson Co. / Tenn.
14 Bright sunny morning, the day fine and dry all through. I worked at the Township books. Jim
hauled grain (2 loads) to Dundalk for H. Gallaher. John and Clark hauled stones with the steers.
Mr. A. Lonsway and wife were here a while tonight.
15th Sabbath. Cool day, but nice and dry and sunny.
16 Dry morning, the day dry and fine all through. Jim plowed, John and Clark hauled stones with
steers.
188
17 Dry morning, the day dry and fine, like Indian Summer. Jim plowed, John and Clark picked
stones. I went to Dundalk in the eavning on Business, was about to purchase Mr. Thos.
Lakin[g]s’* house, but did not. [*Thos. Lakings is listed on Collector’s Roll, 1886, as proptery
owner; see History of Dundalk, p. 269.]
18 Dry morning, the day dry and fine all through. Jim plowed in the forenoon and in the afternoon
took 224 pounds of Butter to Dundalk and sold it for .18¢ [per lb.] on account. We also took in 2½
bags of potatoes for Eliza and sold them for .65¢ per bag. Jim got a suit of clothes, to be made, at
$19.00. John bought himself an overcoat for $7.00, and a coat, vest and hat for $9.00. Clark was
shingling with John Gott.
<Q3 folio 31 verso>
October 1882
19th Cold, chilly day all through. Jim was plowing, Johney was making a stone boat. Clark and I
helped brother Sam put in straw.
20 Very hard frost this morning, the day very chilly all through. We were logging. Henry Gallaher
helped us with his oxen. Brother John and his wife came here this eavning.
21 Very fine morning, the day dry and mild. The day, generally speaking, was one of idleness: except
paring some apples and asking hands for the threshing, there was nothing done. The thrashers
came here this afternoon and set up their machine.
22nd Sabbath. Fine day, cool, clear and dry. The Misses Neitherut, brother John and wife, were here
today.
23 Misty morning, and the general appearance of the day was wet, but scarcely any fell. We were
threshing today. Brother John and wife were here today.
24th Bright morning when threshing began. The day was cool and clear. We finished threshing at 9:30
A.M. The grain did not turn out well. As near as I can estimate, I had about 25 Bushels of oats
per acre, 14 bushels of pease and 10 bushels of wheat. Some of the oats are light, must have been
froze by the summer frost. The wheat shrunk, some a little froze, the pease a good enough sample,
but very wormy. John and wife and my wife left for home this afternoon. Mrs. R. is going to see
her father. [in margin] Thrashed.
25 Fine frosty morning, the day dry but chilly. Jim was plowing, John was at Dan Reid’s working,
Clark and I worked among the log heaps.
26 Fine frosty morning, the day dry all through. Jim was plowing, Johney and Clark were picking
stones.
<Q3 folio 32 recto>
October 1882
27th Fine morning, the day dry and remarkably beautiful for this season of the year. Jim was plowing,
John and Clark were picking stones. I was picking up in the fallow. John Agnew and Dr. Madill
were here at noon.
28 Frosty morning, but the sun soon got out and the day was dry and fine, though rather cool and
pretty windy, with a slight mizzle of rain falling after night. Nancy came home at noon after being
gone since Tuesday noon. Jim was plowing, Johney and Clark picked stones. I picked up in the
fallow and fired heaps and set fire to some stumps in the afternoon.
29th Sabbath. Cloudy, dry day but very cold.
30 Quite chilly this morning and the day was cool, cloudy and dry. Jim plowed, John and Clark
picked stones. I went to Melancthon and hunted up Faucet who had been doing some chopping
and clearing for me during the summer. I paid him his full contract price, less three dollars. The
189
contract was not near completed but I paid him to get rid of him. [in margin]. Henry Lonsway
married to Miss Brou[g]hton.
31 A slight shower of rain this morning, but the day cleared off soon and was fine and mild all
through. Jim plowed, Johney and Clark picked stones and I dug a drain in the field to carry off the
water. There were here a while this eavning Mrs. C. Bell, Mis S. Bell, and Mrs. Skeffington Bell,
also Walter Bell and his brother Skeffington. Jim is at, I think, Mr. Joseph Neithercut’s, as there
came a messenger from them to Jim while he was plowing. Halloweve is now about over, will we
all see another? All that were here, I mean, that’s the question.
<Q3 folio 32 verso>
November 1882
1st Remarkably fine morning, the day beautiful and sunny all through. Jim plowed, John and Clark
picked stones. I dug a ditch.
2 A very slight skiff of snow this morning, just barely distinguishable. The day was pretty cold, but
fair. Jim plowed, John and Clark branded and picked up. I helped in the forenooon and in the af-
ternoon I dug a ditch.
3 Very hard frost this morning, and the air was chilly and cold all day. It kept freezing in the shade
all through the day. Jim plowed, John was at W. J. Arnold’s threshing. I finished my digging of a
drain in the forenoon, and in the afternoon Clark and I cleaned a small grist and sawed some hem-
lock logs. Mrs. M. Broughton called to see us this eavning.
4 Very cold raw morning, the ground froze very hard. John and Clark picked up and branded. Jim
took two bags of wheat to Dundalk mill, did not get it ground. Then he got some repairs done at
the blacksmith’s and harnessmaker’s. I went to Mr. Duncan’s to get him [to] cut some oat sheaves
for us, then I went to Dundalk and from thence to C. Fry’s to see a span of colts [MS coalts] that
he had to sell. I did not like them, made him no bid for them. Mrs. R., Eliza and I dined with Mr.
and Mrs. Lonsway in Dundalk. I got a letter from Brother William. [in margin] Got a letter from
Brother William.
5th Sabbath. Fine sunshiney morning, the day pretty mild for this season of the year. Mrs. R. went to
Melancthon meeting. Brother Sam and Phoebe came out with her and stopped to about 9 P.M.
John Agnew stopped here this night.
<Q3 folio 33 recto>
November 1882
6th Rather chilly this morning, and the day was cold all through, hard frost in the morning. Jim
plowed, John was at D. Reid’s threshing. Clark and I took up turnips.
7 Mild morning, with a slight mizzle of rain. The day was dark all through, with appearance of rain
towards night. Jim plowed to about 3 P.M. when he broke his plow point, and had to go to Dun-
dalk for a new one. John was at D. Reid’s threshing, Clark worked at the turnips. I fixed a little
in the barn, preparing for getting some sheave oats cut tomorrow.
8 Misty morning and the day was lowering all through, but mild. We were cutting oat sheaves. We
had Mr. John Duncan, his cutting box, and horse power, and himself and son. They had two span
of horses. They cut from about 10 A.M. till 5:30 P.M. He cut about 95 dozen large bind
[sheaves], and charged $3.50. He done good work and his charge was reasonable.
9 Mild misty morning, the day a little dark all through, with a slight mizzle of rain at night. Jim
plowed in the forenoon, and in the afternoon went with the team to Dundalk for some wheat I had
bought. I went in the forenoon to Dundalk and purchased Twenty-five Bushels and sixty -nine
pounds of prime fall wheat at .85¢ per Bushel. John and Clark were working at turnips.
190
10 A very fine, mild morning, the day beautiful for this season of the year. I helped brother Sam to
butcher a young cow. Jim went to the grist mill. John and Clark put potatotes into the cellar.
<Q3 folio 33 verso>
November 1882
11th Dark mizzly morning, and the day continued slightly wet. Jim plowed, John and Clark took six
head of cattle for us, and one for brother Sam, to Brother John’s in Tossorontio Township to be
wintered there. I chored around and went to Dundalk to transact Township business. [in margin]
Took cattle to Tossorontio.
12th Sabbath. Very fine day, dry and mild.
13 Quite a change in the weather this morning, snow on the ground and a little fell throughout the
day. Pretty cold and stormy towards night. Jim plowed, I worked at the Township Books. Stabled
up the cattle this eavning for the first [time] this season. [in margin] First snow / Stabled cattle.
14 Sharp frosty morning, snow on the ground and a pretty keen freeze. The day pretty cold all
through, a little glimmer of sunshine about 4 P.M. Jim plowed part of the day. Boys got home
from Tossorontio.
15 Sharp cold morning, the day chilly all through. Mrs. R. and Jim went with the team and some
geese to Dundalk. She sold the geese alive to Mrs. Lamon*for .60¢ each. [*James Lamon was a
lawyer in Dundalk, History of Dundalk, p. 93.]
16 Cold morning, the day got milder and the afternoon was a little wet, and finally turned to snow at
night. The boys were fixing around the buildings. I went to Dundalk in the morning to see Mr.
Hewetson.* He wished me to collect his store accounts for him and offered to provide a rig for me
and pay me $2.00 per day. I did not take the job as I thought it would be too fatiguing on account
of the bad roads and bad weather. The roads are breaking up now and the winter coming on, con-
sequently the job would be very cold. [*Hewetson and Smith ran “London House”, a general
store on Main St., Dundalk; see History of Dundalk, p. 3].
<Q3 folio 34 recto>
November 1882
17 Pretty heavy fall of snow on the ground this morning, very wintery-like. The boys fixed up the
buildings, preparetory [sic] to the winter.
18 Fine bright morning, the day sunny and thawing. The boys hauled some firewood and cut some
stove wood, and ground their axes.
19th Sabbath. Pretty sharp morning, the day cool all through. Mrs. R. and I went to Melancthon.
20 Cool in the morning, milder towards noon, with a sharp freeze at night. Johney cut some stove
wood at the house. Mrs. Russell and I went to Dundalk and transacted some business. I deeded
Lot 31, fifth Con. Melancthon to Jim, and Lot 215 + 216, first Con., Proton to Mrs. Russell. Life
is uncertain, and if anything happened to me (I being troubled with heart disease) this would an-
swer for a will and be better.
21 Cold morning, the day pretty cool all through, with indications of snow at night. Jim, Clark and I
were fixing our shanty. John helped his uncle Sam to make Sq[uare] timber.
22 Some snow fell this morning, and the day was soft in a general way, with frequent showers of soft
snow. The boys and I were fixing shanty. [in margin] Mrs. McCulloch* died. [*S. McCulloch
was proprietor of the Anglo-American Hotel in 1877, Hist. of Dundalk, p. 101.]
23 Soft morning, thawing. The day was soft with frequent showers of snow. It is now, (8:30) P.M.,
snowing. Jim and Clark were at the shanty. Johney was helping his uncle Sam put in a culvert. I
went to Dundalk in the afternoon. Miss S. Bell is stopping here tonight.
<Q3 folio 34 verso>
191
November 1882
24th Stormy morning, blowing and snowing, and continued so all day. Jim and Clark went to the shan-
ty in the afternoon. John helped Sam.
25 Rather more moderate than yesterday, but some snow fell occassionally [sic] through the day. The
snow is now about six inches deep on the level. In the fence corners it is drifted about two feet
deep. Jim was helping W. J. Arnold to chop. Clark was at H. Hewitt’s threshing. Johney and I
fixed up part of the old barn for a shed.
26th Sabbath. Snowing this morning, snowing at noon, and snowing at night. Soft air.
27 A little sharp this morning, but the day got milder towards noon, with a sharp freeze at night. We
were roofing our shanty in Melancthon.
28 Pretty sharp morning, the day cool, and decidedly cold at night. Very fine sleighing now. We
were fixing our shanty on Lot 31 Melancthon. Mrs. S. Bell and her sister Miss M. Robinson were
here today. [in margin] P. Conner’s child died of diptheria.
29 Very sharp morning, and pretty cold till the afternoon, when the day became somewhat milder, and
snow began falling towards night. The boys and I were fixing the shanty. Mrs. James L. Johnson
died last night. [in margin] Mrs. Johnson died.
30 Rather stormy this morning, the day kept getting worse, the afternoon was blowing and snowing
very strong. The boys were at the shanty. Mrs. R., Willie, Eliza and I went in the afternoon to
Mrs. Johnson’s funeral.
<insert>
[Between folio 34 verso, 35 recto, scrap of paper with measurements for rooms of house, not clear the
purpose.]
</insert>
<Q3 folio 35 recto>
December 1882
1st A little snow fell this morning and the day got softer towards evening, with indications of a thaw.
The boys chored around home. I attended a Council meeting in Dundalk in the eavning. [in mar-
gin] Sent letter to William / Yellow Creek P. O. / Houston Co. / Tenn.
2 Cold blustery morning, snow falling thick. There was a good deal fell during the day. Jim and
Clark went to Melancthon lot, split some firewood and brought home a load at night. John went to
W. J. Arnold’s sawing. Brother John’s Robert came here this eavning.
3rd Sabbath. Rather rough this morning, blowing and snowing, which was the prevailing features [sic]
of the day. All the family went to Melancthon Church.
4 Stormy morning, blowing and snowing. The day cleared off a little towards noon, then came on
more snow and wind, harder than ever. It was a pretty big storm when night came on. I had one
Ewe died today. Cause: something in her head. The boys moved their bedding, etc., to the shan-
ty.
5 Mild morning, the day pretty mild all through, with some snow falling at night. The snow is pretty
deep now, about fifteen inches, I think, on the level. The boys are at the shanty. Mrs. R. and I
went to Dundalk, sold an old stove for $1.90, and a sheep skin for .75¢. W. Lonsway was here to-
night while I made up for him the amount of timber w[h]ich measure was in the culverts which he
built for the section. H. Lonsway and wife were here a while.
6 Snow falling this morning, and a little fell through the day. The boys are chopping cordwood. I
went accross [sic] today and brought home a small load of wood.
<Q3 folio 35 verso>
192
[writing switches to blue/purple pencil from black ink]
December 1882
7th Extremely stormy morning, snowing and blowing a regular tornado or tempest. The storm kept
raging furiously all day. I did not see a solitary person on the road today. The storm was so vio-
lent that I could not find my way to the watering place, consequently all the horned animals had to
go without. I melted snow for the horses. Brother John’s Bob intended on going home this morn-
ing, but he has got stormstaid and cannot. Johney came home from the shanty at night. [in mar-
gin] Violent storm.
8 Another stormy morning, blowing, snowing and freezing. The storm did not abate any through the
day. The cold was more intense than yesterday. I made my way to the watering place and shov-
eled out the snow. Then we drove the cattle, and a hard job it was. I got both my ears froze stiff
as bricks while doing so. This is the longest storm I ever re[me]mber of.
9 Sharp morning, but the wind not near so strong as yesterday. Some sleighs appeared on the road
today, but they had to take the fields in a good many places. The roads are blowed up at a terrible
rate. Jim was at the shanty part of the day. In the afternoon he went to Dundalk and bought an
axe, the former one being so hard that it is breaking continually. Eliza showed signs of having
diptheria today, her throat being filled with white matter. We are gargling it repeatedly, and blow-
ing sulphur in it. It appears to be getting a little better. John’s Bob went to brother Sam’s when
we found Eliza had diptheria. Jim is stopping with H. Lonsway tonight. [in margin] Eliza took
diptheria.
<Q3 folio recto 36>
December 1882
10th Sabbath. Pretty stormy day, cold, blowing and snowing. Jim, Clark and Willie went to the shanty
this afternoon. Did not like to let them stop in the house where diptheria is. Eliza is getting better.
We keep gargling her throat with salt and water about every hour. Also blowing sulfur with a quill
into her throat. Also we have put on two mustard blisters to her throat.
11 Somewhat calmer than the former days, not blowing nor near so cold. Some snow falling now and
then. John went to Walter Nickle’s threshing. Jim came home this afternoon from the shanty with
a sore throat. Hope it is not diptheria. Eliza is still keeping gaining, perhaps Jim will not have it
very bad. [in margin] Jim got diptheria.
12 Calm, cold morning, the day got windier in the afternoon, and colder, with some snow falling.
Johny went to the shanty for some wood. Clark came home today, thinks he has diptheria. Jim is
getting better.
[writing in purple pencil ends]
13 Quite stormy this morning, snowing some through the day, a perfect hurricane at night. I went
with Mr. McGregor, Reeve, to Council meeting at Cedarville, had to stop there all night.
14 Another stormy morning, the day stormy all through. Came home, the roads impassible in places,
had to take the fields. Mr. McGregor’s mare could scarcely draw the cutter in places.
15 Sharp freeze this morning, but not so much storm as the other days. The snow is an immense
depth.
16 Calmer but quite cold, a little snow fell through the day. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk in the
eavning. Brother John is here tonight.
<Q3 folio 36 verso>
December 1882
17th Sabbath. Something milder this morning and not so much snow fell. Brother John went to brother
Sam's and came back at night.
193
18 Quite mild this morning, the day mild all through, the trees covered with hoar frost. Johney took
one cord of Cedar to Dundalk and sold it for $1.25.
20 Rather windy this morning, the snow drifting, with a tendancy to rain at night. I went to Dundalk
to the council meeting in the afternoon.
21 Mild day, with a slight rain falling most of the time. Johney took a cord of dry Cedar to Dr.
McWilli[a]m’s* in the forenoon, and in the afternoon drove his mother to Dundalk. I was in Dun-
dalk in the afternoon, and posted and registered cheque to manager of Merchants Bank, also
cheque to Manager, Bank of Commerce, Toronto, $24.00, $28.00 coupons S. Sections, Proton. [*
Dr. James A. McWilliam, Medical Officer of Dundalk, 1888-1903, see History of Dundalk, p. 33.]
22 Mild morning, thawing till the afternoon, when towards night it began snowing. It is now (8:45)
snowing pretty briskly. Johney and Clark went to Melancthon Lot and cut a small load of wood
and brought it home. I stopped at home and done the chores. [in margin] Watson Ballard / (col-
oured) died.
23 A soft snow falling this morning, something between a rain and snowfall during most of the day.
There has been a thaw, but of short duration, not much water as yet, and the snow very little gone.
John and Clark brought home a little stove wood today. Jim and I cleaned peas (60 Bushels), 13
Split + 47 Whole.
<centrefold Quire 3>
<Q3 folio 37 recto>
December 1882
24th Sabbath. Mild day all through, a slight quantity of snow fell.
25 Mild morning, the day very mild, a slight softening of the snow. John and Clark took a sow to the
hog in the forenoon, and in the afternoon all the boys went to a Social at Dundalk. Mrs. R., Eliza
and I visited Mrs. C. Bell after dinner. [in margin, double underline] James Lonsway / married / to
Miss Chambers.
26 Mild morning, the day mild all through, with a slight snow fall. Jim hauled to Dundalk two cords
(short wood) dry cedar to Mr. Thomas Hanbury at $1.25 per cord. John and Clark cut a cord at
home.
27 Rather sharp morning, the day pretty cold. The boys went to Melancthon to work. John brought
home a small load of firewood. In the eavning I went to the Trustees Annual Meeting in S. S. 2
Proton and paid the school rates to the trustees, $330.00. Coming home I dined with Mr. Christo-
pher Johnson.
28 Pretty sharp morning and a keen freeze all day. I took the boys out some bed clothes and some
bread to the shanty. Brother Sam has commenced his job of taking me out rails. Mrs. R and I
went over to H. Lonsway’s a while tonight.
29 Not very cold this morning, almost inclined to thaw, the wind pretty strong throughout all day.
The three boys are shantying. Mrs. R. took some bread to them.
<Q3 folio 37 verso>
December 1882
30th Rather mild this morning, the day mild all through. Willie and I cleaned up a small grist in the
forenoon. Mrs. R., Eliza, Willie and I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. [in margin] Posted letter
to Ireland.
31st Sabbath. Blowing and snowing a good deal this morning, and a good deal of blow throughout the
day. Mrs. R., Eliza and I went to brother Sam’s, and from thence to the Union Church in the after-
noon.
194
The old year has just about passed away and alas, the dearest and kindest of parents have been
called away during the year. Poor Father, Darling Mother, both gone to their everlasting [MS ling]
homes. Who can tell how soon another one of us may go? Perhaps another year may cause a
blank in some of our families.
January 1883
1st Cold this morning, the day cold all through. The boys started for the shanty this morning. I went
in the afternoon to Dundalk and polled my vote.
2 Cold morning, the day cold all through. I went to the Bank at Dundalk and deposited $1012.54,
Township moneys.
3 Cold stormy morning, blowing, snowing and freezing, which was the prevailing features of the
day. Mrs. R. took the boys in some eatibles [=edibles] in the eavning.
4 Cold morning, the day cold all through. The boys are at the shanty. Mrs. Kirby is stopping here
tonight. One of our calves took bad with a swelling, the urine seems to be stopped. I am afraid I
will lose [MS loose] the calf.
<Q3 folio 38 recto>
January 1883
5th Very sharp cold morning, the day very cold all through, I think the coldest day that has come
through the winter. I took a small grist to John McDowell’s Mill (7½ Bushels).
6 Cold morning, the day cold all through. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and straightened up the
Township affairs with the banker. In the afternoon I got a grist from Mr. McDowell’s. Calf died,
too much food in stomach, could not digest it.
7th Sabbath. Not quite so cold as yesterday, another fall of snow today.
8 Rather milder this morning. Killed a swine in the forenoon. In the afternoon took the calf’s skin
to Dundalk, got .06¢ per pound [for] it. It weighed 33 pounds. Then took some provisions for the
boys to the shanty. Brought home some firewood. Mr. Skeffington Bell and wife were here a
while at night.
9 Pretty cold day all through.
10 Keen freeze this morning, the day very cold. Mrs. R., Eliza and Willie went in the afternoon with
provisions to shanty.
11 Pretty cold morning, the day chilly all through, but not near so cold as yesterday. I went to Dun-
dalk in the afternoon. Two Miss Neithercuts and Miss Oliver were here today.
12 Bright sunny morning, the day sunny but sharp. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk in [the] eavning.
13 Very stormy this morning, the wind kept getting fiercer and some snow fell. This was the windiest
day [that] has come, I think, this winter.
<Q3 folio 38 verso>
January 1883
14th Sabbath. Stormy, snowey day, the roads are drifting up pretty full, especially those which run
North West and South East. Brother Sam and his family were here today.
15 Calmer this morning, and the sun shone out pretty strong. The day was very cold. I went to a
Council meeting at Hopeville.
16 Bright sunny morning, and the day pleasant all through. Mrs. R. and I visited Mr. Skeffington Bell
in the eavning.
17th Blowing and snowing this morning, and the day was one of storm all through. The snow came
down very thick. Mrs. R. took some provisions to the boys at the shanty. I have entered on my
48th year of existance today. Will I see another Birthday? Poor Father and Mother were both
alive this time last year. Alas, both are now gone.
195
18 Pretty sharp morning, the day pretty cold all through. James L. Reid of Dundalk died today.
19 Very blustery morning, and the day stormy all through, blowing, snowing and freezing. Mrs. R.
went to William Lonsway’s. Mrs. Lonsway gave birth to a boy.* [in margin] Mrs. W. Lonsway
gave birth to a boy. [*William, d. Feb. 1960, buried in Alliston in family plot.]
20 Something softer this morning, and towards night there was a slight rain or sleet for about two
hours or a little more, when it cleared and there fell some snow. I went to Dundalk in the after-
noon and made a Township deposit in the Bank.
<Q3 folio 39 recto>
January 1883
Sabbath. 21st Cold blustery morning, and the day was one of storm, blowing and freezing. The boys
came home about noon.
22 Extremely cold day from morning till night. The sharpest frost this winter, nothing like it. Jim
and John went to Lot 31 Melancthon for some firewood. [in margin] Very cold.
23 Very cold morning, the day extremely cold all through. We chored around home today. [in mar-
gin] Very cold.
24 Another stormy cold morning, but not quite so bad as yesterday. The day was very cold all
through, and the wind high. The wind increased towards night. We butchered a swine. Jim made
a wood rack, Clark and I cleaned up a grist for the mill.
25 Sharp morning, the day piercing cold. The boys took the team and started for Lot 31 Melancthon
to swamp out some cordwood.
26 Very cold morning, but the sun got out soon, and the day was rather pleasant. I went to Dundalk in
the eavning. Henry Lonsway and wife were here a while at night.
27 Something milder and almost like a thaw. Still, I think the thaw is a good while coming. Jim was
trying to haul cordwood to Dundalk. Could not get along well, the roads were so filled up with
snow and the sleighs kept cutting off. It's poor business. I was at Dundalk in the eavning.
<Q3 folio 39 verso>
January 1883
28th Sabbath. Another cold stormy day.
29 Blowing and snowing, mostly, all through the day. John and Clark went to Lot 31 Melancthon for
some firewood. Brought home about an eighth of a cord. Got a telegram from John Agnew say-
ing his father was dead.
30 Very mild morning, the day soft all through, the snow melting and in some parts on the road, al-
most watery. Mrs. R. went to her father's funeral. Johnny and Willie went also. Clark and I took
a grist to the little mill. Jim is at home laid up with a cold. Eliza is keeping house.
31 Very stormy morning, snowing, blowing and freezing, the day was fearfully stormy all through.
February [1883]
1st Another stormy morning, the day stormy all through from morning till night.
2 Bright morning, the day rather milder than yesterday, with a good deal of sunshine.
3 Pretty stormy morning, the day rough all through, with a sleet fall towards night. Jim and John
went to Lot 31 Melancthon for some firewood.
4th Sabbath. Another stormy day from morning till night.
5 Another stormy day, blowing, snowing and freezing all day long. Jim went to help his uncle Sam
haul logs to the mill. Got along badly. Horses crowded. Broke his harness. Broke his clevis.*
Did not get a solitary log to the mill. Came home with one horse hitched to the sleigh, the other
behind. [*Clevis: u-shaped metal connector, with a pin or bolt through the ends of the U, used to
hitch a chain to the harness, to tow logs.]
196
<Q3 folio 40 recto>
February 1883
6th Another stormy day, blowing, snowing and freezing. The boys were cutting stove wood in the
bush at home. Joseph Jackson of Melancthon was married to Miss Johnson of Artemesia today.
[in margin] Joseph Jackson married.
7 Another day of storm. Blowing, snowing and freezing. The boys were cutting stove wood.
8 Another stormy day from morning till night, blowing, snowing and freezing. The boys cut stove
wood in the forenoon, and in the afternoon tried to get some home. First, John took his steers and
broke the road to the Bush, Jim shoveled out the snow in the gaps. Then Jim hitched up the horses
and went back. He could only fetch a few sticks. The sleigh was almost load enough for the hors-
es. There had been no road to the Bush any time this winter, so that every foot of it was bursting
through Snow from 2 to 5 feet deep. He succeeded in getting home a few sticks.
9 Very stormy morning and the day continued extremely cold and blustering all through. Blowing,
snowing and freezing were the prevailing characters of the day. Jim went to Dundalk. It kept him
three hours coming home.
10 Sunshiney morning, the [day] clear, bright and calm, but a sharp freeze. The boys were in the
bush cutting stove wood. Jim butchered a swine in the afternoon. I had her up three months fat-
tening, and still she was poor enough. Henry Lonsway and wife, and James Lonsway and wife are
here this night for a while. Miss Sarah Bell was here in the afternoon.
<Q3 folio 40 verso>
February 1883
11th Sabbath. A sharp cold day all through, but not so much of a blow as some of the days past.
12 Sunshiny morning, the day bright and pretty warm, the snow melting on the sunny side of the
buildings. Jim hauled home stove wood, John and Clark manufactured it in the bush.
13 Sunshiny day all through. The boys, assisted by Henry Lonsway, were in the bush cutting fire-
wood.
14 Stormy day, snowing and blowing. Jim helped Henry Lonsway saw wood. Clark and Johney
were in the Bush in the forenoon. In the afternoon Johney took John Gott to Flesherton. Clark
went for his boot to the shanty, took it to Dundalk.
15 A little inclined to be soft this morning, the day tending to softness all through. Mrs. R. and I went
to Dundalk on some business.
16 Raining this morning. Raining at noon, and raining at night. I went to Toronto, took a ticket for
there and back, Price $3.80. Got the mixed train at Dundalk, rode to Orangeville and waited there
to the eavning train. Went on board, train delayed at Woodbridge, freight train off the track at
Weston, got to Toronto at 12 night. [in margin] Thaw.
17 The morning blowing and cold. Cleared up about noon, the afternoon sunny. Seen lawyer S. H.
Blake, consulted him about the Essa Lot Mortgage. Took the train 4:25 P.M. and got home to
Dundalk at 10 P.M.
<Q3 folio 41 recto>
February 1883
18th Sabbath. Pretty cold stormy day, the roads very bad, almost impassable.
19 Pretty chilly in the morning and all through the day, although there was a little sunshine. Jim tried
to haul some stove wood from the bush. Only hauled one small load, the horses crowded so. In
the afternoon I went to Clippert’s sale thinking to buy a steer calve, but his calves were heifers.
Johney cut some wood in the bush.
20 Another stormy day, blowing and snowing. I attended a Council meeting at Dundalk.
197
21 Cold stormy morning, the day was very windy all through, drifting snow. The boys started for Lot
31 Melancthon.
22 Cold day all through.
23 Bright sunny morning, the day pretty mild, sun shining all day. Brother Sam came here about to
11 A.M. He and I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. Mrs. Russell went to Dundalk in Mr. Nick-
le’s sleigh.
24 Blowing pretty strong all day, the afternoon sleeting, or more like cold rain falling. The boys are
at the shanty.
25th Sabbath. Blowing, snowing and freezing. Brother Sam and Phoebe, and Miss Maxwell were here
in the afternoon.
<Q3 folio 41 verso>
February 1883
26th Snowing, blowing and freezing from morning till night, a regular NorWester Blizzard. Willie,
Eliza and I cleaned up a load of oats in the forenoon, and in the afternoon I went to Dundalk on
some business.
27 Calm morning, but the day turned out very rough and windy, with a raging snow storm at dark.
Brother Sam hauled out two loads of oats for me today (57 Bushels 15 lbs + 69 Bushels + 18 lbs).
Sold them for .40¢ per bushel. I could not put my horses on the road because they crowd so much.
28 Nice mild morning, the day bright, sunny and warm. Very pleasant after so much cold weather.
Brother Sam hauled two loads of oats to Dundalk for me. Sold at .40¢ per bushel.
March [1883]
1st Bright sunny morning, the day mild and a thaw wind with a hot sun. The snow is settling down
and melting. [in margin] Thaw.
2 Very fine morning about sunrise, but the day got overcast and was pretty cold in the afternoon,
with a slight snow fall. [in margin] Got letter / from Ireland.
3 Rather cold this morning, and the day was chilly all through, with a rather strong wind and a slight
snow fall occassionally.
4 Sabbath. Cold morning, the day chilly all through, very sharp.
5 Another cold morning, the day cold all through, with a pretty bright sun. Keen frost though. [in
margin] First lambs came.
<Q3 folio 42 recto>
March 1883
6th Pretty cold morning, the day cold all through, with some snow falling in the afternoon, and an ex-
ceedingly heavy wind storm at night.
7 Stormy morning, the wind blowing fiercely, the cold very intense. The wind kept raging furiously
all day, but fell at night.
8 Pretty chilly this morning, and the day sharp all through. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk.
9 Mild morning, the day mild all through, with a slight thaw wind.
10 Soft snow falling this morning and a good deal like a thaw through the day, with frequent showers
of snow now and then. Mrs. R., Willie and Eliza took the team and went to the shanty with provi-
sions for the boys. I went to Dundalk and sent a draft for $701.50, County rates to the Co. Treas-
urer, Owen Sound. [in margin] Posted letter / and three newspapers / to W. Russell, Ireland.
11th Sabbath. Rough stormy day from morning till night. Mrs. R., Eliza and I went to brother Sam’s.
We had hard work getting the horses through the snow banks.
12 Stormy morning, stormy at noon, stormy at night, the wind blowing fiercely, snow fallling oc-
cassionally and a bitter freeze at night.
198
13 Mild morning, the day pretty mild all through. Bright sun and a little thaw on the south side of the
buildings. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon. Mrs. W. J. Arnold was here. W. J. Arnold brought
home the ram.
<Q3 folio 42 verso>
March 1883
14th Soft wind blowing this morning, and continued soft all day with a bright sun towards the middle of
the day, causing a slight thaw. Mrs. R. took some provisions to the boys. I went to Dundalk.
Elizabeth Lonsway, a helpless invalid that has been confined to her bed for more than twelve
years, died today. [in margin] Elizabeth Lonsway / died.
15 Cold stormy morning, snowing, blowing and freezing. The day continued stormy and cold.
16 Stormy cold morning, the day cold, blowing, freezing and snowing. We went to Elizabeth Lon-
sway’s funeral in the afternoon.
17 A little milder this morning than yesterday. The day appeared to get softer, almost like a thaw. I
went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
18th Sabbath. Cold morning, the day got remarkably stormy, blowing, snowing and freezing all day
long. Mrs. R. and I went to William Lonsway’s.
19 Very sharp morning, the forenoon piercingly cold and snowing, the afternoon not much better.
Mrs. R. took the boys to the shanty, then went to a quilting at Phoebe’s.
20 Sharp morning, but the day was sunny and bright. Mr. Thos. Hanbury and ____ Walker, Township
auditors, were here today and commenced their audit.
21 Sharp cold morning, the day pretty cold all through, but a bright sun shining. Capital sleighing
now, the snow storm of Sabbath having filled up the inequalities of the road.
<Q3 folio 43 recto>
March 1883
22nd Bright cold morning, the day chilly all through, although the sun shone out bright.
23 Pretty nice morning, the day sunny and bright. The auditors finished their audit today. [in mar-
gin] Mr. Nickle’s / Baby died.
24 Bright sunny morning, the day fine all through, but rather chilly.
25 Sabbath. Bright sunny morning, the day pretty nice and warm. Brother Sam and wife, and Josiah
Sauder* were here and they and our family went to the funeral of Mr. Walter Nickle’s baby in the
afternoon. Brother John, Eliza and two of their boys came here at night. [in margin] Mr. W. Gal-
laher’s / child died. / Esther [=Easter]. [*Josiah Sauder, no. 33 in picture, History of Dundalk, pp.
312-13. Jim is groom’s man for Sauder, 8 August 1883.]
26 Pretty fine morning, the day sunny but sharp. Brother John and Eliza went to Brother Sam’s. Jim
and I hauled a ton of hay from James Ros[e]borough’s lot on the gravel. The ton cost $13.00. Hay
and cattle feed of all kinds are very scarce and can scarcely be obtained. Jim hauled a couple of
loads of moving for Skeffington Bell in to Dundalk in the afternoon.
27 Sharp morning, the day very cold but clear. I took Jim to the shanty, then I went to Dundalk.
Brother John left for home today.
28 Bright morning, the day cold and clear.
29 Bright sunny morning, the day clear and cold. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
<Q3 folio 43 verso>
March 1883
30th Beautiful morning, the sun shone out very bright and warm. The afternoon got cooler, and at night
it was quite sharp. All the family, with the exception of myself, went to the Examination of
School Section No. 5 Melancthon.
199
31 Bright sunny morning, the day clear all through but pretty chilly, especially in the afternoon. I
went to Dundalk, and Skeffington Bell, Collector, and I settled collector’s Roll and he returned it.
April [1883]
1st. Sabbath. Bright sunny morning, the day clear and cold.
2nd Bright morning, the sun shone out strong, the day was pretty mild, but the snow did not melt
much. Mrs. C. Bell was here today.
3rd Rather cloudy morning, but the sun got out soon and the day was rather inclined to be soft. There
was a brisk wind for a short time in the afternoon. I went to Dundalk and posted a letter to Mr.
Mathew Knox, South Dummer Post Office, containing a Draft for $221.00, Land payment and in-
terest on Lot 31, Con. 5, Township of Melancthon. Miss Martha Neithercut was here today.
4 Mild morning, the day inclined to be soft, and there was something of a thaw.
5 Slight rain falling this morning, and throughout the day there were frequently small showers. Mrs.
Russell and Willie took some provisions on the mare’s back to the boys.
<Q3 folio 44 recto>
April 1883
6th Rather cloudy morning, the day was overcast several times, sunshine and clouds alternating, not
much thaw today. Sharp frost at night.
7th A fresh fall of snow this morning, and a little fell through the day, but the afternoon was mild,
a[nd] there was a slight thaw. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk in the forenoon.
8th. Sabbath. Mild morning, the day pretty fine all through, the snow melting a little. Mrs. R. and I
visited at Mrs. C. Bell’s in the eavning.
9 A little chilly this morning, and a pretty strong wind, but the sun soon got out and the day became
warm, and from a cold wind it turned to a thaw wind. The snow disappeared more today than any
day this spring. I heard a Robbin today. Willliam Boyd, Township assessor, was here and as-
sessed Lot 215 $900.00, Lot 216 $200.00, 1 span horses $100, 5 cows $75, + 8 sheep $15.00 =
$190, Total Assessment: $1290.00. I gave in 35 acres cleared on Lot 215, and one acre of bad
land, 10 acres cleared on Lot 216 and 40 acres bad land. There are 7 days St[atute] Labor. I was
at Dundalk this afternoon. [in margin] Heard first / Robbin.
10 Cloudy morning and rather chilly, the wind middling strong. There was not much of a thaw today.
11 Pretty windy morning, the day was inclined to thaw some, the wind got very strong in the after-
noon. The snow is disappearing, though very slowly. There is a great scarcity of cattle provender
in the neighbourhood.
<Q3 folio 44 verso>
April 1883
12th Bright sunny morning, the day beautiful all through, the snow melted a great deal. Jim came from
the shanty and took the Bay mare with him. He is going to get his uncle Sam’s horse and try to
swamp out some rail cuts. Mrs. Daniel Reid was here this afternoon.
13 Mild day, with a strong thaw wind, the snow melted a good deal today. I went to Dundalk. Mrs.
Henry Lonsway was here this afternoon. [in margin] Seen first / Robbin of the / season.
14 Warm morning, the day very sultry, the snow disappearing very fast. The air close and warm, a
thunder storm is evidentally indicated. The boys got home from the Melancthon Lot, John and
Jim were swamping out rail cuts. They did not succeed well, as the mare was too firey. They
broke a couple of their tugs. Clark was at a wood Bee at his uncle Sam’s.
15th Sabbath. Very fine day, sultry and the snow melting rapidly. Rain in the afternoon.
16 Dark morning, but the sun shone out once and again through the day. The boys went to Lot 31
Melancthon in the forenoon. Willie took the Black Mare to the blacksmith’s and got two shoes on.
200
Jim came home in the eavning and made preparations for starting the plow tomorrow. I took in 20
Bushels turnips out of a pit, there was one bushel spoiled ones.
17 Frost this morning, the day was mild but cloudy. Jim took the team, and John, and started for Lot
31 Melancthon to begin plowing. The snow has disappeared as if by magic this last week and
plowing has, in general, commenced. We began on the 19th last year. Mrs. Daniel Reid and Baby
were here today. Fire in Dundalk last night. [in margin, formal printing script] Plowing com-
menced.
<Q3 folio 45 recto>
April 1883
[“april” in formal lower case gothic script]
18 Rather cloudy morning, and the day was chang[e]able, being dry and warm in the forenoon, and in
the afternoon, wet and chilly. The four boys are on the Melancthon Lot, some plowing, some
chopping, and some making molasses.
19 Rainy morning, a slight mizzle, mostly all day. I went with Clark and carried some bread to the
boys. I then went to Dundalk.
20 Fine morning, sun bright and warm, the day generally fine, with a tendancy to frost in the after-
noon. Was in Dundalk in the eavning at a cheese factory meeting.
21 Fine morning, the day bright and clear. I went to Priceville to see Inspector Ferguson.
22 Sabbath. Pretty fine morning, the day generally warm. W. Lonsway and family were here in the
eavning.
23 Pretty hard frost this morning, the day chilly all through, although the sun shone out bright. I
plowed on Lot 31 Melancthon, Johney also plowed. Jim went to Jos. Neithercut’s raising. Clark
and Willie made molasses.
24 Very sharp morning frost, and [MS to and, with “a” overwritten] snow falling occassionally
through the day, and the wind cold and raw. Very sharp frost all day long. I and Mrs. Russell
went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
25 Very hard frost this morning, and the day was cold all through and freezing. Johney went to Dun-
dalk in the forenoon and thence to Lot 31 Melancthon to chop rail cuts.
<Q3 folio 45 verso>
April 1883
26th Misty morning, a slight rain in the forenoon, something heavier in the afternoon. Then it turned to
snow and there was, for the space of about an hour, a very heavy snow fall, immensely large, soft
flakes. It cleared off just at dark.
27 Ground covered with snow this morning, but about 3 P.M. it had disappeared. The ground is very
sloppy. Jim came from the shanty for some horse feed. He then went to Mr. Roseborough’s for
half a ton of hay. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon.
28 Hard frost this morning and a little snow on the ground, the day cold all through. The boys got
done plowing in Melancthon. They have plowed about 18 acres. I attended a meeting of the
cheese factory at Dundalk.
29th Sabbath. Rather chilly day all through, a hard frost in the morning.
30 Frost this morning, but the ground was fit to plow. The afternoon was a little wet on towards
night. Jim plowed with the horses. Johney and I started to pick stones with the steers. The stone
boat soon gave out, then we hitched to a plow. The steers plowed pretty well, it being their first
time. They hauled* a little during the forenoon, but we tied their heads together and that broke
them partly off it. We first tied their tails together, but this was no use. Mrs. R., Clark and Willie
201
went to Melancthon to boil down some sap. Clark came home at night. [*i.e. they did not pull to-
gether in tandem as a team.]
May [1883]
1st Ground covered with snow this morning, quite wintry-like. The snow had all disappeared at
noon. The afternoon was fine and drying. The boys plowed. Jim and Willie went after supper to
Melancthon to fetch home the syrup and utensils. [in margin] Snow.
<Q3 folio 46 recto>
May 1883
2nd Misty morning, the day overcast, a slight rain came on about noon, and got heavier about 4 P.M.
The afternoon was unpleasant and wet. Jim plowed, Johney, Clark and I picked stones. A tramp
called and had his dinner.
4 Dark morning, the sky overcast and a slight mizzle of rain falling. The day was generally gloomy
and unpleasant, the ground is very wet, scarcely any [MS: and] low fields can be got on to be
worked. Jim and Johney plowed. Clark and I cleaned wheat. The Misses Neithercut were here
this afternoon.
5 [entry is in purple pencil] Misty morning, the day mizzling all through. Jim sowed five acres of
pease. Johney plowed and Clark harrowed. Mrs. R., Eliza and I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
[in margin] First grain / sown (pease) / one day before / new moon.
[end of pencil, reverts to black ink]
6th Sabbath. Frost this morning, the day sunny till the afternoon, when it clouded over. Mrs. R. and I
went in to Brother Sam’s.
7 Wet morning, the forenoon pretty showery, the afernoon dry, but dark. The boys plowed. Clark
chored around in the afternoon. Dan Byer[s] was here and paid $5.00 com[m]utation of Statute
Labor for his father’s Lot for 1882.
8 Dry morning, the day continued dry but cloudy. Jim plowed to noon, when the large clevis of his
plow broke. He went in the afternoon to Dundalk, got another 2 coal oil barrels at .75¢ each + 3
barrels of salt at $1.50 each. John, Clark and I gathered stones in the forenoon and he [Jim?
John?] plowed in the afternoon. [“when the large clevis of his plow broke” is likely an error, since
it is reported as happening the next day.]
<Q3 folio 46 verso>
May 1883
9th Dark cool morning, the day chilly all through, a sharp shower of sleet about 2 P.M. The eavning
very much like a snow storm. Jim plowed for a while in the forenoon, when his large clevis broke.
He went to the blacksmith’s and got one made, price .75¢. Clark plowed in the afternoon. John
plowed all day. I picked the seed potatoes.
10 Dark morning, the forenoon dry, the afternoon very wet. It rained incessantly from about 1 P.M.
till dark. I sowed 4½ acres wheat. Jim got it partly harrowed, then had to stop on account of the
rain. John plowed during the dry part of the day. Clark sowed some salt on the wheat ground. [in
margin] Sowed first wheat / Seen first swallow.
11 Very cold morning, the day cold all through, a very heavy frost this morning. We sowed 2½ acres
of wheat on Lot 31 Melancthon. Johney plowed at home. [in margin] Frost.
12 Hard frost this morning, the day very cold all through, but dry. We sowed the remainder of the
wheat, also some oats, and some oats and vetches. John plowed. Clark harrowed at Sam’s. I went
to Dundalk in the afternoon and paid Mr. G. R. Middleton for 3 Barrels of salt which Jim had got
this week. The salt was $1.50 per barrel. I gave him a $5.00 bill and he returned me 0.55¢. Mr.
Fred Nixon and ____ Ketchum* were present. Ketchum said the dearness of the salt came from
202
the national policy. I said after paying so much for it, that I throwed the salt on the ground. Mr.
Nixon remarked that it made good manure. [in margin] Frost. Finished sowing wheat. / First oats
sown / Sowed some vetches. [*first name is blank in MS; Jesse Ketchum had a tannery in Dun-
dalk, and was band master in 1870s; see History of Dundalk, pp. 91, 104, 225]
<Q3 folio 47 recto>
May 1883
13th Sabbath. Cold day, dark and chilly. [in margin] Frost.
14 Frost this morning, the forenoon dry, snow after dinner and raw afternoon. A very unpleasant day.
We sowed five acres pease. Could scarcely get them harrowed, the ground was so wet. Johney
picked stones in the forenoon and plowed in the afternoon. I went to Dundalk after tea. [in mar-
gin] Finished sowing pease / Moon a week old / Frost / Got letter from Willie
15 Fine dry morning, the day breezy and sunny, drying the ground well. Jim and Clark started to
Melancthon to prepare the ground for sowing oats. Johney plowed at home. I went to Dundalk af-
ter tea. [in margin] Sent letter to / Brother William / Yellow Creek P. O. / Houston Co. / St. of
Tenn. / US
16 Dry clear morning, the day sunny and breezy. John plowed at home. Jim and Clark came home at
noon from Melancthon and took away seventeen bags of oats to sow. Willie harrowed at his uncle
Sam’s.
17 Beautiful morning, the sun shone strong and warm all day, the first really spring day has came.
Johney plowed, Jim and Clark sowed and harrowed in Melancthon. Willie was at Sam’s.
18 Rather cloudy this morning, the day pretty windy but dry, with the exception of a few drops of rain
near night. Appears like a thunder storm. Jim and Clark worked in Melancthon, John plowed at
home. I went to the back line after supper.
19 Wet morning for a while, a thunder shower at noon. Quite a thunder storm with a rain pour at
night. Clark went to Tossorontio for the cattle. Jim harrowed in Melancthon. John plowed and
picked stones at home. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
<Q3 folio 47 verso>
May 1883
20th Sabbath. Dark gloomy day, cold and raw.
21 Very cold morning, freezing hard through the forenoon, as cold as some days in the winter. Jim
harrowed in the forenoon in Melancthon, and plowed at home in the afternoon. Johney pulled
some brands off the fallow and harrowed afterwards. I sowed oats. The afternoon was wet all
through, a very cold rain at that. Sent first milk to factory. [in margin] Frost. / Brought cattle
home / First milk sent to factory
22 Cold morning, very cold rain came on and kept raining for most of the day. The boys plowed
most of the dry part of the day. I attended Council meeting in Hopeville.
23 Cold raw morning, the forenoon cold and gloomy, the afternoon some sunshine. Jim plowed,
Johney and Clark picked stones and dragged. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
24 Fine morning, the day sunny generally, except a while in the afternoon when it clouded over. Jim
plowed, John harrowed. I sowed about five acres of grass and clover seed.
25 The day dry and sultry, becoming overcast in the afternoon. Jim sowed oats, Clark harrowed,
Johny harrowed. I went to Dundalk in the morning, thence to Lot 31 Melancthon, and from thence
to brother Sam’s. I harrowed a while in the afternoon for him.
26 Dry early in the morning, but the rain soon came on and the day was very wet till 3 PM. Jim har-
rowed some and plowed some. Johney and Clark picked stones. I went to Dundalk in the after-
noon.
203
<Q3 folio 48 recto>
May June 1883
27th Sabbath. Dry day in part, but rather cold.
28 Dry morning, the day dry till about 4 P.M. when there came on a pretty sharp, cold rain. The after
part of the day was cold and wet. I attended a Council meeting at Dundalk in the afternoon. Jim
went to Mr. Oliver’s to log. John and Clark went to Lot 31 Melancthon to cut roads to rails that
are split. I took seven head of cattle to John Gott’s to pasture. I am to pay 0.50¢ each per month
for them. [in margin] Took cattle to / John Gott’s.
29 Dry morning, the day dry all through. I sowed some mixed oats and pease. Willie harrowed. Jim
is at Mr. Oliver’s. John and Clark are trying to get out rails with the oxen,
30 Dry morning, dry in the forenoon, the afternoon very wet. I sowed some oats. Willie harrowed
with one mare. Jim is at Mr. Oliver’s. John and Clark are getting out rails.
31 Dark morning, a slight mizzle of rain fell during the forenoon. The afternoon partly dry. Jim was
working at Oliver’s. John and Clark are taking out rails. Mrs. R. went to Mrs. C. Bell’s in the af-
ternoon. I went to Dundalk.
June [1883]
1st Bright morning, sun out clear, frost on the ground, the day dry and cloudy in the afternoon. I
sowed some oats, Willie harrowed. The boys are working in Melancthon. [in margin] Frost.
2 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and pretty warm. Cloudy in the eavning. I sowed some oats.
Willie harrowed, the other boys were swamping out rails in Melancthon. This has been the
wet[t]est spring I ever remember. The grain is only puddled in. [in margin] Finished / Seeding.
<Q3 folio 48 verso>
June 1883
Working in Melancthon for a week. Kept no record.
10th Sabbath. Dry day generally.
11 Showery morning, the day showery all through. I helped Sam cut potatoes. The boys were getting
out rails in Melancthon.
12 Wet morning, with frequent showers through the day. The boys were getting out rails.
13 Dark morning, the day dry and breezy in the afternoon. I sowed some grass seed in the forenoon
and Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. The boys were getting out rails. I got
$101.00 Sup[erannuation] pension.
14 Frost this morning, the day fine and dry all through. I went to Lot 31 Melancthon to help the boys
to get out rails. [in margin] Frost.
15 Fine morning, the day dry and pretty warm. The boys and I were fencing. Jim came home in the
afternoon and prepared some chop to mill.
16 Beautiful morning, the day very hot all through. John, Clark and I were fencing. Jim took to be
chopped 536 pounds gross, and in the afternoon went to Tom Talbot’s raising.
17th Sabbath. Very warm day, with a sharp shower in the eavning.
18 Rain in the morning, rain in the eavning, dry in the middle of the day. John, Clark and I were get-
ting out stakes. Jim is at home, choring around. Tried to drill up some for turnips but found it too
wet.
<Q3 folio 49 recto>
June 1883
204
19th Dry early in the morning, then dry and wet alternately through the day. John, Clark and I were
getting out stakes for a fence in Melancthon. Jim and Willie went to the mill with a grist. We are
having the loan of one of Brother Sam’s horses as one of our mares has colted. Poor little Hannah
McKay, formerly Hannah Mills, died this morning after suffering in her mind and body for the
past eight or nine months. Took the wheat to Speighton Mills,* ____ Campain, Miller. Got very
poor return, had 32½ bushels, only got 34 pounds to the bushel and a very small portion of bran.
[in margin] Mrs. Hannah McKay / died [* Perhaps also called Speeton Mills, 1.5 miles from
Flesherton; Robert took grist there in 1877.]
20 Misty morning, there was a little rain fell through the day. We were getting out stakes in Melanc-
thon.
21 Cloudy morning, but the day was dry and the afternoon sunny. The boys were getting out stakes.
Mrs. R., Willie, Eliza and I were at Mrs. Hannah McKay’s funeral.
22 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and hot. We were making fence in Melancthon.
23 Sunny day, dry and very warm. John, Clark and I were fencing. Jim went to the mill for some
chop. Also went to the harness makers and got a sett of harness, price: thirty-six dollars.
24th Sabbath. Dry morning, the day dry till near night, when it commenced raining. Mr. Skeffington
Bell and wife were here today.
<Q3 folio 49 verso>
June 1883
25th Some rain fell this morning, then cleared off till about 10 A.M. when it commenced again and kept
pouring for quite a while. Brother Sam and I started to see a farm in Eldersley Township.* We got
as far as Chesley village this day. The country from Hanover to Chesley appears to be a good
farming section. The fall wheat however, is a failure. Pease, grain and clover appear excellent.
[*Elderslie Township, Bruce County.]
26 Rain this morning, but cleared off about 8 A.M. We left Chesley and drove to the place. Did not
like it: too flat and very much cut up with a creek running through it, winding in and out. The
bridge swept away so that we could not get the team into the farm. A good deal of the farm cov-
ered with pine stumps, the bush consists of a good deal of black ash, swales and hemlock. Alto-
gether, the farm is a very poor one. Left the place at noon, came through the Township of Sullivan
to Desboro, 10 miles, thence to Williamsford village 8 miles, thence to Williamsford Station 3
miles, thence to Markdale 9 miles. Stopped there in Breen’s Tavern all night.
27 Fine morning, the day dry all the forenoon. The latter part of the afternoon rainy. Left Markdale
this morning, got home about noon.
28 Dry morning, the day dry all through. Done some Township writing and other chores. The boys
are making slash fence in Melancthon.
29 Bright sunny morning, the day dry. Jim and Clark were underbrushing.
30 Fine morning, the day dry. Jim and Clark were underbrushing. Johney chored around. I was in
Dundalk in the afternoon, collecting cheese money.
<Q3 folio 50 recto>
July 1883
1st Sabbath. Dry day with the exception of a slight shower in the afternoon. Brother Sam and family
were here, also Mr. R. Montgomery and wife.
2 Dry with the exception of a slight shower at noon. We all went to see the pastime at Dundalk.
3 Dry morning, a slight shower in the forenoon, a terrific thunder and lightening storm about 9 P.M.,
accompanied with heavy rain and high wind. I was coming from Council Meeting at Cedarville
205
with Mr. McGregor, Reeve, and we were out in most of the storm. It was the dreadfulest thunder
and lightening I ever witnessed. It was perfectly appalling. [in margin] Terrific Storm
4 Fine morning, wet, the afternoon dry, the ground is fairly saturated with wet. The crops on the low
ground are drowned out, cannot be any good. Jim is spreading manure. John was helpin[g] Sam.
5 Pretty fair day till eavning, when there came on a rain storm. Jim was working at home. John is
helping his uncle Sam.
6 Fine morning, the day fine till about noon, when there came on a rain pour. The afternoon was
dry. Jim was plowing. John was helping his uncle Sam. Mrs. Abraham Jackson visited us.
7 Very rainy morning, the forenoon wet all through, the afternoon dry but a little misty. Mrs. R. and
I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. Jim and John were helping Sam.
8th Sabbath. Dry all all through. Mrs. R. and some of the family drove to Lot 31 Melancthon.
<Q3 folio 50 verso>
July 1883
9th Dry day all through. I was bossing on the Statute Labor. Jim sowed turnip seed in Melancthon.
Clark harrowed, John worked at Sam’s. [in margin] Sowed turnip seed.
10 Dry day all through. I bossed the Statute Labor. Jim and Clark underbrushed. John helped his
uncle Sam.
11 Dry warm day all through. Jim and Clark underbrushed. John helped Sam. I sowed some turnip
seed in the afternoon. [in margin] Sowed turnip seed.
12 Dry morning, but very cloudy and indications of rain, although a heavy dew lay on the grass.
There came on a rain storm in the afternoon. The three eldest boys went to Maxell with the young
Britons* of Dundalk. Jim fifed for them. They are not yet (9. P.M.) home. [*Loyal Orange
Young Britons Association, youth wing of the Loyal Orange Lodge.]
13 Misty morning, the day dry but cool. John helped Sam. [in margin] Cattle to J. Lonsway.
14 Fine morning, the day dry and very warm in the afternoon. The boys hoed amongst the potatoes.
I went to Dundalk in the forenoon.
15th Sabbath. Dry in the morning, showery in the afternoon.
16 Dry throughout the day, a thunder storm threatening at present (9:6) P.M. I took the three boys to
the shanty in the morning and in the afternoon I hoed some potatoes.
17 Dark morning, the day dry, cloudy and windy. The boys are working in Melancthon. I went to
Dundalk in the afternoon.
<Q3 folio 51 recto>
July 1883
18th Dark morning, a little rain fell in the forenoon, the afternoon was dry. The boys are underbrush-
ing. I helped brother Sam to hoe potatoes.
19 Fine morning, the day dry with the exception of a slight shower in the afternoon. The boys were
underbrushing in Melancthon. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. Mrs. Nickle & Miss Sarah Bell
were here in the afternoon.
20 Fine morning, the day dry all through, dark and cloudy in the afternoon, every appearance of rain.
The boys were underbrushing. I cut the tops of thistles.
21 Fine morning, dry throughout the day and extremely hot in the afternoon. Heavy thunder and
lightening at night, accompanied with a rain pour. The Misses Neithercut came here this eavning.
The boys were working in Melancthon.
22nd Sabbath. Dry day all through. Mrs. R. and I were at Brother Sam’s.
23 Dry morning, the day dry all through. The boys were working in Melancthon. I went to Dundalk
in the forenoon and cut the tops of thistles in the afternoon.
206
24 Dark morning, the day cloudy all through, but dry, not much sun. I was cutting thistles. The boys
were swamping cordwood in Melancthon.
25 Bright sunny morning, the day very warm and dry all through. Jim and Clark were swamping
wood. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and Willie and I hoed potatoes in the afternoon.
<Q3 folio 51 verso>
July 1883
26th Bright sunny morning, the day dry and very warm. A slight shower of rain after night fell with
indications of more. Jim and Clark were swamping wood. Johney, Willie and I worked at mould-
ing potatoes.
27 Heavy rain last night, this day cloudy but dry, with a little thunder in the afternoon. Jim and Clark
were swamping wood. I atttended some business in Dundalk.
28 Dry morning, slight rain in the middle of the day, the afternoon dry and cool. Mrs. R., Eliza, Clark
and I went to Tossorontio. Clark hired with his uncle John Russell, 1 month for $20.00.
29th Sabbath. Dry day all through. We went from John Russell’s to John Agnew’s.
30 Dry morning, the day dry but cool. In the morning I got a tongue put in the democrat, as the other
had got broken on Saturday night. We left Brother John’s at 2. P.M. and got home at 7:35 P.M.
Jim commenced making a hay rack. John commenced mowing. [in margin] Commenced haying.
31 Dry morning, the day dry but cool all through. Johney went to his uncle John Agnew’s in Essa this
morning. He is going to work a month for him for $30.00. Jim finished his hay rack. I raked and
put up some hay in the afternoon.
<Q3 folio 52 recto>
August 1883
1st Cloudy morning, with quite a heavy rain last night. The day dry but cloudy and cool. Jim and I
were mowing.
2 Cool and cloudy all day. Jim and Willie took to Dundalk in the forenoon 8 lambs which I had sold
yesterday to E. Ross for $3.12½ each. In the afternoon they raked hay and hauled in. I mowed.
3 Cool cloudy morning, with quite a rainfall last night, enough to prevent the hay from being hauled
in today. The day was very chilly all through. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon, and in the after-
noon Jim and I mowed. [in margin] Subscribed / for Mail.
4 Cold cloudy morning, with a slight mizzle of rain. There had fallen some rain through the night.
The day was cloudy, cool and windy. We raked some hay in the afternoon and hauled it in. It was
pretty green and damp, still we thought it would be best in the barn.
5th Sabbath. Dry morning, the day dry all through. Mrs. R. and Eliza went to Melancthon.
6 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and bright. I mowed and helped to load hay. Jim and the rest
of the family worked at raking and hauling in.
7 Bright sunny morning, the day clear and dry. Mrs. R. and Willie went with the team to Dundalk in
the forenoon. Jim and I mowed. Willie and Eliza raked after dinner.
<Q3 folio 52 verso>
August 1883
8th Bright sunny morning, the day dry and very warm. We brought in two loads of hay in the morn-
ing. I mowed the remainder of the day. Jim went in the afternoon with Josiah Sauder and Miss
Eliza Neithercut to Shelburne and acted Groom’s man for him. [in margin] J. Sauder and E. Nei-
thercut married.
9 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and sunny. We raked hay in the forenoon and hauled in in the
afternoon. Finished hauling in hay today, except what we have to cut around the fences. [in mar-
gin] finished / Haying.
207
10 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and warm. I went to a Council meeting of Melancthon to try to
get paid for building a line fence between my Lot and the Municipality. Jim hauled a load of lum-
ber for John Gott from Dundalk in the forenoon and in the afternoon he mowed.
11 Sunny morning, the day dry and hot, with thunder clouds in the afternoon. I helped brother Sam
rake hay. Jim mowed at home.
12 Sabbath. Bright morning, the day dry and very warm till the afternoon, when there came on a slight
shower of rain. Johney Norval* was here. [*blacksmith in Dundalk].
13 Mizzle of rain this morning, the day dark all through, but scarcely any rain fell. Jim went to Dun-
dalk in the forenoon to get his boots fixed. He and I mowed in the afternoon. Miss Carson &
Miss Sarah Bell were here making a dress. I brought the young cattle home from James Lon-
sway’s.
14 Pretty sharp frost this morning, the day dry and warm. Jim and Willie Paris Greened the potatoes.
Mrs. Sam Russell and [Mrs. R.] took our wool to the carding mill. [in margin] Frost.
<Q3 folio 53 recto>
August 1883
15th Bright sunny morning, the day dry. Jim and I mowed fence corners in the forenoon and in the
afternoon we bunched up hay. There was a frost this morning.
16 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and very hot by spel[l]s. Every appearance of a thunder storm
in the afternoon, but the clouds cleared off about night. Jim and I hauled in the hay that was in the
fence corners and some swale grass in the forenoon. In the afternoon I went to a raising at Mr. Ol-
iver’s, and Jim and his mother finished the hay. Willie went to the Berry marsh.
17 Cloudy morning, the day cloudy, dry and warm. Jim went to N. B. Allen’s, Melancthon, to get our
monkey Wrench. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk and had our Photographs taken.
18 A little rain this morning, and more fell during the day. At night there was a slight thunder storm.
Jim hauled rails for a fence.
19th Sabbath. The day a little cloudy, but very hot in the afternoon. Mrs. R and I went to Lot 31
Melancthon.
20 Cloudy, but very warm. Jim hauled rails in the forenoon and in the afternoon went to Melancthon
for the Beetle & Wedge* and saw. I worked at the Township Books and also went to Dundalk.
[*Beetle, or maul (large wooden hammer, bigger than an axe), used with a wedge, to split wood.]
21 Very fine morning, the day dry and very warm. I attended a Council meeting at Hopeville. Jim
split rails, then helped J. Gott to swing barn doors.
22 Bright morning, but the sun got overcast and there was a thunder storm about 9 A.M. and another
about 6 P.M. Heavy rain. Jim put up a piece of fence in the forenoon, and he hauled some stove
wood home in the afternoon.
<Q3 folio 53 verso>
August 1883
23 Bright morning, the day dry and cool. Jim and I were putting up fence. [in margin] cattle home /
from J. Gott’s.
24 Frost this morning, but I think it done no harm. The day was clear and cool. Jim split some wood
in the forenoon and I entered some orders in L[edge]r Book. In the afternoon we went to Dundalk
to get some pictures taken. [in margin] Frost.
25 Fine morning, the day dry and cool. Jim and I were thinning turnips on Lot 31 Melancthon. Hen-
ry Lonsway and wife were here this evening. [in margin] Frost.
26th Sabbath. Bright cool day all through, frost in the morning. Phoebe and Sam were here today.
27 Frost this morning, the day cold and clear. Jim and I were thinning out turnips.
208
28 Cool morning, the day dark and cool. Jim and I were swamping out cordwood with the oxen.
29 Bright warm day. Jim and I were swamping cordwood.
30 Bright warm morning, the day dry and very hot, especially in the afternoon. Jim and I were
swamping cordwood.
31 Very warm day in the forenoon. The latter part of the afternoon was a little wet. Jim and I
swamped cordwood. [Six lines of text crossed out: Brother William who had been away for sev-
enteen years in the States paid us a visit accompanied with his wife. We were all very much sur-
prised and agreeably so. Time has worked a great change in his personal appearance and voice. I
scarcely recognized him.]
<Q3 folio 54 recto>
September 1883
1st Pretty warm day, a slight shower of rain in the afternoon. Jim and I swamped out cordwood.
Brother William accompanied by his wife paid us a long expected visit. He has been away in the
States for seventeen years. I would scarcely have known either his personal appearance or voice,
time has changed him so much!
2nd Sabbath The forenoon dry, the afternoon wet. Brother William, with his wife, and Nancy and I
visited Sam’s.
3 Dry day but cool. Jim got home from Tossorontio. He had went away yesterday for John. Johney
came with him. Willie and I went to Dundalk. Hard frost in the middle of the night, none in the
morning. [in margin] Frost.
4 Very cold morning, the day cold all through. The afternoon showery. We visited at W. Lonsway’s.
5 Cool day. We visited at Sam’s. Very wet in the afternoon.
6 Dry day all through. Brother William and wife & I and Nancy visited at Mrs. C. Bell’s in the af-
ternoon. [in margin] First pease / pulled / first / harvesting.
7 Dark morning, a little rain in the morning, very showery through the day, and especially so in the
afternoon. We went to Dundalk to have our likenesses taken, but the artist had not all his imple-
ments with him so we were disappointed.
8 Cold, rain all through, very nasty day.
9th Sabbath. Cold morning, the day cold all through. Brother John brought up son Clark, who had been
working for him.
<Q3 folio 54 verso>
September 1883
10th Very severe frost this morning, never seen the like at this time of the year. All kinds of grain ap-
pear to be injured, don’t see well how how anything could escape. The crops are very green on
account of the wet spring and summer. It’s deplorable to contemplate the harm that one night’s
frost can do! Jim and Johney, with team, done three day’s Statute Labor for their uncle John Ag-
new in Dundalk. Brothers William, John and I went to Dundalk in the forenoon. We had a small
party here this night on Brother William’s account, who is leaving tomorrow for Brother John’s.
There were Mrs. C. Bell and her daughter Sarah, Mr. Walter Bell and wife, Mr. Skeffington Bell
and wife, Mr. William Lonsway and wife, and brother Samuel and wife, also brother John. [in
margin] Fearful frost.
11 Another frost this morning, the day bright and warm. Brother John and Brother William and wife,
Clark, Nancy and I went to Brother John’s today. The boys pulled pease at home. [in margin]
Frost
12 Fine morning, the day clear and bright all through. Brother John & wife, Brother William & wife,
Cousin May Murphy, Nancy and I went to Alliston and had our likenesses taken in a group.
209
13 Dry morning, but the afternoon was rainy. Brother John loaded up his reaper, after putting it in
working order, for me to fetch home.
14 Dry morning, the day dry and very hot. We bade farewell to Brother William and wife and started
for home. It may be a long farewell, perhaps a last farewell, but I hope not.
<Q3 folio 55 recto>
September 1883
15th Dry morning, the day very hot and dry. Jim & John put the reaper together this morning, assisted
by John Agnew, who came here last evening. They then hitched the horses to it. They done passi-
bly well, it being their first time on a reaper. Jim cut about six acres of grain.
16th Sabbath. Dry in the forenoon, the afternoon a little wet. John Agnew and his daugher Annie left
for home about 1 P.M. Mrs. R. and I went to Brother Sam’s in the afternoon.
17 Dry morning, the day dry all through. Jim and I bound oats and wheat. I helped Henry Lonsway
in the afternoon. Johney craddled at Jim Lonsway’s. Clark came home from Brother John’s and
reports that Brother William and his wife left Alliston for Tennessee this morning.
18 Fine dry morning, but another frost. However, things are past being injured as any grain that could
be frozen was frozen on the night of the tenth inst. The day was very dry. Johney craddled. Clark
and I tied wheat in the forenoon, and Jim reaped. We hauled pease into the Barn in the afternoon.
19 Dry morning, the day dry all through, but cloudy. Jim reaped. John and Clark and I hauled in
pease. Also hauled in three loads of oats at night. We had brother Sam’s team all day.
20 Cloudy morning, the day dark and lowering. A slight rain fell about noon and a good deal heavier
rain came on about 5:30 P.M. The boys and I helped Brother Sam to harvest.
<folo 55 verso September 1883>
21st Cloudy morning and the day threatened rain, but none of any account fell. Jim was reaping at
Sam’s. Sam was hauling in for us. Some of us hauled in, and some of us mowed some oats that
were down.
22 Fine morning, the day dry, clear and warm. Jim reaped till tea time, then hauled in. Johney, Clark
and Willie hauled in with the oxen from morning till tea time. I tied oats & wheat.
23rd Sabbath. Cloudy day, but dry all through.
24 A slight sprinkling of rain fell this morning early, the sky was lowering all through the forenoon.
A slight rain about 2 P.M., which increased to a regular pour about 5 P.M. The boys were hauling
in wheat and oats to the Barn during the dry time of the day. When it came on rain they hauled in
some oats from the back end of one of the fields to the Barn yard, and stooked them up there, the
object being to clear the field for the cattle. I was binding oats.
25 Dark rainy morning, the day generally showery. The boys hauled in some oats from the back field
and stooked them around the Barn. In the afternoon Jim took the reaper to Melancthon. I worked
at the Treasurer’s Books. Johney hauled a few drags of wood for J. Gott with his oxen.
26 Dry morning, and the day continued dry but cloudy. We were reaping oats on the Melancthon
place. They are very badly straw broken and lodged, the worst lodged of any grain I ever seen,
and it is almost impossible to cut them. Johney craddled some wheat. Both oats and wheat are
badly frozen.
<Q3 folio 56 recto>
September 1883
27th Dry morning, but indications of rain. The afternoon pretty windy and rain began falling about
5:30 P.M. Johney, Willie and I hauled in loose oats. They were rather damp, but we wanted the
field cleared for the cattle. We had brother Sam’s team. Jim and Clark are reaping in Melancthon.
210
I bought a colt from Brother Sam for $40.00. It is about three months and a half old. Mrs. Emma
Reid was helping Mrs. R. to quilt a fancy quilt. [in margin] Bought Sam’s colt.
28 Dark morning and quite cold, a shower of sleet fell about 9:90 A.M. The afternoon was dry. Mrs.
R. and I tied wheat. Willie and Eliza shocked it. The other boys were harvesting on the Melanc-
thon Lot.
29 Heavy frost this morning, a shower of sleet came on about 10 A.M., then it turned to a fine rain
and kept steadily to it during the remainder of the day. John, Willie and I hauled in two loads of
oats and two of wheat during the dry time of the day. John and Clark were working in Melanc-
thon.
30th Sabbath. Dark morning, the day cold but dry.
October [1883]
1st Dry morning, the day dry and clear, but cloudy in the afternoon. I went to Dundalk in the fore-
noon. Johney reaped, Jim craddled. Clark and I tied. Mrs. R. helped to tie some.
2 Wet morning, the afternoon dry. I shocked up oats in the forenoon and bound a little in the after-
noon. Johney finished reaping our field. Jim and the other two went to Melancthon to harvest in
the afternoon. Eliza Russell, Bob* & horses came here this eavning. [*brother John’s wife, Eliza
Agnew Russell, and their son Bob (Robert A.); horses is not clearly written, but later reference is
made to his team of horses. ]
<Q3 folio 56 verso>
October 1883
3rd Chilly morning, the day cold and the afternoon windy. There was a shower of snow in the fore-
noon which whitened the ground. Mrs. R. and I tied oats. The boys mowed oats in Melancthon.
4 Very heavy frost this morning, the ground perfectly hard. We were binding oats and some of us
hauling in. Brother John’s Bob helped us. There was so much frost on the sheaves that our rakes
were coated over as with snow. Mrs. R. went to the Agricultural Show Fair, Dundalk, and placed
on exhibit a fancy Quilt, [a] Peck Potatoe[s], Onions, Five pounds Buttter, and a loaf of bread.
5 Heavy frost this morning, but the sun got out bright, and the day was pleasant, though cool. We
hauled in twelve loads of oats in the forenoon, two teams, John’s Bob helped with his, this finished
harvesting in Proton. In the afternoon we all went to the Show Fair. Mrs. R.’s Fancy Quilt and
onions took first prizes.
6 Fine morning, the day dry all through. The three eldest boys harvested in Melancthon. Bob and
his mother went home.
7th Sabbath. Very fine morning, the day beautiful, almost like Indian Summer.
8 Dry morning, but dark, the forenoon fair, the afternoon a little wet. We were tieing oats in
Melancthon. Mrs. R., Phoebe, & Willie went to the carding mill for the yarn.
9 Dry morning, the day splendid till night, when there came on a rain storm with some thunder and
lightening. We started to haul in, in the afternoon, to a stack. Got twelve loads in, then the rain
put a stop to [MS: till] the work.
<Q3 folio 57 recto>
October 1883
10th Wet morning, the forenoon pretty wet, and slightly showery in the afternoon. The boys finished
mowing the tangled oats in Melancthon. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
11 Dark morning, but no rain, the sun got out about 10 A.M. and the day was dry. We took up 43
Bags of potatoes and put them in the cellar.
12 Rainy, generally, throughout the day. John was at Walter Bell’s threshing in the afternoon.
211
13 Cloudy morning, the afternoon very wet. John was at Walter Bell’s threshing in the forenoon. Mr.
& Mrs. Campbell from Bentinck Township were here today and stopped all night. Jim went with
him to hunt up six head of cattle that had strayed out of the tavern keeper’s field where he had put
them.
14th Sabbath. Wet forenoon, the afternoon dry. Campbell and wife left here about nine in the forenoon,
and on their way up the road they got their cattle in Jim Best’s field.
15 Dry morning, the day dry all through. Jim was plowing, John and Clark were picking stones. I
was threshing.
16 Very hard frost this morning. I attended Council meeting at Dundalk. The boys were harvesting
in Melancthon.
17 Hard frost in the morning, the day dry. We were hauling in oats in Melancthon, putting them in
stack. Two teams in the forenoon, and three teams in the afternoon.
<Q3 folio 57 verso>
October 1883
18th Dry morning, the day [dry] till near night, when it began to rain and continued so doing during the
most of the night. We were stacking oats in Melancthon. Just finished harvesting today. A long,
tough job we had at it. Began about the 4th of September. The grain in Melancthon was badly
broken down, and had to mow good deal of it. [in margin] finished harvesting.
19 Wet in the early morning, the afternoon dark and lowering, the afternoon dry. Jim went to Dun-
dalk in the afternoon, the others hauled Jim and Willie’s potatoes into the cellar. I thrashed pease
in the afternoon.
20 Dry morning, the day chilly all through. Jim and Johney plowed with the horses and oxen. Clark
and I cleaned pease in the forenoon, then Clark chored around, and I and Mrs. R. went to Dundalk.
[in margin] Ground white with snow.
21st Sabbath. Rather chilly morning, the day pretty cold all through. Brother Sam and wife and family
were here today.
22 Hard frost this morning, the day cold. Jim and John plowed. Jim went to Dundalk at night and got
a shoe put on the black mare. Thos. Mitchel[l] and Mrs. John Gott were here. Clark and Willie
picked potatoes out of pit at Sam’s.
23 Dark morning, but the day was dry though cool. John was with the team at James Lonsway’s
thrashing. Clark [stricken text: and Willie sorted potatoes at] plowed some, and hauled some rub-
bish off the street.* Jim went to Thos. Mitchel[l] to pay back time. [*clearly written street, but
meaning unclear.]
<insert> [Between folios 57 verso and 58 recto, two leaves (3 pages written, one blank) of an account
ledger, Payment and Receipts, May through December 1883. Includes personal expenses, cloth-
ing, salaries, bank payments of interest, newspaper subscriptions, cheese payments, etc.] </insert>
<Q3 folio 58 recto>
October 1883
24th Dark morning, the day fine and mild, but no sunshine. Jim was at Tom Mitchel[l]’s, Johney at Jim
Lonsway’s, with the team, threshing. Clark plowed. I worked at the Township books. An old
woman, phemale* tramp, stopped here tonight. [*not clearly written=female?]
25 Dark morning, the day dry, but chilly in the afternoon. John and Clark were at H. Lonsway’s
threshing. I worked at the cheese Book in the forenoon, and in the afternoon Mrs. R and I went to
Dundalk. I purchased 59 pounds of cheese at 10½ ¢ per lb.*, and one barell of flour @ $5.00 per
brl. [*the flour shows up in ledger, noted above, but no entry for cheese; cost of cheese must be
deducted from payment due from factory.]
212
26 Fine morning, the day beautiful all through. I think it must be Indian summer. John and Clark
were at Henry Lonsway’s thrashing. Jim was paying back time to John Oliver. I opened up some
water furrows. W. Lonsway slept here this night.
27 Beautiful morning, the sky hazy like Indian summer, the day fine all through. Jim opened some
water furrows in the forenoon and in the afternoon went to John Gott’s threshing with the team.
John and Clark were at H. Lonsway’s threshing in the forenoon, and Johney was at John Gott’s in
the afternoon. I went to Melancthon Lot to see how the stacks were keeping. Came home and ti-
died up the barn preparatory to threshing. The threshing machine came here at night. We sent our
last milk to the cheese factory for the season this day. [in margin] Threshers came / Factory milk
stopped.
28th Sabbath. Fine day all through, dry and pretty mild.
29 Slight mizzle of rain this morning, which kept increasing, and the day, especially the afternoon,
was very wet. We commenced threshing but had to quit at noon on account of the rain.
<Q3 folio 58 verso>
October 1883
30th Wet showery forenoon, high wind, the afternoon dry and very windy. Headwind against us at
threshing. We hitched some of the horses on in the morning, but took them off again on account
of the rain. We threshed in the afternoon.
31 A slight shower of sleet in the morning, but the forenoon was dry, and pretty windy during the
afternoon. There were frequent showers of snow. We finished threshing at noon. Jim Johnson
and Henry Nichol stopped in the afternoon and helped to put in straw. I had a very poor yield of
grain, and that of the most inferior quality, frozen and dam[p], except the pease which were dry
and not frozen. I think it will be about 11 bushels of wheat to the acre, the worst froze wheat I
have ever seen in my life. There will be about 25 bushels of oats to the acre, frozen badly, and
about 10 bushels pease to the acre. A poor yield, poor quality, and bad in every way. Another
year’s such miserable crop would parch the corns pretty hard. [parch and corns are not clearly
legible; meaning?]
November [1883]
1st Ground covered with snow eight inches deep, and more snow falling, a regular winter’s day. The
boys put straw in during the forenoon. In the afternoon I attended a Council meeting.
2nd Sloppy, nasty day. John and Clark put straw into the barn, and then chored around. Jim was at T.
Mi[t]chel[l]’s chopping Bee.
3 Sloppy, nasty day again! The snow melting and rain falling sometimes. John was at Mr. Nichol’s
threshing. Clark was at D. Reid’s threshing. Jim chored around. I went to Dundalk in the after-
noon.
<Q3 folio 59 recto>
November 1883
4th Sabbath. Fine day all through. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway visited us today.
5 Dry in the forenoon, and wet in the afternoon. Clark was at Dan Reid’s threshing. John was at H.
Johnson’s threshing. Jim and I cleaned some grain. I put the hogs up to fat. [in the margin] Hogs
put up to fat.
6 Fine day all through. The boys cleaned up oats, ground their axes, etc.
7 Fine day all through. The boys are working in Melancthon, piling wood. I worked at the Town-
ship Books.
8 Mild day, but very sloppy. The boys were working in Melancthon. I chored around home and
went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
213
9 Very wet forenoon, the afternoon showery also. The boys were working in Melancthon.
10 Fine mild day all through. The boys were working in Melancthon. Willie and I took to Dundalk
655 Gross of frozen wheat to get chopped. I butchered a spring pig in the afternoon, and at night
went to Walter Bell’s and drew a Lease between him and Peter Doner.
11th Sabbath. Beautiful day from morning till night. At dark there came on a heavy wind and snow
storm.
12 Stormy morning, blowing, snowing and freezing, the day rough and cold all through. Jim went to
William Lonsway’s threshing. The others stopped at home and tended the cattle.
<Q3 folio 59 verso>
November 1883
13th Very stormy day all through. Snowing, blowing and freezing. Jim was at W. Lonsway’s threshing.
John and Clark were at home. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
14 Another stormy morning, the day blowing and snowing. John and Clark started for the shanty.
Willie drove them out. I fixed up things a little at home. Miss Sarah Bell is stopping here tonight.
15 Cold morning, the day cold all through. Snowing in the afternoon and blowing a terrific gale at 10
P.M. The boys were underbrushing. I was at H. Johnson’s threshing[? writing very cramped]
16 Cold stormy day all through. The boys were underbrushing. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
17 Pretty chilly morning, the day cold on till night, when it got milder. The boys were underbrushing.
I worked at the factory books in the forenoon, and in the afternoon went to Dundalk and paid the
patrons.* Mrs. Broughton & husband were here at night. [*cheese factory patrons]
18th Sabbath. Mild day. Mrs. R. and I went to Br. Sam’s.
19 Another mild day, the snow dissappearing, sleighing about gone. Jim took the boys’ oats to Dun-
dalk and sold them for .29 & .28¢ per bushel. There were 87 Bushels in the two loads which he
took in. They had 13 Bushels left and I bought them at the same price.
20 Still thawing, sleighing gone, raw through the day. Jim & John went with their mother to Dundalk
and purchased clothes with their oat money. Clark was at Brother Sam’s threshing.
<Q3 folio 60 recto>
November 1883
21st Raining in the forenoon, a little showery in the afternoon. Jim and John went to the shanty. Clark
was at Sam’s threshing. This night was very windy and on towards morning it blew a regular hur-
ricane.
22 Dry morning, the day dry all through. The boys were working in Melancthon. I went to Dundalk
in the afternoon.
23 Mild day all through. The snow has disappeared and the roads are in a fearful state of mud. The
boys were underbrushing.
24 Mild morning, the snow all gone except a little in the fence corners. Willie and I put out some
manure on the garden, and then plowed it under. The boys were working in Melancthon.
25th Sabbath. Pretty mild day all through. John Irvin’s ram and ours had a battle yesterday, and ours
killed him.
26 Wet morning, the day very wet all through. The boys cleaned some pease, and Jim took the cross-
cut saw to John Gott’s in the eavning to be fixed.
27 Cold frosty morning, the ground hard and very rough. The day was pretty chilly, with a little sun-
shine. Willie took the boys to the shanty and brought home a little stove wood. In the afternoon
he took the oxen and hauled wood for J. Gott.
28 Cold day all through, strong wind and freezing. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk. I got two teeth
drawn and Mrs. R. got one filled.
214
<Q3 folio 60 verso>
November 1883
29 Pretty chilly morning, but not so cold as yesterday. Snow came on about dark, and it is now,
(10:20) P.M., snowing pretty briskly. Willie and I ground our axe at H. Lonsway’s in the morning,
and in the afternoon Willie yoked up the oxen and hauled home drags of wood. Mrs. Nichol &
daughter, and Mrs. Lonsway, were here in the afternoon, and Mr. Nichol came about dark. Mrs. R.
and I went to see Mrs. C. Bell, who is sick, at night. The boys are working in Melancthon.
30 Cold day all through. A slight snow falling most of the day. The boys are chopping in Melanc-
thon.
December [1883]
1st Milder than yesterday, a little snow fell in the forenoon. The afternoon was soft, like another
thaw. The boys were chopping cordwood. Mrs. R., Eliza and Willie went with the team to Dun-
dalk in the forenoon, and I went in the afternoon on foot.
2nd Sabbath. Some snow fell during the day, pretty cold weather. Mrs. R. and I went to see Mrs. C.
Bell in the afternoon.
3 Pretty sharp morning, the day generally cold. Willie took the boys and their provisions to the
shanty in the morning. In the afternoon he and I cleaned up some wheat.
4 Mild morning, the day mild all through, with some snow falling at night. The boys are chopping
cordwood. Willie and Eliza visited at Mr. Nichol’s. There is a feeble old man named William
Conners or O’Conners stopping here tonight. Says he came from Durham and is on his way to
some township near Madoc. I hardly think he will ever reach it, he is so feeble. Seems also to be
wandering in his mind.
<Q3 folio 61 recto>
December 1883
5th Mild morning, the day mild all through. The sleighing about gone, pretty good waggoning. I went
to Dundalk and got a shoe on one of the mares, then transacted some other business. The boys are
cutting cordwood. Jim came home this eavning to go to the grist mill tomorrow.
6 Very mild morning, and the day extremely fine. Jim took eight bushels of very bad frozen spring
wheat to Speighton mills. Got only 215 pounds flour, could not expect any more. The worst fro-
zen wheat I ever raised. John and Clark are cutting cordwood.
7 Wet morning, the day rainy all through. Mrs. R. took Jim and some provisions to Melancthon,
then went to Dundalk and bought a barrrel of flour at $5.25.
8 Pretty cold morning, the day chilly, with a slight snow fall in the afternoon. The boys were chop-
ping cordwood. Brother John is here tonight, came about 10 P.M. I went to see Mr. J Duncan
about cutting some oat sheaves. From thence I went to Dundalk and done some Township busi-
ness. At night Mrs. R and I went to see A. Lonsway, who is suffering through a fall.
9th Sabbath. Pretty chilly day all through. A little snow falling now and then.
10 Raw cold morning, the day windy. The roads are extremely rough and hard. The boys are at the
shanty. Brother John is stopping here tonight.
11 Pretty chilly morning, high wind and snow storm in the afternoon. The boys are working in
Melancthon. Brother John left for home early this morning. I went to Dundalk in the eavning.
<Q3 folio 61 verso>
December 1883
12th Pretty cold day all through, wind strong and cold. The boys came home this eavning. Mrs. R.
took the team for them.
215
13 Mild morning, the day mild all through, but pretty windy in the afternoon. We butchered four
hogs. Clark took in a cord of two feet, dry cedar to Dundalk and sold it for $1.50. He then bought
a coat and vest for $7.25. Mr. A. Lonsway and wife were here this afternoon.
14 Cold morning, some snow fell during the day, strong wind and a very keen freeze towards night.
Jim was at Mr. T. Carson’s wood bee. John and Clark cut stove wood in the Sugar bush. They
came on two racoons and captured them.
15 Very cold morning, the day piercing sharp all through. Mr. John Duncan cut oat sheaves for us in
the afternoon. He was cutting about two hours.
16th Sabbath. Cold day all through. Mrs. R. and I visited at William Lonsway’s.
17 Cold day, a little snow fell now and then. The boys were getting out dry cedar and Jim hauled
some to Dundalk.
18 Another cold day, blowing and snowing, especially in the afternoon. John and Clark were cutting
stove wood. Jim hauled two loads to Dundalk.
19 Sharp morning, the afternoon something milder. Mr. John Duncan was cutting oat sheaves for us.
Cut about six hours today, and two hours on Saturday and charged four dollars.
<Q3 folio 62 recto>
December 1883
20th Cold morning, the day pretty cold all through. Jim took a cord of short hardwood to Dundalk and
sold it to Dr. Griffin for $1.50. In the afternoon he took a cord and [a] quarter of dry cedar to J. J.
Middleton, and put it in on Willie’s clothes, and paid for a cap for him. John took in a cord of dry
cedar (short wood) and sold it to Dr. Griffin for $1.50. Clark hauled to the house with the oxen
some stove wood. I worked at the Township accounts.
21 Pretty chilly morning, the day cold all through. Jim took in two loads of saw logs to the mill.
John and Clark split some firewood at the house.
22 Very cold morning, the day bitterly cold from morning till night. Jim hauled the lumber (620) feet
to Lot 31 Melancthon. John and Clark skidded up some logs. I went to Dundalk and done some
business.
23rd Sabbath. Extremely cold morning, the day very windy and freezing quite sharp.
24 Milder than the preceeding days, rather inclined to a softness. The sleighing pretty fair. The boys
went to Melancthon and fixed a place for the straw when it is threshed. The rest of us went to
Dundalk. Took in 53 pounds butter and sold it on account to J. J. Middleton at .18¢ per pound,
making $9.54.
25 Mild morning, the day mild all through. The snow soft, almost like a thaw. Jim went in the early
part of the day to Mr. J. Neithercut's party. The others of the family, old and young, except myself,
went to Dundalk after dinner. I went at night to see sister Margaret and her little ones. They have
diptheria, but are getting better. John Irvin and nephew dined with us today.
<Q3 folio 62 verso>
December 1883
26th Mild morning, the day mild all through. Jim was at Joseph Neithercut’s Bee with the team. John
and Clark went to Melancthon to chop cordwood. John Gott came here tonight and got me to
make him out a Bill of lumber for Patrick Conner’s Barn.
27 Soft morning, some snow falling in the forenoon. Blowing and snowing in the afternoon, very
cold at night. The boys were working in Melancthon. I bagged up twelve bags of frozen wheat,
took it to the Mill, and got it chopped. Paid ten cents a bag for chopping. Sold the chop to Mr.
Morgan for a cent a pound. The worth of it out in flour at $5.40 per barrel.
216
28 Very sharp morning, the forenoon generally pretty cold, the afternoon something milder. The boys
are working in Melancthon. Mrs. R. went to see sister Margaret who has diptheria. I went to
Dundalk.
29 Pretty mild morning, the day not very cold. The boys were working in Melancthon. I went to
Dundalk on Township business.
30th Sabbath. Snow falling this morning, and a good deal fell through the day. The afternoon was mild.
Brother Sam and wife were here.
31st Mild day, good sleighing, a little snow falling through the day. Jim started to haul cordwood to
Dundalk. John was at Walter Bell’s sawing. I went to Dundalk, purchased three small swine for
$3.00. Transacted some Township business. The old year is drawing to a close and so also are the
most of us. Our crops have been rather poor this year, owing to the frost. It is a hard like winter
for the majority farmers. We have had our health. Who will live to see another year close?
<end of Quire 3>
217
Volume 2
1 Jan. 1884-31 Oct. 1887
See the Preface to Volume 1 for editorial conventions, and a list of variant spellings. Modern foliation
of the 120 folios in volume 2 (added in 2018) is noted in this transcription inside angle brackets
(e.g.<folio 2 recto>) preceding the running title found on each manuscript page. For details on front
and back matter (pasted-in excerpts, sketches, recipes), and physical description of the volume, see the
material description of the diaries, circulated separately.
<folio 1 recto>
<tipped-in sketch of orchard>
North of map
Diagram of Fruit Trees planted on Lot 215 Proton May 5th 1887
Toronto + Sydenham Road
<end of tipped-in sketch>
<title>
Robert Russell’s
Diary
Proton Township
Co. Grey, Ontario
January 1
st
1884
</title>
<pasted-in poem from newspaper column on upper right corner>
<folio 1 verso>
<pasted-in, 3 columns of poetry from newspaper>
<folio 2 recto>
January 1884
[first entry obscured by pasted-in part-column of newspaper poem]
[1st. . .]ning, the day generally fine, the afternoon [. . .] sharp frost. Jim was hauling cordwood [. . .
Dunda]lk, Clark was cooking for him, Johney, [. . .] I butchered two hogs. In the afternoon Willie
took the oxen and sleigh and brought home three swine.
2 Cold morning, the day pretty stormy, especially in the afternoon, blowing, snowing, and freezing.
The boys were working in Melancthon. Clark came home this afternoon to go to school tomor-
row. Chris. Johnson was here this eavning.
3 Very cold morning, the day bitterly cold all through, snowing, Blowing, and freezing. The wind
very high. John and Jim are in Melancthon. Clark started to school. Willie and Eliza inte[n]ded
going but it was too cold. [in margin] Very cold.
4 Fearfully cold this morning, the day a regular sneezer all through, high wind and a piercing frost,
would almost chill the marrow of one’s bones. Jim and John are in Melancthon, Clark was at
school. I went to Dundalk in the eavning. [in margin] Cold.
218
5 Cold morning, the day pretty sharp all through, but not so cold as yesterday, not much wind. Jim
was hauling wood to Dundalk. John was chopping. Clark was choring around home. I was work-
ing at the Treasurer’s Books. [in margin] Cold.
6th Sabbath. Another very cold day, keen freeze from morning till night. [in margin] cold.
<folio 2 verso>
January 1884
7th Sharp morning, keen freeze, the day very cold from morning till night. John was hauling wood. I
went to Dundalk to the Municipal Election. [in margin] Cold.
8 Another cold day, blowing, snowing and freezing. A good deal of snow fell in the afternoon. Jim
was hauling wood. Clark was at school. Johney is chopping & cooking on Lot 31 Melanc[thon].
[in margin] Cold.
9 Blowing, snowing and freezing this morning, the day very rough all through. Jim and Johney are
working in Melancthon. Clark is at Daniel Reid’s threshing. Willie and Eliza are at school. [in
margin] Stormy.
10 Sharp morning, the day cold all through and pretty windy. Jim and John were at the shanty. Clark
was at Daniel Reid’s threshing. Willie and Eliza were at school.
11 Another cold morning, the day cold, snowing, blowing and freezing. Jim and John were working
in Melancthon. Clark and Willie were at school. [in margin] Stormy
12 Cold morning, the day pretty cold all through, a little snow falling occassionally. Jim and John
were working at cordwood. Clark was at John Irvin’s threshing. Willie yoked up the oxen and
went to Melancthon for a load of stove wood. [in margin] cold.
<folio 3 recto>
January 1884
13th Sabbath. Rather milder today, a good deal of snow fell and a few drops of rain at night. Mrs.
Robert Oliver of Melancthon died this afternoon. [in margin] Mrs. R. Oliver died.
14 Snowing this morning, and a good deal fell through the day. Not such a keen frost as some of the
days past. Jim and John were in Melancthon at the cordwood, the other three were at school. I
helped John Irvin put in straw.
15 Pretty cold morning, the day cold all through and a very sharp freeze at night. Mrs. R., Jim, John,
Eliza and I were at Mrs. Oliver’s funeral.
16 Cold day all through, snowing and blowing. I went to Dundalk and sold the cordwood at $2 75/100
per cord. The boys were in Melancthon preparing for threshing.
17 Another cold morning, but not so sharp as yesterday. We were threshing in Melancthon, two
teams were hauling home the grain. [in margin] Birthday.
18 Cold stormy morning, the roads very badly drifted, almost impassible, the day blowing and snow-
ing some. We finished threshing in Melancthon, the grain is of a very poor quality, frozen when
growing, wet and dried a dozen or more times before [dittog.: before] stacked, wet and frozen in
the stacks. There is not a bushel of it merchantibel [=merchantible] at the present. There are
about 500 bushels oats and 30 bushels wheat.
19 Something milder this morning, the day got sharp towards night. Sam and the boys fetched two
loads of oats from Melancthon. Mrs. George Broughten & Husband were here a little time at
night. [in margin] R. Montgomery of Proton died.
<folio 3 verso>
January 1884
20th Sabbath. Cold day all through.
219
21 Sharp morning, a very keen freeze through the day. Exceedingly cold at night. I attended a coun-
cil meeting at Dundalk. Jim hauled two loads of oats from Melancthon. Brother John and his son
Robert with their team came to help us haul wood. A. G. Hunter of Dundalk offered to act as
treasurer of Proton for $50.00 per year. The council refused him and retained me at $75. per an-
num.
22 Sharp morning, but the day was not so cold as yesterday, the wind pretty strong. Some snow fell
and there was a good deal of drifting, the roads are in some places impassible. The boys with their
uncle John is fixing a place in Melancthon for their team. Jim hauled a load of oats home in the
afternoon.
23 Snowing, Blowing, and freezing all through the day. The Boys are fixing a stable in Melancthon.
24 Very cold morning, the day cold all through, exceedingly so. The boys and Brother John were
working in Melancthon. [in margin] Cold.
25 Sharp morning, the day cold from morning till night. The boys and John were working in Melanc-
thon.
26 Sharp morning, the middle of the day not very cold. The roads very heavy. John and Jim hauled
wood to Dundalk. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
27th Sabbath. Pretty chilly day all through. Brother John & Bob, Willie Lonsway and family were
here.
<folio 4 recto>
January 1884
28th Pretty sharp morning, the roads very heavy this morning, the day somewhat milder in the after-
noon. The Boys and Brother John with his son Robert is getting out wood in Melancthon. Clark
was at Nichol’s threshing. Mrs. R. visited Mrs. C. Bell.
29 Mild morning, the day mild all through, some indications of a thaw. All the force, with the excep-
tion of the three youngest, are in Melancthon.
30 Thaw this morning, rain falling and the day was wet all through. The boys and John and Bob are
in Melancthon. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon. [in margin] Thaw.
31 Cold, raw wind in the morning, the day cold all through with a slight snow fall. Brother John
came here and stopped all night. Mrs. John Gott and family were here in the afternoon. The boys
were working at the cordwood.
February
1 Pretty sharp morning, the day cold but a good deal of sunshine. John left for home this forenoon.
The boys are working at the cordwood.
2 Rather mild this morning, but the wind arose and it commenced to snow and drift, making the
roads very heavy. I went to Melancthon and helped cut some stove wood. I stopped there all
night. The boys were hauling wood to the station, and Johney was swamping out with the oxen.
<folio 4 verso>
February 1884
3rd Sabbath. Heavy snow fall this morning. It cleared off about 10 A.M. I stopped at the shanty till 2
P.M. then came to Sam’s and from there home. Josiah Sauder and wife and two Miss Neithercuts
were here.
4 Pretty sharp morning, the day cold all through. The boys are working at the cordwood. They took
Eight head of young cattle to Melancthon to eat the straw there.
5 Milder this forenoon, the afternoon a little sharp. The boys are working at the wood.
6 Mild forenoon, the day generally mild. The boys are working at the wood. I went to Dundalk in
the afternoon.
220
7 Another mild morning, the day pleasant till the afternoon, when it got sharper. Mrs. R. and I paid
a visit to Mr. Walter Nichol at night. Boys are working at the wood.
8 Very mild morning, the day pleasant all through with a decided tendancy to a thaw. The Boys are
working at the wood.
9 Mild morning, the day mild all through with a slight fall of snow. The boys were hauling wood. I
went to Dundalk in the afternoon. [in margin] Posted letter to Br. William
10th Sabbath. Mild day all through. Mrs. R. and I visited at Mr. Walter Bell’s.
<folio 5 recto>
February 1884
11th Pretty cold morning, the day chilly all through. Johney and Bob went to Melancthon to swamp
wood with the oxen. Jim is laid up with a cold.
12 Mild forenoon, but the afternoon was windy with a good fall of sleet which turned to rain towards
morning. The two boys are swamping wood. The Township auditors (T. Hanbury & J. Binkley)
audited my books.
13 Rain falling early this morning, a shower of snow about 10 A.M., the afternoon fine. Jim took the
teams to Melancthon, he and Bob and Brother Sam hauled cordwood to Dundalk. Mrs. R. was at a
quilting at Mrs. Lonsway’s [minutely written].
14 Very stormy morning, the day snowing, blowing and freezing all through. The boys are hauling
cordwood. Mrs. R. helped Sister Margaret to quilt.
15 Mild day all through, quite a change from yesterday. The boys were at the cordwood. I went to
Dundalk and done some business.
16 Pretty sharp morning, the day got milder as it advanced, the afternoon was rather softly inclined.
The boys finished hauling cordwood. There are 77 cords. The double pile is 154 feet long and 8
feet hight [sic]. I was in Dundalk [MS dundalk]. [in margin] Finished hauling c. wood.
17th Sabbath. Mild day all through, fall of snow at night.
18 A quantity of soft snow this morning, the day soft, like a thaw. Got the wood measured. Was cut
2 cords the measurement and 2 cords for culls. Got pay for 73 cords. Jim helped Sam today.
Brother John came here at night. Mr. Lonsway & wife were here this afternoon.
<folio 5 verso>
February 1884
19th Soft morning, the day soft all through, with high wind and rain at about 8:30 P.M. We cleaned up
57 20/34 bushels of oats. Jim took them to Dundalk, got .28 1/2 p. Bushel. They were very wet,
having been saved in a stack. I went to Peter Doner’s sale in the afternoon.
20 Extremely stormy morning, the rain that was falling last night turned to snow, the wind rose to a
violent gale, and the cold was intense. The day all through was one of the stormiest and coldest
that came this winter. We cleaned and took to Dundalk 117 Bushels of oats, sold them for .27¢,
the first load, and .25¢ for the second. The oats are very wet and we can’t sell any more of them to
we get them dried. Brother John came here this afternoon from Sam’s. A lamb came today, being
the first of the season. It is a big strong Ewe lamb. [in margin] First lamb.
21 Pretty cold stormy morning, the storm increased as the day advanced, till at last it blew a perfect
hurricane. The storm of wind and snow was so grate [sic] that I could not take the cattle to water.
The first day this winter that they went without. Brother John started for home this morning. His
son Robert went to W. Lonsway’s to put on a load of moving for him and take it down. Jim and
John went to Melancthon.
22 A little milder this morning, but the afternoon got stormy and rough. Jim and John were at the
shanty taking out saw logs. Mrs. R. and I went to Mr. Lonsway’s in the eavning.
221
<folio 6 recto>
February 1884
23rd Stormy morning, the [day] windy, and a very sharp freeze in the afternoon. The boys were in
Melancthon. I went to Dundalk, bought some grain bags at $3.40 per dozen, drawing knife at
$1.00 & a spokeshave at .40¢.
24th Sabbath. Rather milder this morning than yesterday, the day pretty mild all through. Mrs. R. and I
went to Brother Sam’s. Stopped there a while, then Sam, Phoebe & we went to William
Lonsway’s.
25 Mild morning, the day inclined to softness. Snow came on in the afternoon, and continued snow-
ing pretty steadily till after night. Jim went in the forenoon to Melancthon for the sleigh. John and
I cleaned a load of Oats. Jim took them to Dundalk in the afternoon, did not succeed well in sell-
ing them as they were damp. Peddled them around a good deal, finally succeeded in getting .26¢
p. B.
26 Mild morning, the day inclined to be soft, snow fell during the afternoon. Jim and John went to
Melancthon in the morning, their mother drove them there with the team.
27 Mild morning, the day mild but without sunshine. A good deal of snow fell. Jim and John are
taking out saw logs in Melancthon. I took them some bread in the forenoon, then I went to Dun-
dalk and bought 1 Brl. salt for $1.40. Miss Sarah Bell was here today.
28 Stormy morning, Blowing, snowing and freezing, the afternoon worse than the forenoon, terribly
cold. Jim and John were working in Melancthon. [in margin] very cold.
<folio 6 verso>
February 1884
29th A very cold morning, the day cold all through, Blowing, drifting and freezing like Greenland. Jim
and John were working in Melancthon. [in margin] Very cold.
March [1884]
1st Pretty sharp morning, but the sun got out and the day was pretty fine, with a keen freeze in the
afternoon. The boys were in Melancthon. I attended a cheese meeting in Dundalk.
2nd Sabbath. Pretty keen freeze all day, the sun shone some. Mrs. R. and I went to Mr. Lonsway’s in
the eavning.
3 Keen frost this morning, some sunshine in the forenoon, the afternoon very cold and the wind
high. Jim took 61 11/34 Bushels of oats to Dundalk in the forenoon, got .25¢ p. B. They were wet.
He then went with the team to William Lonsway’s and got on his load of moving. Johney and his
mother also went in to help pack up. Brother John came here at 5 P.M. and he and I went to W.
Lonsway’s. He is going to haul a load.
4 Bitterly cold morning, the day very cold all through. I think last night was the coldest came this
winter. W. Lonsway, Sister Margaret and family left their old home in Melancthon for their new
home in Essa. I wish them God Speed. There were six teams at the moving. Jim, John, and their
mother went with them.
5 Pretty sharp morning, the sun shone out a good deal through the day, but the air was cold. There
are only the two youngest and I at home now, the others are gone to Essa. Skeffington Bell was
here in the afternoon.
<folio 7 recto>
February 1884 [March written above]
6th Sharp morning, rather hazy, but the sun shone out clear and bright during the forenoon. The after-
noon was overcast and snow is falling now (9:45) P.M. I went to see Walter Bell’s boy who is
pretty sick with pleuresy.
222
7 Pretty chilly this morning, but the sun shone out and the day was pleasant. First class sleighing
now. The folks got home this eavning.
8 Snowing, blowing, and drifting this morning, the day pretty cold all through. Jim left home this
morning with his uncle Johney’s Reaper and six bags of seed oats which we are changing. John,
Willie and I cleaned up some seed oats. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
9th Sabbath. Pretty mild day all through.
10 Mild morning, the day mild, the snow inclined to soften a little. John brought home twelve sticks
of wood with his oxen from Melancthon. Then he and I moved about 150 Bushels of oats out of
the bins into the chaff house. Jim has not got home yet (7:12 P.M.). Mrs. A. Lonsway was here
this afternoon.
11 Rain this morning, sleeting and raining all through the day, also a pretty hig[h] wind. Jim and
John went to Melancthon. [in margin] Thaw.
12 High wind this morning and the day was very windy, with an occasional shower of snow. Jim and
John are getting saw logs to the mill.
<folio 7 verso>
F March 1884
13th Bright sunny morning and the sun shone all day. There was a thaw wind and the snow softened
considerably. Jim and John are working in Melancthon getting saw logs out. W. Lonsway called
here this morning on his way to Essa. Mrs Walter Nichol and Mrs. Maria Broughton was here part
of the day.
14 Middling sharp morning, but the Sun shone out about 9 A.M. and the day was pretty mild, the
snow melted a little. The boys were working in Melancthon. Mrs. R. was to see Mrs. C. Bell in
the afternoon. Two strange Ladies driving along here this afternoon got off the track. Their horse
got down in the Snow and broke a shaft of their cutter. I spliced it best I could. I think they Said
they lived near Walkerton.
15 Rind on the trees this morning, the sun shone out after a while and the day was thawing till about 3
P.M., when it began to freeze. Then about 5 P.M. snow began to fall and it is now 10:40 P.M.
snowing and Blowing fiercely. Jim and John were at the saw logs. I went to Dundalk in the after-
noon with Mrs. R.
16th Sabbath. Nice mild day, but the eavning was chilly
17 Rain very early this morning, then turned to snow about daylight, and kept snowing to about 9
A.M. The afternoon was cold but fair. I went to a council meeting at Cederville. J. J. Middleton
gave me a ride. We stopped all night at Mr. S. Rogers’. The boys worked in Melancthon.
<folio 8 recto>
March 1884
18th Bright sunny morning, the day fine and sunny all through. I came home from Cederville. Stopped
in Dundalk and voted for our M. P. P. The boys worked at the logs. I wrote Andrew Lonsway’s
Will this night.
19 Dark morning, no sun out today. Rain came on about 11 A.M., and continued slightly during most
of the afternoon. I went to Melancthon and brought the team home in the afternoon.
20 Fine morning, the sun shone out through the day, and the weather was quite pleasant. Jim and
John were working in Melancthon. Mrs. R. went to see Phoebe. The assessor, John McMurdo,
was here and assessed Lot 215 @ $700., & Lot 216 @ $350., and personal property @ $150., with
6 days statute labor.
21 Beautiful day, bright, warm sun from morning till night, the snow disappearing fast. The boys
were working in Melancthon.
223
22 Bright sunny day from morning till night, the water running on the road, the birds out singing.
The boys worked in Melancthon. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
23rd Sabbath. Rain in the forenoon, the afternoon fair. Brother Sam and family were here.
24 Dark morning, the day generally dark, a little sun now and then. Snow melting fast. Mrs. R. took
some provisions to the Melancthon Lot.
<folio 8 verso>
March 1884
25th Fine sunny morning, the day nice and bright till about 2 P.M., when it clouded over. The after-
noon cold, with a slight sprinkling of rain. Jim and John were chopping. I went to Dundalk in the
eavning [last word is miniscule].
26 Wet morning till about 9 A.M. when it cleared off a little, the remainder of the day was showery.
The boys are in Melancthon. I was at D. Reid’s wood bee. G. Broughton and wife, and H. Lon-
sway and wife, were here at night.
27 Fine morning, the day fine all through, with a good deal of sunshine. The boys are chopping in
Melancthon. Mrs. R. went to Dundalk.
28 Fine morning, the day very nice, sunshine prevailing all day. The birds singing merrily. Robins
out for more than a week, though I have not seen any of them yet. Mrs. R., Clark, Eliza and Willie
went to the School Examination in No. 5 Melancthon. I stopped at home. There were six lambs
came today.
29 Cool in the morning, the wind rose and the day got very cold. Very high wind in the afternoon,
freezing hard. I went to Dundalk and S. Bell and I worked at making out the Defaulters List.
Clark fetched two heifers from Melancthon. [in margin] Saw first Robin.
30th Sabbath. Bleak, cold day, piercing wind.
31 Cold morning, a little sunshine through the day. The day was generally cold. I went to Dundalk
in the forenoon. The boys were cutting wood.
<folio 9 recto>
April 1884
1st Cold morning, no sunshine through the day. The day was very cold. Some snow fell. The boys
are cutting cordwood. Mrs. R. went to H. Johnson’s.
2 Sharp morning, the day dark, cold and windy. Some snow fell. The boys are cutting wood.
3 Dark, cold day all through. Very strong wind blowing the cattle feed all through the Barn Yard.
The boys are chopping. [in margin] Got letter from Br. William.
4 Dark, cold morning, the day chilly all through, and very little sunshine. Keen frost in the after-
noon. The boys are cutting cordwood.
5 Cold, raw morning. Keen freeze throughout the day, no sunshine. I was in Dundalk in the fore-
noon. The boys were cutting cordwood. W. McKay, who is helping them, is stopping here to-
night. Mr. A. Lonsway and wife were here a while at night. [in margin] Posted letter to William.
6th Sabbath. Sunny morning, but a sharp wind, the day pretty clear but cool.
7 Bright sunny morning, sunshine all day, the snow melting. Mrs. R. took the team and some prov-
ender to the boys in the forenoon. In the afternoon I took fourteen bags of cut feed to the Shanty.
8 Rather chilly morning, a little sunshine in the forenoon, and a fine snow storm in the afternoon.
The boys are cutting wood in Melancthon.
<folio 9 verso>
April 1884
9th Quite cool this morning, a little sunshine in the middle of the day, the afternoon cold. I took 27 1/3
Bushels of pease to Dundalk and sold them for .63 ¢ per Bushel. I bought 10 Bushels of Seed
224
back at .50 ¢ per Bushel. The boys were chopping. Jim got his head cut. He and the others had
their axes fastened into a tree which they thought would fall the wrong way. They were trying to
pull it. The tree fell, Jim ran, and his hat fell over his face, and he struck his head against the edge
of William McKay’s axe. The cut, I think, will not be serious.
10 A little cold in the forenoon, some sunshine in the middle of the day, the afternoon rather cold.
Mrs. R. went to Melancthon to make some molasses. The Sap did not run well and she came
home at night. I hauled from Melancthon 1/2 cord short wood to Mr. Parson’s of Dundalk. The
roads are extremely bad. Jim came home this eavning. The Assessor (R. Mooney) assessed the
Melancthon Lot for $850. [in margin] Assessed Melancthon.
11 Pretty sharp morning, a little sunshine in the afternoon, cold at night. All the boys but Jim are
working in Melancthon.
12 Fine morning, the day generally mild, with a good deal of sunshine. Jim and I cleaned some oats
and weak wheat, to get chopped. Eliza was in the sugar bush, along with Clark and Willie. Jim
went in the afternoon & got a shoe put on the mare. [in margin] heard 1st Frog.
<folio 10 recto>
April 1884
13th Sabbath. Mild morning, the day pretty mild all through. Mrs. R. and I were at Brother Sam’s.
14 Mild morning, the middle of the day a little warm with some sunshine, the afternoon cloudy. Jim
and John started the plows in Melancthon. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon and bought a half
bushel of Alsac[e] clover seed, paid $5.10 for it. [in margin] First plowing.
15 Cloudy morning, rain came on about 8 A.M. and continued most of the day. I borrowed Brother
Sam’s mare and [dittog.: and] took her and one of my own to [Cederville stricken] Hopeville. I
drove the Reeve to a council meeting. The roads were very bad coming home, and the night as
black as pitch.
16 Wet morning, the day mostly wet. There is no getting around on account of the state of the roads.
John and Willie are in Melancthon. Jim is at home.
17 Rather cold this morning, the day damp and cloudy. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk in the after-
noon. Jim took the team and some provender and went to Melancthon.
18 A little finer this morning, some sunshine through the day. The boys, with the horses and oxen,
are plowing in Melancthon. Mrs. R. went to Miss Ann Irvin’s and got some plum trees to plant.
<folio 10 verso>
April 1884
19th Fine morning, the day mild, with a good deal of sunshine. The boys are plowing in Melancthon.
Mrs. R. planted out her fruit trees. I went to a cheese meeting in Dundalk in the afternoon. [in
margin] planted / fruit trees.
20th Sabbath. Cool morning, the day cold all through, no sunshine. Hard frost at night, with a shower
of snow.
21 Very sharp morning, the day cold all through. Bright sun, but sharp cold wind. Mrs. R. went with
Johney to Melancthon to work in the sugar bush. John and Jim are plowing. Willie is cook in the
shanty.
22 Bright, sunny morning, the day bright and clear all through, but the air a little chilly. Mrs. R. came
home from Melancthon from making molasses. Johney brought the oxen and a wagon for wheat.
23 Fine morning, sunshine all through the day. The air pretty warm, nice day all through. Jim is at
Melancthon. Johney started from home this morning with nine bags of seed wheat to Sow in
Melancthon. Mrs. R. has started gardening [in margin] First wheat / sown.
225
24 Bright sunny morning, the day clear and warm, fine springlike weather. The boys are working in
Melancthon. I digged around the apple trees.
25 Fine morning, the day beautiful. The boys finished putting in wheat. Mrs. R. and I went to Dun-
dalk in the afternoon. Gerty colted on her way home. Colt weak; won’t live. Did not
<folio 11 recto>
April 1884
come to its time. Mrs. R.and I went to brother Sam’s where Jim had left the colt. We did what we
could for it, stopped up all night and attended to it.
26 Beautiful morning, the day splendid, very warm, in fact, hot. Mrs. R. and I stopped all day at
Sam’s. We hauled the colt out in Sam’s light waggon at night. The boys were picking stones at
home.
27th Sabbath. Something cooler this morning, the middle of the day sunny, the afternoon cloudy, a
heavy shower of Rain, accompanied with thunder and lightening at night. The little colt died this
night.
28 Cold morning, the day cold and clear. Jim and John plowed.
29 Very hard frost this morning, the ground would scarcely turn over, the forenoon pretty cold with
but little sunshine, the afternoon milder but overcast towards night. Jim and John plowing.
30 Slight frost this morning, a little sunny through the day, but pretty cool, cloudy in the eavning. We
sowed five acres of pease. John plowed. [in margin: Sowed pease / moon week old]
May [1884]
1st Bright sunny morning, very sultry in the forenoon, a heavy shower about noon, some thunder,
Raining at night. Jim ganged,* John plowed, I swam Barley in pickle* to get some wild oats out
of it. Clark hunted up three steers that had strayed from Melancthon. [*ganged=plowed with a
gang plow, i.e. a plow with two or more shares, capable of turning more than one furrow at a time.
Swimming barley in a pickle (a salt and water solution thought to be a natural weed killer; see 3, 5
April 1878 entries) causes the lighter grains of wild oats to float to the top to be removed.]
<folio 11 verso>
May 1884
2nd Cold morning, frequent showers of cold rain during the forenoon, high wind also. There was quite
a brisk shower of snow in the eavening. John and Jim plowed in the dry part of the day. I went to
Dundalk.
3 Hard frost this morning, the sun got out and the frost gradually thawed out, the afternoon was pret-
ty fine. I sowed five acres of Barley in the forenoon, but we only could get it harrowed once on
account of the ground being so soft from the frost thawing out, will have to let it stand till it dries.
Jim made a stone Boat, John plowed, and Clark harrowed. We took two calves into Dundalk in
the eavening, only got .50¢ each for them. James Mulholland was here and Bought four bags
pease at .63¢ p. Bushel. [in margin] sowed Barley.
4th Sabbath. Dry in the forenoon, cloudy in the afternoon and rain at night.
5 Cloudy this morning, the sun shone out bright about the middle of the day, the afternoon cloudy.
Jim and Johney were plowing. I loosened some stones and plowed with John’s team a while in the
afternoon, he having got a stiff neck.
6 Dark morning with a very heavy dew, the forenoon overcast, but dry, a little sunshine. During the
afternoon I sowed the remainder of the barley, then went to Dundalk, got home at noon, raised
some stumps till tea time then Clark and I picked stones. Jim plowed in the forenoon, harrowed to
226
tea time, then plowed. Clark plowed to tea time, then gathered stones. John is laid up with a stiff
neck. Mr. Ferris got a calf here from us. We started to put the milk into the factory today. [in
margin] Seen Swallow / Milk to / the factory 72 pounds.
<folio 12 recto>
May 1884
7 Dark cloudy morning, the wind strong and a slight drizzle of rain. The day from morning till night
was overcast and a scotch mist falling all the time. Jim plowed. Johney plowed and gathered
stones. I loosened stumps.
8 Dark muggy morning, the day misty all through, a slight mizzle of rain falling now and then. I
sowed Thirty pounds of Alsike clover seed. Jim and Johney plowed. Jim took a load of stove
wood to Dundalk to Mr. Parsons from Melancthon after tea time. [in margin] Alsike / Sown.
9 Dark morning, slight rain falling, which increased about 10 A.M. to a real good shower. It was
slightly showery in the afternoon and a very heavy rain at night. The boys plowed during the dry
part of the day and while it was raining they helped J. Brinkman to clean 25 Bushels of oats which
I bought from him @ .33 per Bushel.
10 Misty morning, the forenoon overcast, the afternoon, dry and windy. John, Clark and Willie gath-
ered stones in the forenoon, and John plowed in the afternoon. Jim plowed all day. Mrs. R. and I
went to Dundalk in the afternoon. [in margin] Got Sup[erinten]d[ent]. / Blanks / from Toronto.
11th Sabbath. The day generally cloudy and pretty cool, a slight frost at night.
<folio 12 verso>
May 1884
12th Frost this morning, and cloudy, the day cleared and no rain fell. Jim sowed ten acres of oats. Wil-
lie harrowed. John plowed, I routed [=rooted] out some stumps and chored around. [in margin]
First oats / sown.
13 Dark overcast morning, a slight rain fell in the forenoon, the afternoon very wet, and rain falling
now (8:30) P.M. Jim finished harrowing the oats he sowed yesterday. John plowed, finished
plowing the old pasture field. Mr. T. Mitchel came here to sell me a reaper.
14 Cold morning and cloudy, the day was very windy and drying. Jim and John started with the teams
for the Melancthon Lot to plow, as the ground is to[o] wet at home to sow. I dug out stumps and
roots in the old pasture field.
15 Cold morning, the day dry till about one o’clock, when there came on a thunder and lightening
storm accompanied with hail, rain and wind. A great deal of rain fell. The afternoon extremely
cold and a snow storm came on at dark. The Boys were plowing in Melancthon. I took out roots
in the forenoon and went to Dundalk in the afternoon. [in margin] Frost
16 Snow, Snow, Snow, the ground covered about l ½ inch, strange at this time of the year! It had all
disappeared at noon. The afternoon was windy and dry. The boys are plowing in Melancthon. I
went to Dundalk in the forenoon. [in margin] Snow.
<folio 13 recto>
May 1884
17th Bright sunny morning, the day clear but cool. I went to Flesherton, thence to Priceville, then
came home by Dundalk. The boys finished plowing in Melancthon. [in margin] Went to /
Priceville.
18th Sabbath. Bright morning, the day balmy and springlike. Mrs. R. and I went to Brother Sam’s.
19 Cloudy morning, the day generally overcast. A slight shower about 6:45 A.M., a little sprinkling
now and then through the day. Jim and Willie are putting in oats in Melancthon. I sowed some
oats at home, John harrowed.
227
20 Rainy morning, rain during all the forenoon, the afterpart of the afternoon dry. No work going on
at home today on account of the wet. Jim and Willie are in Melancthon.
21 Fine morning, the sun shone out bright, the day was sultry, with a good growth. John and I cut
seed potatoes. Jim and Willie are seeding in Melancthon.
22 Fair morning, the day dry during the forenoon, a little rain in the afternoon. Jim finished putting in
oats in Melancthon. John and I cut potatoes.
23 Dry morning, the day dry and very sultry till about 6 P.M., when the sky got overcast and it began
to rain. There is now, 9:10 P.M., a perfect pour, also thunder and lightening. The three boys were
hauling manure. I was letting water off the field.
<folio 13 verso>
May 1884
24 Dark cloudy morning, the day cloudy and a slight mizzle of rain now and then. Jim and John went
to Shelburne to celebrate the day.* I let water off a piece of low land in the forenoon and went to
Dundalk in the afternoon. [* 24 May is Victoria Day holiday]
25th Sabbath. Dark morning, the day cloudy but dry.
26 Misty morning, the day warm but cloudy, with considerable of sunshine now and then. We planted
potatoes. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. Jim and I went to J. Brinkman’s at night, I bought
11 Bushels of oats from him at .35¢ per Bushel. I sent the milk cows to pasture at John Gott’s. [in
margin]: First / Potatoes / planted.
27 Cloudy morning, the middle of the day bright and sunny, the afternoon very cold, hard frost at
night. I attended Council meeting at Hopeville. Got a ride there and back with Mr. T. Hanbury.
The boys planted potatoes on a piece of sod, just plowed the sod down on them. The Misses Nei-
thercut were here.
28 Very sharp frost this morning, ice on the water, the ground as hard as a board. The day cold all
through, but drying. Freezing tonight. Jim harrowed at Walter Bell’s. John helped John Gott pile
manure. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. [in margin] Hard frost.
29 Clear, cold and windy. Jim took 960 pounds of mixed grain (oats, pease & wheat) and got it
chopped for the pigs and calves. John worked at putting up a fence round a calf park. [in margin]
Frost.
<folio 14 recto>
May 1884
30th Snow on the ground this morning, and more falling. It had all disappeared before noon. Jim went
to Melancthon for a load of wood in the forenoon, and in the afternoon he and John went to
Melancthon to mend a brush fence. I went to Dundalk and Exchanged a 20 gallon milk can for
another of the same size, the first being rusty. Mr. Brinkman was here looking for a lost calve. [in
margin] Snow.
31 Mild morning, the day pretty warm all through, good growth. Jim and John are fencing in
Melancthon. I sowed about three and a half acres of white oats at home. Willie harrowed. Clark
with the oxen hauled stones off the ground. I helped when I had finished sowing. We are now
done sowing grain, but from the appearance of things I think some of the oats will have to be
sowen over again. The seed was poor, on account of the frost last harvest, and the ground was
cold for a long time this spring. The two causes combined is tilting badly for the crops, almost
every person around here has to sow their oats over again. [in margin] Finished / seeding.
<folio 14 verso>
June 1884
228
1st Sabbath. Nice growing day. Mrs. R and I went to Melancthon and stopped at Brother Sam’s on our
way home.
2 Dry morning, and very warm. Got some shoes on the horses. Jim and I started for Tossorontio to
buy seed oats, as our own had missed. Got as far as Rosemont when there came on a very heavy
rain storm, with some thunder and lightening. We went to brother John’s. Johney shore the sheep
at home. [in margin] Shore sheep.
3 Very sultry day all through, the sun extremely hot. Bought 25 Bushels oats @.35¢ per Bushel and
changed them with John for his as I think they are the best seed.
4 Dry warm day all through. Jim and I got home from Tossorontio about 7 P.M. Johney was pick-
ing stones at home.
5 Dry warm day. Jim ganged, John and I hauled stones off with the oxen.
6 Dry warm day. I sowed oats. John hauled with the oxen in the forenoon. Jim and Walter Bell
ganged till they finished the field, then they harrowed till quitting time. This is the second sowing
of oats this season on this field. [in margin] Finished seeding.
7 Very hot day. Jim finished harrowing oats. John and Clark put out manure in the forenoon on the
potatoe patch. Jim helped at the planting in the afternoon. [Stricken Mrs. R. and ] I went to
Dundalk.
<folio 15 recto>
June 1884
8th Sabbath. Bright sunny day all through.
9 Slight rain early this morning. It cleared off, then came on again about noon. There was heavy
cold rain in the afternoon. The boys finished planting potatoes at home then they went to Melanc-
thon in the afternoon to plant two bags for Jim. They could not get it done, as the rain came on.
Jim stopped in Melancthon all night.
10 Cool morning, the day cool, windy and dry. John was repairing Brush fence, Jim finished plant-
ing potatoes, then came home and drove his mother to Dundalk. I worked at the Township and
Cheese accounts. William Lonsway and Wesley were here this night.
11 Rather cool this morning but the day got warmer towards noon, the afternoon was pretty warm.
Jim went with the team to help his uncle Sam haul square timber. Johney and I fixed fences in the
forenoon and in the afternoon he went to Pat Conner’s raising. The oats which I sowed on last
Friday are appearing above the ground already. They are only sown five clear days.
12 Bright morning, the day clear, cool and breezy. Jim helped Sam, John and I picked stones. I went
to Dundalk after tea time.
13 Cool and cloudy. We gathered stones on the summer fallow.
<folio 15 verso>
June 1884
14th Cloudy and cool in the forenoon, bright and cool in the afternoon. Jim gang plowed, Johney,
Clark and I took stones off the summer fallow. After tea I warned out the workers of statute labor.
Mrs. R. and I stopped a while at night at Mrs. C. Bell’s.
15th Sabbath. Clear and sunny most of the day, the afternoon cloudy. Mrs. C. Bell, and Brother John,
Pho[e]be, and children were here.
16 Bright sunny day all through, very warm in the afternoon. John and I hauled stones together. Jim
plowed. Miss McLaughlin, dressmaker, here.
17 Bright, sunny all through, and hot. There were some clouds after sunset. Jim plowed, John hauled
stones into piles. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon. Mr. Langley opperated on two yearling colts
229
of mine. Sam & Wesley Lonsway were here a while in the eavning. Miss McLaughlin left at
noon, having finished her work sci[e]ntifically [=sufficiently?].
18 Fine morning, dry and warm. Very heavy clouds came up about 3 P.M., there were some thunder
and lightening, a little rain and very strong wind. I was Overseeing statute labor. Jim plowed in
the fallow and John gathered stones.
19 Cloudy morning, the sun soon shone out, the day was extremely sultry. In the afternoon I was
overseeing statute labor. John gathered stones, Jim plowed in the summer fallow.
<folio 16 recto>
June 1884
20 Bright sunny morning, the day very hot. I finished statute labor. Jim helped his uncle Sam, John
gathered stones. [in margin] Hot.
21 Warm morning, the afternoon exceedingly hot. Jim made a jumper, assisted by his uncle Sam.
John and Clark picked stones and prepared a cabbage plot. I worked at township business in the
forenoon and attended council meeting at Dundalk in the afternoon. [in margin] Hot / Got pension
/ $101.00/xx.
22nd Sabbath. Dry, warm day, cloudy in the afternoon, a little thunder and a few drops of rain.
23 Dry morning and pretty warm in the forenoon. There was a nice shower in the afternoon. Jim and
John went with the oxen to Melancthon to swamp out cordwood. I went to Dundalk in the
eavning.
24 Dark morning and a very slight shower of rain. The remainder of the day was cloudy, sultry and
dry. Jim and John are swamping wood. We planted out at home 307 cabbage plants. Mrs. R. & I
went to Mr. Lonsway’s in the afternoon. Mr. Snoden, W. M. Minister, was here a while in the
eavening.
25 Cloudy, cold morning, the day dark and cold. Jim and John are swamping wood. Mrs. R. and I
took them provisions, then I went to Dundalk and paid cheese money.
26 Cold morning, Bright and clear and cool through the day. The boys were swamping wood. I
worked at account Book. Patrick Shaw, Councilor, and Mr. Ken[n]edy were here.
<folio 16 verso>
June 1884
27th Bright sunny morning, the day warm, clear and dry. Jim and John were swamping wood. I went
to Dundalk in the afternoon.
28 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and very warm. Jim and John were chopping in Melancthon.
Clark harrowed in the summer fallow. I hoed among the carrots and fixed fences.
29th Sabbath. Dry, warm day all through.
30 Bright morning, the day dry and hot. We were at Brother Sam’s Barn raising.
July 1884
1st Bright morning, the day very warm, got cloudy in the afternoon, and a few drops of rain fell. We
all went to Dundalk to see the sports.
2 Bright morning, the day sunny and breezy. The Boys swamped wood. Mrs. R. and I took them
some provisions in the morning, then drove to Dundalk and in the afternoon took the wool to the
swale and washed it.
3 Bright sunny morning, the day oppressively sultry. I worked at the township books. Mrs. R. took
out provisions for the boys who are working swamping wood in Melancthon.
4 Rather cool and cloudy this morning, a very slight shower in the middle of the day. The boys are
swamping C[ord]Wood. I worked at the Books. Took three steers to pasture at John Gott’s. [in
margin] Steers to J. Gott’s.
230
<folio 17 recto>
July 1884
5th Cool day, cloudy in the afternoon and a pretty strong wind. I hoed carrots in the forenoon and
went to a council meeting at Dundalk in the afternoon. The Boys were swamping wood. Brother
John and Wife came here this afternoon
6th Sabbath. Raining this morning, a drizzling cold rain all through the day. John and wife, Mrs. R.,
Jim and I went to Sam’s.
7 Cool this morning, the day pretty cool all through. The three Boys left for Melancthon this morn-
ing. Jim to oversee statute labor, and John and Clark to swamp wood. I hoed potatoes at home.
8 Bright cool morning, the day clear and cool. The Boys were swamping wood and doing R[oad]
Work. I hoed among the potatoes and carrots. Miss Sarah A. Bell was here in the afternoon. [in
margin] Slight frost / this morning.
9 Fine morning, the day dry and clear. I was hoeing potatoes, Clark and Willie hauled out manure.
Jim and Johney swamped wood.
10 Fine morning, the day dry and clear, the afternoon a little cloudy. Jim and John swamped wood.
Clark and Willie hauled manure. I hoed potatoes in the forenoon. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk
in the afternoon.
<folio 17 verso>
July 1884
11th Beautiful morning, sun shone bright and warm, the day dry and clear, with the exception of a
slight shower of rain about 2 P.M. Jim and John finished swamping cordwood and came home at
night. Clark and Willie hauled manure. I hoed thistles among the potatoes. Mrs. R., Phoebe, and
Miss S. Bell started this morning to make the grand tour. They are to do W. Lonsway, John Ag-
new and John Russell. Happy trio, won’t they feel jolly climbing the hills of Mulmer and de-
scending the glades of Mono, taking in the majestic beauties of Tossorontio, and the beautiful
scenery of Essa. Long, oh long will their trip be remembered, and cherished in their heart as
something never to be forgotten!
12 Slight rain this morning, then cleared off and was fine to about 10:30 A.M., when there was anoth-
er shower. Cleared off again and the remainder of the day was dry. Mrs. R. absent, the three eld-
est boys not yet returned from Shelburne (9:30) P.M. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon and sent
to Steel Bros. & Co., Toronto, for 6 pounds turnip seed, 2 of White Globe, 2 of Grey Stone, & 2 of
Yellow Aberdeen.
13th Sabbath. Cool cloudy morning, the day cold and windy. I went to Brother Sam’s in the afternoon.
14 Cool morning, the day cold, cloudy and windy. The boys were working at the summer fallow,
some hauling out manure, and some plowing. I hoed the thistles in the potatoes.
<folio 18 recto>
July 1884
15th Cloudy, dry morning, the day cool, cloudy and breezy. The boys were putting out manure and
plowing. I cut some thistles in the afternoon. Mrs. R. and Poebe got home this eavning.
16 Cold, misty morning, the fog cleared off and the day was dry and cold. The boys were working at
the summer fallow. I cut thistles, then some wood in the afternoon. Mrs. Thos. Hanbury was here
in the eavning.
17 Dark morning, the day cloudy and cool. John plowed, Jim hoed potatoes in Melancthon. Clark
spread manure, Willie wed carrots and hunted up the sheep. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
18 Pretty warm morning, the day dry and warm, with a good deal of sunshine. It clouded over about
sunset and is now (8:40) P.M., Raining quite a nice rain, and it is very much needed. Everything
231
seems parched with the excessive dry weather. Jim and Clark are working in Melancthon. John
and I worked at home at the summer fallow. Willie is laid up sick. Over Exerted himself yester-
day hunting for the sheep. I rented a field of Grass today from Joshua Brinkman for six dollars.
Part of the field is sown with oats, but they missed. Part of it is seeded down, but a poor catch.
However, the field will make a splendid pasture. I brought Twelve head of cattle from J. Gott’s
pasture. [in margin] Brought / cattle / from J. Gott’s.
<folio 18 verso>
July 1884
19th Splendid mizzle of rain during the forenoon, the afternoon dry, cloudy, cool and windy. I plowed
a little in the morning, then sowed about Eight acres of turnips on a summer fallow. They will
probably do for a run for the cattle in the fall. I sowed two pounds of White Globe, two pounds of
Grey Stone and two pounds of Yellow Aberdeen. Purchased the seed from Steel Bros. & Co., To-
ronto at .20¢ per pound, paid .25¢ freight on the parcel. John harrowed them in one stroke with
the iron harrows. Clark and Jim are working in Melancthon.
20th Sabbath. Cool day, mostly clear, decidedly cold about sunset. Mrs. R. was at Mr. Joseph
Jackson’s.
21 Cloudy cool morning, the day dry and cool. Jim took a load of stove wood to Dundalk. The oth-
ers worked at weeding carrots. I fixed a fence to let the cattle get to a spring at J. Brinkman’s.
22 Bright sunny day all through, dry and warm. Clark started for Tossorontio this morning. Jim and
John helped Sam to Shingle his Barn. I cut thistles. [in margin] Clark / went to /Tossorontio
23 Slight rainfall this forenoon, the afternoon dry. I cut thistles. Jim and John helped Sam to Shingle
his Barn.
<folio 19 recto>
July 1884
24 Cloudy this morning, the day dry and pretty warm. Jim helped Sam at his barn. The rest of the
family picked berries. I cut thistles in the forenoon and went to Dund[alk] in the afternoon.
25 Fine morning, the day [dry] and pretty breezy. Jim and John went to Dundalk in the forenoon for
a new Reaper which I had bought. It is called the “New Brantford”. Price, $82 50/xx, cash. They
commenced mowing in the afternoon. I chored around generally. [in margin] Started / Mowing /
Got Reaper home.
26 Fine dry morning, the day dry, clear and pretty warm. Jim and John mowed. I went to Dundalk
Cheese factory and helped to Box and weigh a quantity of cheese. Mrs. R. and I went a while to
G. Broughton’s this night.
27th Sabbath. Rather dark in the morning, a slight rain, only a mizzle, through the day.
28 Fine morning, beautiful day, dry and clear. The boys mowed. I went to a council meeting at
Cederville.
29 Fine morning, the day dry and clear. Jim and John mowed. I brought the grindstone from the
Shanty in the forenoon, and in the afternoon Willie and I raked some hay and put it up in hand
shakings.
<folio 19 verso>
July 1884
30th Fine morning, the day dry till about 1 P.M. when there came on a splendid rain. There was some
thunder and lightening. Another rain about 7:30 P.M. It will do a vast amount of good, although
it may wet the hay. Jim and John mowed in the morning while the dew was on the grass. Then
they and I raked hay and hauled in just one load, when the rain came on. The boys mowed in the
eavning. I cut thistles in the turnips. Miss Kate Johnson was here in the eavning.
232
31 Wet day generally, from morning till night. I went to the cheese factory in the afternoon and
helped to make up the accounts.
August [1884]
1st A little mizzle in the morning, the afternoon dry. Jim borrowed his Uncle Sam’s sulky Rake, and
raked about two acres.
2 The grass very wet with a heavy dew this morning. Clear and dry in the afternoon. Jim raked
some in the forenoon with the Sulky. John, Willie, and I hand raked. Jim took home the rake in
the afternoon, then hauled in. I went to Dundalk and paid the Patrons of Cheese factory.
3rd Sabbath. Cloudy morning, and some sharp showers of rain through the day. Mr. George Glazier
took shelter here a while in the afternoon from the rain.
<folio 20 recto>
August [1884]
4th Cloudy morning, the day dandy all through with a very slight sprinkling of rain. Jim and John
mowed. I worked in the carrot patch. Mrs. R. and I went to H. Lonsway’s at night.
5 Dark, cloudy morning, the forenoon dry, a slight shower of rain came on about 5 P.M. John and
Jim were mowing. Willie and I raked hay from noon till tea time. We thought to get some hauled
in, but the rain prevented us. Johney took a very severe turn of cramps in his stomach after tea.
He had eat [sic] a large quantity of gooseberries and I think they were the cause. We bathed his
feet in hot water, put hot salt to his stomach and gave him some pain killer. He is now [dittog.: he
is now], (9:35) P.M., convalescent.
6 Pretty cool day, dark, not much sunshine. Jim and I mowed and hauled in some.
7 Another dark, cool day. Jim and I mowed. Johney helped us in the afternoon. This finished our
mowing.
8 A little cloudy in the forenoon, the afternoon dry. We hauled in till tea time, then helped Br. Sam.
[in margin] Frost.
9 A slight frost this morning, the day fine and dry. Raked hay in the forenoon and hauled in in the
afternoon. Finished haying. Mrs. R., Jim & I went to Dundalk. [in margin] Frost.
<folio 20 verso>
August 1884
10th Sabbath. Bright morning, the day dry and warm. Mrs. R. and I went to Lot 31 Melancthon, and
also to see Mr. William Neithercut. [in margin] Frost / at night.
11 A slight frost this morning, the day dry but cool. Mr. Skeffington Bell came here and set up the
reaper which I had bought from him. We then cut some barley. The reaper worked well. Willie
cut with it for about two hours. John, Jim and I tied and stooked. [in margin] Commenced / Har-
vesting.
12 Fine morning, the day dry and pretty warm, especially in the afternoon. We finished cutting Bar-
ley. Jim and John went to Melancthon in the afternoon. They intend chopping some large timber
to get sawed into stove wood.
13 Fine morning, the day dry and hot with some clouds in the afternoon. Jim and John are chopping
on the Melancthon Lot. I worked at Twp. Books. [in margin] Annie Middleton / died at 8 P.M.
14 Fine morning, the day hot and dry. Mrs. R., Eliza, Willie and Phoebe went to the carding mill
beyond Maxwell with the wool. There were 38 1/2 pounds gross weight. Jim and John were cut-
ting timber for the sawing machine. I worked at the Township Books in the forenoon and went to
Dundalk in the afternoon. [in margin] Hot.
233
15 Sultry morning, the day very hot. Mrs. R., Eliza and I went to the funeral of Mr. J. J. Middleton’s
little Annie. She was buried about 8 miles down the Gravel Road. Jim and John are working in
Melancthon. [in margin] Hot.
<folio 21 recto>
August 1884
16th Very fine day, but extremely warm, the sky a kind of hazy in the afternoon. Mrs. R., Eliza and I
put in five acres of Barley, then I drove to Melancthon for the boys who were chopping. [in mar-
gin] Hot
17th Sabbath. Extremely warm in the forenoon, a smart shower of rain in the afternoon, some thunder
and lightening. Brother Sam got the Democrat to go to John Jackson’s. [in margin] Hot
18 Warm morning, a little cloudy through the day, but pretty warm. Jim and I dug for water for the
cattle in the swale. John went to Dundalk in the forenoon & got his boot repaired, and bought a
new pair. Then he pulled pease after he came home. [in margin] First / pease / pulled
19 Cloudy morning, the day cloudy but very sultry. I pulled pease. John and Jim went to work in
Melancthon.
20 Cloudy morning, the day cloudy and a gentle breeze occassionally, but the air was close and warm
when the breeze did not blow. The boys are working in Melancthon. I pulled pease at home.
Sold Eight Lambs this eavning at $2.50 each.
21 Very sultry forenoon, a slight sprinkling of rain about 11 A.M., the afternoon cool and breezy. I
took the lambs to Dundalk. Henry Lonsway hauled them. Pulled pease when I came home. Jim
is skidding logs. Johney was at S. McDowell’s logging bee with his team.
<folio 21 verso>
August 1884
22nd Cool, cloudy morning, the day cool all through, no sunshine. The Boys were sawing in Melanc-
thon. I pulled pease at home.
23 Quite cool this morning, the day decidedly cold, scarcely any sunshine. A slight rainfall twice
through the day, a little about 7 A.M., and a few drops about noon. There are some indications of
frost this night, the air is exceedingly cold. If there comes a frost now, grain of all kinds in this vi-
cinity will suffer. The boys finished sawing at noon today. They think they have about seventy-
five cords of short wood. I think sixty cords will be nearer the mark. I pulled pease at home, there
are a great many thistles in them, making them very hard to pull. I Expect Clark home tonight
from his uncle John Russell’s. He has been away a full month, helping him to Harvest.
24th Sabbath. Cool day, dry and cloudy.
25 Cool morning, the day cloudy, cool and windy, with a slight sprinkling of rain about noon. I was
pulling pease. John was helping his Uncle Sam. Jim with the team was at Mr. Elliott’s sawing.
26 Cool morning, the day dry, cool and windy. John helpd his Uncle Sam. Jim and I pulled pease at
home. Miss Sarah Bell was here a while today. John is not home yet (8:30) from Sam’s.
<folio 22 recto>
August 1884
27th Ground covered with a white frost this morning. A slight mist arose with the sun, the day clear
and pretty warm in the afternoon. The frost, I think, done little harm, although there was an ice on
the water. Jim and John hauled in pease. I pulled pease, and finished the job. Clark came home
this afternoon from his uncle John Russell’s. The four boys went to Dundalk after tea to get them-
selves boots. [in margin] Frost, Ice / Finished / pulling pease.
234
28 Clear morning, the sun came out but the day got cloudy after a little, the afternoon pretty black,
and rain came on at night. Jim and John worked in Melancthon. I went there in the forenoon for a
load of stove wood. In the afternoon I went to Dundalk. Mrs. R. was helping Emma Reid to quilt.
29 Rainy morning, the day wet till about 2 P.M. John and Jim were working in Melancthon. I
worked at the cheese accounts.
30 Cloudy morning, but the sun shone out about 9 A.M. and the day was dry till the latter part of the
afternoon, when there came on a slight mizzle of rain. Jim and John were working in Melancthon.
I went to Dundalk in the forenoon, and in the afternoon Clark, Willie and I hauled in the remainder
of the pease. I sent a letter and two newspapers to Ireland. We brought home the heifer which
was at W. Bell’s. [in margin] Sent / letter to / Ireland.
<folio 22 verso>
August 1884
31st Sabbath. Dry day. Brother Sam and Phoebe were here.
September [1884]
1st Cool morning, the day dry and breezy. We went to Melancthon to cut wheat with the cradles. Jim
came home at night for the Reaper. Eliza is sick with the measels.
2 Bright morning, the day dry and very windy in the afternoon. We cut wheat with the reaper in the
forenoon. In the afternoon the wind was so strong that we had to quit Reaping and cradle.
3 Fine morning, the day dry and pretty windy in the afternoon. The Reaper is not giving good satis-
faction, had to get the agent to see it. Did not improve it any. Took it across to Brother Sam’s to
cut some for him. Had hard work getting it through the Swamps.
4 Fine morning, the day dry and pretty hot. Johney finished the wheat with the cradle. Clark and I
tied, then we all stooked. Jim was reaping at Sam’s.
5 Beautiful day, dry and warm, in fact hot. We reaped some oats. Skeffington Bell came and fixed
up the Reaper. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk.
6 Dry, warm day. We craddled some oats and tied some. Clark tramped out pease with the horses.
Jim took a load of wood to Parson’s in the eavning.
<folio 23 recto>
September 1884
7th Sabbath. Dry in the forenoon, the afternoon windy, cloudy, some thunder and lightening and rain.
Dundalk came near being burned from swamp fires.
8 Some rain this morning, the day dry from about 9 A.M. Jim and John stoned* till noon, then Jim
took the team with a load of stove wood to Dundalk. I paid the patrons of cheese factory in the af-
ternoon. [*stone, verb to pick stones from a ploughed field.]
9 A little cloudy this morning, but the sun got out and the day was very sultry. Jim cradled oats in
Melancthon. John and I made a culvert in Melancthon in the forenoon, and tied oats in the after-
noon. Miss Mary Dane and Miss Sarah Bell, Mrs. A. Lonsway, Mr. G. Broughton and wife were
here in the eavning.
10 Fine morning, the sun came out bright and clear, and the forenoon was very sultry. There came on
a thunder storm and heavy rain about noon. We started to haul wheat home from Melancthon.
Jim got caught in the rain with the second load and took shelter in John Neithercut’s Barn. Broth-
er Sam and Alex Patterson just got into the barn at home when the rain came on. Clark helped
Walter Bell.
11 Drizzly morning, the forenoon dark and gloomy, the afternoon dry, sunny and windy. John cra-
dled and tied some oats. Jim went to Melancthon for the grindstone, and chored around. I went to
Dundalk in the afternoon.
235
<folio 23 verso>
September 1884
12th Cool, cloudy morning, the day cool but dry. Jim Reaped for Sam. John was at John Neithercut’s
threshing part of the day, the remainder he cradled for Sam. I entered orders in the Township
Treasurer’s Book in the forenoon and in the afternoon helped Brother Sam to haul in. [in margin]
Frost
13 White frost this morning, the sun got out and scattered the frost, the morning then clouded over,
and there was signs of rain, but the clouds passed over and no rain fell. We were hauling in wheat
from Melancthon. Finished the wheat and hauled in about 50 dozen of oats at home, also a load of
oats from Melancthon. We had Walter Bell and his team, also Brother Sam and his team. [in
margin] Frost
14th Sabbath. Frost this morning, the day pretty cool and dry.
15 Cloudy morning, the forenoon dry. Rain came on about 5:30 P.M. There has not fallen much as
yet (8:30 P.M.). Jim reaped some oats, John craddled some. In the afternoon I drove them out to
Melancthon to cut some oats there.
16 Cloudy morning, the forenoon overcast but dry, the afternoon also dry and very windy. I worked
at Cheese accounts in the forenoon, and in the afternoon helped Sam to harvest. Jim and John are
cutting oats in Melancthon.
17 Cloudy morning, the day dry and windy. I helped Sam to haul in oats. Jim and John cradled the
remainder of the oats in Melancthon. Got done about 3:30 P.M.
<folio 24 recto>
September 1884
18th Slight rain this morning, but it soon cleared off, the afternoon was dry. John Reaped oats from 10
A.M. till about 3 P.M. Jim tied some that had been cut before. I was in Dundalk in the forenoon,
and after tea we tied oats and hauled in four small loads.
19 Great frost this morning, quite a heavy ice on the water, the day dry till about 4 P.M., when there
was a slight rain fall. Brother Sam and I, Jim and Johney tied oats in Melancthon during the dry
part of the day. Clark tied oats at home and his Mother and he hauled in two loads in the after-
noon. I stopped at Sam’s all night. [in margin] Frost
20 A little rain fell early this morning, the remainder of the day was dry and breezy. I stooked oats in
Melancthon till about 1:30 P.M., then tied and stooked till night. I stopped in the Melancthon cab-
in all night. John finished Reaping oats at home. Clark and Jim picked stones. Heavy frost this
night. [in margin] Finished / Reaping
21st Sabbath. More frost this morning, the day dry but pretty chilly. Mrs. R. and I went to Brother
Sam’s. [in margin] Frost
22 Wet morning, the day showery all through. I worked at the Township Books. Jim made a sett of
steps for the cellar. John chored around. Mrs. R. went to Decorate Dundalk Eng. Church.
23 Slightly wet this morning, the afternoon dry. The boys brought a load of wood from Melancthon
in the afternoon, and picked stones in the forenoon. I attended Council meeting.
<folio 24 verso>
September 1884
24th Wet morning, the day generally showery, especially in the afternoon. I took Mrs. R. to Dr. Grif-
fin*, Dundalk. She is ailing with something like dispepsia. Jim and John gathered stones during
the dry part of the day. [*W.S. Griffin, Physician, is only listed in 1887 Dundalk Directory; see
History of Dundalk, pp. 104, 126.]
236
25 Dry morning, but cloudy, the afternoon dry, sunny and breezy. We picked stones till tea time,
then turned oat sheafes in the field.
26 Frost this morning, the day sunny and pretty breezy in the afternoon. Jim went in the forenoon to
Melancthon to see if the oats were dry enough to haul in (they were not). When he came home
[dittog.: when he came home], we hauled in oats at home in the afternoon. They were pretty
damp, but we thought it best to draw them in.
27 Very wet morning, the day showery from morning till night. No work doing today, Except Clark
who threshed out some wheat to take to the Show fair at Dundalk. Mrs. R. and I visited at Mr.
Nichol’s this eavning.
28th Sabbath. Dark morning, the day overcast and frequent showers, with a very heavy rain just as
night came on. Brother Sam, Pho[e]be and family were here.
29 Bright morning, the sun shone all day and was pretty drying. Willie and I kept working among the
oat sheaves all day, spreading them out, then turning them over. John and Jim hauled rails to put
up a fence.
<folio 25 recto>
September 1884
30 Cloudy, overcast morning, the sun got out after a little and it appeared as if the day might be dry.
We hitched up the horses and started for the field to haul in oats, but the old saying (there is many
a slip “twixt* the cup and the lips) came true, for we had scarcely got into the field when there
came on a violent rain, and so put a stop to our hauling. It rained for about an hour. The afternoon
was dry. Jim and John built a rail fence. I threshed some pease for Willie, who is going to take
them to the show fair on the 7th of next month. [*Robert uses a double quotation mark (not the
modern apostrophe), indicating a supposedly missing prefix be- in betwixt]
October [1884]
1st Cloudy morning, the day generally overcast, though pretty drying. In the forenoon Jim and John
went for a load of oats to Melancthon. They were so wet we had to stand them up outside the
barn. Willie and I turned sheaves at home in the forenoon, and in the afternoon all hands hauled
in. Brother Sam with his team came and helped us. We finished hauling in at home. The last ten
acres which we put in are very damp, some of them growing in the field, but there did not seem
any chance of getting them dry, as every other day for these last twelve days has been wet, and so
soon as we got them a little dry, they would be wet again. It has been a tough time getting them in
the barn.
<folio 25 verso>
October 1884
2nd Cloudy, overcast morning and [rain] began to fall about 9:30 A.M., and increased in volumn
[=volume] till noon, when there was a pretty steady afternoon’s rain, and it is still (6:45) P.M.
Raining! We started this morning for Melancthon to haul in oats. There was Brother Sam, Dan
Reid, and Jim. They fetched a load each. The oats were pretty wet when they got home. There
are about two loads still remaining in the field.
3 Slight mizzle of rain early this morning. The day cleared off soon, the afternoon was very bright
and warm. I chored around in the forenoon, and in the afternoon went to Dundalk and got en-
trance tickets for the animals and articles which I mean to show at the fair in Dundalk on the 7th
and 8th inst. Jim opened out oat stooks in Melancthon. John helped Brother Sam at his house.
4 Dry morning, but clouds soon began to appear. There was a slight sprinkling of rain in the fore-
noon and a continuous light rain in the afternoon. We hauled oats from Melancthon, the first two
237
loads we put in the Barn, the last two loads we stood up outside the Barn as they were very wet.
Brother Sam and Johney Oliver helped us.
5th Sabbath. Clear, sunshiney day all through.
<folio 26 recto>
October 1884
6th Bright morning, the sun shone all day. Jim helped Walter Bell to finish his harvest this afternoon.
We put in the last of our oats very early this morning. It has been a tough harvest. Began on the
11th of August. Johney and Willie took up potatoes. I thrashed some grain with the flail for the
Show fair. [in margin] Finished / Harvesting
7 Bright sunny morning, the day dry and pretty warm. Mrs. R. and I took in some things and placed
them in the show grounds. Jim and John raised potatoes. Brother John’s Bob and Nancy came
here this afternoon.
8 Cold, wet morning, faired off a little about noon. More cold rain in the afternoon. Very unpleas-
ant day. All went to the show fair. Mrs. R. got first prize for Star quilt (patch), [stricken second]
third prize for fancy quilt, first for coucumbers [=cucumbers], and first for tidy [?]. Jim and John
got second prizes for White and Black oats.
9 Fair day all through, but a little chilly. The Boys raised potatoes. I went to Dundalk and calculat-
ed the cheese dividends.
10 Fine sunshiney day all through. I took Mrs. R., who is sick, to Dr. Barr of Hornings Mills. Jim
and John were at Mr. Oliver’s logging Bee. James Patterson of Melancthon got very badly hurt at
the bee by a stubb* falling on him. The shock caused concussion of the brain. He also has his col-
lar Bone broken. Poor James, it will go hard with him. [*presumably a short log, falling off a
load.]
<folio 26 verso>
October 1884
11th Bright morning, the day pleasant and dry, cloudy in the afternoon. I went to see James Patterson
in the forenoon. He is very low, still, there is a slight hope of his recovery (I trust God will spare
him to his family). In the afternoon I went to Dundalk and paid the patrons of the factory their
cheese dividends. The boys raised potatoes at home.
12th Sabbath. Fine sunny day all through. Mrs. R. and I went to see James Patterson. He is no better.
John Patterson came home with us and stopped all night.
13 Cold, raw morning, the day cloudy and chilly all through. Mrs. R. and Phoebe went with Sam’s
team to the carding mill. I took John Patterson to see his brother James, then I drove him to Dun-
dalk station. The boys were at the potatoes.
14 Dry day. I asked hands for the threshing in the forenoon. John was logging at M. Neithercut’s
Bee. Jim had the Horses helping H. Hewitt to thresh. The driver asked Jim to drive a while for
him, and when he stepped on the horse power* to do so, his foot got caught. He jumped, but his
foot is badly torn. The sole is torn open the breadth of the entire foot and half the length of it, also
very deep. Patrick Conners and Brother Sam brought him home. Dan McDowell went for Dr.
McWilliams. He came, washed, dressed and sowed it together. It’s a terrible tear. [in margin]
Jim got / Foot crushed [*the horse power is the mechanism which converts the motion of the radi-
al arm pulled by horses walking in a circle, through a system of gears, to power the threshing ma-
chine.]
<folio 27 recto>
October 1884
238
15th Fine day, till about 5 P.M. when there was some rain. Bob Mills is threshing here. Jim’s foot is
pretty painful.
16 Fine day. Finished threshing: pretty fair yield, about 23 Bushels of Oats per acre, 14 of Wheat, 12
of pease and 14 of Barley. The wheat is a very good sample. The machine ground the pease into
dust and blowed them away. I lost in this manner about 40 Bushels. I have 140 Bushels Wheat,
60 of pease, 70 of Barley, and near 700 B. of oats, or perhaps 730 B. of Oats, close to 1000 Bush-
els in all of grain. Jim’s foot is progressing favorably. The Dr. came and dressed it this afternoon.
17 Cool, dry day. John was at H. Johnson’s threshing and Clark was at W. Bell’s threshing. Willie
and I tidied up the granary and Barn. I went to Dundalk at night.
18 Quite a shower of snow fell this morning, the day was cool all through. John and Clark were at H.
Lonsway’s threshing. Willie and I chored around home. Brother John and Wife came on a visit
here this afternoon. [in margin] First snow
19th Sabbath. Fine day all through, but windy. Quite a number of persons came here to see how Jim’s
foot was doing. Dr. McWilliams came and took the stitches out.
<folio 27 verso>
October 1884
20th Beautiful day from morning till night. Brother John and wife went to Brother Sam’s. Clark and
John, with the team, are at D. Reid’s threshing. Willie and I put back straw in the barn. [in mar-
gin] Indian / Summer
21 Dry morning, but cloudy, the day was dry. We were putting back straw in the barn. Brother John
and Eliza were here at night. Very heavy rain storm at night. [in margin] Notice of sale / Essa.
[*see below; attempt to sell the farm owned jointly by John and Robert Russell in Essa]
22 Wet morning, the day showery and cold. Brother John and wife left for home. John and Willie
were at J. Gott’s threshing in the forenoon. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. I sat
up this night with James Patterson at R. Oliver’s.
23 Ground covered with snow and plenty more falling this morning. Snow falling all through the
day. There is now (7:30) P.M. Six or 7 inches of snow and more falling. I came home from Mr.
Oliver’s, called at Brother Sam’s and bought a cow from him for $2300/XX. [in margin] Snow
24 Heavy coating of snow on the ground, and more falling, the day generally wintry-like with fre-
quent showers of snow. John cut some firewood and hauled it home. I went to Dundalk.
25 Wintry morning, cold, and snow on the ground, the day pretty cold except where the sun shone.
John took 285 pounds wheat and 460 [pounds] mixed grain to the mill. He used the sleigh. I went
to Dundalk. [in margin] Doctor / Here 4th / time
<folio 28 recto>
October 1884
26th Sabbath. Snow and slop, very disagreeable day, snow melting at night.
27 Rain this morning, and mostly all through the forenoon, the latter part of the afternoon dry. John
and Willie cleaned pease. I went to Dundalk. Jim’s foot is mending slowly. It causes him con-
siderable of pain sometimes.
28 Snow, pretty much all gone, the day a little chilly, but not very cold. John and I took up turnips
and carrots. Willie drove his mother to Dr. Barr’s.
29 Very nice day all through, dry, mild and breezy. John and I with the team were at Brother Sam’s
threshing. Doctor here to see Jim’s foot, 5th time. Jim’s foot is mending slowly, still, it is mend-
ing, for which we may be thankful.
30 Nice mild day all through, a little snow still remains in the bush, waiting on the next to come.
John and Willie were taking up potatoes in Melancthon. The Scott act* was voted on in Dufferin
239
and carried by over 500 of a majority. Two of the Brinkman boys were here tonight to see Jim.
One of our cows swelled up this night after coming off the turnips. She was dead this morning
when Clark went to fetch the cattle home. [*The Canadian Temperance Act (known as the Scott
Act, since its major sponsor was Sir Richard Scott), passed in 1878 by the Canadian Parliament,
allowed communities or counties to vote separately on the question of prohibition. Dufferin is
“dry” as a result of this vote, but is Dundalk, in Grey County? See
http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/prohibition/]
31 Dry in the forenoon, wet in the afternoon. John brought home a cow from Brother Sam’s. I
bought her for $2300/xx, intend fatttening her. Then he went to H. Hewitt’s threshing. I took a
cowhide to Dundalk, brought $3.85.
<folio 28 verso>
November 1884
1st Dark morning, and in the afternoon snow fell to a considerable extent, the snow pretty soft. John
was at H. Hewitt’s threshing in the forenoon. We put in some straw, gathered up some turnips,
then I went to Dundalk at night.
2nd Sabbath. Dark day all through, the snow again dissapearing. Miss Hannah Neithercut and her sister
Minnie were here.
3 Dark morning, the day generally cloudy, a small bit of sunshine once. The snow is mostly all
gone. Jim’s foot is improving. Miss Minnie Neithercut and her sister Hannah are here. John and
I brought in our potatoes, and some of our carrots into the cellar. I had the smallest yield of pota-
toes this year that I ever had, about 40 bushels on an acre and a half.
4 Cloudy morning, quite a quantity of soft snow fell during the day, the afternoon was soft, almost
like a thaw. We were choring around today.
5 Very cold, stormy morning, the day blust[e]ry all through. Quite a severe snow storm. John took
Miss Minnie Neithercut and her sister home, and brought the cattle from Melancthon. I went to
Dundalk in the afternoon.
<folio 29 recto>
November 1884
6th Plenty of snow on the ground this morning, the day pretty mild, a good deal of snow melted.
Went to Shelburne in the cars*, walked from there to Brother John’s in Tossorontio. [*in the cars
= on the train; in the absence of passenger cars, travellers sat on plank benches installed in box-
cars (see History of Dundalk, p. 36). Robert’s walk from Shelburne to John’s was about twenty
miles (from Shelburne to close to Alliston).]
7 Snow still disappearing, not much here, the day pretty mild all through. I went in the eavning with
Brother John to Alliston, seen John Agnew, then went home with him and stopped there all night.
8 Mild day all through, little or no snow here, sun shining a good deal. John Agnew, John Russell
and I attended the advertised sale of the Essa farm. It was not sold. The Hussay’s paid up all the
interest due to the first of the present month, being one year and eight months interest, also all the
costs. They further agreed [MS:agreead] to give a new mortgage on the farm, to run Five years
from first of the present month, the mortgage to carry seven per cent per annum interest. They
signed an agreement to this affect [=effect], the writing to be completed in ten days. [in margin]
Attended / Sale of / Essa Lot
9th Sabbath. Mild morning, the day mild all through. John Agnew drove me to William Lonsway’s
near Clover Hill. We stopped a while there and then came back to John’s.
10 Another fine morning, the day fine all through. John’s son, J. T., drove me up to Brother John’s in
the forenoon. I stopped at John’s that afternoon and night.
240
<folio 29 verso>
November 1884
11th Fine morning, the day mild all through. Brother John’s Jim drove me up six concessions on my
way home. I then turned him back and footed it to Shelburne, took the cars from there home.
Johney attended the fair at Dundalk today and sold a pair of three and a half year old steers for
Sixty dollars.
12 Mild in the forenoon, but chilly in the afternoon. Johney chopped wood in the afternoon and went
to Mr. Nichol’s threshing in the forenoon. Mrs. R. and I went to Sam’s.
13 Mild morning, the day dry and breezy in the afternoon. Johney and Willie with the oxen went to
Melancthon to stump and stone. I stopped at home and done the chores. I went to Dundalk in the
afternoon.
14 The ground covered with white frost, the sun shone out and the day was beautiful, almost like In-
dian Summer. Johney and Willie are working in Melancthon. I took care of the animals at home.
Miss M. Hewitt was here.
15 Mild day, the sun shone out bright and clear most of the day. John and Willie worked in Melanc-
thon. I was in Dundalk on cheese business.
16th Sabbath. Fine morning, the day beautiful all through. Brother Sam and Phoebe were here.
<folio 30 recto>
November 1884
17th Cold, raw morning, the day cold all through. Johney and Willie went to Melancthon to work.
18 Pretty chilly morning, the day cold. John and Willie are working in Melancthon.
19 The ground very hard frozen this morning, a chilly air, generally, all day. John and Willie worked
in Melancthon. I went to R. Cornell’s to help make out the milk accounts. Came home about 2
O’clock [at] Night.
20 Cool morning, the day dry, cool and breezy. I worked at home till 3 P.M. at the milk accounts,
then I went to Dundalk and paid the patrons of factory for their cheese.
21 Rather milder this morning, the air was soft through the day and the ground thawed some. The
boys worked in Melancthon.
22 Pretty sharp frost this morning, the day cold all through. I and Mrs. R. went to Dundalk in the
forenoon. Brother Sam brought home the Democrat Waggon at night. He had been away since
last Tuesday through the Townships of Mulmer, Nottawaysaga and Collinwood [=Nottawasaga,
Collingwood] trying to get a farm to rent. He did not succeed.
23rd Sabbath. Rain in the morning, rain at noon with a strong wind. The rain turned to snow at night.
Two Miss Johnson[s], H. Hewitt & Richard Neithercut were here.
<folio 30 verso>
November 1884
24th Very cold morning, blowing, snowing and freezing, and continued so all day. We butchered nine
pigs. Henry Lonsway helped us.
25 Stormy morning, snowing, blowing and freezing all day. Willie and I took four fat pigs butchered
to Dundalk, sold them for $5.20 per cwt. John went to Walter Bell’s threshing. He did not thresh.
26 Cold stormy morning, snowing, blowing and freezing all day. Johney and Willie went to Mr.
Wright’s grist mill, they took 15 Bush[els] & 48 pounds wheat, got near to 40 p. per Bushel.
27 Mild morning, a softness in the air, day almost like a thaw, the day pleasant all through. John was
at W. Bell’s threshing. Mrs. Bowler, Mrs. Neithercut and her daughter, Martha, were here. I went
to Mrs. Bowler’s at night.
241
28 Mild morning, the day mild and foggy, like a fall of rain or more snow. John underbrushed* in
Melancthon. I got a ton of hay of [sic] Dan Reid for $7.00. He hauled it home, then he helped me
drive a yoke of steers from Brother Sam’s home. Mrs. C. Bell was here today, also Jim Nic[h]ol
and three of his sisters were here a while at night. [*cut underbrush on lot that has been logged, or
about to be logged]
<folio 31 recto>
November 1884
29th Mild morning, a little snow fell during the day and the afternoon got chilly. John was underbrush-
ing. Clark took Four head of our young cattle and two of Brother Sam’s to Tossorontio to Brother
John’s to feed them for the winter. Mr. D. Reid and wife were here a while tonight. [in margin]
Cattle / sent to / John’s.
30th Sabbath. Pretty mild day, a little sunshine now and then. I was at Brother Sam’s at night, also to
see J. Patterson. He is improving rapidly.
December [1884]
1st Mild morning, the day generally mild, not much sunshine. John and Willie took the team and
went to Melancthon to repair the Horse stable. Willie brought home a load of stove wood in the
afternoon. Mrs. Widow Broughton and her daughter, Mrs. Lonsway, were here this eavning.
Clark got home this eavning.
2 Mild day but cloudy, and without any sunshine, the sky greately[sic] overcast at night, indicating
snow. A moderate wind prevailed during the day. John is working in Melancthon. Jim’s foot is
mending very slowly.
3 Misty day from norning till night, a slight thaw, strong winds in the morning. John is at the Shan-
ty.
4 Beautiful day, bright sun, the snow disappearing rapidly. Mrs. R. took Jim in to Sam’s in the
sleigh. John is working in Melancthon. I went to Dundalk. [in margin] Sent letter / to William /
Omega, Tenn [i.e. his brother William]
<folio 31 verso>
December 1884
5th Misty morning, the sun shone out after a while, and the forenoon was beautiful, the afternoon was
rainy. John is working in Melancthon. I went to Sam’s in the forenoon and in the afternoon Mrs.
R. and I took Jim to Dundalk for the Doctor to see his foot.
6 Cloudy morning, a general thaw has sett in. Wet afternoon, Raining now (8:00 P.M.), the wind
pretty brisk. John was working in Melancthon. Brother Sam and I went to Melancthon, he helped
me to make a wood rack.
7th Sabbath. Very wet day from morning till night, the rain turned to snow at night.
8 Blowing and snowing this morning, the day windy and snow fell during most of the day. John is
working in Melancthon. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon, got a payment from Collector of Tax-
es, also paid Dr. McWilliam* for his services to Jim’s crushed foot. [*Previously treated Jim, “at
point of death” in late June, early July 1879. Dr. McWilliam began medical practice in Dundalk
upon graduation from Trinity Medical College in Toronto in 1876, selling his practice in 1921; see
History of Dundalk, p. 128; and 21 Dec. 1882, above.]
9 Blowing and snowing this morning, a good deal of snow fell during the day, but the wind blew it
off the roads. No sleighing worth anything. John is working in Melancthon.
10 Pretty cool morning, the middle of the day a little sunny, the afternoon cooler, the day calm. Mrs.
D. Reid and Miss S. Bell helped Mrs. R. to quilt. I paid Melancthon tax, Valuation $850, Co. Rate
242
3 mills (2.55), Township R. 2 ½ (2.13), Railroad R. 3. (2.55), drainage $6.89, Trustee tax $3.83,
total $17.95. [amounts we give in parentheses are written as superscript, underscored]. [in mar-
gin] Paid / Melancthon / Tax
<folio 32 recto>
December 1884
11th Pretty sharp morning, the day very variable, snow and sunshine, storm and calm. John is working
in Melancthon. Mrs. R. took some provisions to him and brought home the Bobsleighs which
were there.
12 Pretty sharp morning, the day chilly all through. John is working in Melancthon. Miss J. Neither-
cut came here this afternoon.
13 Cold morning, the afternoon rather milder, not any sun, the day cloudy all through. No sleighing
and very bad wagoning. Miss Neithercut was here making a dress for Eliza. John was working in
Melancthon. Willie, Clark and I moved some straw in the mow in order to get at the hay. Clark
and I then went to Dundalk in the afternoon, he bought himself an overcoat at $10.50. Willie took
Jim in the sleigh to Johney Neithercut’s. He is going to stop there tonight. Mr. Thos. Middleton,
Teacher of this Sch. Sect. Was here tonight. I paid him his order $333.00.
14th Sabbath. Cold, raw wind, the day dark, without any sunshine. Brother Sam and Phoebe were
here.
15 Lots of snow falling this morning, and plenty of snow fell during the day. Pretty good sleighing
now. John hauled stove wood home from Melancthon. I attended council meeting in Dundalk.
Frank Millsop died this morning. [in margin] Sleighing
<folio 32 verso>
16th Cold stormy morning, blowing, snowing and freezing. The day cold and stormy all through. We
Butchered a fat cow. Dan Reid was chief Executioner, John Gott helped to skin her. I had bought
her about 45 days ago for $25.00. I have been fattening her since then, she is in good order.
17 Sharp morning, the day cold all through, a little snow fell occasionally. John helped Walter Bell at
his wood bee. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
18 Cold morning, the day extremely cold, a little snow fell occasionally. John started to haul cord-
wood to Dundalk. Henry Lonsway is helping him, the sleighing is good. [in margin] Hauled first
/ wood to / Station / this winter.
19 Extremely cold morning, a sharp freeze all day. Some sunshine through the day, no wind, the day
calm. Mrs. Skeffington Bell was here. I was sawing up a cow today and a mighty hard job it was.
She was frozen as hard as [a] stick. [in margin] Cold.
20 Extremely cold day from morning till night. Good sleighing, a little snow falling at night. John
was hauling cordwood. I went to Dundalk. [in margin] very cold
21st Sabbath. A little milder this morning, the middle of the day fine, the afternoon cold. Mrs. R. and I
were at Brother Sam’s.
<folio 33 recto>
December 1884
22nd Very stormy morning, the day stormy all through, blowing and snow drifting very badly in the
afternoon. John hauled wood to Dundalk.
23 Sharp morning, the day pretty chilly all through, no wind, but calm. I worked at the township
Books in the forenoon and went to Dundalk in the afternoon. John Agnew was here all night.
24 Pretty cold day, not any blow but a sharp freeze. John hauled wood. I worked at the Township
Books. John Agnew left for home this forenoon.
243
25 Pretty sharp morning, the day cold all through. Brother Sam and Phoebe were here a while in the
afternoon. William Agnew and wife and wife’s sister came here in the afternoon. Clark got home
from O. S.* Examination. [*Owen Sound was a venue for Teacher Qualification examinations;
Clark is aged 17.]
26 Bright sun pretty much all day, but rather sharp freeze, the day pleasant. John hauled wood. Clark
hauled home a load of stove wood.
27 Cold morning, the day pretty chilly, the day overcast, no sunshine. John hauled cordwood. I and
Clark fixed a place to fat a sow in. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon, bought 10 Bushels pease at
.56¢ per Bushel.
28 Sabbath. Mild day, like a thaw, especially in the eavning.
29 Soft forenoon, the afternoon raining. A thaw has set in. John hauled wood to Dundalk. I went to
the nomination.* Mrs. R. went to a Quilting at Phoebe’s. Jim also went to Brother Sam’s. [*It is
unclear which level of government the nominations are for. It is likely for township council (for
which Robert and two eldest sons vote on 5 Jan. 1884); for provincial government, Robert votes
for M. P. P (Member of Provincial Parliament) on 18 March 1884.]
<folio 33 verso>
December 1884
30th Thawing all day, Raining in the afternoon. The boys are in Melancthon. Jim is at Sam’s. Willie
brought the horses home from Melancthon in the afternoon. T. Hanbury, John Neithercut and
Tom Mitchel[l] were here. [in margin] Thaw.
31 Rain in the morning, a little sunshine towards noon, strong cold wind in the afternoon. Freezing at
night. Clark was at J. Patterson’s wood bee. Jim is stopping at Brother Sam’s. Johney is working
in Melancthon. Willie came home from Melancthon for the oxen. The old year is again passing
away and will soon be ended. We have had pretty fair fortune during its continuance, no sickness
which is something to be thankful for. Pretty fair crops and good health. The only drawback was
the accident to Jim’s foot, but I think that time will eventually restore it to its proper use. Good
by[e], Old Year, and may your successor prove a Beneficial One.
<folio 34 recto>
January 1885
1st Cold morning, the day cold all through, sharp cutting wind, freezing keenly. The boys are work-
ing in Melancthon. Mrs. R. and I visited at Mrs. C. Bell’s. Jim is at Brother Sam’s.
2 Very cold morning, cold noon and cold afternoon. Sharp air, freezing keen. The boys are in
Melancthon. Jim got home from Sam’s. His Mother went after him with the Sleigh. The sleigh-
ing is gone, though.
3 Sharp cold morning, the day pretty breezy, the wind very cutting, scarcely any sunshine. John,
Clark and Willie were working in Melancthon.
4th Sabbath. Pretty mild day, some sunshine.
5 Pretty mild day all through. Jim, John and I went to Proton and voted*, then John and Jim went
and voted in Melancthon. [*Jim and John are aged 21 and 19, respectively. As property owners
and residents in both townships, they vote in both Proton and Melancthon municipal elections.]
6 A little sharp this morning, the afternoon mild. John is working in Melancthon. Jim is stopping
somewhere, there. Clark & Eliza started for school.
7 Windy, generally, through the day, with several flurrys of snow, the day inclined to be soft. Willie
started for school. John is working in Melancthon.
244
8 Rather mild morning, the day mild. John was working in Melancthon. We took Jim to Dundalk in
the afternoon, to the Doctor’s. Mr. R. Oliver got his Barn, some grain, implements, and some
stock burned this morning about 5 A.M. [in margin] R. Oliver’s Barn / Burned.
<folio 34 verso>
January 1885
9th Mild in the forenoon, cold and a little snow in the afternoon, very strong wind at night with a
blinding snow storm. The wind kept very high all night, making the house quiver. John went to
Mr. Oliver’s bee to haul lumber. George Rutherford came here at night and Insured the outbuild-
ings for $500.00 and contents for $800.00, total $1,300.00, paid $13.00 for insurance and $1.00 for
fees. The insurance to last for 3 years from date. [in margin] Insured / in Western.
10 Pretty sharp morning, strong wind the middle of the day, and afternoon was mild. John and Clark
went to Melancthon and finished making wood rack.
11th Sabbath. Mild day with a slight snowfall in the afternoon, the afternoon also pretty windy. I went
to Brother Sam’s, Mr. Joseph Jackson and wife, and Miss S. Jackson was at our place.
12 Sharp morning, high wind and snow, the day was very windy, with frequent showers of drifting
snow. John left with the team to swamp out short wood in Melancthon. Mr. H. Lonsway and wife
were here at night.
13 Very cold morning, the day sharp all through. John was hauling wood from Melancthon to Dun-
dalk.
14 Sharp morning, the day pretty cold all through. Rather strong wind. I went in the forenoon to Mr.
Oliver’s Raising, then accompanied brother Sam to Dundalk. John was hauling short wood to
Dundalk.
<folio 35 recto>
1885 January
15 Rather cold morning, the afternoon something milder. Pretty good sleighing on account of a slight
snow fall last night. John was hauling short wood to Dundalk. Jim went to John Arnold’s in the
eavning, then he went with Joseph Jackson to his place. I went to Dundalk.
16 Pretty chilly morning and quite a snowfall in the forenoon, very cold towards night and a very
strong wind. Miss Sarah Bell visited us in the afternoon and Miss Gen* Neithercut came here in
the eavening to make up a coat, cloak or something else for Eliza. John was hauling wood to
Dundalk. [*Short for Jennie?, whose older sister married Josiah Saudier, both are daughters of Jo-
seph Neithercut; History of Dundalk, p. 360.]
17 Extremely cold, stormy morning, the day one of storm all through. High wind, piercing cold,
drifting show. Miss Neithercut is here. John took one load of wood to Dundalk and brought an-
other home in the eavning. Clark helped Sam Lonsway 1/2 day at his sawing. I am Forty-nine
years of age. [in margin] Birthday.
18th Sabbath. Cold stormy day, Blowing and snowing. [in margin] Cold.
19 Very cold all through the day, Blowing and freezing, the coldest day, I think, [that has] come this
winter. I hired a horse and cutter from G. R. Phillips* for $1.50, went to Hopeville to a council
meeting. I am retained again as Township Treasurer, Salary $75.00 per annum. [in margin] In-
tensely Cold. [*G.R. Phillips, livery stable, 1887 business directory; History of Dundalk, p. 104.]
<folio 35 verso>
20th Cold morning, the day very sharp all through, a stormy wind and freezing keenly, no sun, the day
cloudy. John is hauling wood to Dundalk, Jim is stopping in Melancthon. [in margin] Cold.
245
21 Cold stormy day from morning till night, Blowing and snowing with an intense freeze. John is
working with the team in Melancthon. Miss Sarah Bell of Proton was married today to a Mr. Pat-
terson of Egremont. [in margin] Miss Bell / married.
22 Bright sunny morning, the sky got overcast towards noon, the afternoon was cold. John is work-
ing at the cordwood. I went to Dundalk in the eavning.
23 Pretty sharp morning, the day generally cold. John was hauling cordwood to Dundalk
24 Milder this morning, the day inclined to be soft, almost like a thaw. John and Brother Sam were
hauling cordwood to Dundalk.
25th Sunday. A little colder than yesterday, quite a quantity of snow fell. Mrs. R. and I went to Br.
Sam’s. I then went to meeting.
26 Stormy morning, blowing and drifting, the day one of storm and cold. John hauled one load to
Dundalk and one home. A. Lonsway and his son James were here.
<folio 36 recto>
January 1885
27th Quite a keen freeze this morning, the day very cold all through. John went to Melancthon to haul
wood. Minnie Neithercut went home this morning with John. I have just got the Township Books
audited and my accounts are straight as possible.
28 Very cold morning, hard freezing, especially in the forenoon, the afternoon a little milder with
some sunshine. John and Brother Sam were hauling wood to Dundalk. Mrs. R. and I went to
Dundalk in the afternoon.
29 Cold morning, the day cold all through, very little sunshine. Sharp freeze. John was hauling
cordwood to Dundalk. Brother John and wife, and cousin Mary Murphy, came here this eavning.
30 Not so cold as yesterday, the day considerably warmer in the afternoon. Johney was hauling
cordwood to Dundalk. Brother John, his wife and daughter Minnie, and cousin Mary Murphy, are
here. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
31 Mild morning, the day pleasant, with considerable of sunshine now and then. Brother John went
to Brother Sam’s. Johney was hauling cordwood. Clark left home this morning to go to School in
Alliston.* Willie and I cleaned up a small grist. [*Clark is attempting to qualify as a teacher; he
plans to attend middle school.]
<folio 36 verso>
February 1885
1st Sabbath. Considerable of snow fell in the forenoon, the day pretty chilly. John and Mrs. R. went
with the team to Brother Sam’s for John and the others.
2 Cold this morning but the day got milder and the afternoon was pretty nice. John finished hauling
long wood to Dundalk. Brother John and his company went home. Mrs. Thos. Robinson was bur-
ied today. [in margin] Finished / Hauling / longwood.
3 Mild morning, the day mild all through, with a little snowfall in the afternoon. John went to the
mill with a small grist. I chored around. Mr. Nichol called in the eavening.
4 Pretty mild day, scarcely any sunshine but the air soft, the trees covered over with a very heavy
hoar frost. John was hauling logs for Henry Lonsway.
5 Sharp morning, Keen frost, the middle of the day something milder, but the afternoon, especially
about nightfall, extremely cold. I posted a letter to Brother William “Omega P. O., Houston Co ,
St. of Tennessee”, also another to Sister Sarah “Sunnidale Corners P. 0.”* [in margin] Posted / let-
ter / to Br. William. [*Sunnidale Corners is in Simcoe County, near New Lowell.]
246
6 Very cold morning, terrible frost, the middle of the day and afternoon was milder with quite a bit
of sunshine. John was hauling short wood to Dundalk. Mr. Walter Nichols and Wife were here a
while at night.
<folio 37 recto>
February 1885
7 Not near so cold a morning as yesterday, the afternoon, especially, was quite sunny, but on about
dark there was a severe frost again. John hauled one load of short wood to Dundalk in the fore-
noon, then he went to Wright’s mill in the afternoon. He had left to be gristed Eleven Bushels and
Fourteen pounds, and he got Four hundred and forty five pounds of flour or almost Forty pounds
to the bushel. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
8th Sabbath. Cold and windy, some snow fell in the afternoon, and drifted at night
9 Cold, Blustering morning, the day very stormy all through, snowing and blowing. Johney brought
a load of firewood in the forenoon from Melancthon. He hurt his finger pretty badly while load-
ing, struck his finger between the load and the stick he was throwing up. Clark got home from Al-
liston where he had went to School. No Room for him in the school, more money wasted, fitting
him out, cost me about $20.00, all for nothing, humbug from beginning to end of the drama. First
lamb came this morning. Ewe had two, one of them was dead when found. [in margin] First
Lamb.
10 Very cold morning, Blowing and freezing, the day extremely cold all through. I went to Dundalk
to try to sell my cordwood, did not get a bid for it, the first class wood in the yard was selling for
$1.75 per cord. James Murphey was here, I met with him in Dundalk. [in margin] Very cold.
<folio 37 verso>
February 1885
11th Very cold morning, intense frost, the day cold all through. James Murphey stopped here all day.
[in margin] cold.
12th Another cold morning but not quite so sharp as yesterday. John went to Melancthon to haul some
short wood to Dundalk. James Murphy went to Brother Sam’s. [in margin] cold.
13 Another cold morning, the day a little milder in the afternoon. John brought a small load wood
home. [in margin] cold.
14 A little milder this morning, the sun shone out and made things look cheery, the afternoon was
rather mild. We Butchered a fat pig in the forenoon and took her to Dundalk in the afternoon.
Sold her for $5.50 per hundred pounds. She weighed 319 pounds. I sold my cordwood to a Mr.
Higgins for $1.60 per cord and $2.00 more added to the sum total of price. It is very little for it. I
got $2.75 per cord last year.
15th Sabbath. Sharp cold day all through.
16 Very cold morning, the day Blowing and freezing and Extremely cold. John and Jim went to
Dundalk and measured the wood, there were 74 cords. In the afternoon John and I hauled two saw
logs from the field. I got 2 Tons of Hay from Mrs. Bowler at $8.00 per ton.
17 Another cold day, very sharp frost. John went with the saw logs to the mill in the forenoon, and in
the afternoon [brought] 8 saw logs home.
<folio 38 recto>
February 1885
18th Something milder than yesterday, still there was a pretty sharp frost. John hauled logs to the saw
mill. Mrs. H. Bowler was here.
19 Pretty cold in the forenoon, sharp frost, the afternoon something milder. John hauled a load of
stove wood to Dundalk. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon, seen brother Sam there. He came near
247
loosing [=losing] about $400.00. In getting into the sleigh at home he put the money in his wife’s
satchal and left the satchel on the wood pile, right on the edge of the travelled road, while he
placed the child in its mother’s arms. He drove to Dundalk without the satchel, missed his money,
then turned and came home. Luckily he found it on the wood pile where he left it.
20 Cold morning, the middle of the day something milder, the afternoon cold with a sharp frost. John
hauled a load of wood to Dundalk and another home. He and Jim went to a flare-up* held in Mr.
John Duncan’s at night, under the patronage of W. Acheson’s Boys. I went to Dundalk, sent a
cheque to the Manager Bank of Commerce for $577.85 to Redeem the second Drainage Debenture
of School Section No. 1 Proton, also Deposited Near $500.00 in the Dundalk Bank. [*obviously
some sort of party; perhaps an outdoor bonfire?]
21 Sharp morning, the day cold all through. John brought a load of wood home, and a little hay that
he had left at John Neithercut’s. Mrs. R. visited Mrs. C. Bell in the eavening.
<folio 38 verso>
February 1885
22nd Sabbath. Pretty chilly in the forenoon, the sun shone out about 10 A.M., the afternoon was pleas-
ant. Mrs. R. and I went to H. Lonsway’s in the afternoon.
23 Bright beautiful morning, the sun shone out strong all day, the day mild. John and Jim started for
Melancthon to work stove wood. This is the first day that Jim attempted work since the 14th of
last October, when he got his foot badly crushed and mangled in the Horse power of a threshing
machine. The foot is far from being well yet. The Township auditors, Messrs. F. Nixon and T.
Fennell were auditing my books here as Treasurer of the Township. [in margin] Jim / tried / work.
24 Rather hazy this morning, the forenoon without sunshine, the afternoon sunny and mild. Jim and
John worked in Melancthon. Eliza went from school to Joseph Ne[i]thercut’s, little Joe Neithercut
came to our place with Clark and Willie.
25 Beautiful morning, the sun shone out clear all day, the day very pleasant. Mrs. R. and I went to
Brother Sam’s last night. His Baby Boy is sick nigh unto death with inflamation on the lungs. I
came home this morning, Mrs. R. stopped till this afternoon. The baby is something better. Jim is
in Melancthon. John is at Mr. Hewett’s wood bee.
<folio 39 recto>
February 1885
26th Beautiful Day all through. John and Jim are in Melancthon working. I went to Dundalk in the
afternoon.
27 Another fine day, almost like a thaw, the air soft and the snow inclined to melt. John and Jim
worked in Melancthon. Mrs. Pierce, a religious crank stopped here all night.
28 Pretty mild morning, the day soft all through, not freezing much. Jim worked in Melancthon, cut-
ting stove wood. John hauled home two loads of stove wood. I cleaned oats in the forenoon, as-
sisted by Clark and Willie. They cleaned in the afternoon themselves and I went to Dundalk to at-
tend a meeting of the Patrons of the cheese Factory. At night Mrs. R. and I went to Brother Sam’s
and sat up all night with his Baby.
March [1885]
1st Sabbath. Mild morning, but some snow falling, the day was something colder in the eavening.
Brother Sam brought Mrs. R. and I home. The child is something better.
2 Mild in the forenoon, with some sunshine, the afternoon was cold and blowing. Jim took the team
to Melancthon to haul stove wood to Dundalk. John cut cedar posts at home, I went to Dundalk.
[in margin] Got letter / from Br. / William.
248
3 Dark, lowering day without sunshine, but not cold. Jim hauled stove wood to Dundalk, John cut
posts. I worked at the Township accounts.
<folio 39 verso>
March 1885
4th Dark day all through, with some snow falling now and then, not cold, rather inclined to be soft.
John hauled posts out of the Swamp in the forenoon with the oxen, in the afternoon he went to
Dundalk. Jim was at Mont[gomery] Neithercut’s sawing. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk in the
afternoon. I went to see about a letter of mine which I posted on the 20th of last month to the
manager, Bank of Commerce, Toronto, containing a cheque for $577.85 to retire Debenture No. 2,
Drainage of School Sect. No. 1 Proton. Said letter has went wrong somehow, although I Regis-
tered it. I wrote to the manager respecting it on the 2nd inst. but I have got no reply.
5 Mild morning, but cloudy, the day cloudy all through. John hauled posts out of the swamp. Jim
hauled wood to Dundalk. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon, sold my oats to Sam McCullough
for .34 3/4 ¢ per Bushel.
6 Beautiful morning, the day splendid, delicious Sunshine all day long. I attended Council Meeting
at Cederville. John hitched up the colts.
7 Pretty fine day, but not near so pleasant as yesterday. There was a good deal of sunshine, but pret-
ty sharp frost. John, Clark and Willie cleaned oats. Jim is somewhere, not at home.
<folio 40 recto>
March 1885
8th Sabbath. Pretty mild in the forenoon, the afternoon a little rough and windy. Mrs. R. and I went
to Brother Sam’s.
9 Mild in the morning, it began getting rough about 10 A.M., and the wind arose very high, accom-
panied with snow late in the afternoon, and through the forepart of the night the storm was bad.
Phoebe came here in the forenoon and in the afternoon Sam came. We took a load of oats to Dun-
dalk in the forenoon. [in margin] Big Blow.
10 Pretty cold morning, the day pretty sharp all through. Sam was here a while about noon. Jim and
Johney started for Melancthon to cut stove wood. They left in the eavning.
11 Milder this morning, the day cloudy but not cold. Jim and John are working in Melancthon. Mr.
Abraham Jackson was here on his rounds, trying to raise money to wipe out the debt for the build-
ing of the English Church in Dundalk.
12 Pretty sharp in the morning, the afternoon milder, with a little sunshine. Jim and John are cutting
stove wood. I took a load of oats to Dundalk.
13 Very cold morning, the sky hazy with a cutting wind, a snow storm in the afternoon. Jim and John
are in Melancthon. I took two loads of oats to Dundalk.
14 Cold, stormy day. I took a load of oats to Dundalk and hauled Sam a load of firewood in the af-
ternoon.
<folio 40 verso>
March 1885
15th Sabbath. Very stormy day, blowing, snowing and freezing, the roads drifting up badly. [in mar-
gin] Storm.
16 Very cold morning, no traffic on the roads, they are filled up with snow, the afternoon piercing
cold. Jim and John started to cut cordwood in Melancthon. Brother Sam came here and he and I
went to Dundalk in the afternoon. He bought a Black horse, rising Eight years old, from Kenneth
McAulay for $120.00 on ten months’ time. I went in the note with him. [in margin] Sam’s / note
due / January / 16th 1886.
249
17 Cold morning, a sharp frost all day long. Jim and John are working in Melancthon.
18 Cold morning, the day cold all through. The Boys are at Melancthon, working at the cordwood. I
clerked at Kenneth McAulay’s sale.
19 Very sharp morning, the day piercing cold all through. Jim and John are at Melancthon. I hitched
up the horses in the afternoon and drove to Dundalk for the mail matter, then I went to Mr. H.
Johnson’s for Mrs. R. who was at a Quilting. Mrs. Sarah Patterson, Walter Bell, Mr. Patterson and
Mrs. W. Bell were here at night. [in margin] Mrs. S. Patterson here.
20 Very sharp morning, the day cold all through. Jim and John are in Melancthon.
21 Very sharp morning, the day cold all through. Jim and John are in Melancthon. Jim got a laced
boot made for his crushed foot, the first since it was hurt. [in margin] Sent letter to Sister Sarah.
<folio 41 recto>
March 1885
22nd Sabbath. Clear cold day all through, sunshine, but sharp frost. Mr. Skeffington Bell and wife
were here.
23 Cold morning, the day pretty sharp all through, a good deal of sunshine but cold wind. John and I
started for the Grist mill with Five Bags of wheat. When we got part of the way the mares began
to crowd each other off the track. We had to Borrow a one horse sleigh and put our wheat on it
and go to the mill with the one mare. The snow is very deep on the roads, being drifted. Our
mares are very heavy with foal and our Journey was very risky. Slightly worked one of them.
24 Stormy morning, Blowing and snowing at a fearful rate. The day was one of storm all through.
John and Jim left for Melancthon to cut cordwood.
25 Pretty sharp morning, the day had a little sunshine about noon, the afternoon mild.
26 Soft wind this morning, the sun shone out in the forenoon, melting the snow. A big snow storm
came on in the afternoon, the snow very soft, inclined to turn to Rain. I went to Dundalk in the af-
ternoon, posted a letter to Brother William, Houston Co., Omega P. O., St. of Tennessee, U.S.
Miss Mariah Maxwell and Mrs. Maria Broughten were here.
27 Soft in the forenoon, thaw wind and bright sunshine. The afternoon pretty sharp frost. I was at
Dundalk in the afternoon.
<folio 41 verso>
March 1885
28th Hard morning, the roads stiffened up well with the frost last night. There was some sunshine in
the middle of the day and through the afternoon. I got Daniel Reid to go to the mill with his team
on account of my team crowding.
29th Sabbath. Bright sunny day but a cool air. Mrs. R. and I went to Brother Sam’s with the team. We
had to go three miles out of our way on account of Side Road 220 being filled with snow. When
we got within 40 Rods of Sam’s House our horses crowded so that we had to take them off the
sleigh.
30 Dark morning, but mild, quite a snow storm came on in the afternoon, and it is now (9 P. M.)
snowing thick. John and Willie started for Melancthon this morning. John to chop and Willie to
cook. David Kinnear came to chop, have hired him for 1/2 month at $7 1/2. Jim hauled 2 loads of
stove wood home from Melancthon. Clark and I cleaned some Barley in the eavening to get
chopped.
31 Stormy in the afternoon, snowing very heavily. Jim hauled wood in the afternoon. Jim also took 7
bags of Barley and Oats to the mill to be chopped.
<folio 42 recto>
April 1885
250
1st Blustery day, storming a good deal. Jim is in Melancthon, though not chopping. He has a pain in
his Breast. John is chopping. Willie is cooking.
2 Another blustery day, storming. John is chopping cordwood in Melancthon. Jim is on the sick
list. Mrs. R. and I visited at A. Lonsway’s tonight.
3 Not so cold as yesterday, a good deal of sunshine during the day. I went to Dundalk for the chop.
A. Lonsway went with me. Jim came home this afternoon.
4 Pretty sharp morning, the day pretty chilly although there was a good deal of sunshine , the after-
noon pretty chilly. I helped D. Reid in the afternoon to draw in two loads of Hay. Clark, who had
went to the shanty on Friday morning, came home sick this afternoon.
5th Sabbath. Pretty sharp morning, quite a bit of Bland [MS:Blank?] sunshine in the forenoon, with
showers of sleet. [in margin] Easther.
6 Rather pleasant all through the day, genuine sunshine most part of the time. The snow took a start
towards the rivers and Lakes. John and Clark went to Melancthon to chop. Willie went to cook.
Jim hauled a load of stove wood home in the forenoon. I went to Dundalk.
7 Cloudy day all through, with a little rain now and then, the snow melting. I attended a special
meeting of Council at Hopeville. S. Bell provided horse and cutter. [in margin] Thaw.
<folio 42 verso>
April 1885
8th Cold stormy morning, blowing, snowing and freezing. The snow stopped after a little, but the
wind increased, the afternoon was piercing cold. The wind was so strong and the roads so icy that
it was with difficulty any person could walk without falling. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon
and posted a Draft to the Manager of Molsons Bank, Owen Sound, for $1440.00, Sinking funds of
School Sections, to remain on deposit. In the afternoon I again went to Dundalk for the veterinary
surgeon to attend Mr. A. Lonsway’s mare. [in margin] First / cow /calved.
9 Bright sunny morning, the day pleasant, the snow melting, quite springlike. John is chopping.
John Agnew stopped here this night.
10 Cloudy mostly all day, the snow melting a little, going away very slowly. John is chopping.
11 Quite a change from yesterday, snowing and blowing mostly all day. John & Clarke were chop-
ping. [in margin] 2nd Cow calved
12th Sabbath. Pretty cold day all through, the snow melted a little in the sunny side of the buildings in
the afternoon.
13 Cold morning, the day stormy all through, snowing and blowing, a regular winter’s day. Jim start-
ed for the shanty with Willie to cook and John to chop. Mrs. R visited at Mrs. C. Bell’s in the af-
ternoon.
14 Fine morning, the day sunny and the snow melting some. The Boys are chopping in Melancthon.
I bought a ton of Hay from J. Roseborough for $10.00. He hauled it home for me. [in margin] 3rd
Cow calved
<folio 43 recto>
April 1885
15th Rather fine morning, the snow melted some through the day, a little sunshine. The Boys are chop-
ping in Melancthon.
16 Bright sunny morning, the day sunny all through, the snow melting in the sunny side of the Build-
ings. The Boys are chopping. I went to Dundalk in the eavening. Mrs. Lonsway & Wife were
here at night.
251
17 Mild morning, a little sunshine in the forenoon and a good deal in the afternoon, the snow melted
considerably and I think spring is approaching. The Boys are chopping. Clark went to
Melancthon this afternoon with Bread. I helped Dan Reid to saw stove wood.
18 Bright sunny morning, the day sunny all through. The snow melted a good deal but it is a great
depth yet on the Roads and in the fields along the fences. The Boys were chopping in Melanc-
thon. Mr. A. Lonsway and wife and H. Lonsway and Wife were here at night. [in margin] 4th
Cow calved
19th Sabbath. Bright sunny day all through, the snow disappearing fast. Brother Sam & Phoebe were
here.
20 Bright sunny morning, the day very warm, the snow going rapidly. John & John Neithercut are
chopping. I went in the morning to Walter Bell’s sawing. The Horse walk* got so soft he could
only saw for about an Hour. [in margin] Heard / Robins / sing. [*the circular path followed by
horses, pulling a radial arm, to power the saw.]
21 Dark morning, a little sprinkle of Rain, the day cleared, strong sunshine. The Boys are working in
Melancthon.
<folio 43 verso>
April 1885
22nd Bright sunny morning, the day dry and warm, the snow going very rapidly, the ground will soon
all be bare. The boys are working in Melancthon. [in margin] Seen first / Robin.
23 Fine morning, the day sunny and very warm. The Boys were chopping. Johnney cut his toe, not a
very bad cut, but bad enough to lay him up for a little while. I was at Ch[arle]s. McConnell’s Rais-
ing in the afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway were here at night. [in margin] John / cut his / toe.
24 Dark morning, the day cloudy, a slight mizzle of rain, the day quite cool. I had the oxen at John
Gott’s logging. I Rolled, J. Gott teamed. Jim is working in Melancthon.
25 Cloudy morning and cold, the day dark and cold. Rain came on at night and turned to sleet to-
wards morning. Jim chopped, Clark moved fence. I attended meeting of Directors of C. Factory
in the eavning.
26th. Sabbath. Ground covered white with sleet this morning, quite cold. The sleet had disappeared
before noon. The day dark and cold. Brother Sam was here in the afternoon.
27 Quite cold this morning, the day pretty cool, not much sunshine. Jim tried to plow where we in-
tend sowing wheat: it was too wet. We then tried another field, it was something drier, still the
ground is very wet. We had the Horses & the Oxen plowing in the afternoon. [in margin] First
Plowing.
<folio 44 recto>
April 1885
28th The Ground covered with snow this morning, and more falling. It snowed most of the forenoon,
the [snow] was about Four inches deep on the level. Mrs. R. and I went to A. Lonsway’s at night.
29 Ground covered with snow this morning, but the sun shone out bright and most of the snow had
disappeared at night. We cleaned about seventy Bushels of wheat. John Made an Ox Yoke out of
cedar to plow with.
30 Chilly morning, the day clear but cold. Jim and John plowed. I chored around and went to Dun-
dalk in the afternoon. Mr. McLean & W. Maxwell were here at night on Factory business.
May [1885]
1st Bright morning, the sun shone out all day but the air was chilly. Jim and John plowed. Jim put in
Rock, a two year old colt, in the afternoon along with one of the mares, he went well.
252
2 Clear but cool morning, the day rather dark, very cold air, especially in the afternoon, sharp frost
at night. Jim, John & Clark were plowing, Clark only in the afternoon. I borrowed Dan Reid’s
plow for him. I also had John Gott’s man and team plowing. We have finished plowing for
wheat, if the ground only dries fit for the seed. A. Lonsway & Wife and Wesley were here at
night. Johney put the two year old Bay colt along with the Bay mare and plowed [with] them in
the afternoon. The little fellow is pretty tired, the ground being so soft.
3rd Sabbath. Dark cool morning, the day overcast and chilly. Mrs. R. & Eliza went to Brother Sam’s.
<folio 44 verso>
May 1885
4th Snow on the Ground this morning and quite wintry-like. The snow had all disappeared about
noon, the afternoon was pretty sunny but quite cool. Jim plowed in the forenoon and sowed pease
in the afternoon. John plowed all day. I harrowed in the afternoon. [in margin] Snow / First
Grain / Sown, pease.
5 Wet morning, the rain cleared off. We plowed some in the garden in the forenoon, and hauled
manure on it. In the afternoon we started for Melancthon with the three teams. The land at home
is too wet to work. Melancthon Lot is dryer.
6 Wet morning, the day wet all through. We had just got the teams started to plow when the rain
came on and we had to stop. There fell so much rain that the stables leaked and we had to take
one of the teams to another stable.
7 Rain early in the morning, but it cleared off about 8 A.M. and the day was dry. The three of us
plowed, Jim & John with the horses and I with the oxen. I came home this night and brought the
oxen with me. I intend sowing wheat tomorrow.
8 Dark morning, quite a frost on the ground. The day was gloomy all through, with a slight rain in
the eavening. I sowed wheat, I think about 13 Bushels. The Ground is very wet, I never sowed
grain on such wet ground, but the season for sowing wheat is about past, so I could not wait for the
ground drying. Willie harrowed with the oxen. [in margin] Sowed Wheat.
<folio 45 recto>
May 1885
9th The Ground covered with snow this morning to the depth of about 2 inches, and more falling.
There were several showers of snow through the day. Jim, John & Clark were in Melancthon.
They did not work the teams. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon. [in margin] Snow
10th Sabbath. Cold morning, the day dark, cold & dreary, plenty of snow around the fence comers.
Mr. A. Lonsway and wife were here.
11 Hard frost this morning, very cold for this time of the year, the day milder a little while in the af-
ternoon. I bought 1/2 ton hay and got it home, price $5.00. I then bought another 1/2 ton for same
money, and Willie and I brought it home. John took the Bay team to Melancthon to plow.
12 Hard frost this morning, the sun shone out, frost disappeared, the day fine in the afternoon. Willie
harrowed a little in the wheat ground. He and I took the oxen some hay & oats and went to
Melancthon in the afternoon. John & Jim are plowing there. [in margin] Seen / first / swallow.
13 Splendid, dry warm day. We were plowing in Melancthon.
14 Splendid day. We had three teams plowing in Melancthon.
15 Very warm day. We finished plowing in Melancthon.
16 Beautiful day, very breezy and drying. Willie harrowed with the colts in Melancthon. I fired
stumps and picked up. John & Jim plowed at home. Clark started this morning for Tossorontio
for the cattle.
<folio 45 verso>
253
May 1885
17th Sabbath. Bright sunny day from morning till night. [dates 17-22 May have been corrected, from
initial numbers 18-23.]
18 Bright morning, the day fine all through. Willie & I were working in Melancthon. John & Jim
worked at home.
19 Fine morning, the day clear & warm, great growth. I sowed oats in Melancthon. Willie harrowed,
the other two worked at home. [in margin] First oats / plowed
20 Beautiful morning, the day very fine. I sowed oats. Willie Harrowed. John & Jim worked at
home. [in margin] Got cattle / home
21 Beautiful day, splendid growth, lovely weather. Willie & I worked in Melancthon. John & Jim
worked at home. [in margin] Got pension / papers
22 Sky a ltttle overcast this morning, the day sultry, a few drops of Rain late in the afternoon. Willie
& I worked putting in Oats in Melancthon. John & Jim at home. [in margin] Both mares / colted.
23 A little cloudy this morning, but the day cleared off and was fine. Willie finished harrowing in
Melancthon, having harrowed 20 acres in about a week, giving it three harrowings with a span of
two year old colts. Willie & I came home in the afternoon. He then harrowed about five acres.
24th Sabbath. Bright morning, but the day got overcast. There was a little thunder and lightening with
a shower in the afternoon. Brother Sam and Phoebe were here.
25 Bright morning, but clouds gathered and there was a pretty heavy shower in the afternoon. We
were plowing, Harrowing, sowing oats and stone picking. I went in the afternoon to Mr. G. Glazi-
er’s, and bought a Bag of pease from him at .65¢ per Bushel.
<folio 46 recto>
May 1885
26 Bright morning, fine growth, the day fine, dry and warm. I sowed some pease and oats, mixed,
also some vetches. Jim and John plowed and Harrowed. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk in after-
noon.
27 Bright sunny morning, the day fine all through. I attended a council Meeting at Hopeville, the
boys finished putting in grain at home. [in margin] Finished / seeding.
28 Bright sunny morning, the day fine all through. The boys put out manure.
29 Fine day all through, the boys put out manure and plowed a potatoe patch. Willie and I went in
the afternoon to Melancthon with the colts for Eight Bags of potatoes I had bought.
30 Fine morning but cool, the day got overcast and there was some rain about 11 O’clock A.M. I
went to Priceville. The Boys planted potatoes, the[y] finished all but a Bushel.
31 Cool morning, the day dry but cool. Mrs. R. and I went to Brother Sam’s, then to church. [in mar-
gin] Sabbath
<folio 46 verso>
June 1885
1st Cool morning, the day pretty cool, but dry and clear. The Boys made a brush fence, Washed the
sheep and finished planting potatoes. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon. [in margin] Frost.
2 Dry day, but quite cool. The boys fixed Brush fence in the forenoon and went to Mr. Carson’s
raising in the afternoon. I worked at the Township Books.
3 Bright sunny morning, the day dry, cool and clear. Jim and I went to Melancthon with the Horses
and Waggon and gathered stones off the oats which we had sown. John clipped sheep. There was
some rain this night.
254
4 A little foggy this morning, but the sun got out after a little and the day was dry. Jim and I were
gathering stones. John finished clipping sheep, and came to help us in the afternoon. It rained al-
most the whole of this night.
5 Misty morning, with some rain very early, the forenoon was cloudy. In the afternoon the sun
shone out and the day was fine. We finished picking stones in Melancthon.
6 Bright sunny morning, a little frost on the ground, the forenoon cloudless, the afternoon overcast
and a little like rain. We ploughed up about 2 1/2 acres of wheat that the wire worm had cut out,
and we sowed it in Barley. Jim fixed up a Roller at Walter Bell’s in the afternoon, and I went to
Dundalk.
<folio 47 recto>
June 1885
7th Sabbath. Bright sunny morning, the forenoon clear and pretty warm, the afternoon cloudy and
windy at night. A little rain at night.
8 Rather cloudy this forenoon, and very cold all through the day, with a very stormy wind in the
afternoon. John gathered stones of[f] the grain in the forenoon. I helped and in the afternoon I
went to Dundalk. Jim Rolled the Grain.
9 Cold, Breezy morning, a pretty chilly air all through the day, considerable of sunshine. Mrs. R.
and I drove out to Mr. J. Cavanagh’s, Township Clerk. I had to get him [to] make out R. J.
Doyle’s Default. Jim finished Rolling at home. John hauled Rails.
10 Bright morning, the day dry and warm. Jim rolled oats in Melancthon. I burned pick up heaps
and stumps. John fixed fences at home.
11 Bright sunny morning, the day clear bright and warm. Jim Rolled in Melancthon, I burned
stumps, John fixed fences at home,
12 Bright morning, the day very dry and hot. John and Jim fenced. Clark, Willie and I cleaned some
Barley, 815 lbs., and I took it to the mill in the afternoon to be chopped for the pigs and calves.
13 Bright morning, the afternoon cloudy and a pretty nice shower of Rain about 6 P.M. A pretty
strong wind through the day. The boys and I were logging on Lot 216 Proton.
<folio 47 verso>
June 1885
14th Sabbath. Fine dry day, all through.
15 A little cloudy in the morning, a pretty sharp rain came on about 11 A.M., the afternoon was dry.
Jim, John and I were swamping out cordwood in Melancthon. The clerk of Proton Township (Mr.
Cavanagh) paid me a visit on Township business.
16 Fine morning, the day cool but pleasant. We were swamping out cordwood.
17 Fine morning, the day fine. We were swamping out cordwood. I came home at night to go to W.
Bell’s sawing.
18 Fine dry day, sunny and warm. Jim and John were swamping out wood. I was at Walter Bell’s
sawing. Walter got his finger badly bruised.
19 Fine morning, the day pretty warm. Clark took the oxen which had come home last night back to
the boys to swamp out wood. I took the horses and Democrat and went to Dundalk to the mill for
chop which I had there. Mrs. R. went with me.
20 Morning cloudy, the day cloudy and a little cool, slight shower at night. Jim took the Democrat
and went to J. Sauder’s. John & Clark swamped wood. I hoed potatoes.
<folio 48 recto>
June 1885
21st Sabbath. Cool and cloudy in the forenoon, heavy Rain in the afternoon.
255
22 Cold morning, the day bitterly cold for this season of the year. Jim and John were doing statute
labor for Melancthon. I attended Council Meeting at Dundalk.
23 Cool morning, the day pretty cool with some sunshine. I Bossed the statute labor in this Beat. Jim
& John, with the Oxen, logged at Sam’s.
24 Cool bright morning, the afternoon Rather warmer and sunny. Jim and John were swamping wood
in Melancthon. I Bossed the Statute labor in this Beat. Miss Kate Johnson was here making Dress
for Eliza.
25 Bright sunny morning, the day pretty hot. Jim and John were swamping out wood, I went to Mr.
Glazier’s Barn Raising.
26 Warm morning, the day hot all through. Jim and John were swamping wood. Mrs. R. and the
three youngest went to a pick-nick at S. Sect. 5, Melancthon. I worked at the Township Books.
27 Bright morning, the day dry and very warm, Cloudy in the afternoon. I went in the forenoon with
H. Lonsway to Melancthon to settle with him for Extra timber he took. Jim was at the shanty,
sick, and came home. John and Oxen at Mr. Maxwell’s.
<folio 48 verso>
June 1885
28th Sabbath. Extremely warm forenoon, some thunder in the distance, the afternoon got hazy, and a
thick mist kept blowing around. Extremely cold at night. Mrs. R. and I dined with Mr. A. Lon-
sway.
29 Cold morning, the day very chilly all through, threatening frost in the eavening. Jim, John and [I]
Made crossway* in the swale between Lots 215 & 216 Proton. [*a causeway, or corduroy road
through the marshy swale?]
30 Bright morning, the day cool and dry. Jim and John were working in Melancthon. [in margin]
Got pension.
July [1885]
1st Cool morning, the afternoon very cold and cloudy. All of us went to Dundalk to see the sports.
2 Misty morning, the day overcast, the afternoon wet. John with the oxen was logging at a Bee of
Alx. McKee’s in Melancthon. Jim was in Melancthon.
3 Very fine morning, the day dry and pretty warm, fine growth. I worked at the milk Books in the
forenoon and in the afternoon went to Dundalk. Jim and John chopped in Melancthon.
4 Sultry morning, the day dry and warm, a little cloudy in the afternoon. I worked at the Milk
Books in the forenoon and in the afternoon Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk. John and Jim worked
in Melancthon. Clark went to the Teacher’s Examination,* Owen Sound. [*qualifying exams for
teaching certificate; held over three days.]
<folio 49 recto>
July 1885
5th Sabbath. Bright morning, the day dry and very warm. Brother Sam & Phoebe were here.
6 Sultry morning, the day very warm but dry, cloudy in the afternoon with a little thunder. Raining
now (11:00 P.M.). The Boys are working in Melancthon. Clark is at Owen Sound. Mr. Lonsway
and wife & Wesley were here at night.
7 Warm morning, the day fine and dry, with rather a strong wind. Jim and John are working in
Melancthon. I worked at the Milk Books part of the day, and hoed potatoes the remainder.
8 Sultry forenoon, the afternoon still warmer. Mrs. R. and Eliza went to Melancthon with provisions
for the boys. I hoed potatoes in the forenoon and in the afternoon went to Dundalk and paid pa-
trons of Factory their dividend. It was small to each as our cheese are selling very cheap this sea-
son.
256
9 A little cloudy this morning, and a slight rain in the forenoon, also a good heavy shower with some
thunder and lightening a little before sunset. I hoed potatoes in spells through the day. Jim was at
M. Neithercut’s logging Bee. John was chopping in Melancthon. Willie came for the oxen this af-
ternoon to go to Samuel McDowell’s logging Bee tomorrow.
<folio 49 verso>
July 1885
10th Dry day all through and pretty warm. John is at S. McDowell’s Bee with his oxen. Jim is chop-
ping in Melancthon. I was hoeing potatoes.
11 Cool morning, but the day got pretty hot and breezy. The boys were working in Melancthon.
Mrs. R. and I went to Shelburne.
12th Sabbath. Pretty fine day with a little rain in the afternoon, or rather, at night.
13 Misty morning with some rain in the forenoon and a good deal in the afternoon, in general a very
wet day. The family went to Dundalk early in the day. Mrs. R. and I went at about 3 P.M. when
the Rain had ceased. Brother John and Wife came here in the eavning.
14 Fine day, but a little cool, especially in the afternoon. Brother John and We went to Melancthon
Lot, then he went to Brother Sam’s and stopped there all night.
15 Bright sunny morning and the day was pretty hot. The boys, Jim, John & Willie, are working in
Melancthon. Clark cut thistles at home. I hoed potatoes and went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
16 Bright sunny morming, windy and hot through the day, the afternoon cloudy. Mrs. R. & Clark
drove in to Proton, the others worked in Melancthon.
<folio 50 recto>
July 1885
17th Bright morning, the day got a little overcast and pretty breezy. Clark went with some provisions
to the boys in Melancthon and brought home a load of stove wood. Jim & John went to Mr. Oli-
ver’s raising in the afternoon. I hoed potatoes in the forenoon and moulded in the afternoon with
the plow. Mr. Lonsway and wife were here in the eavning.
18 Bright, sunny morning, the day dry and very warm. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and chored
around in the afternoon. Clark worked among the potatoes. Jim and John worked in Melancthon.
Clark went for them with the team at night. [in margin] Hot
19th Sabbath. Rather cloudy day, but pretty hot. Mrs. R., Eliza and Willie went to Church In Dundalk.
John Gott and family came here in the eavening.
20 Sunny morning, the day very sultry, but cloudy in the afternoon. The Boys took the oxen and
went to Melancthon to work. I mowed in the forenoon and Paris Greened* the potatoes in the af-
ternoon. Mrs. Nichols and her daughter Mariah were here a while in the afternoon. [in margin]
Commenced mowing [*Insecticide; see earlier entries in vol. 1]
21 Heavy Rain, thunder and lightening last night. Misty this forenoon, dry in the afternoon. The
Boys worked in Melancthon. I mowed some and Paris Greened potatoes.
<folio 50 verso>
July 1885
22 Pretty sultry this morning and the afternoon was decidedly hot. Jim & John are working in
Melancthon. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and in the afternoon Clark and I Greened potatoes
and raked up hay.
23 Cloudy in the morning, the day generally overcast but very sultry in the afternoon. I mowed in the
forenoon and helped D. Reid in the afternoon to draw in hay. The boys were working in Melanc-
thon.
257
24 Dark morning, the day rather dark but sultry, a slight sprinkling of rain at night. D. Reid cut grass
for me with his mower in the forenoon. John mowed fence corners in the forenoon, he and I
mowed in the afternoon. Jim worked in Melancthon. Clark helped Walter Bell at his meadow in
the afternoon.
25 Hot, dry day all through. D. Reid cut grass for us with his mower in the forenoon. Jim and John
cut with the scythes in the forenoon and hauled in, in the afternoon. I went to Dundalk in the af-
ternoon and paid the milk patrons their dividends.
26th Sabbath. Fine morning, the day dry and pretty warm. Mrs. R. & I went to Brother Sam’s.
27 Dry day and pretty warm. Jim and John fixed broken fence in Melancthon in the forenoon, then
came home and worked at the hay. Clark helped W. Bell at his hay.
<folio 51 recto>
July 1885
28th Clear morning, the day cloudy but dry and pretty breezy in the afternoon. We worked at Hay
making at home in the forenoon and went to Melancthon in the afternoon and burned the Brush on
15 acres of a wood fallow.* We got a good burn on about 10, the fire did not run good on the other
5 as there were too many Berry bushes growing. [*land recently logged, once the brush is burned
off it will be plowed the next year.]
29 Bright morning, the day dry and pretty warm. I finished mowing. Jim and Clark worked in
Melancthon, John helped D. Reid.
30 Extremely sultry morning, the heat increased till about 3 P.M., when it became almost unbearable.
Willie and I Raked hay and put in same. In the afternoon our load upset, which caused us a good
deal of bother. Miss McKee, (dress maker), is working here to day. Jim and Clark are working in
Melancthon. John is helping Brother Sam.
31 Bright sunny morning, the day fine all [through], not near so hot as yesterday. Quite a cool air in
the eavning. Willie and I hauled in the last of our hay in the forenoon. We branded and burned
heaps in the afternoon. Jim and Clark worked in Melancthon at the wood fallow. John helped Br.
Sam at his hay. We put away about 3 tons of hay in the big mow for the spring work. We have
about 5 tons more for the other animals. Miss Mckee is here.
<folio 51 verso>
August 1885
1st Some clouds this morning, but the sun shone out and the day was dry and pleasant. The afternoon
showed some signs of Rain. John and I helped Br. Sam at his hay. Jim and Clark worked at the
log fallow in Melancthon. Miss McKee left here this afternoon.
2nd Sabbath. Fine dry day, all. through.
3 Raining this morning with a strong wind blowing, the rain increased as the day advanced and the
afternoon was very wet. Jim took 24 bushels of wheat to Mr. Wright’s mill, got only about 35
pounds to the bushel. The wheat was good, but a great deal of oats in it. I went to Dundalk in the
Eavning.
4 Slight rain this morning, and contined a little showery through the day. I went to a Council Meet-
ing at Cederville, took Mrs. R. along, drove out with the colts. The night was so dark coming
home that we stopped at Hopeville. The Boys worked in Melancthon.
5 Dry morning, the day dry all through. Came home this morning. Went to Melancthon in the af-
ternoon for a load of wood. Jim and Clark worked at the fallow. John helped Mr. Oliver to haul
in hay.
6 Frost this morning. I think it done no harm. I helped D. Reid to haul in hay, the Boys worked at
the fallow, the day was dry. [in margin] Frost.
258
<folio 52 recto>
August 1885
7th Cloudy morning, the day cloudy, cool and dry. The boys worked in Melancthon, I worked at the
milk books in the forenoon and went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
8 Cloudy, cool and dry, with quite a Brisk wind. John helped his uncle Sam at his hay, the others
worked in Melancthon. I worked at the Township Books. Mr. R. Cornett, Cheese Manufacturer,
was here in the afternoon.
9th Sabbath. The day overcast and cloudy, slight rain fell occasionally through the day. Mrs. R. and I
were at Mrs. C. Bell’s in the afternoon.
10 Cloudy morning, the day cool, cloudy and dry. The Boys worked in Melancthon. I entered Or-
ders.
11 Misty morning, but the sun dissipated the mist and the day was bright and very warm. I tried to
get the young cattle which were in the bush to take to the fair. I did not succeed. John went to an
Excursion to Owen Sound. Jim and Clark worked in Melancthon.
12 Cloudy morning, the day dry, pretty warm in the afternoon with appearance of rain, but none fell.
I Butchered a sheep in the forenoon and in the afternoon went to Melancthon and made some hand
spikes. The Boys worked in Melancthon.
13 Dry morning, heavy rain about 3 P.M. Had logging Bee in Melancthon, got about 10 acres
logged, had 6 teams and about 30 men. [in margin] Logging Bee
<folio 52 verso>
August 1885
14th Misty morning, a slight rain fell during the forenoon, the afternoon dry but cold. I went to Dun-
dalk in the afternoon, the boys logged in Melancthon.
15 Frost this morning, but I think done no harm, the day was dry and pretty warm. We were logging
in Melancthon. Sold my lambs (6) to S. Little for $ 2.50 Each. [in margin] Frost. / Sold Lambs
16th Sabbath. Bright morning, the day fine and dry.
17 A little cloudy this morning, the day dry but having an appearance of rain in the afternoon. Jim,
Clark and Willie worked in Melancthon. John was at E. Noble’s Manure Bee. I made some Horse
pokes.
18 Fine morning, the day dry and pretty hot. We had the sawing machine working in Melancthon,
got about 45 cords of short wood cut.
19 Dry morning, the day dry but a little chilly. Jim and I fenced the calves from the oats, and took the
lambs to Dundalk. John, Clark & Willie picked up.
20 Fine morning, the day dry and sunny. We were all picking up in Melancthon. R. Cornett dined
with us.
21 Wet forenoon, the afternoon dry. The Boys helped H. Lonsway at his sawing. Willie & I picked
up.
22 Dry day, plenty of sunshine, three of the Boys picked up. John helped M. Neithercut to saw in the
afternoon. I went to Dundalk.
<folio 53 recto>
August 1885
23rd Sabbath. Fine morning, the day dry all through. Brother Sam & Phoebe visited us.
24 Wet morning. Raining during the forenoon, a slight rain in the afternoon. I went to Dundalk in
the afternoon.
259
25 Dry cool morning, the sky overcast but the sun shone out and the day was dry. Very chilly about
sunset, indications of frost. We pulled pease, this is our first harvesting. [in margin] First Har-
vesting
26 Wet morning, the forenoon pretty damp. We pulled pease in the afternoon. Mrs. R. and Willie
went to Dundalk.
27 Chilly morning, the day dry, cool and cloudy. We finished pulling pease in the forenoon, then
Willie took Jim and John to Melancthon and brought home a load of stove wood. Mrs. Sam Rus-
sell and Mrs. J. Maxwell were helping Mrs. R. to quilt. Willie drove them home in the eavning.
[in margin] Finished / pulling / pease.
28 Dark morning and cool, a slight rain came on about noon, the afternoon was a little damp. The
Boys were working in Melancthon. I cut a road back to the pease.
29 Frost this morning, but I think it done no harm. A little sunshine in the forenoon, the afternoon
cloudy. Jim and John were working in Melancthon. Mrs. R., Phoebe and I went to the Carding
Mill at Maxwell. We traded off our wool, 112 pounds @ 20¢ per lb., for cloth. We hauled in two
loads of pease when we came home.
<folio 53 verso>
August 1885
30th Sabbath. Misty morning, slight mizzle of rain in the forenoon, the afternoon dry. Walter Bell, his
mother & Wife, were here in the eavning.
31 Very heavy dew this morning, the day cloudy but dry. Jim cut wheat and hauled in pease after
supper. I went to Dundalk after dinner, bought a craddle finger and had it put in. [in margin] First
/ Wheat cut.
September 1885
1st Quite cool this morning with a very heavy dew. Rain about 10 A.M., then dry for a spell, then
more Rain in the afternoon, and very cold rain at that. A very unpleasant day. We bound some
wheat and cut some mixed feed in the dry part of the day. There was Hail and some snow fell in
some parts around here. George Scott (Councilman of Melancthon) and R. Henderson were here
in the afternoon. [in margin] Frost / snow.
2 Ground covered with frost this morning. Ice half an inch thick or nearly so, the day dry and the
frost does not seem to have done much harm, it blackened a few potatoe leaves, that is all that is
discernable as yet. I think that on account of the ground and the crops being so wet, the frost had
little effect, for harm. We were Reaping and binding and finished hauling in pease. [in margin]
Ice / Finished / hauling in / pease.
3 Dry morning, a little rain about noon, the day windy. Jim & John went to Melancthon to burn log
heaps. I tied Wheat in the forenoon and went to Dundalk after.
<folio 54 recto>
September 1885
4th Cloudy morning, the day cloudy and cool. The Boys are working in Melancthon. I threshed pease
with the flail.
5 Cloudy morning, the day cloudy and cool, with a slight sprinkling of rain in the afternoon. The
Boys worked in Melancthon. I threshed with flail.
6th Sabbath. Frost this morning, the day dry, cool and cloudy. Mrs. R., Phoebe and I went to Melanc-
thon. In the afternoon the family went to church. [in margin] Frost.
7 Frost this morning, the day dry with a good deal of sunshine. Jim and John branded in Melanc-
thon. Mrs. R., Clark and I tied Mixed feed at home. [in margin] Frost.
260
8 Frost this morning, the day cloudy but dry till noon, the afternoon wet. Clark, Willie and I hauled
in the mixed feed in the forenoon. Jim & John worked in Melancthon. There were 145 dozen of
mixed feed. [in margin] Frost.
9 Wet morning, the day wet all through. John and Jim came home this morning. I attended a Coun-
cil Meeting at Dundalk.
10 Foggy morning, the day dry and cool. Jim Reaped oats in the afternoon. John and I tied some.
Mrs. R. & I went with Br. Sam and Phoebe to Salvation Army.
11 Frost. Ice, this morning, everything caught it, great damage done. Jim Reaped oats & Barley,
Johney and I went to Melancthon and done some Branding. [in margin] Frost, Ice.
<folio 54 verso>
September 1885
12th A little hazy this morning but the sun shone out and the day was warm and dry. Just as night fell
there was some Rain, and a good deal after dark. Jim and CIerk hauled in wheat and mixed feed at
home. John and I Branded. I stopped in the Melancthon Cabin alone all night.
13th Sabbath. Wet morning, the day showery throughout. I came home at night.
14 Dark morning, the day dry but cloudy and threatening Rain. Jim and John took the Reaper and
went to Melancthon to cut oats. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
15 Misty morning, the day dry. We were harvesting in Melancthon.
16 Heavy dew this morning, the day dry with a fine breeze. We were harvesting in Melancthon.
17 Fine morning, the day dry and sunny. The Boys hauled in at home, five acres of loose oats and
Two of Barley. I stopped in Melancthon and tied oats. There was some thunder and lightening
and a shower of Rain about 9 P.M.
18 The morning fine and sunny, the day dry and warm. We harvested in Melancthon. P. Sauder
helped us.
19 Bright sunny morning, the day fine. Jim Reaped at home, finished Reaping (oats). The rest of us
worked at harvesting in Melancthon till about 2 P.M., then we helped Sam.
<folio 55 recto>
September 1885
20th Sabbath. Fine day, dry and beautiful. All the family went to Zion Church to hear the Gospel Ar-
my.
21 Fine morning, the day dry. Henry Lonsway, Johney and Clark tied oats at home. Jim Reaped for
his uncle Sam. Willie and I light [=lit, set alight] log heaps in Melancthon. When Jim came home
at night, they went to work and hauled in what they had tied through the day. There were Fourteen
loads.
22 Bright morning, the day dry all through. Willie and I Worked at the burning in Melancthon till
noon, When the boys came out with some teams and hauled some of the oats home.
23 Cold morning, the ground covered with snow, the snow melted and the day got fine. We were
hauling in oats from Melancthon.
24 Beautiful day, dry and Warm. We finished hauling in oats this forenoon from Melancthon, there
were Eighteen loads in all. This finished our harvesting this year. We have got the grain in pretty
dry, and all in the barn. I took the horses in the afternoon to get shod. Clark and Jim helped Sam
to tie oats. John was at A. Lonsway’s threshing. [in margin] Finished harvesting.
25 Beautiful day all through, like Indian Summer, the sky hazy and the air balmy. Jim and John
started for Melancthon to plow, they also drove the young cattle there. Clarke tied oats at Sam’s.
<folio 55 verso>
September 1885
261
26th Bright sunny morning, the day beautiful, the atmosphere hazy like Indian Summer. Jim and John
worked in Melancthon preparing the ground for fall wheat. Clark helped Sam to harvest. I
threshed some oats for the Horses and went to Dundalk in the afternoon. Miss Matilda Hewitt was
here and got her Father’s Milk money, $6.00.
27th Sabbath. Bright sunny day, delightful weather.
28 Dark morning, the sun shone [MS shine] out and the day was lovely. Jim and John worked at the
new fallow in Melancthon, getting it ready for wheat. Clark helped Walter Bell to haul in oats. I
went hunting seed wheat, got some, 15 Bushels, from Mr. Wright of Osprey at $15.00.
29 Beautiful day. Warm, balmy and clear. Sowed wheat, Jim Harrowed, Johney plowed. Clark was
helping H. Lonsway to thresh.
30 Lovely day, Balmy, dry and warm. We were putting in the wheat. Walter Bell helped us with his
team, harrowing. Jim harrowed with spring tooth harrows, price $ 28.00, warranted not to break.
They are badly broken in the woodwork nevertheless. But they are just the thing for new land,
providing they withstand the Rack. Clark was with H. Lons[way] ½ day, then he came to
Melancthon in the afternoon and cut snags and Brush out of the new fallow. John broke the point
of his plow. I had to get a new one.
<folio 56 recto>
October 1885
1st Charming day, as fine as a man could desire. Clear, warm and dry. We worked at putting in the
wheat, plowing, harrowing, sowing, cutting snags & picking up.
2 Nice day, dry and Warm. I finished spring Wheat this forenoon. The wheat is called the Roger
variety, it is not a large wheat, not near so large as the Clawson, neither is it white in colour, it is
of an amber tint. The boys worked at the fallow. I came home this afternoon.
3 Fine morning, but a little cooler than yesterday, the foorenoon dry, the afternoon Raining from
about 3 O’clock, and a perfect pour about 5 P.M. I worked at the milk accounts in the forenoon
and in the afternoon went to Dundalk and collected some $80.00 due the cheese factory from the
merchants for cheese which they had bought. The boys came home from Melancthon.
4th Sabbath. Chilly morning, occasional showers of Rain through the day. Mrs. R and I went to Brother
Sam’s.
5th Ground covered with snow this morning, the day cold all through. Mrs. R. placed some things in
the show fair. Jim hauled wood home. John threshed some pease.
6th Pretty chilly day all through, but dry. We all attended the Agricultural show at Dundalk.
<folio 56 verso>
October 1885
7th Pretty cool in the morning, the afternoon mild. John was at Walter Bell’s threshing. Jim Raised
some potatoes in the afternoon. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon, and threshed some oats with
the flail in the afternoon. Mrs. R., Phoebe & Willie went to the carding mill.
8 Rather milder than yesterday, the day dry and a little sunshine. Jim and John were at W. Bell’s
threshing in the forenoon. Then they came home and raised some potatoes.
9 Dark morning, but the sun shone out and the clouds scattered. The air was rather chilly. We
Raised potatoes, they are a good crop. [in margin] Finished / Raising / potatoes.
10 Beautiful day all through, dry and sunny. We finished Raising our potatoes this forenoon. From
about an acre of Ground we have 145 Bushels, besides all we have used during the summer. In the
afternoon, Jim went to Eufrasia [=Euphrasia]*. I went to Dundalk and paid the patrons of cheese
factory over $1000.00. [*Euphrasia Township (with villages of Kimberley and Heathcote), Grey
Co., is immediately north of Artemesia Township (of which Flesherton is the major town).]
262
11th Sabbath. Beautiful, bright sunny day. Sky hazy like Indian summer. Mrs. R. & I went to the
U[nion]. church.
12 Chilly morning, the forenoon pretty cold, the afternoon milder. We picked our potatoes and put
them in the cellar, about 120 Bushels, choice potatoes. I have about 27 bushels of small ones for
the hogs. Jim went to Wright’s Grist mill with l250 pounds good old wheat, and only got 727
pounds of flour. The Bran and shorts won’t make up the weight. John is at J. Gott’s threshing.
<folio 57 recto>
October 1885
13th Wet morning, the day wet and chilly from morning till night, no work doing here to day. Brother
Sam got the Democrat to go to Collingwood.
14 Wet morning, the day Rainy all through. Jim threshed oats, John helped D. Reid Fix his stables. I
worked at the Factory and Township Books. Mr. and Mrs. Lonsway were here. [in margin] Sta-
bled / the cows / 1st night / this season.
15 Dry morning, the day, dry and pleasant. John went to J. Gott’s threshing. I built an arch for the
Sugar Kettle and boiled some potatoes for the pigs. Then Mrs. R and I went to Dundalk. Jim
hauled some manure on the garden, then plowed it and put up the fence. Bought 60 pounds of
cheese at the factory price, 9 1/2 p. pound.
16 Fine morning, the day clear, warm and dry. John, Jim and I log[g]ed in Melancthon.
17 Bright morning, the day dry and pleasant, the afternoon got cloudy, very dark and a little rain fell
at night. We were logging in Melancthon. Jim left in the afternoon and went to Mr. William
Acheson’s and bought four small pigs, four weeks old, at $1.06 each. Miss Minnie Nethercut is
here tonight. [in margin] got swine.
18th Sabbath. Dark morning, the day dry. Brother Sam & Phoebe were here.
<folio 57 verso>
October 1885
19th Dark morning, the day cloudy but dry. We were logging in Melancthon.
20 Wet morning, the forenoon generally wet, the afternoon dry. We were logging.
21 Ground covered with snow this morning, the day dry but cold. We were logging in Melancthon.
Bob Morin* helped us. [Later spelled Morn, both perhaps phonetic spellings for Moran, the sur-
name of Clark’s wife, Maria.]
22 Cool morning, the day cloudy, cool and dry. We were logging in Melancthon.
23 Cloudy cool day, with a fine afternoon. I filled* manure in the forenoon and went to Dundalk in
the afternoon. Jim hauled out manure. John was at D. Reid’s threshing. [*Loaded the wagons,
which Jim hauled out and spread?]
24 Bright sunny morning, but a very hard frost, the day pleasant and dry. I started this morning to see
Sister Sarah. I had not seen her for three years. She lives in the township of Sunnydale, near New
Lowell, about 28 miles from here. I went to Bageroes [=Badjeros], thence to Maple Valley,
thence to Dunedin, then to Cre[e]more, thence to Cash Corners and from there to her place. She
was in middling health, but she and her family are in very straightened* circumstances. [*Sarah’s
poverty is frequently alluded to when she is mentioned, but no causes for the poverty are ever giv-
en.]
25th Sabbath. Fine day all through, warm and dry.
26 Rainy this morning, but soon got dry. Left Sarah’s and came home.
<folio 58 recto>
October 1885
263
27th Fine morning, the day dry and pleasant. Jim was helping his Uncle Sam to thresh. John was help-
ing Henry Johnson. Strange dog worried one of my sheep.
28 Dry morning, the day dry and pleasant till the afternoon, when it clouded over, and some rain fell
at night. Jim and I were putting out manure. John was at H. Johnson’s threshing. Mr. J. Abbott
and wife were here
29 Wet morning, the day pretty wet all through. John was at H. Johnson’s threshing. I worked at the
milk books.
30 Ground covered with snow this morning, and pretty chilly air. There was a little sun during the
afternoon. Jim went for a load of firewood to Melancthon, then plowed when he came home.
John threshed cattle feed and hauled out some manure in the afternoon. I worked at the Township
Books. Mrs. R. & Willie went to Dundalk to Sell Geese. Miss Minnie Neithercut, Who has been
on a visit here for about two weeks, went home today.
31 Ground covered with snow and a very hard frost. Jim spread manure in the forenoon and plowed
in the afternoon. Clark and Johney hauled out manure. I thrashed cattle feed in the forenoon and
in the afternoon went to Dundalk. Willie and his mother took some dead Geese to Dundalk in the
afternoon and sold them at from 50¢ to 65¢ each.
<folio 58 verso>
November 1885
1st Sabbath. Wet, sloppy morning, Rain mixed with snow. It finally turned to rain in the afternoon.
Mrs. R. and I were at Brother Sam’s.
2 Some snow on the ground this morning, but the frost had worked pretty well out, there were sever-
al showers of soft snow through the day. Jim plowed, John spread manure and I threshed with the
flail. The youngsters were gone to H. Lonsway’s [MS Lounsway’s] apple paring* tonight.
[*Paring bee, to make dried apples.]
3 Pretty cold morning, the ground frozen [MS frize] pretty stiff. There were some showers of snow
through the day. Jim plowed, John spread manure in the forenoon, and in the afternoon went to
Melancthon for a load of stove wood. I threshed cattle feed.
4 Dark morning, the day dark, without sunshine, thawing a little, slight rain now and then. Jim
plowed, so also did John. I worked at the milk accounts in the forenoon, in the afternoon fixed a
hog pen.
5 Dark morning, the day cloudy and Rain in the afternoon. Jim water-furrowed.* John was at S.
McDowell’s threshing. I Chored around and went to Dundalk in the afternoon. Mrs. R. went to
Dundalk to hear the sermon, and how Guy Fawks was blowed up in England a long time ago.
Wonderful enchanting entertainment, and all for Twenty five cents! [*Cut furrows to let off wa-
ter.]
<folio 59 recto>
November 1885
6th Dark morning, the day dark all through with an occasional shower [MS showers] of Rain. Jim and
Willie started for Melancthon to plaster the shanty. John was at S. McD[owell’s] threshing.
7 Dark morning, the day gloomy all through, with showers in the afternoon. John was at S.
McDowell’s threshing. Jim and Willie worked at plastering the shanty. The threshers came here
tonight. [in margin] threshers / came.
8th Sabbath. Dark morning, a little clearer about noon. Rain at night.
9 Wet morning, it cleared off about 9 A.M. Rather an unpleasant day for threshing. Some snow
showers in the afternoon. We threshed all day.
264
10 Rough morning, but cleared off soon, the afternoon, especially, was very fine. We finished thresh-
ing today. Some of the grain turned out very poorly. Wheat about 5 Bushels to the acre, small and
miserable at that. Barley 15 Bushels, very dark and small. Peas about 12 Bushels to the acre,
good sample and Oats, about 27 Bushels to the acre, good sample. We threshed 14 hours in the
two days and I paid them $1l.00. I had about 2 acres barley, 6 of wheat, 5 of pease and 27 of oats.
l1 Very fine day, warm, with a good deal of sunshine. We put in our straw. Wesley Lonsway helped
us and Jim Johnson helped us half a day.
<folio 59 verso>
November 1885
12th Dark morning. Sunshine from about 10 A.M. to 4 P.M. Raining in the afternoon. I worked at the
milk Books in the forenoon, and in the afternoon went to Dundalk and drew $1000. out of the
Bank, and paid patrons of Factory. Jim was plowing for Mr. Smith of Melancthon. John & Clarke
were cutting stove wood at home.
13 Wet morning, the day sloppy and wet with showers of snow. Jim plowed at Mr. Smith’s. John
hauled home firewood and went in the afternoon to Mr. Brinkman’s for two small swine that I had
purchased. I worked at the milk books. Mr. J. Roseborough was here for his milk money. [in
margin] Got 2 swine / 7 Weeks old
14 The ground covered with snow and more falling, the day dark, without sunshine. John and Clark
cleaned some pease and chored around. Jim plowed at Smith’s for 1/2 day, then came home. I
made some entries in the milk books.
15th Sabbath. The Ground covered with snow and more falling, the day very slushy and dark.
16 Dark morning, the day dark and no sunshine. A mizzle once in a while of Rain. John plastered
the cow stable. Jim went to Dundalk for a pair of boots. When he came home, he went to Mr.
John Duncan’s to get him [to] cut feed for the horses. Willie and I cleaned seed pease.
17 Sloppy sort of a day, fine above, but very slushy travelling. Jim and John underbrushed on Lot
216, Proton.
<folio 60 recto>
November 1885
18th Dark morning, the day dark all through, the afternoon wet, very wet. John was at Mr. Nichol’s
threshing. Jim went in the afternoon for Mr. J. J. Duncan’s cutting Box. He is to be here tomor-
row cutting oat sheaves. I sold A. Lonsway a cow today for $20.00. The cow is about 7 years old.
He pays in a year.
19 Freezing this morning, the day pretty mild with a good deal of sunshine. John Neithercut, for Sam
McDowell, came to help us cut Horse feed, and as the cutter did not come, he and the Boys under-
brushed. Mr. Duncan came with his horse power in the afternoon. [in margin] Sent a / letter to
Bro. / William / Paris P. O. / Lamor Co. / Texas, U.S.
20 Hard frost this morning, the ground very rough, the day dark, but without rain, a slight sprinkling
of wet at night. Clark was at Mr. Nichol’s threshing. Mr. Duncan was cutting oat sheaves for us.
The machine did not work well, the little soft leaves of the straw kept turning Round the Rollers.
21 Some snow on the Ground this morning, a little more fell during the day, the day generally dark,
without sunshine. John was at A. Lonsway’s with his oxen skidding logs. We finished cutting oat
sheaves this afternoon. I think we cut about 150 dozen. I paid Mr. Duncan $4.50 for the cutting
of them.
22nd Sabbath. Cloudy morning, the day dark, without sunshine, the Roads very rough. A little snow on
the ground, but not enough to make sleighing.
<folio 60 verso>
265
November 1885
23rd Chilly morning, the wind in the east, a little soft snow falling, the day dark, without sunshine. Jim
and John were underbrushing on Lot 216. Willie and I mixed the cut feed in the Barn. Mr. John
Abbott, collector of Proton, was here and paid to me, as Township Treasurer, $1601.00.
24 Cloudy morning, the day dark, without sunshine, but not cold. Jim, John & Wesley Lonsway were
underbrushing on Lot 216 Proton.
25 Dark morning, the day rather mild, but no sunshine. Jim, John & Wesley Lonsway were under-
brushing. I attended a meeting of the Directors of Cheese factory in Dundalk.
26 Dark morning, but the sun shone out after a while and the day was pleasant. Jim, John and Wesley
Lonsway were underbrushing. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
27 Fine morning, the day one of sunshine and very pleasant. Jim and John went to Melancthon to
saw some logs. Jim stopped all night.
28 Dark morning, but the sun got out after some time and the day was pleasant. Jim is in Melancthon
splitting some culled Blocks of wood. John hauled two loads of stove wood home. Clark chopped
short wood for himself. Mrs. R. purchased a Dinner Bell from S. McDowell for $8.00.
<folio 61 recto>
November 1885
29th Sabbath. Dark morning, a good deal of soft snow fell during the day. It soon melted. Mrs. R. and
I went to Mr. Abraham Jackson’s.
30 Fine, mild day, a little sunshine now and then. Jim and John Rigged up a dinner Bell on a post
about 18 feet high. Then we Butchered a fat swine in the afternoon.
December [1885]
1st Mild day, the Ground getting soft, a little soft snow falling now and then. Jim went to Mr. Joseph
Neithercut’s Raising. John and I cleaned some Barley and he took it to the mill in the afternoon to
be chopped. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
2 Pretty cold morning, and a shower of snow about 10 A.M. Jim and John were chopping on Lot
216 Proton.
3 Rather chilly this forenoon, the afternoon something milder. Jim and John were chopping on Lot
216. I worked at the milk Books in the forenoon and in the afternoon went to Dundalk and wrote
and posted 65 cards to the patrons of cheese factory, telling them when pay day would be.
4 Chilly in the morning, the afternoon something warmer. Jim and John went to the saw mill and
got some Logs sawn. I worked at the milk books.
5 Sharp morning, the day storming. John went to D. Reid’s sawing. He did not saw. John Agnew
came here this eavning. T. Hanbury drove him out.
<folio 61 verso>
December 1885
6th Sabbath. Very cold, stormy morning, the day stormy all through. John Agnew is here.
7 Sharp, keen morning, but the sun shone out fine, the forenoon was moderate, the afternoon was
very cold. John Agnew left for home this morning. Jim and John went to D. Reid’s sawing.
8 Cold morning, the day pretty chilly all through, with a shower of snow in the afternoon. John took
some animals to Dundalk fair, did not sell any. Jim hauled a load of stove wood home in the fore-
noon. We Butchered Hogs in the afternoon. Mr. A. Lonsway helped us.
9 Raining this morning, the day wet all through, the snow disappearing. Mrs. R. and I cut up the
pork and salted it. Jim and John oiled the Harness. John Gott was here and I made him out a Bill
for Barn lumber. [in margin] Thaw.
[writing switches to purple pencil]
266
10 Sharp morning, the day cold all through. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon and paid the patrons
of the cheese factory the Balance in full of their money. Jim hauled wood to Dundalk. John was
at home choring around. I gave Mr. T. Hanbury $2.00, Two year’s subscription for the Weekly
mail* in advance, a prize Book (Sp. of the Rebellion) is a Book to come with the papers. [in mar-
gin] payday / Subscription / Renewed for / W. Mail. [*Toronto newspaper the Mail later joins the
Globe, origin of the current Globe and Mail, which sees itself as “Canada’s newspaper”.]
11 A little milder in the forenoon, but pretty rough in the afternoon. Jim hauled wood, John was at
Walter Bell’s threshing.
<folio 62 recto>
December 1885
12 Pretty sharp morning, a little snow fell, the afternoon was milder. Jim hauled wood to Dundalk.
John chored around. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk. [in margin, switching back to black ink]
Took 6 / cattle to the B. [=butcher?]
13th Sabbath. Cold in the forenoon, something milder in the afternoon. Sam & Phoebe were here.
14 Moderate day, a little snow fell, the sleighing is pretty good. Jim hauled a load of lumber from the
Mill in the forenoon, and went to Melancthon in the afternoon to haul a load of stove wood to
Dundalk. John fixed a Horse manger in the forenoon and went to a church opening at Corbetton in
the afternoon.
15 Pretty cold morning, the day chilly all through, a little snow fell. I borrowed John Gott’s Cutter,
and John drove me out with the colts to a council meeting at Hopeville. Jim hauled wood.
16 Mild morning, the day mild all through. I was fixing up my Orders, which I had got at the Council
meeting yesterday, and in the afternoon I went to Dundalk.
17 Mild morning, the day mild all through, a hoar frost gathering on the Bushes, something like a
thaw. John and Jim were in the wood business. Jim broke the Roller out of his sleighs going
across [MS accross] H. Lonsway’s field. Jim made a sheep Rack in the afternoon.
<folio 62 verso>
December 1885
18th Mild morning, the day soft all through, almost like a thaw. The trees are covered with a drapary
[=drapery] of frost. Mrs. R., Jim and Willie started for a visiting tour among their friends in
Tossorontio & Essa. John was at Mr. Oliver’s sawing, he came home about nine O’clock at night
and took his oxen away to skid logs for Oliver tomorrow.
19 Stormy morning, very high wind accompanied with a snowfall. The wind prevailed all day, al-
most amounting to a Blizzard, except that there was no great cold. John with his oxen was at R.
Oliver’s sawing. Clark took the sleighs which had the Roller broke to the shop to get fixed.
20th Sabbath. Cold day, and pretty windy, the snow is drifting at a great rate.
21 Another stormy morning, snowing and blowing, also pretty cold, the afternoon milder. John
hauled two loads of stove wood home.
22 Soft this morning, continued getting softer all day, a thaw has sett in. John hauled two loads of
stove wood home. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. Clark chored around.
23 Rain all day from morning till night. Clark & I went to Hopeville, took the colts and John Gott’s
cutter. Mrs. R., Jim and Willie got home. Bob and Nancy came up.
<folio 63 recto>
December 1885
24th Sharp morning, the day cold, the roads very bad, sleighing badly used up.
25 Something milder than yesterday, the day calm, but sharp in the afternoon.
267
26 Pretty cold morning, the day cold but no wind. John split some firewood, Jim went to Melancthon
for his axe and also for to make an axe handle. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon and done some
Township business.
27th Sabbath. Soft morning, the day mild all through.
28 Mild morning, the day inclined to be soft, the snow still disappearing. John and Clark are cutting
down some swam[p] on Lot 216 Proton. Jim and Willie went to swamp cordwood in Melancthon.
I went to Dundalk in the forenoon.
29 Another mild day, the snow is disappearing fast. The wheels are going on the roads. Jim and Wil-
lie are in Melancthon. John and Clark are cutting the swamp. I worked at the Township books.
30 Soft day, thawing. Jim & Willie are in Melancthon, John and Clark are chopping at home. I
worked at Twp. Books.
31 Soft morning, the day soft, with snow in the afternoon. Jim & Willie are in Melancthon. John and
Clark are chopping. I worked at the Township Books. Nancy and Bob started for home this
morning. They left their cutter and took my democrat. I sent $40.00 with Bob to purchase wheat
from his father at .80¢ p. Bushel. Good By[e], Old Year. Which of us all will see the end of your
successor?
<folio 63 verso>
January 1886
1st Mild morning, the day mild all through, the sheep and cattle in some places out picking in the
fields. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. John and Clark were chopping. Jim and Willie
worked at swamping wood in Melancthon.
2 Dark morning, the day rather chilly, cold wind, some sleet falling at night. Mrs. R. and I went to
Mr. A. Lonsway’s at night. Jim and Willie came home from Melancthon. John and Clark were
chopping.
3rd Sabbath. Dark morning, the day wet in the afternoon. Mrs. R. and I were at Brother Sam’s. Mrs.
John Agnew was here this night. [in margin] Rain.
4 Wet morning, the day wet from morning till night, the Roads Busting up. We went to the voting
in Proton in the forenoon, then Jim and John went to vote in Melancthon. Mrs. R. visited at Mrs.
C. Bell’s.
5 Pretty mild morning, freezing good, snow came on about noon and kept falling till night, and after.
John and Jim chopped. Mrs. R and I went to Dundalk.
6 Very sharp morning, strong wind and keen frost. The day got colder towards evening and at night
the cold was piercing. John and Jim started with the team for Melancthon at noon. [in margin]
Cold.
7 Very cold day, intense frost and keen wind. Jim & John are swamping cordwood in Melancthon.
I went to Dundalk and sent by Express to sister Sarah a new dress. [in margin] Very cold.
<folio 64 recto>
January 1886
8th Very cold morning, the day intensely cold, but a good deal of sunshine. Jim and John are swamp-
ing cordwood in Melancthon. Clark started for Dundalk village school today. [in margin] very
cold.
9 Cold, windy morning, the day very sharp, with a strong wind. Some snow fell in the afternoon,
but the wind was so strong it blew it off the Roads, so that it did not help the sleighing any. John
was at H. Hewitt’s sawing. Jim swamped wood in Melancthon. Clark, Willie and [I] cleaned
Grain. [in margin] Very cold.
268
10th Sabbath. Cold day, and windy, very keen freeze. Some snow fell but the wind swept it off the
roads. [in margin] Very cold.
11 Sharp morning, but the sun rose bright. It got clouded over in about an hour, then shone some in
the afternoon. The day was intensely cold. Jim and John went to Melancthon to swamp out cord-
wood. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon, and bargained with John Vodden*, Waggon Maker, for
a sett of new bobsleighs, knee benches, three benches in each Bob, Box on sleighs and shelving on
Box. The sleighs to be finished in first class style, and to be strong enough to haul a load of Logs
or wood, price $45.00. Also a new cutter (Portland style), first class finish, with Both pole and
shafts, price $45.00. I pay $30.00 cash, give a farrow cow, value $20.00, a note of hand which I
hold on a neighbour for $20.00 more, and deliver him 10 cords of dry hardwood, 4 feet long, again
next winter. [*John Vodden and A.S. McArthur, were carriage makers in 1888; see History of
Dundalk, p. 5.]
<folio 64 verso>
January 1886
12th Sharp morning, a little sunshine, the middle of the day a little milder than yesterday, the afternoon
pretty cold. Jim and John were swamping wood in Melancthon. [in margin] cold.
13 A slight amelioration in the weather from yesterday, not quite so cold, the sun shone out a good
while of the day, and was pleasant. Jim and John were swamping cordwood. I went to Brother
Sam’s in the forenoon. In the afternoon Miss Martha May (formerly a scholar of mine), accompa-
nied by Miss Ellen McCullough and Miss ___ Keys visited us. [name is blank].
14 Pretty sharp morning, the day got milder and there was a good deal of sunshine, the afternoon was
pleasant. The Boys finished swamping out wood and came home. Mr. Abbott (Township Collec-
tor), Mrs. Lonsway and Mrs. Nicholas* were here. I worked at the Township Books at intervals.
[*Mrs. Walter Nicholas visits on 3 May 1886.]
15 Mild morning, the day soft like a thaw. Jim went to Mr. Wright’s mill with Six Bushels of wheat,
got only 21 pounds of flour to the Bushel. The wheat was very poor.
16 Soft morning, the day dark and thawing, with Rain in the afternon which turned to snow at night.
Clark helped Walter Bell in the forenoon to take out ties. John helped Sam at taking out posts.
Jim made an axe handle in the forenoon, and went to Dundalk in the afternoon for a cutter. [in
margin] Rain.
<folio 65 recto>
January 1886
17th Sabbath. Rather stormy day, strong wind and snowfall. Sam and Phoebe were here. [in margin]
Birthday.
18 Mild morning and pretty moderate till about 3 P.M., when it began to blow and turned very cold at
night. I went to a council meeting at Hopeville. Willie drove me out with the colts. Jim was help-
ing Walter Bell to take out ties. John was helping Sam to take out posts.
19 Pretty rough morning, some snow falling. The wind rose in the afternoon and the snow drifted,
there was a good deal of snow fell. Jim hauled a load of short wood home in the forenoon, and in
the afternoon cut some posts in the swamp. John helped Sam to take out posts.
20 Rather stormy this morning, a good deal of snow fell during the day, and the sleighing is pretty
fair. Jim and John took out posts in the forenoon and in the afternoon Jim hauled wood for Tom
Mills to Dundalk. I went to Dundalk in the eavning.
21 Blowing and snowing a good deal during the day, not very cold though. Jim & Johney were
swamping out posts.
22 Snowing and Blowing the General character of the day. Jim & John were sawing posts.
269
<folio 65 verso>
January 1886
23rd Cold, Stormy day. Very sharp frost all day. John and Jim worked at getting posts in the forenoon.
In the afternoon Jim went to Dundalk and brought home a new cutter which I had bought for
$45.00. John drove John Gott with the colts to Osprey. Clark and I sawed posts in the afternoon.
[in margin] Got / cutter home.
24th Sabbath. Rough day, cold and stormy.
25 Pretty cold in the forenoon, a little snow fell, the afternoon milder. Jim hauled cordwood to
Dund[alk]. John hauled a load of Grain to Dundalk for J. Gott, then he hauled a load of lumber
home in the afternoon. Brother John’s Wife, and sons Bob and Jim, came here in the afternoon.
[in margin] Started / to haul / Cordwood.
26 Rather milder today, not so cold as yesterday. Jim hauled C.[ord]wood. John hauled lumber.
Mrs. R., Eliza R., Bob R., & Jim R. went to Br. Sam’s.
27 Mild day, a heavy Rime on the trees, almost indicating a thaw. Jim was hauling C. Wood. John
hauled lumber. Eliza and Jim went home.
28 Rather mild all day, but foggy with a great Rime on the trees. Jim was hauling cordwood. (Mrs.
R.)[=striken] John was hauling stove wood home.
29 Dark day but mild, almost like a thaw. Jim was hauling wood. Mrs. R. and I went to Mrs. R. Cor-
nett’s funeral. She was buried at Flesherton. [in margin] Mrs. R. Cornett / Buried.
<folio 66 recto>
January 1886
30th A little colder than yesterday, still not unpleasant. Jim was hauling wood, John and I cleaned up
some wheat and filled four Bags of Barley to be chopped. We took the wheat to Dundalk and only
got .65 per Bushel for it, it was very poor, and worth no more. We took the Barley to McDowell’s
mill to be chopped, there were 378 pounds of it. I Renewed my subscription to Weekly Globe.
My first paper will be Friday Feb. 5th. [in margin] Subscribed / for Globe.
31st Sabbath. Mild day. Mrs. C. Bell was here.
February [1886]
1st Pretty cold in the morning, milder about noon, and cold in the afternoon. Jim hauled wood to
Dundalk. John hauled wood home. I worked at the Township Books. Clark Brought home the
young cattle from W. Bell’s. [in margin] Brought / cattle home.
2 Cold, stormy morning, snowing and blowing, the day pretty cold, without sunshine, the Roads
filling up badly. Jim was hauling wood to Dundalk. John was hauling wood home. [in margin]
Cold.
3 Very cold, nipping frost. Good sleighing. Jim was hauling wood. Johney hauled stove wood
home. [in margin] Cold.
4 Very cold morning, the afternoon something milder. John stopped working the colts, they have a
cold, or the vet says, the distemper. Jim hauled wood to Dundalk. I went to Dundalk in the after-
noon. [in margin] Very cold.
<folio 66 verso>
February 1886
5th [stricken, 6th written several lines lower, opposite middle of entry, so order of entries reversed, with
6th preceding the 5th] Not quite so cold this morning as yesterday. Some snow fell in the after-
noon. Jim hauled wood to Dundalk. Clark to[ok] the cow to Mr. Vodden which I had sold him
some time ago. John took the young horses to Dundalk to the Vet. He pronounced them as having
the distemper.
270
5[th] Quite cold this morning. It is the general opinion that this forenoon was the sharpest of the season
for so far. The afternoon was not quite so cold, but it might suit anyone for coldness. I went to
Dundalk at night. Jim Hauled wood. John’s team is laid up with a cold.
7th Sabbath. Rather mild day all through.
8 Bright sunny morning, the day lovely, sunshine all through, a sunny thaw. Jim was hauling wood.
John went after dinner to Melancthon to chop stove wood. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon and
sold my cordwood (about 170 cords) to Mr. Higgins for $1.75 per cord, he paid me $10.00 on the
Bargain for which I gave him a Receipt. Miss Mary Trugon was to be married today. [in margin]
Miss / Trugon’s / Wedding day.
9 Bright sunny morning, the day fine. Jim was hauling wood. John was working in Melancthon.
The Township auditors were here auditing my Township Books.
10 Warm day, the wind thawing the snow, the sleighing is going. Jim is hauling wood. John is work-
ing in Melancthon. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. Eliza and cousin Bob went at night to C.
Johnson’s party.
<folio 67 recto>
February 1886
11th Soft morning, no frost last night, the snow melted away fast today, a slight mizzle of Rain in the
eavning. Jim is hauling wood. John is working in Melancthon. James Dane called here this fore-
noon on his way home. Walter Bell was with him. Mrs. R. went to Brother Sam’s in the after-
noon. [in margin] Thaw.
12 Soft morning, the day milder all through. Sleighing gone off a good deal of the Roads. Jim came
home this afternoon with the team. He took them away again for fear of them getting the Distem-
per from the young horses. John is working in Melancthon.
13 Rain this morning, Rain at noon and Rain at night. Jim and John are in Melancthon. Clark Bor-
rowed W. Bell’s sleigh and with the oxen took from Melancthon in the afternoon to Dundalk a
Cord of Dry Cedar. Sold it to Mr. Deans for $1.00. [in margin] Rain.
14th Sabbath. Snowing all day long. Mrs. R. went to Mrs. C. Bell’s.
15 A Good deal of snow fell during the day, but the air was mild, the afternoon turned cold and very
Windy at night. Jim and John are in Melancthon working at something.
<folio 67 verso>
1886 February
16th Stormy morning, blowing, snowing and freezing, the day was one of storm all through. Jim and
John are in Melancthon working.
17 Stormy morning, the day stormy all through, Snowing, blowing and drifting. Jim is in Melanc-
thon, John is at home. An Ewe lambed this eavning, had three Ewe lambs at a Birth. [in margin]
Sent letter / to Br. William / First lambs.
18 Roads drifted pretty badly this morning, the day mild. The wind rose in the afternoon and the
Roads are filling up again. Jim is working in Melancthon hauling wood. John went with the oxen
to Walter Bell this afternoon to Swamp logs.
19 Snowing this morning, but mild. The snow continued coming down all day, but got colder at
night. Jim was in Melancthon.
20 Very sharp morning, the Roads badly drifted, the day very cold all through. Jim was in Melanc-
thon, Johney at home. I attended a meeting of the Cheese factory patrons in Dundalk. [in margin]
Very cold.
21st Sabbath. Blowing, Snowing and Drifting all day.
22 Roads Badly drifted, Snow falling and strong wind. Jim is hauling wood. I went to Dundalk.
271
23 Another stormy day, Blowing and snowing. Jim is hauling wood. Johney is choring at home.
<folio 68 recto>
February 1886
24th Strong wind this morning, the wind generally strong all day, the roads filling up, pretty sharp frost
at night. John hitched up the young horses for the first time in about three weeks and drove his
mother to Dundalk. Jim is hauling wood.
25 Raining this morning, and continued Showery through the day. Very windy at night and turned to
Snow and freeze. Jim is working in Melancthon. John went to Mr. McKay’s to See about seed
oats (Black Diamond). Got none. [in margin] Rain.
26 Piercing cold morning, snowing, Blowing and freezing. The day was very cold with a strond
wind. Jim is working in Melancthon hauling wood. John took him some provisions and stopped
there. [in margin] Cold.
27 Bitterly cold morning, sunshiny through the day, but piercingly sharp. Jim and John were working
in Melancthon. They all came home tonight as Jim had finished hauling cordwood (70 cords)
which I had sold at $1.75 per cord. Jim got the wood measured and got paid. He brought a sett of
new Bobsleighs home from Norvall & Vodden’s*, Dundalk, price $45.00 complete. [in margin]
Finished / Hauling / C.Wood. [*John Norval, blacksmith, and John Vodden, carriage-maker; the
purchase is detailed on 11 Jan. 1886; see History of Dundalk, pp. 5, 101, 104.]
28th Sabbath. Very cold morning, the day very sharp all through, bitterly cold at night. [in margin]
Very cold.
<folio 68 verso>
March 1886
1st Cold sunny morning, the day intensely cold from morning till night. Bright sun but piercing air. I
went to Dundalk and purchased three post Office money orders, value $257.00, and sent the same
to A. P. Poussette, Esq., Barrister, Peterborough, instalment $200.00 & Interest, $57.00, on pur-
chas[e] money of Lot 31*, Con 5, Township of Melancthon. John was helping John Gott to take
out ties. Jim was hauling logs for Mr. Oliver. [in margin] Extremely / cold. [*Seems to be written
Lot 34, but probably is Lot 31, Con. 5, Melancthon, bought in May 1881, with payments on 1st of
March until principal is paid off; $57. interest at 6% means principal was still $950; see 28 May
1881.]
2 Very cold morning, cold at noon and stormy and cold at night. We cleaned about 200 Bushels of
Oats, then Jim took the new sleighs to Dundalk to get some alterations in them. Mr. Jas.
Cavanagh, Township Clerk, was here a while this afternoon. He wished to get a little money in
advance on his salary and I advanced him $20.00. [in margin] cold.
3 A little milder this morning, but the wind was pretty strong and the afternoon was cold. Jim start-
ed for Brother John’s to get some wheat that I had bought for milling. H. Lonsway went with him
to See his Brother William. Johney and I cleaned oats in the forenoon, and he took his oxen to
John Foster’s sale in the afternoon, but he did not sell them.
4 Mild day, the sun shone strong. Jim is gone for wheat. John hauled oats to Dundalk.
<folio 69 recto>
March 1886
5th Bright sunny morning, the day clear and mild. Jim is not home yet. John hauled Oats to Dundalk.
6 Mild morning, the day soft and balmy, snow melting. Jim got home from the mill this afternoon.
William Lonsway and Margaret and their son William were here tonight. John was hauling oats to
Dundalk.
272
7th Sabbath. Mild day all through. Brother Sam and Phoebe, Mr. A. Jackson and Misses Jackson were
here.
8 Mild morning, snow came on in the afternoon, quite soft like. Jim went in the morning to Melanc-
thon with the team to work. John hauled oats to Dundalk.
9 Mild morning, a little snow falling, the day pretty mild. Jim is working in Melancthon. John
hauled oats to Dundalk in the afternoon. In the forenoon he took his oxen to the fair in Dundalk,
sold them for $90.00, Cash. Sam Lonsway came here tonight to bid us good-by. He is going to
the St. of Nebraska tomorrow. [in margin] John Sold his / Oxen / S. Lonsway / going off / States
10 Mild day, some snow fell, during the afternoon it cleared off. John took some grain to the mill to
be chopped. Jim was hauling logs to the mill.
11 Mild day, but quite a quantity of snow fell. John and Jim were working with the teams in Melanc-
thon.
<folio 69 verso>
March 1886
12th Mild day all through, but the roads very heavy. John and Jim were hauling logs to the mill.
13 Mild morning, the day mild all through, but a good deal of soft snow fell. Jim was at Sandy
McAulay’s Bee, hauling square timber. John hauled saw logs to the mill. Jim Thompson is here
tonight. Mr. H. Lonsway and wife came here at night. The Proton assessor was here and assessed
Lot 215 at $700.00, Lot 216 at $315.00 and the personal property at $150.00, Total $1200.00.
14th Sabbath. Pretty mild day, almost like a thaw. Miss Minnie Neithercut & Jim Thompson were here.
15 Mild morning, some snow fell during the day. Jim and John went to Melancthon to work at get-
ting out saw logs. I went to Dundalk.
16 Mild day, with a heavy fall of snow at night. Jim came home from Melancthon for to get his team
to take to Melancthon tomorrow. John is working in Melancthon.
17 Foggy morning, the sun shone out after some time and the day was exceeding warm, the snow
melting and running in streams on the streets. Jim and Johney were hauling logs to the mill. I
went to Dundalk in the forenoon. Brother John came here this afternoon.
18 Soft day all through. The boys are hauling logs. Brother John and I went to Melancthon, thence
to Sam’s, then home. [in margin] Sam’s / baby /born.
<folio 70 recto>
March 1886
19th Wet Morning, the day cleared off about noon, then it rained some in the afternoon. The day was
very unpleasant, there was quite a lot of thunder and lightening after night. Jim and John were
hauling saw logs. Brother John went to Dundalk and bought seed oats. Jim came home from
Melancthon this afternoon. I Clerked at Jas. Mulholland’s sale. [in margin] Thunder / Jas.
Mulholland’s / Sale.
20 Dark morning, the ground covered with sleety snow, the forenoon dry, quite a sharp rain at night.
Mrs. R. was at Brother Sam’s. Brother John and she came out in the afternoon. Jim went to Dun-
dalk in the afternoon to get some seed oats changed. Johney and Willie were in Melancthon.
Johney hauled logs to the Saw mill.
21st Sabbath. Soft snow fell most of the day. Towards night it began to rain and rained quite a bit.
22 Dark morning, the day generally cloudy, a snow storm sett in at night, with a strong wind. Johney
went to Melancthon to haul logs. Brother John started for home this morning with some seed oats
which he had bought. My Jim went with him. [in margin] Jim / went with / Bro. John.
23 Roads very heavy this morning, the day quite cold. John is hauling logs. I attended C. Meeting in
Dundalk.
273
24 Dark day all through, but pretty mild, the snow melting. Johney is working in Melancthon. Mrs.
R. was at a quilting in Mr. H. Lonsway’s.
<folio 70 verso>
25th Bright sunny day, the snow disappearing rapidly. John was hauling logs to the mill from Melanc-
thon. Mr. John Abbott, Collector of Rates for the Township of Proton, was here and made out his
Defaulters’ List and returned his Collector’s Roll.
26 Fine day, but a little chilly in the afternoon, snow melted quite a bit in the forenoon. John was
hauling Logs for S. McDowell. Clark went to Dundalk with the Team when he came from School
and brought home 33 22/34 Bushels of Black Diamond oats which I had Bought from John R.
Montgomery at .33¢ per Bushel. Mrs. R. also went to the village.
27 Sunny morning, but the air was rather chilly through the day. The sun thawed the snow a little.
John was hauling logs. Clark hauled one load with the colts. Mrs. R. went to See Phoebe this af-
ternoon. Mr. Thos. Arnold and Wife, and Mrs. John Arnold, were here a while in the forenoon.
Mr. H. Johnson’s son and three of his daughters and Mr. Andrew Lonsway and wife were here at
night.
28th Sabbath. Rather cool wind today, although the snow melted some. Mr. Skeffington Bell and Wife,
and Miss Carson, were here.
<folio 71 recto>
March 1886
29th Rain in the morning and Rain the afternoon, a cold sleety Rain, sticking like ice on the trees and
ground. John left in the afternoon to get some Blacksmithing done and then to go to Melancthon.
Sold John a yoke of steers, coming 3 years old, for $35.00 cash.
30 Some Rain fell in the forenoon and a little in the afternoon. The day dark and drizzly. John is in
Melancthon. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon with H. Lonsway, done some Business and bought
110 lbs of Timothy seed at Rate of $3.00 per Bush[el].
31 A slight rain this morning, the day generally showery, the snow is fast disappearing. There is a
mist or steam-like rising off the ground. John is in Melancthon. Mrs. R. took the colts and sleigh
and drove the children to school, then she went to Melancthon Lot. Mrs. H. Lonsway and Baby
were here. Our first cow calved this season. [in margin] 1st calve
April [1886]
1st Windy morning, and some snow falling, the wind increased till about 2 P.M., when it was very
strong. There was quite a snowfall through the day. Mrs. R. drove Eliza to School. John is in
Melancthon. Walter Bell here at night.
2 A little snow fell occasionally through the day. John is working in Melancthon. Mrs. R. drove
Eliza to School, then went in the afternoon to a quilting at Mrs. D. Reid’s.
<folio 71 verso>
April 1886
3rd Fine morning, bright and sunny, the day was pretty mild and the snow melting some. John and
Clark were hauling logs to the saw mill. I helped W. Bell to put in a stack of hay
4th Sabbath. A good deal of sunshine through the day. Mrs. R. and I went to Brother Sam’s.
5 Stormy morning, a good deal of sunshine through the day, the afternoon chilly. I went to R. Cor-
nett’s sale. John was hauling wood home.
6 Very strong wind this forenoon and pretty cold, the wind stronger in the afternoon, especially to-
wards night, also a violent snow storm sett in. John was hauling wood home. Mrs. R. visited in
the afternoon at Mr. John Arnold’s. [in margin] Big Blow / & Snow / Storm.
274
7 Sunny morning, the day pleasant, but a chilliness in the air in the afternoon. John split stove wood
at home. Mrs. R. & I went to Mr. Lonsway’s at night.
8 Bright sunny morning, the day one of sunshine and thaw. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon and
paid for 112 lbs of Timothy seed which I had bought at $3.00 per Bushel. I also bought and paid
for one peck of Red Clover seed, 2.00, and a peck of Large Late Clover seed, 2.25. Then I
purhased a Draft payable to the Molsons Bank, Owen Sound, for $235.00, Sinking funds of Four
S[chool] sections, and mailed & Registered it, to the Manager Molsons Bank, Owen Sound.
<folio 72 recto>
April 1886
9th Bright sunny morning, the day fine and the snow melting rapidly. All the family, Except Jim (who
is from home), went to an Examination in School Section No. 5 Melancthon. I kept home. [in
margin] heard & / seen / first / Robin.
10 Bright morning, the day one of sunshine, the snow is on its liquid journey to the Lakes (more
speed to it). John went to Walter Bell’s to chop. Clark Split wood at home. I chored around. The
Melancthon Assessor was here and assessed Lot 31, 5th Con. at $800.00. That is $58.00 less than
in 1885. [in margin] Melancthon / Assessor.
11th Sabbath. Chilly in the morning, a thaw wind in the afternoon and the snow melting. Mr. A. Lon-
sway and Wife were here in the Eavning.
12 Rain in the forenoon, Rain in a slight degree in the afternoon, the roads breaking up and becoming
as muddy as possible. [in margin] 2nd Cow Calved.
13 Dark in the morning, with a slight mizzle of rain, the afternoon fine, but hazy. Mrs. R. started for
Tossorontio this morning to bring home Jim. Johny skinned a yearling calve which had got hurt
by some of the cattle and died. He took the hide to Dundalk, got only .75¢ for it.
14 Misty morning, the afternoon sunny and warm, quite spring-like. A lot of little songsters are out
trilling. John and I sowed 10 acres of timothy and clover on Lot 31 Melancthon.
<folio 72 verso>
April 1886
15th Bright sunny morning, the day pleasant and warm all through. Johney made Five mauls*, then
took the Black mare in the eavning and went to meet his mother and Jim who came in the train.
[in margin] Jim / came / Home. [*wooden sledge hammers; see vol. 1]
16 Beautiful morning, the day splendid, a warm bright sun. Johney and Willie cleaned some seed
Oats. Jim and Johney took the team and went to Melancthon in the eavning. Mrs. H. Johnson was
here this afternoon. Mrs. R. and I were at Mr. Lonsways [written as a very small squiggle]. [in
margin] Heard / Frogs.
17 Beautiful morning, the day fine. Splendid weather. John and Jim went to Melancthon to make sap
troughs.
20 Beautiful day, …. etc., [3 lines in total, stricken, which are entered below in proper place.]
18th Sabbath. Fine morning, the day fine all through.
19 Beautiful morning, the day lovely. Jim, John & I were sinking post holes. [in margin] 3rd Cow
calved.
20 Beautiful morning, the day warm and balmy, no such spring weather has occured this many a year.
We were sinking post holes. I and Mrs. R. went to Dundalk in the eavning.
21 Lovely sunny morning, the day Bright and warm. The Boys started for Melancthon with the teams
to plow. I dug post holes. [in margin] Commenced / plowing.
<folio 73 recto>
April 1886
275
22nd Sunny morning, the day very pleasant and dry, the sky bright, without a cloud. Jim and John were
plowing in Melancthon. I dug post holes. Mr. A. Lonsway and wife were here at night.
23 Splendid morning, Beautiful and bright, the day fine till about 6 P.M., when there arose a thunder
storm and some Rain. Clark pruned some apple trees in the forenoon, and in the afternoon went to
Melancthon. Jim and John are plowing. I sunk some post holes.
24 Rainy morning, dry for about three hours in the middle of the day, the afternoon wet. John and
Clark plowed during the dry part of the day in Melancthon. Jim made a Vdrag* at home. John
Neithercut and T. Mitchel were here. [*V drag, or v-shaped hitch for a harrow, dragged behind
the horses; often the name given to the harrow itself, which could be made of a series of chains at-
tached together to make a quilt-like blanket, which when dragged over a plowed field, broke up
remaining clods of soil, creating a smoother surface for seeding. Harrows here are wooden
frames, with protruding wooden teeth, or pins; he later tries new iron harrows.]
25th Sabbath. Dry morning, wet in the afternoon. Mrs. R. went to Br. Sam’s. [in margin] Esther.
26 Ground very wet this morning on account of the heavy rain last night. The day was dry but
cloudy. We put in some posts for making lane from the Road to the Barn.
27 Dry in the forenoon, dry and breezy in the afternoon. We turned potatoes in the cellar and hunted
up the young cattle. The boys went with the teams to Melancthon in the afternoon. [in margin]
4th cow calved.
28 Fine dry day. The boys are plowing in Melancthon. I went there to see the fall wheat. We con-
cluded not to Re-sow. [in margin] W. Neithercut / died.
<folio 73 verso>
April 1886
29 Fine dry, Breezy morning and the day was dry till about 4 P.M. when there came on a heavy rain
with some hail stones. Mrs. R. and I went to W. Neithercut’s funeral. He was buried in the Grave
Yard at the Union Church. The funeral was pretty large. Jim sowed pease. John plowed and Wil-
lie harrowed. [in margin] First grain / (pease) sowen.
30 Dark morning and a little showery in the forenoon, the afternoon dry. The boys were working in
Melancthon. Mrs. R. was House cleaning. Mr. A. Lonsway and Wife were here at night.
May 1886
1st Bright sunny morning, the day pretty drying, with sunshine most of the time. The Boys were
plowing and harrowing in Melancthon, and came home tonight.
2nd Sabbath. Fine morning, the forenoon clear, the afternoon cloudy, but no rain. Brother Sam and
Phoebe were here.
3 Fine morning, the day dry and breezy till about 3 P.M. when it got overcast and there was a slight
Rain about dark. John went to Melancthon to plow. Jim sowed about 4 acres of wheat at home.
Willie harrowed. I swam* the wheat and bagged up some seed oats. Mrs. Walter Nicholas was
here in the afternoon. [*see above, pickling barley, 1 May 1884; before seeding, seed grain is im-
mersed in brine, thought to prevent weeds.]
<folio 74 recto>
May 1886
4th Dark morning, Rain came on and there was quite a lot fell. Jim started for Melancthon and took
25 Bushels of Seed oats (Black Tartar) to Sow. John is working in Melancthon.
5th Cool morning, but the sun shone out and the day was fine and dry. John and Jim were plowing in
Melancthon. We finished plowing there and John brought the team home to plow. I plowed a few
hours in the afternoon.
276
6 Fine, warm, dry day all through. Jim sowed 10 acres of oats in Melancthon. Willie harrowed. I
sowed 10 acres in Grass seed. John plowed at home. [in margin] First oats / sown.
7 Fine day all through. Willie finished harrowing in Melancthon. John plowed at home. I attended
cheese meeting in D[undalk]. [in margin] Seen first / swallow.
8 Fine dry day. John and Wille plowed. I went to Dundalk and bought a new Wilkinson plow No. 4
for $15.00 cash, from S. Bell. I also Bought 8 Bgs. potatoes from C. Johnson for 40¢ p. Bg., cash.
I also took John Vo[d]den 5 Bgs. potatoes.
9th Sabbath. Dry day, but very much like rain.
10 Wet day all through. John and I plowed in the forenoon. Jim dug post holes when dry.
<folio 74 verso>
May 1886
11th Dry but cool morning, the day was cloudy till about 3 P.M. when the sun shone out. John and Jim
were plowing. The Ground is pretty wet after yesterday’s Rain.
12 Fine morning, the day breezy and sunny. John and I plowed. Jim dug post holes.
13 Fine morning, but cloudy, the day was dry till about 5 P.M., when there was quite a shower. It is
again Raining (8 P.M.). Jim sowed 9 Bags tartar oats and three of Black Diamond. Willie har-
rowed. John dug post holes and I plowed. [in margin] 5th cow / calved.
14 Cloudy morning, not much sunshine through the day, but there was a fine growth, the day was
pretty sultry. Jim was working at the Barnyard fence, assisted by Willie. John harrowed. I
plowed. Patrick Langly casterated two yearling colts for me. [in margin] Casterated / colts.
15 Rainy morning, Exceedingly so, and a great deal of Rain had fallen during the night. All forenoon
was slightly wet. A little mizzle fell during the afternoon. John and Clark plowed in the after-
noon. Jim and Willie worked at the Board fence. I chored around.
[changes to purple pencil]
16th Sabbath. Cool cloudy day, chilly, especially at night. There was a frost this morning. [in margin]
Frost.
<folio 75 recto>
May 1886
17th Frost this morning, Ice on the water as thick as a 50 cent piece. The day cloudy, cool and dry.
John and I plowed. Jim worked at the fence. In the afternoon he went to Dundalk and bought 10
12/60 Bushels pease at 56¢ per Bushel. He also bought a keg of nails and a Roll of Barbed wire.
John Agnew stopped here this night. [in margin] Frost / [in ink] Factory / opened. [back to purple
pencil]
18 Cloudy but dry and pretty warm. John and I plowed. Jim worked at the fence. An old man
named Wright came here in J. Agnew’s Buggy and is stopping here this night. We had a cow
calved today, after taking a full month past her time. [writing changes back to ink] John Agnew
stopped here this night. [in margin, in purple pencil] 6th cow / calved.
19 Fine morning, the day Breezy, dry and warm, the eavning about sunset was cloudy like a thunder
storm. I sowed about 9 1/2 acres of Black Diamond oats. Willie harrowed. John plowed. Jim
worked at the fence.
20 Fine morning, the day dry and cool, cloudy towards night. I helped Jim in the forenoon at the
fence and in the afternoon I sowed some mixed pease and oats for cattle feed. John plowed and
Willie harrowed. Mr. A. Lonsway and wife were here at night. [in margin] 7th cow calved / Got
papers / from / Toronto.
<folio 75 verso>
May 1886
277
21st Fine morning and warm, the afternoon was a little showery. I plowed in the forenoon and helped
Jim at the fence in the afternoon. John sowed oats in the forenoon and plowed in the afternoon.
Willie harrowed. We finished seeding, have got about 58 acres spring grain and 10 of Fall Wheat.
This is about the first time, so far as I can Remember, that we finished so early. [in margin] Fin-
ished / Seeding.
22 Fine morning, dry and warm, the day was lovely all through. Jim went to Mr. McGregor’s mill in
the forenoon and got 535 feet of lumber sawn. In the afternoon he worked at the fence. Johney
and Clark hauled out manure and planted about a Bushel of potatoes in the afternoon. I went to
Dundalk in the morning with Jim. [in margin] 8th Cow / calved / First potatoes / planted.
23rd Sabbath. Fine morning, the day dry and mild. Miss Sarah Jackson and her Brother Sam were here.
24 Fine morning, the day dry, cool and Breezy and very cold at night. Jim worked at the fence.
Johney harrowed with his team at Walter Bell’s. Clark and Willie went a-fishing. Eliza went to
the Garden party at Mr. Hame’s. Mrs. R. went to Brother Sam’s. I helped Jim a little at the fence
and chored around.
<folio 76 recto>
May 1886
25th Very cold morning, the day cold all through. I went to Council meeting at Hopeville. Jim worked
at the fence. John at Walter Bell’s.
26 Another cold morning, and cold, windy day. I went to Brother Sam’s in the forenoon and to Dun-
dalk in the afternoon. John put out manure in the forenoon and in the afternoon went to C. John-
son’s for some Beauty of Hebron potatoes which I had bought. Jim worked at the Board fence.
27 Cool morning and Raining. The rain soon abated and the day was dry and cool. Jim went to Dun-
dalk for material to make gates, and made most of one when he came home. John was laid up
with sore throat and dizziness. I cut seed potatoes. Walter Bell got our Black mare this afternoon
to put along with one of his own and go to Egremont for seed potatoes.
28 Fine morning, the day dry but a little cool in the forenoon, the afternoon warm and cloudy. We
planted potatoes, about Eight Bushels of Early Rose and Seven of Beauty of Hebron. Wesley
Lonsway helped us from noon. Jim worked at a gate. [in margin] Frost / Finished / planting / po-
tatoes.
29 Fine day, but very windy. Mrs. R. and I went to Priceville. I borrowed D. Reid’s Buggy. Jim
worked at the fence in the forenoon and went to Mr. Nichol’s Raising in the afternoon. John
washed the sheep.
<folio 76 verso>
May 1886
30th Sabbath. Bright sunny day. Mrs. R. and her Sister Eliza went to Brother Sam’s.
31 Bright sunny day. John helped his uncle Sam to plow. Jim worked at the fence. Eliza and Bob
went home. I went to Melancthon and paid T. Mitchell for 46 1/8 c. wood. [in margin] clipped
sheep.
June [1886]
1st Mild morning, the day pretty warm. Mrs. R. and I clipped the Sheep. John helped his uncle Sam
to plow. Jim plowed up the lane and levelled it.
2 Dark morning, a slight rain fell during the forenoon, the afternoon cool and cloudy, with an ap-
pearance of Rain at night. John and I picked stones in the afternoon. Jim went to Melancthon and
mended Brush fences.
3 Very chilly morning, the day cold all through, and a slight frost at night. Jim was working at the
Lane fence. John and I picked stones in Melancthon.
278
4 Cool and Breezy, a little sunshine through the day. Jim was working at the fence. H. Lonsway
helped him. John and I picked stones at home and hauled them off the Grain.
5 Cool and cloudy. Jim worked at making Gates. John went to Tossorontio for flour. Clark and
Willie planted potatoes in Melancthon. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon.
<folio 77 recto>
June 1886
6th Sabbath. Cool and clear. Mr. Joseph Jackson, wife and child, were here, and also Miss Mariah
Maxwell.
7 Cool and cloudy. Jim worked at the Gates. I fixed calve park. William Lonsway and his two lit-
tle girls, with Irma Silk, were here at noon. The little ones are stopping here this night.
8 A little cool in the morning, but the afternoon was warmer. John got home with the flour from
Tossorontio. Jim finished the lane fences and gates in the forenoon and went to Steve Broughton’s
Raising in the afternoon. I went to Dundalk.
9 Bright sunny morning, the day pretty breezy and dry. It got cloudy and a few drops of Rain fell in
the afternoon. We were picking Stones all day.
10 Cool morning, the middle of the day warm, the afternoon cool, clear and dry. John hauled lumber
for Joseph Jackson. Jim Rolled in Melancthon. Mrs. R. & I went to Dundalk.
11 Cool morning, a slight hoar frost, the day sunny and dry. Jane Ludlow Lock Jawed this morning.
Her father came for one of my boys to go for the Doctor. Willie went. The Dr. got the Jaw in.
Jim was painting gate in the forenoon and chopping in the afternoon. John was Rolling in the
forenoon and working for H. Lonsway in the afternoon. [in margin] Frost.
<folio 77 verso>
June 1886
12th Bright morning, the day rather cloudy and a trifle Breezy, the sun overcast about setting time,
quite Rainy like. Jim was at Joseph Jackson’s Barn Raising all day, Johney in the afternoon, and
splitting rails with H. Lonsway in the forenoon. Clark Rolled in the forenoon and chopped in the
afternoon. Willie drove his mother to Dundalk in the forenoon and Rolled in the afternoon. I
worked at the Township Books, Ent[ering] orders.
13th Sabbath. The day dry and pretty warm. Brother Sam and Phoebe were here.
14 Bright morning, the day very hot. We were taking out square timber for a Lintle* to the Barn.
Walter Bell helped us, we got the timber on his Lot. [*Lintle seems to mean an addition built on
to the existing barn, using post and beam construction, as in the original barn.]
<insert><inserted half page> <recto>
Work* At Lintle [*This lists the schedule of work, and payments owed for the construction]
1886. June 13th. 4 men at Sq. timber
14. 6 men Ditto
15 6 men “
17 5 men “
18 Team + 3 men
19 Team + 2 men
21 Team + 2 men 1/2 day
23 4 teams
“ 1 team 1/2 day
“ 1 man - -
24 2 teams
25 Hauling sleepers 1 team
279
26 Hauling sleepers 1 team
28 Cutting + Hauling posts
July 16th John Gott + C. Maxwell
“ Jim, John + Clark
17 John Gott + C. Maxwell
“ Jim, John + Clark
19 John Gott + Ch. Maxwell
“ Jim, John + Clark
20 John Gott + C. Maxwell
“ 18 Men 1/2 day Raising
<verso> Aug. 5th J. Gott [stricken: + C. Maxwell]
“ Jim Russell
6 John Gott 1/2 day
“ Jim + John
7 John Gott, Jim + John Russell
9 John Gott, Jim + John Russell
16 Jim + John Russell 1/2 day
17 Jim + John Russell 1/2 day
25 John Gott + Jim Russell
26 Jim
30 Jim + John 1/2 day
Sept. 10th John Gott 1/2 day. Oct 2. John Gott 1/2 day
[Oct.] Clark 1/2 dy
7 John Gott + Self
8 John Gott. 9th J. Gott 1/2 day
11 John Gott. 12th John Gott
Clark
14 John Gott
Nov. 19 John Gott + Norman Schell 1/2 day
Six months after Date I promise to pay.
</insert>
15 Dry, hot day with a slight thunder in the eavning and signs of Rain. We were taking out square
timber in Melancthon. W. Bell, H. Lonsway and Wesley Lonsway helped us.
16 Beautiful, shower of Rain this morning, the day pretty warm and a fine growth. We were making
square timber. H. Lonsway, W. Bell and Brother Sam helped us. Jim was the Hewer.
<folio 78 recto>
June 1886
17th A little more rain this morning, the day cloudy and very cold at night. We were making lintle tim-
ber. Brother Sam and W. Bell helped us.
18 Cool morning, the day cool and cloudy. We were getting out Rafters and swamping timber.
19 Frost this morning, the day pretty warm and dry. Clark and I fixed a Brush fence at home. John
swamped square timber. Bob Morn* cut roads for him. Jim helped Mr. Morn with the Black
Mare to swamp T[elegraph]. Poles. [*see 21 Oct. 1885]
20th Sabbath. Bright sunny morning, the day fine. Mrs. R. and I were at Mr. A. Lonsway’s.
280
21 Cloudy morning, a slight mizzle of rain fell in the forenoon, the afternoon dry. Jim and John cut
and swamped sleepers for the lintle. I chored around. Jim went with the team to Dundalk in the
eavning.
22 Slight rain throughout the day, with indications of a heavier rain at night. John with his team was
at John Arnold’s sawing. Jim and I fixed Brush fence in Melancthon.
23 Slight Rains all through the day. We were hauling home the timber for the lintle. Brother Sam,
John Arnold & D. Reid helped us with their teams.
24 Dark cloudy day, but pretty sultry. We were hauling home the timber for the lintle.
<folio 78 verso>
June 1886
25th Rainy morning, but cleared off about 10 A.M., the afterpart of the day was fine. John was at M.
Neithercut’s sawing. Jim hauled sleepers home.
26 Rainy morning, but soon cleared off, the afternoon was dry. John went to M. Neithercut’s sawing.
Jim and Clark Hewed sleepers till noon, then Jim went to John Brinkman’s Frame Raising.
27th Sabbath. Beautiful day, dry, sunny and warm. Mrs. R. and I were at Brother Sam’s.
28 Sunny morning, the day warm and bright. Jim was at Jos. Neithercut’s sawing. John and I cut
posts for the Lintle and hauled them home in the forenoon. In the afternoon he mended Brush
fence. I went to Dundalk. [in margin] Sent letter / to Ireland.
29 Fine morning, the day fine all through. I went to C. Meeting at Cederville, took Jim along. Mrs.
R. also went as far as Mr. John Abbott’s. It was daylight when we got home next morning. John
Agnew & C. Johnson, Councilmen, were with us.
30 Fine dry day, sunny, bright and warm. John Hunted the Bush and fields for two [stricken spring c
]yearling calves which had gone astray, could not get them. John Irwin got them same day along
with his about 4 miles from here in Osprey.
<folio 79 recto>
July 1886
1st Beautiful morning, the day dry, sunny and hot. We all, with the exception of Willie, went to Dun-
dalk to see the sports.
2 Bright morning, the day very warm. John and Jim with the team were at the saw mill hauling logs
forward to be sawn. I warned out hands for the statute labor in the forenoon and in the afternoon
worked at the Township Books.
3 Bright morning, the day dry and very warm. Jim and John were at the saw mill getting logs sawn.
I turned potatoes in the forenoon and in the afternoon went to the letting of some R[oad] Jobs in
Melancthon. Miss Minn[i]e Neithercut came here this eavning. [in margin] hot.
4th Sabbath. Very hot day.
5 Scorching, dry, hot day. I was Bossing St. Labor. Jim hauled lumber home from the mill. John
worked on the Road for D. Reid. Josh. Brinkman came here at night. Mrs. R. took Eliza to Shel-
burne to the Entrance Examination. Clark took the train for Owen Sound to stand his Examination
for a third Class Certificate to teach. [in margin] hot.
6 Dry, warm day. I Bossed on the Roads. Jim & John hauled Lumber. We had the team of D.
Reid’s Waggon. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon & paid Factory patrons. [in margin] hot.
<folio 79 verso>
July 1886
7th Bright sunny day. Jim and [I] done Statute labor for Melancthon lot. John was at Walter Bell’s
logging Bee.
8 Bright sunny day. Jim and John cut shingle timber in Melancthon. I went to Dundalk.
281
9 Bright sunny day. Jim was at S. McDowell’s logging Bee. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and
got some paint. John washed and gave the Waggon one coat of paint. There was a small shower
of Rain at night. [in margin] Rain.
10 Bright sunny day, with considerable of wind. John and Jim cut shingle timber in Melancthon. I
worked all day, nearly, at the Milk Books. Willie painted the Waggon the second coat, also the
plow and the little gate. Eliza painted the chair [?ink smeared].
11th Sabbath. Pretty warm day, dry and dusty. Mrs. R. & family went to hear Mr. Murphy, Church of
England Minister, preach. I went to Brother Sam’s in the afternoon.
12 Dry and dusty with considerable of a Breeze. All hands went to Dundalk. Mrs. R., Eliza and I
went in the afternoon. Clark got home from O. Sound. He thinks his chances for a certificate are
very slim. I think so also. [in margin] Frost this / morning.
<folio 80 recto>
July 1886
13th Dry but cool this morning, the day was dry, cool and cloudy. We fixed fence. Jim went to Dun-
dalk in the afternoon for a pair of Boots. Clark was at W. Hender’s logging Bee.
14 Heavy rain early this morning, and a general wet day from morning till night. Every Kind of crop
was in great need it. The grass is very short and scarcely worth mowing, the Rains are too long of
coming to benefit it. The Grain and potatoes crops will be vastly improved by the splendid wet-
ting which they are now im??inging. Oats are shooting out scarcely six inches in length. I guess
this rain will stretch them. The potatoes are turning yellow in the leaf, and the Rain will cause
them to put on a Green foliage again. In fact, all nature in the vegeatable [sic] and animal King-
dom will be vastly improved. John Gott and his man came here today to Start on building a lintle
to the Barn. He just drew out the plan and then went home, the day was so wet he could not work.
Johney went to W. Watson’s Barn Raising this afternoon. I don’t think, however, that Watson will
put up his Barn this eavning because it has rained incessantly since morning. [in margin] Rain.
<folio 80 verso>
July 1886
15th Misty morning and a slight mizzle of Rain kept coming down all day. The Boys were fixing fence
and choring around, generally. Johney cut his knee slightly with a Broad axe.
16 Cloudy morning, a little sunshine in the middle of the day, cloudy at night. John Gott and C.
Maxwell were here framing, my three boys helped. I cut thistles out of the potatoes. Got cheque
for pension. [in margin] Got cheque / for pension.
17 Mild day, a little cool in the eavning. The Boys worked at the lintle. Clark went to Dundalk in the
afternoon. Willie and I moulded potatoes. [in margin] Sent a letter / to Br. William.
18th Sabbath. Pretty mild forenoon, the afternoon chilly, almost like Rain. [in margin, written very
small] Mrs. Ferris of / Melancthon died.
19 Fine, dry day, very like Rain after dinner. A slight Rain fell just at dark. Jim & John worked with
J. Gott at the Lintle. Mrs. R. and I went in the forenoon to Mrs. John Ferris’ funeral.
20 Quite cool this forenoon, the afternoon very much like Rain, but none fell. The [men] worked at
framing in the forenoon and Raised the lintle in the afternoon. There were 14 Men Besides our-
selves Raising it. It kept us pretty late getting done.
<folio 81 recto>
July 1886
J. 21st Cool morning, the day cool, and a sharp shower of Rain fell in the afternoon. Jim and John are
with D. Reid helping him at his haying. I tried to work but could not, was sick. Then I worked at
the Milk Accounts.
282
22 Frost this morning, the day sunny, dry and warm. I put Paris Green on the potatoes. John mowed
grass. Jim worked at making gate for J. Mills. [in margin] Frost.
23 Fine morning, the day dry and warm, splendid hay day. John mowed grass. Jim finished making
J. Mills’ Gate, then helped D. Reid in the afternoon at his hay. Willie and Eliza Raked up some
hay and I put it in hand shakings.
24 Fine morning, the day splendid, close and muggy at night with a slight sprinkling of Rain. Jim,
John & Willie with the Black Mare helped D. Reid at his hay. Mrs. R., E. & I went to Dundalk in
the afternoon. I paid cheese money.
25th Sabbath. Dry morning, the day fine, a very slight sprinkling of rain at night. Mrs. R. and I went to
Brother Sam’s.
<folio 81 verso>
July 1886
26th A very slight sprinkling of Rain this morning, the day dry till about 5 P.M. when there came on a
pretty heavy rain. Jim was swamping out shingle timber. John and I hauled in a little hay in the
forenoon and in the afternoon John went to Brother Sam’s to help him.
27 Cloudy morning, but the day was dry and pretty warm. John swamped out some shingle timber in
Melancthon. Jim hauled it to the mill. Mrs. R. and I took the wool to Dundalk Woolen Mills in
the afternoon and traded some of it for cloth, and left some to be carded and spun for stocking
yarn. We got .21¢ per pound for it in trade, and gave .35¢ per yard for shirting.
28 Dark morning, the day clouded over several times and a few drops of Rain fell. Jim, John, Willie
and I with three of our horses were helping D. Reid at his hay.
29 A little Rain early this morning, but soon got dry, the day was dry and Breezy. Jim, John & Willie
were working at D. Reid’s.
30 Dry morning, the day dry. Jim, John and Willie were working on their own account at D. Reid’s.
D. Reid and Johney hauled four small loads of hay from there for 12 day’s work we gave him. We
cut & made our own share.* [in margin] 4 Small loads / about 3 tons / put away / for spring.
[*they cut their own share of the hay on Reid’s farm, as payment for the 12 day’s work.]
<folio 82 recto>
July 1886
31st Misty morning, but the day cleared off and was fine and dry, and very hot about 1 P.M. I helped
Brother Sam at his hay. Dan Reid cut some grass for us at home. Jim and John mowed fence cor-
ners and Raked up hay.
August 1886
1st Sabbath. Pretty cool, dry day.
2 Cloudy this morning, the day cool, cloudy and dry, very high wind in the afternoon. John and
Willie hauled in some hay in the forenoon and John went and worked for D. Reid in the afternoon.
I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. Jim went to Melancthon and mowed some fence corners, then
helped Mr. Morn.
3 Very cold morning, the day very cold, strong wind. I worked at the Township Books. Jim helped
H. Lonsway to fence. John and Willie with the Bay mare helped D. Reid to finish his hay.
4 Very cold morning, and a Frost, the day dry. John & Willie helped their uncle Sam at his hay.
Jim & I Brought home the fence corners’ hay from Melancthon. [in margin] Frost.
5 Frost this morning, the day dry. John helped H. Lonsway at his fences. Jim and John Gott worked
at the lintle. I chored around. [in margin] Frost.
<folio 82 verso>
August 1886
283
6th Bright morning, the day dry and warm. Mrs. R. and I went to Tossorontio. Jim, John and John
Gott worked at lintle.
7 Warm day, very dusty. Mrs. R. and I went from Brother John’s to W. Lonsway’s, then to John
Agnew’s. The Boys and J. Gott worked at lintle.
8th Sabbath. Bright warm day. We left J. Agnew’s and came to Br. John’s in the eavning.
9 Fine morning, the day dry but not so warm as yesterday. We came home, got home about 2 P.M.,
did not stop to feed on the way. John, Jim & J. Gott worked at the lintle. We got word in the
eavning that the fire had got on to the Melancthon lot. We went there. About 120 Rods of Brush
fence had been burned and the fire was just at the gate and the rail fence as we got there. We
burned some of the Brush around the Shanty at night in order to Save it.
10 Dry but Breezy day. Jim & John are watching the Melancthon lot from the fire.
11 Dry, hot, windy day. Jim and Johney are watching fires in Melancthon. I attended C[ouncil]
Meeting.
12 Dry and warm. I watched fires in Melancthon. John worked for T. Mitchel[l]. Jim went to Dun-
dalk and bought himself a craddle.
<folio 83 recto>
August 1886
13 Dry morning, the day got overcast and there was considerable of thunder in the forenoon, scarcely
any Rain, the wind was very high in the afternoon. Jim and John are in Melancthon, they are
watching the Bush fires and also to come[n]ce the fall wheat. Mrs. R., Eliza and Willie have gone
to a Berry party at Osprey. Owen Cassidy, an old Resident of Melancthon that had been in Michi-
gan, came here this eavning and stopped all night. There was a slight thunder storm with some
Rain at night. [in margin] Commenced / Harvesting / Fall wheat.
14 A little cloudy this morning but the sun got out and dispersed the clouds, the day was dry. Jim and
John are working in Melancthon. Mrs. R. and Willie took them out some provisions.
15th Sabbath. Dry, warm day. Mr. John Abbott and Wife, Mr. W. Clark & Wife, and Brother Sam &
Phoebe were here.
16 Cloudy morning. Rain came on about 9 A.M., and rained to about 2 P.M. We went to Melanc-
thon to work, but came home again. The Boys went for shingles. I got the Brush hook and
stopped all night in Melancthon.
17 Cool day, with a slight mizzle of Rain. The Boys are shingling the lintle. I cut Berry Bushes in
Melancthon.
<folio 83 verso>
August 1886
18th Cool morning, the day dry. I was cutting Berry Bushes in Melancthon. The Boys were shingling
the lintle. There was a frost this night.
19 Sharp frost this morning, the day dry. Jim cut Fall wheat, I tied. John cut Bushes.
20 Pretty warm day and cloudy . The boys harvested in Melancthon. Willie cooked. I was at home
and went to Dundalk.
21 Cloudy day all through. The boys harvested. I worked at the tedious Milk Books.
22nd Sabbath. Dry in the forenoon, and wet in the afternoon.
23 A Slight Rain in the forenoon, something heavier in the afternoon. The boys put some Shingles on
the Lintle. Jim brought a load of shingles from the mill. He traded horse teams with D. Reid and
gave $60.00 to [MS of] Boot. He gained a Black mare rising 12 years old and a Black horse rising
4 years for a Big stallion, rising 6 years and an Iron Grey horse Rising 5 years old.
284
24 A little cool this morning, there was also a slight Rain in the morning. The Boys finished shin-
gling the lintle. I cleaned out the manure that it was built on.
25 Dry day. John Gott and Jim worked at the lintle. Johney & I cut and tied fall wheat in Melanc-
thon.
<folio 84 recto>
August 1886
26 Very hot, dry day. John and I harvested in Melancthon. Jim finished the horse’s stall then he
fixed up the Reaper. [in margin] Hot.
27 Dry, hot day. We harvested our spring wheat. [in margin] Hot.
28 Dry and hot in the forenoon, a little thunder and Rain in the afternoon. Jim and John went for a
load each of fall wheat. They just got into the Barn when the Rain came. I tied and stooked wheat
till it was time to go to Dundalk to pay the milk Patrons. Clark came home. He was away from
14th July.
29th Sabbath. Very close, sultry forenoon, the afternoon also warm and cloudy. Mrs. R. and I were in
at Br. Sam’s. [in margin] Hot.
30 Wet morning, and considerable of Rain had fallen during the night. The forenoon wet, the after-
noon dry. The boys worked at the lintle in the afternoon. Jim craddled some Roads.
31 Rather dull morning, quite misty-like although no rain fell. The eavning was cloudy also, with a
few drops of rain. John, Clark and Willie went to Melancthon to pull pease. Jim reaped at home.
Broke a guard and had to go to Dundalk for a new one. I tied oats. Sold 9 Lambs at 2 60/100 to
be delivered in one month. [in margin] First oats / cut. / Black / Diamonds / Sold Lambs
<folio 84 verso>
September 1886
1 Misty morning, but the day cleared up and was dry with a bright sun in the afternoon. Jim hauled
two loads of fall wheat from Melancthon. The other boys were pulling pease. I tied oats.
2 Frost this morning and ice in some places on the water. The sun shone out and the day was bright
and fine. Jim hauled in the remainder of the fall wheat. He borrowed a waggon from Mr. Oliver
and Willie brought one load and he the other. Jim then ground the Sickle and went to Melancthon
to reap. Johney and Clark were pulling pease. I tied oats. Mrs. John Arnold was here.
3 Rather cloudy this morning but the day was dry, the sun shone occasionally. Willie and I stood up
some oat sheaves in the morning till the dew got off the wheat, then we hauled the wheat (5 loads)
in. Mrs. R. and Eliza helped. Then we hauled what rails made thirteen Rods of a fence. Put the
fence up and turned our milk cows into the field. Jim, John & Clark harvested in Melancthon.
4 Cloudy morning, the day dry all through, but quite cloudy. Willie and I stooked up about 2 1/2
acres of oats in the forenoon, then we took the team and went to Melancthon and helped the other
boys to pull pease.
<folio 85 recto>
September 1886
5th Sabbath. Fine day, dry and warm.
6 Dry sunny day, pretty hot in the afternoon. Jim went to Walter Bell in place of Clark. Johney,
Clark, Willie and I went to Melancthon and harvested there.
7 Dry sunny day, pretty hot. Jim was at Walter Bell’s for Clark. The others of us all were in
Melancthon harvesting.
8 Dry morning, the forenoon clear and sunny, the afternoon cloudy and like rain. I finished binding
oats in Melancthon, came home and tied oats. Jim and Willie hauled in oats. Johney Reaped.
Clark was at Walter Bell’s.
285
9 Wet morning, had rained through the night, the afternoon dry. We tied some oats in the morning,
but gave it up for a bad job. Mrs. R. and Jim went to Dundalk. I worked at the M. Books.
10 Wet again this morning, the afternoon dry. Jim went to the mill for a load of lumber in the fore-
noon. In the afternoon we reaped and Bound oats. John Gott worked 1/2 day at the lintle.
11 Dry morning, the day dry and breezy. We cut and tied about 10 acres of oats. Willie and Mrs. R.
stooked them. John and Clark are gone tonight to W. Bell’s Binding Bee. Jim has went to Mr.
Moran’s to go with him to Mulmer tomorrow.
<folio 85 verso>
September 1886
12th Sabbath. Cool and cloudy with rain late in the eavning. James Lonsway was here.
13 Dry in the forenoon, Rain after 4 P.M. We were reaping and binding oats.
14 Misty morning but not wet, the afternoon Breezy and drying. The boys were harvesting. Finished
Reaping. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and in the afternoon went to Melancthon and turned
ten acres of pease. [in margin] Finished Reaping
15 Fine Breezy, drying day. We hauled together ten acres of pease in Melancthon and stacked them,
Mr. Jas. Maxwell built it. When we came home from Melancthon we hauled in Ten acres of oats.
Got done about Two O’clock in the morning.
16 Slight mizzle of Rain in the morning, but it soon dried off. We hauled in Eight acres of oats from
about One O’clock in the afternoon till 4 O’clock. D. Reid helped us with his team. The after-
noon was wet.
17 Dry day, breezy in the afternoon. Clark and I went to Melancthon and stood up some Oat sheaves
that were down. Jim and John craddled at John Gott’s.
18 Dry morning, the day dry and sunny. We hauled in Oats from Melancthon. D. Reid with his team
helped. There were six loads, or 222 dozen [sheaves]. This finished drawing from Mel[ancthon].
John hauled in a load of mixed feed at home.
<folio 86 recto>
September 1886
19th Sabbath. Cold and showery.
20 Cold morning, a shower about 2 P.M. A heavy rain set in about dark and lasted for an hour. John
and Clark were Binding oats at John Gott’s. Jim and I took the young cattle to Melancthon,
fenced the pea stack and made a way for the cattle to drink.
21 Damp, dreary day but no Rain fell. Jim and John with one team helped D. Reid to haul out ma-
nure. Clark and Willie chopped in the swamp.
22 Cloudy day all through, a slight shower at noon, another at night. Jim went in the morning to see
about the thrashing machine, then came home and helped us turn sheaves, then went to Dundalk to
get Whiffletrees* fixed, also to get his horse’s heels doctored. Came home, then went to the Brit-
tons’ lodge.* John & Clark with the team helped D. Reid. [*Whiffletree: device attached to tongue
of wagon, and to traces on horse harness; see 10 June 1879. The Young Brittons, the Youth
branch of the Loyal Orange Lodge].
23 Grain of all kinds very wet this morning from the heavy Rains last night. The day dry and sunny.
Jim and Clark got out some flatted ceder [=cedar] pieces for to lay the lintle floor on. John with
the team was at A. Lonsway’s threshing. I went to Dundalk. Mrs. S. Patterson & her Father-in-
Law were here this afternoon.
<folio 86 verso>
September 1886
286
24 Dry morning, the day dry till night when there came on a Rainstorm. We threshed about 10 acres
of pease in Melancthon. They were in a stack and a good many were wet.
25 Rain very early in the morning, the day dry. John and I brought the remainder of the threshed
pease home. Jim and Clark stopped in Melancthon. John went to the Vet with a horse in the af-
ternoon. The Vet said there were wolf teeth in him. He broke them.
26 Sabbath. A little Rain through the day.
27 Misty morning, the forenoon dry, a slight rain in the afternoon. Dan Reid with his team helped us
to haul Grain in the afternoon. It was pretty wet, still I did not like to leave it out any longer, as
the weather is so showery. Jim struck out for Melancthon this morning. He goes to live on his
own Lot*, and do the best he can. He is 23 years of age. I hope he will succeed in life. [in mar-
gin] Finished / Harvesting / Jim / went to his / Farm. [*Robert deeded Lot 31, Con. 5, Melanc-
thon to Jim in Nov. 1882, and Jim is now formally taking possession of it as his own farm.]
28 Showery during the day and quite a Rain pour during the night. John was helping J. Maxwell to
Log. Clark is helping Jim.
29 Bright morning, the day sunny and very breezy. I threshed some oats in the forenoon with the
flail. Made up milk accounts in the afternoon. John spread peas on the Barn floor in the forenoon
and went in the afternoon to Collingwood Show Fair. More money gone and waste of time, sink-
ing me deeper & deeper.
<folio 87 recto>
September 1886
29th Continued —— after a little while longer, things must be swept from me as I cannot hold out
against the Extravagence that is eating the very inside out of all I am worth. Always buy, buy, go
in debt in the stores, get every thing that is needed, no thought where the money is to come from
that is to pay it. Bought 27 fruit trees for self and same no. and varieties for Jim from Mr. Carr of
the Galt nurseries on the 28th, or yesterday.
The names of the trees are as follows. Apples:18 Duchess of Oldenburgh, 3 Man, 2 Walbridge,
& 2 Wealthy. Crabs: 1 Transcendent. Plums: 1 Glasse & seedling. Price: $12.00 for the 54 trees.
[in margin] Fruit trees / on 28th inst.
30 Fine dry morning, the day dry and breezy till about 5 P.M. when it commenced raining and the
rain turned to snow during the night. John was at Collingwood Show Fair. Clark was helping Jim
in Melancthon. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon and paid the milk patrons.
October [1886]
1st Ground covered with snow this morning and very cold, frequent showers of snow through the day.
John and Clark cut some logs in the eavning. [in margin] First / snow.
2 Dry morning, but cold with some snow on the ground, the day cold all through. John plowed,
Clark helped J. Gott at the lintle in the afternoon. I worked at the Twp. Books. Brother Sam’s
Madella is stopping here tonight.
<folio 87 verso>
October 1886
3rd Sabbath. Dry day. Brother Sam’s Madella was here to the afternoon, then went home.
4 Wet this morning, cleared off about 10 A.M., a slight mizzle in the afternoon. The Boys, John and
Clark, started to help Walter Bell this morning to haul in, but the rain came on and they [re]turned
home. John plowed. Clark and I drove the Lambs (9) to Dundalk to Mr. Rundle who had bought
them one month ago at $2.60 each. I bargained with Mr. Tedford*, harness maker, for a sett of
new harness, less collars and Briddles [=bridles]. In lieu of Briddles I am to have halters with bibs
attached. I pay him $20.00 cash and deliver him Eight cords of 22 inch green wood any time dur-
287
ing the winter. [*James Tedford, harness & hardware, in 1906 Dundalk business directory; see
History of Dundalk, p. 105.]
5 Damp morning, quite misty, the day not wet, still not drying. John and Clark were moving fence
in the forenoon. In the afternoon John went to Melancthon for some lumber I had there. I built
fence.
6 Quite misty this morning, the fog cleared off about 10 A.M., the rest of the day was dry and sunny.
John and Clark moved fence and stone piles. I worked at Township Books. John & I took the
team and went to Dundalk for the new harness.
7 Beautiful day, like Indian Summer. Clark helped W. Bell to harvest. John & Team helped D.
Reid to thresh. John Gott & I worked at the lintle. Mrs. R. quilted [miniscule].
<folio 88 recto>
October 1886
8th Beautiful day all through, sunny and bright. John Gott worked at the lintle. John, Clark, [and]
Eliza Raised potatoes and put them in the cellar (41 Bags). They are large and dry but not many at
a stalk [illegible].
9 Beautiful morning, the day very fine. We finished taking up potatoes. We have about 80 Bushels
of splendid ones. Had about 140 last year in the same ground. Jim and Willie came home tonight.
John Gott was working at the lintle.
10th Sabbath. Beautiful day, Warm and balmy. Brother Sam & Phoebe were here.
11 Fine morning, the day hazy almost like Indian Summer. Jim and Willie left for Melancthon. John
and Clark moved stone pile and chips. I went to Dundalk in the forenoon and in the afternoon
helped the Boys. John Gott worked at Lintle.
12 Wet morning, but the day cleared off. I attended Council meeting at Hopeville. John took a yoke
of three year old steers of his own and one two year old of mine to the fair, and sold them for
$40.00 and $11.00. Clark helped John Gott at the Lintle.
13 Cloudy morning, but the day was dry and moderately warm. All hands attended the show fair at
Dundalk. [in margin] Show / Fair.
<folio 88 verso>
October 1886
14th Dry forenoon but the afternoon was very wet and very windy. The wind is now (8 P.M.) a team-
ing gale. Clark went for J. Gott to John Rutherford’s threshing. I put out manure in the forenoon
and chored around in the afternoon. John Gott worked at the lintle. Son Johney left this morning.
He and I had an altercation. [in margin] Johney / Left home.
15 Drizzly wet morning with a high wind. A great many of the fences on the farm are blown down
with the heavy wind last night. The day was cold and showery, some snow mixed with the Rain.
Clark took the team and went to Brother Sam’s threshing. I chored around. Johney came home
this forenoon. I am glad that he is back again, could not bear to part with him at all, would feel
miserable without him, although we quarrel now and then. Hope there will be no more partings.
[in margin] Johney / came / home / Stabled / cattle for / the first time.
16 Cold morning, snow on the Ground and more falling, the day cold all through. John and the team
were at Br. Sam’s threshing till noon, then he came home and hauled manure. I and Clark chored
around in the forenoon. Clark helped Johney in the afternoon and I went to Dundalk. Mr. A. Lon-
sway and wife were here at night.
<folio 89 recto>
October 1886
288
17th Sabbath. Ground covered with snow this morning, and more falling. A soft snow fell most of the
day. Mrs. R. and I went to Jim’s in Melancthon.
18 Ground covered with snow this morning, but the day was mild and the snow mostly disappeared.
Johney was getting some firewood. I was at W. Bell’s threshing. John and his mother and Eliza
are at Mr. A. Lonsway’s pearing [=paring] Bee.
19 Beautiful morning, the day very fine. I was at W. Bell’s threshing. Johney hauled out manure.
20 Fine morning, the day dry till about 4 P.M. when there came on some rain. It cleared off, then
began Raining again. It is now (8:40 P.M.) Raining quite Briskly. John and I were hauling out
manure. Clark got home from Collingwood where he had went on last Monday. T. W. John & W.
Robinson were here at night.
21 Cold raw morning, the day dry but pretty chilly. John and I were putting out manure. Clark was
at John Gott’s threshing. Mrs. R. visited Mrs. Abraham Jackson.
22 Splendid day, dry and hazy. I think it is Indian Summer. John plowed. He and I gathered stones
in the forenoon. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. Clark was at H. Lonsway’s threshing. Mr.
R. Cornett* was here. [*Robert Cornett was member of first provisional town council in 1886; see
History of Dundalk, p. 5.]
<folio 89 verso>
October 1886
23rd Fine morning, the day Splendid, dry and mild. Clark was at H. Lonsway’s threshing in the fore-
noon. He and I cleaned pease in the afternoon. John plowed in the forenoon and in the afternoon
he and his mother went to Dundalk.
24th Sabbath. Quite cool morning, the afternoon cloudy, and wet at night.
25 Showery this morning and quite a sharp mizzle of Rain fell mostly all day, and turned to snow in
the eavning. The ground is now (7 P.M.) white with snow. We tid[i]ed up the Barn for the thrash-
ing, Butchered a Sheep and picked some stones. The thrashers came here this eavning.
26 Hard [frost this] morning and cool, the day dry and cool. We threshed all day. John Brinkman’s
machine. [in margin] Thrashed
27 Hard frost this morning, the day dry and cool. We finished threshing at noon. The Grain turned
out well, Except the wheat which was poor in quantity but good in quality. We had about 112
Bushels of wheat or 8 Bushels to the acre. 900 Bushels of Oats, or 30 Bushels to the acre, and
about 170 Bushels of pease which we had threshed about three weeks ago, or 17 Bushels to the
acre. [in margin] Jim Oldfield / & M. Maxwell / Married.
<folio 90 recto>
October 1886
28 Dark morning, the day showery. Clark went to H. Hewett’s threshing for Brother Sam. John and I
chored around home in the forenoon and in the afternoon John went to John Oliver’s wedding [MS
weeding], I to Dundalk. I saw several strawberry blossoms in the fields. [in margin] J. Oliver & /
J. Neithercut / Married.
29 Rainy morning, the day generally showery. John was plowing in the afternoon. Clark was at H.
Hewett’s threshing for Br. Sam. I was getting information out of the old collector’s Rolls for the
Township Clerk.
30 Fine morning, the day dry, bright and sunny. William McKay with his oxen logged for us on Lot
216, Proton.
31st Sabbath. Beautiful day, dry, sunny and warm. Mrs. R. and I were at Brother Sam’s.
November 1886
289
1st Dry day, sunny and pleasant. John went in the forenoon with a grist to the mill. In the afternoon
he plowed. Mrs. R. and I went to Dundalk. I chored around in the afternoon.
2 Dry day, sunny and bright. John plowed. I spread manure.
3 Cool, Breezy and dry. John plowed in the forenoon and in the afternoon went to the mill for the
grist. Miss Minnie Neithercut came here this eavning. I was seeking the Two yearling colts which
had strayed away. Mrs. R. got them about 3/4 of a mile from home.
<folio 90 verso>
November 1886
4th Quite cold this morning, a shower of snow through the day, cold and windy in the afternoon. Mrs.
R. started for Tossorontio this morning. Miss Neithercut went home this afternoon. John was at
D. Reid’s plowing Bee with the team. I worked at the Factory Books.
5th Cold, Raw morning, the day very windy but dry, with considerable of sunshine. John was plow-
ing. I was Raising stones. Mrs. D. Reid was here in the eavning. John went to Dundalk at night.
I seen strawberry Blossoms in the field. [in margin] Seen / Straw Berry / Blossoms.
6 Rather mild morning, the day cool, dry, and some sunshine. John and I picked stones in the fore-
noon, then I went to Dundalk and he went for a load of wood to Melancthon. I took a Racoon skin
to the Tannery to be tanned. [in margin] Coon skin / to be tanned.
7th Sabbath. Ground covered with snow. Sharp frost, strong wind and cold day.
8 Hard frost this morning, and some snow falling. The day was very cold and a little snow fell.
John and I moved straw out of the lintle in the forenoon and in the afternoon he went for a load of
wood.
9 Pretty chilly in the morning, milder towards noon, a little rain in the afternoon which turned to
snow at night. John and I moved some straw in the forenoon. He took Jim’s Horse to Dundalk in
the afternoon, got a wolf tooth Extracted. Mrs. R. came home.
<folio 91 recto>
November 1886
10th Snow on the ground this morning and some more fell. The day got mild and the snow pretty much
all melted. John went for a load of wood in the forenoon and in the afternoon plowed.
11 Cold, cloudy morning, the day pretty cold with a hard frost setting in in the eavning. John plowed.
I spread manure in the forenoon and went to Dundalk in the afternoon. Mrs. R. was helping Mrs.
C. Bell make Rag carpet.
12 Very sharp morning, the day cold and freezing, the Roads very rough, no snow on the ground.
John chored around. I went to Melancthon with a curry comb* & Brush. [*Horse grooming tool.]
13 Sharp morning, the day very cold, raw wind, the Roads very rough. John & I butchered a fat hog
in the forenoon. Mrs. R. and I went to W. Gallagher’s funeral. Mr. and Mrs. A. Lonsway were
here at night. Jim and Ch. Maxwell came here at night. [in margin] W. Gallaher / died.
14th Sabbath. Cold morning, the day pretty windy, a little soft towards eavning. Willie drove Jim &
Clark to Melancthon.
15 Pretty sharp morning, Bleak wind and cold. John hauled some clay in the waggon and Banked the
house with it. I Journalized and Ledgerized about $950.00 worth of Township orders. Mrs. John
Gott was here.
<folio 91 verso>
November 1886
16th Pretty mild morning, the day had a good deal of sunshine and was nice weather for this time of the
year. John A[gnew Russell], who is exactly 21 years of age today, was at H. Johnson’s thresh-
290
ing. I chored around and went to Mr. Duncan’s in the eavning to get him [to] cut horse feed. Mrs.
R. went to Dundalk. [in margin] John’s / Birthday.
17 Rather soft in the forenoon, the afternoon was sleet and Rain. John was at H. Johnson’s threshing.
C. Johnson’s was here in the afternoon.
18 Very Windy morning, the day stormy, strong piercing wind and snow falling. John and [I] tid[i]ed
up the Barn for cutting on tomorrow. John went in the afternoon for the cutting Box to J. Dun-
can’s. I went to Dundalk on Cheese Business in the afternoon. Mr. W. Nichols & Wife were here
at night.
19 Very Blustery morning, Blowing, snowing and freezing. It was so stormy that Mr. Duncan could
not come to cut Horse feed. The day was one of storm. John Gott and Norman Schell were here
in the forenoon and finished the lintle. We then put our cattle in. [in margin] cattle put / in the
new / Stable.
20 A little snow now and then through the day, still, the day was not unpleasant. Mr. John Duncan
cut sheaves for us. He cut about 100 doz. & charged $3.00. W. Lonsway & Team helped us. [in
margin] Old Sam / McDowell / Buryed.
<folio 92 recto>
November 1886
21st Sabbath. Pretty sharp morning, the day chilly. Jim came from Melancthon and returned in the
afternoon.
22 Rather fine morning, the day cool but pleasant. John was at Mr. Lonsway’s with the team helping
them cut oat sheaves. I worked at the milk accounts.
23 Pretty sharp morning, the day windy. John split some stove wood. I took the Milk Books to Dun-
dalk to the auditors. The Township collector made a payment to me.
24 Raining this morning, the day generally wet. Mrs. R. took John and some provisions to Melanc-
thon. William took Jim’s Grey Horse to the Blacksmith’s to be shod, then took him to Melanc-
thon. [in margin] Thaw.
25 Pretty sharp morning, the Roads very rough. I went to Dundalk to See the Cheese auditors. Had
to stop with them till near 5 O’clock. John is cutting firewood in Melancthon.
26 Hard morning, the day pretty chilly, a little snow fell. John with the team was helping his uncle
Sam to thresh.
27 Pretty Sharp morning, the day chilly all through, the ground Rough & hard. John was cutting
firewood in Melancthon. I went in the afternoon to Dundalk and paid Milk Patrons their last pay-
ment, over $1600.00.
<folio 92 verso>
November 1886
28th Sabbath. Pretty sharp morning, the day Rather cold, with some snow.
29 Snow falling this morning and an occasional snow shower through the day. We Butchered hogs.
Dan Reid helped us. We killed 4 hogs and they weighed Ten hundred less Twenty pounds.
30 Pretty fine day, a little chillier than yesterday. Sleighing is improving, a little snow fell last night.
John went to Mr. Wright’s Mill with [dittog.: with] 1.000 pounds of wheat. He got, of yield, 600
pounds of flour.
December [1886]
1st Mild morning, the day pretty mild, with considerable of a snow fall in the afternoon. John hauled
two small loads of firewood from Melancthon, and returned there at night to chop. Jim came
home with his team and got the Old Bobsleighs which I had gave him. He took some cut feed to
Melancthon. Mrs. R. and I were in Dundalk in the forenoon,
291
2 Pretty sharp day, a little snow fell. John is chopping in Melancthon at firewood.
3 Very cold day, from morning till night. Eliza took Clark and some provisions to Melancthon and
brought home Willie. John is cutting firewood there.
<folio 93 recto>
December 1886
4th Very cold morning, the day cold all through. Mrs. R., Eliza and Willie took some chickens and a
duck to Dundalk. Willie then went to Melancthon. Jim came home this eavning and is stopping
all night. John is cutting firewood in Melancthon.
5th Sabbath. Pretty mild day. Jim stopped here till afternoon, then went to Melancthon. Brother Sam
and Phoebe were here.
6 Very fine morning, the day beautiful sunshine all through. Mrs. R. and Eliza went to John R.
Montgomerie’s with an Order to be Endorsed by the School Marm of No. 10. John is chopping
firewood in Melancthon. Jim is here this night.
7 Fine morning, the day pretty mild. Jim took the Bay team and Bobsleighs and four Bags of oats to
Melancthon, to Saw log[s].
8 Mild morning, the day fine, Rather inclined to be a little soft. I was at John Johnson’s wood be[e].
He is sick with inflamation of the lungs. Jim, John, Clark and Willie are working in Melancthon.
John is hauling Logs to the mill for Jim.
9 Softish morning, the day mild with a good deal of sunshine in the afternoon. I went to Dundalk in
the eavning. John was helping Jim saw log[s].
10 Soft day, thawing. John took the Sow to Hopeville to the Hog. Had his journey for nothing. Mrs.
R. and I went to Mr. Nichol’s at night.
<folio 93 verso>
December 1886
11th A slight mizzle of Rain this morning, and continued misty all day. The snow is fast disappearing.
People have taken to the wheels again. John, with the team, went to Melancthon. He put some
boards on the horse stable. Clark came home at night with a pain in his side. [in margin] Thaw.
12th Sabbath. Dark day and thawing. Mrs. R. drove Clark to Melancthon, then went to Sam’s.
13 Drizzly morning with a pretty heavy shower about 10 A.M. Clark is in Melancthon. John started
with the team to go to Collin[g]wood Town to See Mr. Abraham Horner to buy from him Lot 30,
Con. 4, Township of Melancthon. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon and Deposited in Bank
$1666.00, Township moneys. Snow storm in the afternoon. [in margin] Thaw.
14 Pretty Rough day all through, snowing and Blowing, with considerable of a Freeze. John got
home from Collingwood, did not succeed in purchasing from Mr. Horner. The old Goose of a
Dutchman had wrote us that he would sell the Lot for $1500.00. Now he says he meant $2500.00.
It’s too much for it, so the Bargain is off. I went to Brother Sam’s this afternoon.
15 Pretty cold day, blowing, snowing & Freezing. John is working in Melancthon. I went to Meeting
in Dundalk of Mr. Blythe, M.P.P. James L. Johnson, a Resident of Melancthon, got killed by a
Burch [=birch] limb falling on him. [in margin] Sent letter to Br. W. / Paris P. O. / Lamar Co. / St
of Tex.
<folio 94 recto>
December 1886
16th Pretty Rough day all through, Snowing and Blowing. John & Clark are working in Melancthon. I
went there in the afternoon. Mr. McConnell, Collector, deposited with me this eavning over
$1100.00.
292
17 Pretty cold day, strong wind and freezing, the sleighing is very poor. Some snow fell at night.
John and Clark were working in Melancthon. Jim and his team came home this eavning from the
Funeral of James L. Johnson. John came home at night.
18 Snowing some this morning and kept snowing a little during the day. Jim and his mother started
with his team for Tossorontio this morning. He wants to see the Farrier at Rosemont to get him to
prescribe for his Extra [?] Horse which has the scratches. John hauled two loads of stove wood
from Melancthon. He is now gone to some kind of a show at Dundalk. Willie came home from
Melancthon at night.
19th Sabbath. Mild day from morning till night.
20 Sharp, cold day all through. I attended a council meeting at Dundalk. John was hauling wood
home.
21 Mild day, almost like a thaw. John Hauled wood. Mr. S. Rogers, Reeve of Proton, came here this
morning. I went to Dundalk in the afternoon. Folks came home tonight.
<folio 94 verso>
December 1886
22 Mild morning, the day mild all through. John hauled firewood home. I worked at the Township
Books till about 4 P.M., then I went to Brother Sam’s to see his baby which is very sick.
23 Mild morning, the day mild all through. John split wood for the stove at the house till about 3
O’clock, then he dressed and away to Neithercut’s spree.
24 Mild day. John was fixing the horse stable in Melancthon. I went to Dundalk and bought a copper
Boiler for $4.00.
25 Christmas. Roads pretty heavy this morning on account of the snow fall last night. The day cold
enough. Johney got the team and cutter and went a-girling. The other boys after dinner went to
the Christmas festival at Dund[alk].
26th Sabbath. Sharp cold day. Clark and I left with the team (Jim’s) and went to Melancthon in the
afternoon.
27 Cold day with quite a snow fall. Clark and I were cutting stove wood in Melancthon. John was
swamping cordwood in Melancthon. I came home at night.
28 Another cold stormy day. I went to the voting for M.P.P. Voted for Blythe (Conservative). John
is swamping wood in Melancthon. Broke his harness, came home for the new ones.
<folio 95 recto>
December 1886
29th Cold day with some snow falling. I and Clark cut stove wood in Melancthon. John swamped out
cordwood. I came home at night, don’t like shantying.
30 Another cold day, freezing keenly. Willie left home for Melancthon to cook for the Boys. I done
the chores at home. John was to Start [to] haul cordwood to Dundalk. [in margin] Started / haul-
ing / C. W. to Dund.
31 Cold day, snowing and blowing. John was hauling co