Courtland Olds Diary, 1886

Title

Courtland Olds Diary, 1886

Date Created

January 1, 1886

Is Part Of

Courtland Olds Diary Collection

Medium

Scanned Manuscript

Transcription

THE

CANADIAN POCKET DIARY FOR 1886.


TORONTO: PUBLISHED BY BROWN BROS.

{This page illegible}

JANUARY SATURDAY, 2 1886

Billy and I put in a load of straw for the horses this morning. He has been getting out manure and draw-up wood the ball.{ballance} of the day. The weather continues nice and warm.

Victor mail came to day for the first, and our post office is an established fact.

Went to the cheese factory this afternoon to recieve ball. of years proceeds, from cheese sales, &c {etc}.

JANUARY SUNDAY, 3 1886

Ma and I went out to meeting this morning as usual. We had barely got there when it began to rain and continued almost incessantly until after we got home this evening.

Services both morning and evening were interesting and profitable followed this morning, preaching perhaps... We took dinner with Miss { Jiles?}

JANUARY MONDAY, 4 1886

The rain that began falling at about eleven o'clock yesterday has continued throughout last night and the past day, and still it rains.

I went up to the Wiggins schoolhouse to put in my vote for the new council, through the rain and mud, on foot. The weather is quite warm as well as rainy. Frost has about disappeared everywhere.

JANUARY TUESDAY, 5 1886

Billy and I have been working in the woods most of the time to day packing up down timber of all sorts. The weather continues quite warm and very muddy. There is some prospect of a change however, to colder weather.

It is a great {break?} to have the daily paper come every other day even, and that without going to Dover on purpose, so much for our new post office.

January Wednesday, 6 1886

Billy and I have been working away in the woods to day geting down stuff cut and piled up ready to draw The weather has been quite cold for a change, I like cold weather in the winter time however.

Reed and I walked down to Mrs. L Clarke this evening to see if they had heard from their friends {below?} lately. Found that they had not. & so our walk was for nothing.

January Thursday, 7 1886

The cold weather still continues and seems likely to do so. Billy has been geting up wood and cuting it to day. I went out to Dover this after with W. K. W. to look after some matters relating to household want &c. Sent the ballance due to my threshers to day by Registered letter. The latter promises to be my plan of sending money in future.

January Friday, 8 1886

Billy and I have been cuting away at the drier wood as usual. We are geting a nice pile ready to draw. quite a beginning to our summer pile of wood. The weather is very cold and windy with every prospect of a snow storm soon. We are looking for snow because we need it I suppose To cover the wheat &c; and to make better roads, for traffic

January Saturday,9 1886

The cold is becoming more and more severe, &, the East and North East wind is blowing almost a gale. There seems a prospect of a snow storm before long. Billy and I have been cuting wood in the woods a {gain?} to day. It just happens that we can work {easily?} in the woods notwithstanding the cold. The weather appears to have become settled Winter weather.

January Sunday, 10 1886

Ma and I did not go out to church to day as usual; but, we sent Charlotte and Mr. Reed out instead. The weather has been quite cold and windy. Have been reading and trying to proffit in New ways during the quiet of the Holy Sabbath. We find it quite proffitable to spend these days in this way occasionaly it seems so necessary to have a change occasionaly

January Monday, 11 1886

Billy and I got another load of straw into the drive-barn this forenoon. John Pallisau came after the ballance due him to day. was thankful to be able to pay him up in full. I went down to {Holcomb?} this evening on foot James did not get in until late, however he told me that his father was very poorly and not likely to live a great while.

January Tuesday, 12 1886

I took a grist of oats and peas out to mill to day over the very rough roads. Got along all right however Have had Bily drawing wood from the woods. The weather has been very cold to day - The coldest day of the season I think, Brought- home a quarter of beef from Clover & Rosses to day which I got for 6 1/2 cts per pound

January Wednesday, 13 1886

The weather has been very fine the past day but windy. Billy and I have been cuting wood in the woods this afternoon. We are having a visit from two little girls of Charly Wilsons. I cannot help feeling old when I see these girls. they are half grown up; and yet it only seems as yesterday when they were little things.

January Thursday, 14 1886

Billy and I have been working in the woods again this forenoon. The day has been a delightful one. I went to the Grange this afternoon. Had a rather interesting meeting. Bro. Glasbrooke of Simcoe being with us. Received my ten dollars salary which was some satisfaction to me & a partial return at least from the troubles of my office.

January Friday, 15 1886

I went up to Simcoe this afternoon to attend the Farmers Institute there. Professor Brown and the Veterinary surgeon from the Ontario Experimental farm were there. Attendance good the subject of permenant pastures was first discussed. Some very important points were made. Was satisfied that such pasture will revolutionise our country as a dairy producing section of New World.

January Saturday, 16 1886

I stayed all night at Dave Marrs last night and was quite comforable for Winter. Attended both sessions of the Institute to day. Did not see any there from my own section except the Stoud's. Rain has been falling to day, all the time. David Wooley's Essay on the best mode of exterminating the Canada Thistle & all the benefits of Plaster as manure combined with cloverseed & other manure.

January Sunday, 17 1886

Mother and I went out to church this morning. Had our new minister to preach to us both morning and evening. The minister preached about the afflictions of job in the morning, and with good effect. The good Lord was with us in all our services. Resumed to Sunday school, which I enjoyed very much. Had dinner at Mr. Shriyers and tea at Mr. Wills.

January Monday, 18 1886

Billy and I have been cuting wood in the woods to day, the weather is quite cold and Windy with good prospects of snow. We went down to Wallsis Nice evening to spend a few hours with them. I took down nineteen bushels of oats which I agreed to take some time ago. (?) (?) our horses. Maggie unfortunately got kicked in Wallsis stable.

January Tuesday,19 1886

Ma and I went up to Simcoe this morning to attend the Division Grange, Ma visited at Mr Murphys while I was at the Grange. The attendance was fair and we had a pleasant time. It fell to my lot to be elected. Oversee against my own inclination. Our Granges do not seem to be prospering to any extent There seems a hopeful outlook however.

January Wednesday,20 1886

Billy and I have been geting in a load of straw for the horses to day; and, a pit of potatoes. Took three bags up to his perkis & put the rest in the cellar for our own use. The weather has been pretty cold too - and so night it is snowing with every prospect of a heavy fall of snow. Dollie went after Sarah {Waleb?} to day again. She has been down to Hanbrooke on a visit.

January Thursday, 21 1886

Billy and I have been geting a grist of grain ready to take to the mill for chop this forenoon. I sent him to Rose's mill this afternoon with it. Ma and I went up to Woodhouses this afternoon. Took tea at John Gilberts and from there we went to the tea meeting at the old Woodhouse Chappel. Had a very pleasant time, Rev. {J S?} Laird was there besides some other ministers.

January Friday, 22 1886

We have been working on the woods to day. Billy and I cuting fire-wood. There has been a heavy wind and snow storm in progress. Through out the day and specialy this evening. It is mostly wind however. Have just been told that some hotel keepers in Simcoe have been taken up and fined a large amount for breaking the Scott Act. {The Scott Act was another name for the 1878 Canada Temperance Act.}

January Saturday, 23 1886

Billy and I worked at cuting wood in the woods this forenoon. This afternoon he has been drawing up wood while Ma and I went out to Dover to make a visit - mostly at Mrs Barretts. Enjoyed the evening with them very much. They were all home but Clarence who is at the Art School in Toronto. Alice has just come home from visiting in Toronto.

January Sunday, 24 1886

The weather is very cold, so much so that Ma would not go out to church with me this morning, so I took Mr. Reid. Had an excellent sermon from our pastor and a proffitable after service besides. Came home to dinner and remained home ballance of the day. Mr & Mrs Reid went out this evening in our places.

January Monday, 25 1886

Billy and I worked in the woods this forenoon of and cut down a large oak back of the ten-acre-field which was hollow and fit only for wood. Had Tony Jackson and his mother with the other members of the family to dinner. So I spent the afternoon visiting with them while Billy has been getting up wood The weather has been moderating all day and to night it is raining.

January Tuesday, 26 1886

Intended to have killed some pigs to day; but failed to get the help necessary. James Holcomb promised to help some time ago, We have been geting in some hay from the stack west of the barn part of the time. G.W. {Lencow?} & wife were here to dinner and to spend the afternoon with us. Gave an order for some pear trees with the understanding that I was to earn part of the money helping deliver &c.

January Wednesday, 27 1886

James Holcomb came to day and helped me kill four piggs. Got done by noon. Billy and I have been working in the woods this afternoon. There has been some appearance of a thaw to day rain has been falling moderately, Ma and I went down to Wilson {illegible} this evening to visit them. Had a pleasant evening with {illegible}'s brother and his wife

January Thursday, 28 1886

I went out to Dover this forenoon with three piggs which we killed and dressed yesterday. Sold them at 6 1/4 cents per pound. One to Mr Barrett one to Mrs. Moody and one to Albert Ryerson. Had a visit from our old pastor and his lady Rev. D. {Clatorers?} to day, Mrs Ross & Miss Giles also. It was a great privelige to have this company again.

January Friday, 29 1886

My boy and I worked in the woods this forenoon as usual and made some little addition to our stock of stovewood. The weather has been somewhat soft. Had a lot of visitors to dinner and tea. Two or three families altogather. Unckle {Holuses?}, William Walls, and {illegible} Marr with their ladies besides some others. Intended to have gone to Pelham tomorrow but Janey was unwell.

January Saturday, 30 1886

Billy and I got some more wood cut this forenoon in the woods this forenoon. He has been working away at sundry jobs this afternoon. Ma and I went out to Dover this afternoon, mostly to visit Mrs. Lawson. Spent the evening there very pleasantly. Recieved a letter from Mrs. German and husband. {Rcd?} Mr. J. W. German this evening. The former has been quite poorly, but is recovering slowly.

January Sunday, 31 1886

I took ma and Bertha out to Dover this morning to church. Had an excellent sermon from our own minister. I remained in Dover until the evening service which was also proffitable. Took dinner at Frances Marr's with Bertha, to day. Found Thomas Jackson here on my arrival home ready {illegible} to Pelham in the morning. The Good Lord is still a present help.

February Monday, 1 1886

Thomas Jackson and I started for Pelham this norning at about eight o'clock. Had a very pleasant drive down, the wind being on our backs and otherwise favourable. We called and took dinner with Mr. John {Payrie?} {illegible} {border?} of Dearborn about three miles East of Cayuga. Was pleased to see his nice herd of cows. Got through all right to the end of our journey and are putting up at C. J. Cookes to night.

February Tuesday, 2 1886

Have visited at Mr Cookes, at Mr. W. H Hortons and at Ms. N. C. Holcombs to day. Went down to Billy Holcombs towards night to see the father of the Holcombs who is ninety four years old. Found him quite well considering his great age. Spent the evening at Mr. Cookes mostly. This weather has been quite cold and blustery to day. Have concluded to put up for the night at Mr. Cookes.

February Wednesday,3. 1886

The weather has been very stormy to day. So I have scarcely ventured {away?} from Mr Cookes. {illegible} Have been at Mr. C. Holcomb most of the time. The caller is very talkative although much affected by the condition of his wife, who is apparently a comfirmed lunatic, without even a hope of recovery. His yard, buildings and stock are in a sad condition.

February Thursday, 4 1886

Slept at Mr Cookes again last night. Visited with some people from Trafalger township last night at Mr. Hortons, a Mr. Hager and a Miss {Tierde?}. The caller is quite a medium. Went with Nicus to St. Catherines to day. though very cold & stormy weather. Saw the friends off for the train. Came home again this evening to Mr N. C. Holcomb and settled up with the Caller for a bag of seed wheat.

February Friday,5 1886

Thomas and I visited arround some to day and went down to Clifton towards night. Found our friend Mr. Skinner and Miss Kittie Skinner well and at home. Ida was away however. Have enjoyed our visit with them very much however, I think that Kittie is out of the sweetest girls I ever saw and her company is most desirable to me. More so then any other young lady.

February Saturday, 6 1886

Thomas Jackson Mr. Skinner and I spent a good part of the time to day in visiting p{l}aces of most interest arround Clifton and the Falls of Niagara. Mr. Skinner and Kittie have been so kind to us in every way. that we could not help enjoying our visit with them I would have been pleased if Ida could have come home but have been disappointed so far. Attended prayer meeting with Kittie this evening

February Sunday, 7 1886

Mr. Skinner was quite unwell this morning so we had to go to school alone. The Rev. Mr. Cassady preaches are excellent quarterly meeting discourse. One new feature of his service was that of the congregation and the minister each reading a verse about of the morning scripture lesson. Was very loath to leave my friend Kittie to day. Came back to {illegible} however this evening.

February Monday, 8 1886

Thomas and I intended starting home to day, from North Pelham to day. {illegible} this morning. Gave it up however on account of the exceedingly high wind that has prevailed from South west all day. Visited my old friend {name illegible}this evening and had a very pleasant time with him. was sorry indeed to hear that his farm was likely to be taken from him by a chancery suit with his brother.

February Tuesday, 9 1886

Thomas Jackson and I started for home this morning at about eight o'clock. News The weather was somewhat warm and soft; but we got along very nicely. Arrived at Cayuga for dinner. Went after to visit the herd of Short horns owned by Mr. John P. Marbles. Was well satisfied with our visit there. I had an offer of a bull that was quite satisfactory. Got home all right & found them {illegible}

February Wednesday, 10 1886

Billy and I have {rest of the page is not clear enough to read}

February Thursday, 11 1886

Billy and {?} widow worked out in the barn. The {?} woods this afternoon {?} much dor{?} to {?} this morning and paid John B{?} five dollars on account of wiring. The

February Saturday, 13 1886

{writing is not legible}

February Sunday, 14 1886

Ma and I went out to church. Nice morning as usual. It rained all day however so we did not come home after the morning service. Went to the sabbath school and afterwards to the evening service. The minister preached on popular {words illegible} Wills over evening. Have enjoyed the favour of our God this day also.

February Friday, 19 1889

We have had a sick cow late-ly; and to day she died. I went after {Niel?} Called doc-tor this {illegible} but {the?} cow was dead when I got {home?} again. Mr. McPhee helped us with {the?} little house again to-day. We have got it at our {illegible} for {illegible} at {illegible}. {Illegible} to day. Snow has been falling {-erabely?} but {-sively?} all day.

February Saturday, 20 1886

Mr. McPhee has been helping us again to day. He and Billy got four big logs in to the mill this afternoon. Billy {drew?} over this afternoon. We retrieved new cow this afternoon. The weather was very cold and blustery all day. The snow that fell last night and yesterday has made very good sleighing. {Illegible} at night for our {illegible} drawing after all.

DECEMBER MONDAY 20 1886

I have been

very {lreesily?} even

gayed as usual

{and?} {seendry?} lot.

Made a {foujui?}

for my bad sleigh.

Lesides doing

some erends.

{Kanh?} to take the

ballance of {illegible?}

wheat to martis

so we beane also

got new {illegible?}

sheet ready.

Am exceedingly

grateful to {name?}

Lord for {illegible?}

{illegible sentance?} of

his {illegible?} and

she joys of this

great {sallalein?}.

I never felt mere

leapgy in asfin.

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Citation

“Courtland Olds Diary, 1886,” Rural Diary Archive, accessed October 1, 2022, https://ruraldiaries.lib.uoguelph.ca/transcribe/items/show/146.

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