David Allan Diary, 1876

Title

David Allan Diary, 1876

Date Created

January 1, 1876

Is Part Of

David Allan Diary Collection

Medium

Scanned Manuscript

Transcription

{Cover of Diary}

DAILY

JOURNAL,

1876.

{Printed Calendar for 1876 and first 4 months of 1877.}

DAILY

JOURNAL

FOR

1876.

TORONTO: PUBLISHED BY BROWN BROTHERS, MANUFACTURING STATIONERS.

{A leaf has been placed over this page}

{This page provides typed written information with the following heading: The Annual General Meeting of the Company was held in the Queen's Hotel, Guelph, on the 12th January, 1877.}

{This page provides typed written information with the following heading: THE MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY OF THE COUNTY OF WELLINGTON

For the Year Ending 31st December, 1876.

{This page provides typed written information with the following heading: The Wellington Mutual Fire Insurance Company. BY-LAW No. 4}

{This page provides typed written information with the following heading: Annual Report of the Wellington Mutual Insurance Company FOR 1875.}

{Continued - This page provides typed written information with the following heading: Annual Report of the Wellington Mutual Insurance Company FOR 1875.}

{This page provides typed written information with the following heading: BALANCE SHEET OF LEDGER}

{This page provides typed written information with the following headings: RATES OF POSTAGE; TERMS AND COURTS; BANK HOLIDAYS; TABLE OF STAMP DUTIES; LIST OF SUNDAYS IN 1876}

DIARY 1876.

{Newspaper cuttings dated Nov 1876}

January SATURDAY 1 1876

This is a very remarkable New Years morning foggy weather dark morning & almost like a light rain falling, and during the forenoon a close rain but very fine was falling, and during the whole day it was foggy & drizzling rain the water is running heavy over the dam, and reminds one more of the middle of April than this, we had a great many callers to day, as usual, on New Years day all our works are standing still

January MONDAY 3 1876

Fine day morning yesterday Sun shining fine and almost like an April day. This morning was hard frost and the ground hard and solid, and the Dam covered with young and old scaiting. There has been plenty of water for the Mill for some weeks now.

TUESDAY 4

Hard frost this morning at 7 a m the glass stood at 8º above zero. Wm. Robertson began this morning to put on the felt on the Copper Still and to line it with boards

WEDNESDAY 5

This is also a dry morning but not so hard frost as the day advanced it became milder, after dinner it began to rain. The water still holds out for 3 run of stones going to day and running over the Dam. About ½ past 2 it began to rain again & between 3 & 4 it rained heavy with snow flakes between, and later the water was running down the streets. Mr {blank} Mills of Hamilton was murdered by a Butcher yesterday, who was a tenant of his in arrears of rent

January THURSDAY 6 1876

During the night it dried up, and the roads hard froze this morning, and flakes of snow blowing about but it is too cold for the snow to fall, 3 pair of stones going briskly in the water Mill. The men working at the covering of the Boiler with felt, we had to make 2 wooden rings for top & Bottom, and wide enough to admit of room to introduce the stanes between them and the felt (which was previously tied on round about with twine), and then kept in their place with wedges in a tempory manner untill ready for the iron hoops

FRIDAY 7

This was a very pleasant morning, and very little frost, enough to make the roads hard and dry. And during the day the Sun shone out quite pleasant. William went up to London and then on to Chatham to see about corn, But found that they had not begun to shell it out as yet, the weather being too open for that

SATURDAY 8

This morning was dry but not hard frost, but of any thing dark & dull in the forenoon a light rain came on for a little while, but not enough to drive the skaiters of the ice, But the latter part of the afternoon was quite wet and rained considerable. The copper still is about done the hoops having been put on this forenoon. No snow snow whatever to be seen any where. William came home to night without doing any thing

January MONDAY 10 1876

Yesterday was a remarkably fine day for this time of the year it was quite mild when going to Church & the ground soft and muddy, and a few roles of thunder were herd, in the afternoon the fine clear sunshine seased & foggy dark weather came on and at about church time it rained heavy, and began to blow. There was quite a change this morning a very strong Westerly wind has been blowing all night and continues this morning and very cold, the Glass at 10º above Zero, during the whole day it blew hard and snowed at times, & the ground as hard as ever. A good deal of excitement about voting for the shop Licence By-Law which was lost by 264 majority, got the copper Still lining finished to day

TUESDAY 11

This is another cold morning, a little snow has fallen during the night, but it is too cold for it to come down. The men are working at the staging round the new fermenting tuns.

WEDNESDAY 12

This is a cold morning very little wind, and very little snow on the ground. The frost is sharp, Thermometer 10º above Zero. Have just got information that Wm Alexander of Ellenburn died this morning at 10 a m

January THURSDAY 13 1876

This is a pretty cold morning 12º above Zero cold N Westerly wind. Went out to Ellenburn twice to day and saw the corpse & saw very little change the upper part of the face all above the mouth reminds me very much of my late father. The Boiler makers began this morning, and at noon got an assistnant. After the peices were cut out for the Patches to be put on, we found the space for the water completly filled up and so hard that no water could get to it and in consiquence led to the burning and cracking of the plates, no less than 5 barrow fulls of scale and mud were taken out.

FRIDAY 14

This is another cold morning, it is not blowing much. Went out to the Cemetery with Mrs R Thomson to point out the spot to dig the grave for Mr Alexander and make allowance for the place for the monument. The boiler makers will work late to night. They left about ½ past 10.

SATURDAY 15

This is a very fine morning very moderately cold very little snow to be seen except on the sides of the roads, the middle is all bare. We have a bother with the Beer pump this morning breaking out at the angle of the branch where it was patched before

January MONDAY 17 1876

Yesterday was quite a mild morning. At 9.30 the Thermometer stood at 37º and the atmosphere dull and heavy, and continued so till evening when it began to freeze. Monday morning, a little snow has fallen during the night, but as the day advanced the mild weather & drizzling rain washed it all away. Was over early at the Rectifying house before the furnace was lighted. Mr Cuttler began to day to adjust all the Millstones, all having more or less got out of Ballance. Mrs A and I attended the Funeral of the late Wm Alexander Esq this afternoon it was largely attended

TUESDAY 18

Another mild morning, and thick weather and after Breakfast it began to rain, and kept on all the forenoon more or less, and many teams came in with wheat and had to stand out in the rain till unloaded. The last of the new fermenting tuns are finished with pipes, spouts &c. &c. ready for use

WEDNESDAY 19

This is a wet dull morning and after breakfast rained steady and may be said to have rained all the day more or less, and all the snow is now washed away. There must have been far more rain up the country than here, as the water is very high and comming down very thick and muddy. In the afternoon it got colder and began to freeze about dusk, and about 8 Oclock a heavy shower fell. William started for Toleda this afternoon. I am quite disconcerted about awful deficiency in the amount of spirit which has been lost this last ½ year, on account of the weighing system

January THURSDAY 20 1876

This is a cold blustering morning the ground all covered with snow, and light showers of it now & then.

FRIDAY 21

This is a cold windy morning, a little snow blowing about now & then. But it is too cold for the snow to fall regularly. The roads are very rough for driving the ruts being deep and hard. Cuttler got done with the stones this afternoon

SATURDAY 22

This has been quite a snowey morning, a good must have fallen through the night, but not enough for sleighing, however it continues to fall this forenoon. Snowing this afternoon also. helped to drape the Church this evening in mourning for the late Wm. Alexander, Elder

Sabbath 23 Quite a change again this morning, the water dropping from the eves of the roofs and it was quite sloppy in going to Church and a little snow fell, but so little that it blew away before the wind.

January MONDAY, 24 1876

This morning the ground is hard and the frozen crust on the snow will prevent it from being blown away, there is every appearance of more snow. No word from William since he left. Meeting to day of the Board of Directors, of Wellington Mutual Insurance Co. Only a few flakes of snow fell. Am in trouble to day the Duties being overdue & not enough funds to meet them. There has been no thaw today.

TUESDAY 25

Meeting of Millers Acociation in Toronto. This is a modeate morning. Thermometer 26º and a slight flurry of snow falling. The frost these last 2 nights has made the an impression on the water in the river. Had a Telegram from William dated Chicago 24th that he had bought corn and would leave tomorrow night, (that is to night). We have had a considerable shower of snow this afternoon

WEDNESDAY 26

This is a fine bright morning, the glass 22º, at 10 a m there was very little snow fell last night. The annual Meeting of the Wellington Mutual Insurance Co. for the Election of Directors, at 2 oclock. Mr Edward Thomas died at his recidence in Nassagaweya 71 a very respectable and deacent farmer, and have known him for many years

January THURSDAY 27 1876

This is a very wet morning, it rained heavy during during the night and the streets are running with water, and it is very slippery and most difficult to walk about. William returned from Chicago about 4 a m this morning. It has been thawing all day and the gutters running as in Spring. Mr Guest called this afternoon

FRIDAY 28

This is another wet morning. I started for Hamilton by the 9.30 am train and got down about 12, it rained during the most of the journey down and after I got into the City the weather made it very unpleasant and business very dull. The Brass pump arrived from Cincinnati to day

SATURDAY 29

This is a cold Blustering morning, not much frost but the wind is strong, during the day we had a shower of snow. In the afternoon the wind increased next to a gale almost from the N' East accompanied with snow and was very cold

January MONDAY 31 18976

Yesterday was a fine clear day but cold at ½ past 9 a m the Glass stood at 17º above zero. This morning is not quite so cold, and the wind more round to the South during the forenoon and afternoon, there was a fine bright sunshine and the roads runing with water where the sun shone. And the water flowing over the Dam in a copious stream reminding me of April or May. Mr David Torrance, President of the Bank of Montreal died this morning aged 71 years

February TUESDAY 1

This is quite a wintry looking morning, it is snowing heavy but of any thing soft, and dull weather. It still continues to snow heavy this afternoon. Have been drawing out the new pump rod on full size on paper and on a board for the Blacksmiths. Trade is still very dull all over and a great many failures taking place both here & in the States

WEDNESDAY 2

It blew very hard last night and cold and this morning there was a thick coat of snow and the glass stood at {blank}. At ½ past 9 a m it was at zero. This is the Monthly Fair Day. There was a very small attendance at this Fair the roads being drifted in certain localities may have hindered many of them.

February THURSDAY 3 1876

It is not so cold this morning 6º above zero. Sleighing is pretty good now. William started this afternoon to Douglas for to attend a Sheriffs Sale of the effects in the Mill there, of flour, wheat, middlings &c. of which William bought the whole lot and got it teamed down at 14¢ per 100 lbs. He returned about 12 Oclock

FRIDAY 4

This is a fine day, and hardly so cold as yesterday. Old James McFarlane was buried to day at Rockwood, he having died near Eden villiage, aged 98 years 10 months, he was born in the year of the Irish Rebelion

SATURDAY 5

This is another fine morning glass at 7 a m stood at 2º below zero. Our fine carriage horse lately bought died this morning, he age was 5 years past

February MONDAY 7 1876

Yesterday was a very mild fine day and the snow melting fast and very little frost in the evening. This morning is another very fine morning and the sun shining bright & warm

TUESDAY 8

This is another fine morning and the snow dissapearing pretty fast, the waggons have again to be used in the Town. Nat went down to Toronto by the 11 a m train

WEDNESDAY 6

A good deal of snow has fallen during the past night and this morning it is still falling. A great fire in New York on Monday night, loss in goods & houses about $3,000,000. We took the correct measure of the Pump rod. A drizzling snow has been falling during the afternoon. David Stirton M.P. started for Ottawa this afternoon the Parliament opens tomorrow

February THURSDAY 10 1876

This is a mild morning a little below freezing a considerable deal of sleet has fallen through the night and a crust was frozen over it this morning it has improved the sleighing. I wrote to Mrs McLean in Girvan to day Enclosing draft for $16,15.2 on the Bank of Scotland, London

FRIDAY 11

This is a very wet morning, has been raining a great deal through the night and has done so most of the forenoon, and the roads are running full of water. I have not felt well to day was quite giddy after getting out of Bed & had to return to it & much inclined to vomit. took opening medicine which operated & now feel a good deal better this afternoon.

SATURDAY 12

This is a fine clear morning but mild and the roads a little frozen. But as the day advances the water is running down the roads and the river is very high, lipping over the guard block on the far side of the top beam of the dam and equal to what it is in April, and is a little up on the under side of the cross beam behind the grating at the entrance of the Mill race, and the water is very dark

February MONDAY 14 1876

Yesterday was a very fine mild day, but very slippery walking in parts, towards night it began to harden. Early this morning a little after midnight it began to blow hard, with a good deal of thunder and lightning and then heavy showers of rain, and the water froze on the trees weighing them down considerably and during the forenoon the streets were much flooded and the river rising again, I never remember such a continuation of such mild weather

TUESDAY 15

Midling hard frost last night, the ground and remaining snow is hard, but the river is still very high. The beer pump gave out to night

WEDNESDAY 16

There was pretty hard frost last night, and the wind was strong during the night. I went down to Toronto by the 11 Oclock train, to get Startup the coppersmith to come up

February THURSDAY 17 1876

This is a moderate morning, the ground hard and dry, but as the day advanced it became colder and blowing, there is not enough of snow for sleighing. David Startup came up by the 10 Oclock train, and immediately began to prepare the copper pipe for the new Pump

FRIDAY 18

This is a coldish morning, yet the day shone out very fine, but no thaw. We got on pretty well with the Pump to day and got up steam in the afternoon and after running a charge and a half the log on which the Pump was set burst from the Pressure of the depth of beer in the large tub & had to stop and put on clasps to keep it together. And which had the desired effect, but did not get done in time to run any more to night

SATURDAY 19

Rather sharp frost this morning, but as the day advanced it became much milder, clear and bright sunshine, and no thaw whatever. We got fairly started again early this morning and going well. But as the pump throws up a considerable of beer above the Piston which is run into a pail, but as it is so often filled, and apt to be neglected, we had to put in a large tub with its bottom level with the bottom of the pump logs with a large cock connecting the two, which when filled, we have only to shut off the supply from the fermenting tuns, and open the cock when the pump draws up every drop of it.

February MONDAY 21 1876

Fine day yesterday. This is a fine winter morning, glass 22º above zero roads hard and dry. Rectifying House stopt for cleaning out the boiler, and the man from Ingles & Hunters put in all the thimbles in the tubes which had fallen out in consiquence of them having too much taper, which I got turned off he also caulked round the patches that were leaking. The coppersmith soldered the leak in the bottom of the still which is now tight. He also fixed cocks on the decending pipe of the worm to turn on the faints with the fusil oil on to the Rectifieers or Filters. We have got the fixings of the beer pump and pipes completed and all going well. It began to rain this evening and blow hard, and about 8 Oclock came on to snow.

TUESDAY 22

This is a cold windy morning, with a fresh coat of frozen snow. The water in the river has fallen considerably yet we have plenty to drive the Mill. David Startup is about finished

WEDNESDAY 23

This has been a very cold night, and this morning at 6 oclock the Thermometer stood at 6º below zero, and at 7 a m 2º below it has been blowing pretty hard all day, and the snow that fell during the night, has drifted more or less, and it is very cold getting about with the N. West wind blowing. I got Mr Gideon Hood as my security on my Bond for payment of Duties for the amt. on his part for $10,000. David Startup, coppersmith went off by the 11 Oclock train.

February THURSDAY 24 1876

This last night was much colder at 6 this morning the glass was 6º below, but at 7 a m it was 2º above zero, and to day there is very little wind, and strange to say that where the Sun is heating on the sidewalks the snow is melted and slushey, there is little or no wind. The accounts from Ottawa describe in glowing terms the grand dress Ball, at the Governors Recidence. The day has been a pleasant mild day. Sent paper & letter to Illinois

FRIDAY 25

{No entry}

SATURDAY 26

This is a very cold morning, and during last night it blew hard, to day it is quite cold getting about. I did not feel well to day at all felt giddy in the morning & went only once of ncessity up town, having taken medicine. Towards night it came on to blow hard and the snow drifted very much.

February MONDAY 28 1876

It blew hard & cold all day yesterday, and the snow kept falling for the most of the {blank}. We had an alarm of fire in the school room of St. Andrews Church, there was not much damage done. This morning was cold but got milder during the day. Meeting of Directors of Wellington Insurance Co. to day. It is snowing this evening and looks as if it were going to be heavy.

TUESDAY 29

This is a more moderate morning not so cold as yesterday, but the snow is very difficult to walk on, as it is dry and loose like sand. There has been more snow falling at times but it is not enough to bind the other But in places where it is drifted it is quite hard and carries a person quite easy. The Poultry Show opened to day and there are many more entries than last year. the snow is coming on again

March WEDNESDAY 1

This was a sharp morning. But the day turned out fine. This being the Fair Day there was a large turn out of cattle and there was a number of buyers and the cattle went off quick

March THURSDAY 2 1876

This is a fine winter morning bright and clear glass about 18º below zero at 7 a m. But it continues cold on account of the North Wind. The sleighing is tolerable fair

FRIDAY 3

This was a sharp morning 5º above zero at 7 a m. This is our Fast day in our Church. Mr Wallace came up from Hamilton to day. Mr Peter Idington was also here. The Poultry show broke up at noon to day. Peter Idington here to day. William went up to Stratford about wheat

SATURDAY 4

This was a very fine morning. During the day there was a moderate thaw and the snow is wearing away on the much travelled roads. Peter Idington here to day again. William returned about 5 Oclock this morning.

March MONDAY 6 1876

Yesterday was was a fine mild morning & dry, but in the afternoon it began to rain & continued for some time and in the evening it came on again with light showers. This is quite a mild morning, and the roads are very much washed from the rain during the night, that the sleighing will be altogether gone if this weather continues.

TUESDAY 7

This was a wet morning, and raining more or less for most of the forenoon, and part of the afternoon. The river is rising fast and is nearly as high as the last flood some weeks ago, we opened the flood gates this afternoon. There is appearance of more rain. The roads are in a very bad state

WEDNESDAY 8

Quite a change this morning, during the night it turned to hard frost, and instead of mire of considerable depth is now hard solid roads, and a cold frosty wind blowing. The water is for all that comming down veery deep

March THURSDAY 9 1876

This is a fine dry morning, frost throughout the night was middling hard and will be very trying on the young wheat now without protection. The water in the river is much lower this morning

FRIDAY 10

This is another very fine morning, hard frost last night, but the sun has great power in thawing the middle of the roads so as to soften the hard edges of the ruts and make it more easy on wheel carriages. We had to shut down the flood gates this morning so as to keep up the head on the Dam

SATURDAY 11

A moderate morning, and the roads getting softer. The water is keeping up pretty fair. The afternoon is cloudy, and it began to rain about ½ past 6

March MONDAY 13 1876

Yesterday morning was a rainey, and had been during the night, and continued more or less all day. This morning the ground was covered with snow over 4 inches deep, and the wind continuing strong. This afternoon is becomming much colder and the wind which was Westerly is now becomming more Northerly and getting very cold, a little snow is blowing about. Revd Mr Tanner lectures in our Church to night

TUESDAY 14

This is a tolerable sharp morning, rather too cold for snow last night. During the day the Sun shone out fine and and made the sidewalks smoke. Meeting of Presbytery in Chalmers Church. William started off to Hamilton, thence to Brantford

WEDNESDAY 15

This is a fine clear morning, the glass much the same as yesterday 10º or 11º above zero. The roads are very rough and hard

March THURSDAY 16 1876

This is a very stormy morning, the wind has been blowing at a fearful rate all night, it is accompanied with dry fine frozen particles of snow and in thick clouds and drives with great force against one's face, the cold is not all severe only 23º above zero at 10 a m. The wind still continues this afternoon strong from the East and the fine snow still falling. I wrote to J. Smith, Bridge of Allan by this afternoons mail. William came home by the 6 Oclock train. Mr Fouler had a grand examination in the Town Hall to night, it was cram full & a couple of hundred people in the old hall

FRIDAY 17

This is of any thing a milder morning, and snowing a little, the is more from the West now. It became colder in the afternoon, and still snowing lightly

SATURDAY 18

Sharp morning ½ past 10 am the glass stood at 5º above zero, at 1.30 p m it was 10º above zero. I have kept the house all day, being affected with headach last night and giddiness this morning

March MONDAY 20 1876

Yesterday morning was pretty sharp, at 7 am glass stood at 5º above zero, clear and calm weather. I went twice to Church & did not feel the worse of it. This morning chilly and raw, cold 22º at 10 a m inclined to snow or other change. I feel better this morning. About noon it began to snow and kept on quite heavy all the afternon, and evening and blowing from the East.

TUESDAY 21

Wintry morning, and the fall of snow during the afternoon and during last night, has left a coating of snow generaly all over of from 6 to 8 inches deep. The day is turning out fine with a slight flurry of snow now and then

WEDNESDAY 22

This is a fine morning, glass at 20º. I am going to try the sleighing this forenoon. James Dobbie is said to have died at his tea table last night, of heart disease. Mrs A and I went down to Fishers Mills to see Mr Idingtons family, and found them all well, the roads in Waterloo were considerably drifted up certain places, and sloping so as almost to tip the cutter over

March Thursday 23 1876

This is a fine morning, and as the day advances the sun is begining to melt the snow in the middle of the road. This afternoon the roads are getting quite soft and watery, and if it continues a day or two longer all the snow will be gone. I am glad I went to Waterloo yesterday for the roads in many places must be bare to day. Recd. letter from John Smith, Bridge of Allan.

FRIDAY 24

This is another fine morning and likely to thaw more to day. It has turned out a fine forenoon went out to the Model Farm and found the sleighing very bare in most places & unless more snow falls it will soon be all gone. Peter Idington & wife were here to day. The Court of Queens Bench is sitting just now precideed over by Judge Gainne

SATURDAY 25

This is a very coarse morning with sleet and snow a good deal has fallen through the night, and the roads are now very slushey and dissagreeable. It has continued throughout the day much the same, with frequent showers of frozen rain, sometimes pretty heavy. The weather is so dull and dark that no Eclipse can be seen. Wrote to John Smith this afternoon by US mail

March MONDAY 27 1876

Yesterday was a somewhat blustering day with light showers of snow. This is a dull blustering day, and bad getting about with either sleigh or waggon. Feek, began this morning about 9 Oclock left at 10 a.m. began again at 3 p m. Miss Isabella Alexander came this afternoon

TUESDAY 28

Pretty hard frost last night, the road are very hard and dry. Feek began at 7 a m, and worked till a little after 3 p m. About 1 Oclock it began to snow and continued to fall heavy all the afternoon and no appearance of it stopping. William, went to Paris & Brantford this morning. Wind from the N East. Recd. Telegram from William that he was stormstead at Brantford & could not be home to night

WEDNESDAY 29

This is another snowey morning, and it is now very deep all over, wind from the N. East. William came home at noon to day. We are making arrangements to stop distilling tomorrow to enable us to put in the heating pipes in the smoke stalk to heat up the feeding water for the Boiler, and raise the grate bars 12 inches, so as to reduce the quantity of dead wood that accumulates and blackens in the fire box down on the bars.

March THURSDAY 30 1876

This is a pleasant winter morning good sleighing, and good many teams in town, and we are hurrying out the firewood from the Rocks with a number of hired teams, for we cannot depend on it lasting long, for the frost is too mild to preserve it. Distillery standing to day, having been running on till about 4 Oclock this morning, having run since yesterday morning. We have been working late to night to complete what we think will be a saving of fuel & time in the distillery. Feek to about

FRIDAY 31

This is a mild morning and thawing. I am rather dissapointed in finding this morning that our hard work all yesterday is not going to answer in the present way & am going to stop and replace the grate bars as they were. After cooling down the furnace we lowered the grate bars to their old position and the draft was restored to its former strength. But the feed water passing through the coil of 2 inch pipes does not heat up the water to the heat I expected. I have got a bad cold from last nights late work.

April SATURDAY 1

This is also a mild morning. But as a precaution I have made up my mind to remain in the house all day, having taken, medicine

April MONDAY 3 1876

This morning is soft but no rain, but the thaw is rappid and the roads quite slushey, and the water running rappid in the gutters. I feel a good deal better to day, but keep as much in the Office as I can.

TUESDAY 4

This is another mild morning, and thawing fast

WEDNESDAY 5

This is a dull morning. there has been a little frost last night, about 10 Oclock it began to snow pretty thick loose snow which melted as it fell, and then a little rainey sleet, making the streets slushey and unpleasant. There is a large attendance of Farmers and others in Town to day, this being the Easter Fair, and a greater number of fat cattle shown than I have seen before. Jeffry Lynch was in Toronto yesterday and spent an hour at Mr Wm. Higinbothams & found him more requiring to be watched as he cuts up Handkerchifs &c. into ribbons. We are without a fireman to day, having turned off Scott for dissobedience

April THURSDAY 6 1876

This morning the ground was somewhat dry, but as soon as the Sun got fairly up the water began to run on the streets, and the snow that is still laying on the sides of the roads is getting very soft and melting fast away. The ice on the dam is quite whole yet but it must be brittle and very unsafe to cross on now. Thos. Baxter of Wellington Square is reported to have been drowned this morning on his own farm. fine mild night Mrs A & I at Mrs Websters to Tea

FRIDAY 7

Wet rainey and dull morning with frequent showers of sleet, and there seems to be a regular break up of the ice and the water in the Dam is rising. The Hamilton papers announce the sudden death of an old aquaintance of mine Mr Thomas Baxter of Wellington Square in examining a drain that run into a small creek had become giddy & fell in & got drowned he was 55 years of age. A dispatch from Ottawa says that the site for the New Post Office is fixed, and to be erected on the present site of the Wellington Hotel

SATURDAY 8

It froze hard last night and the ground is quite dry and bearing up. The weather is fine and clear

April MONDAY 10 1876

The weather was fine yesterday. This morning the ground is dry with the nights frost but as the day advances it is thawing fast

TUESDAY 11

This is a fine mild morning and the water running down the road at a rappid rate and the water in the river rising. William went up to Stratford this evening on a tour among customers

WEDNESDAY 12

This is a very dull dark morning, and must have been raining during the night. About 7 a m it began to rain very lightly and then more heavy during the forenoon there is very little snow to be seen on the sides of the roads now. I Had to hoist the flood gates as the water was getting over the fender log at the Northerly end of the aperon, the water is very dark and muddy. Had telegrams from Wm. from Stratford and Mitchel

April THURSDAY 13 1876

This is another dull misty morning, and its condensation producing a very fine rain. But during most of the forenoon the rain fell more freely. The steam Mill Bridge is loaded with stones. In the afternoon rain came on again, and the water in the river continuing to rise, notwithstanding that the flood gates have been raised as far as they will open. And the ice is breaking up & going over. Wm. Telegraphed from Stratford that he will be home at 8 p m. We are only running the Mill with 1 run of stone from the water being so high and causes the water wheel to labour too much in backwater injuring the bucket boards. Higinbotham returned from Ottawa. William came home from above about same time.

FRIDAY 14

This is Good Friday. It was so far fair, with the exception that the fog condenced into fine rain, and continued so throughout the forenoon. The water got very high and we had to raise the gate to the full height. We hear of no disausters as yet from the high floods, the most of the ice is of the Dam except a little on the edges. It began to be very cold towards evening. I went up to Goldie's dam, he was working at his flood gates, being affraid of them.

SATURDAY 15

This was a dry morning, and the water no higher than late last night. The day is quite fine but yet not the warmth in the air we ought to have

April MONDAY 17 1876

Yesterday was a very fine day. This is of any thing a chilly morning. But as the day advances it is getting better. We had to shut down part of the flood gates this morning as the water was too low to run over the Dam shewing how rappidly the flood or spring fresshet dissapears now compared with former years when it lasted for much more than a week.

TUESDAY 18

This is a fine morning, and the water in the river is still lower that the gates have to be farther shut down.

WEDNESDAY 19

This is a very fine morning and the ground is drying up fast, and the flood gates are now altogether shut down close

April THURSDAY 20 1876

This is a fine morning although, there was hard frost last night, and the ground was quite hard. This forenoon and part of the afternoon was fine but farther on it became cold again. Went out the York Road to attend the funeral of a Son of Robert Paterson who died in Detroit day bebore yesterday of Tyfod Fever. William started for London this morning. We had a heavy shower of rain last night and it was very dark, some later it blew very hard

FRIDAY 21

This is a very fine morning, and the roads drying up very fast. The driver of the chopping stones broke, one lug at each end

SATURDAY 22

This was a fine mild morning, and looked like rain. But as the day advanced it became very pleasant and the Sun shone out fine. Willie Higinbotham came home from Hamilton at noon, Aut Agnes & the two boys from Fishers Mills, & Mary was brought from Toronto by her Father to night, so that they are all at home but Harry who is at Elora. William came home from London by the 5 Oclock train. It began to rain about 5 oclock and then again at ½ past 6. I felt very giddy this afternoon and inclined to stagger in my walk

May MONDAY 1 1876

Cold blustery day yesterday, with a shower of snow, but it was light and dry & blew away. It froze hard last night, and there was ice on the tub at the spring ½ an inch thick & over. This is a fine Bright morning but cold. The Masons have begun to build the foundation walls for the shop to be built for the owner of the ground James Mays being 25 feet 8 inches. Wm. Stewart and Petrie's are next being something like 40 feet some inches, then the frame stable which ground is {blank} feet {blank} frontage

TUESDAY 2

This was a very fine morning, and very little frost. I got the Onions sown in the garden to day and also the hot beds with cabbage seed and cauliflour. I got the Bucket boards repiled and changed the position of the bearers between the teirs, and also the 1½ inch Oak planks in the same way. Mr Corby Junr., Distiller from Bellville was here this afternoon intending to stay over tomorrow

WEDNESDAY 3

This is a most beautiful morning for the Monthly Fair. I see a great many, Reapers & Mowers being arranged for Sale. The Wellington Hotel Building was sold by Auction to day for $150.00. The verandah for $13.00. The stable which was a framed one and sheeted both inside and outside, for $40.00, and the ground to be cleared by a certain time.

May THURSDAY 4 1876

This was a dry morning but not so warm as yesterday morning. The party who bought the Wellington stable is busey taking it down

FRIDAY 5

This is a cold wet morning and the wind from the East, it continued fair for the greater part of the forenoon, but came on agin in the afternoon. I sowed a bed of spinnage and also some Parsley this forenoon. The Auction of the furniture &c. is still going on to day and is likely to take all day tomorrow. It has been raining all the afternoon and continues still this evening ½ past 8.

SATURDAY 6

This is a dull damp morning, it must have rained through the night, and likely to rain more ere long

May MONDAY 8 1876

Sabbath was of any thing a damp day threatning rain in the forenoon, but the afternoon was dry. But I did not go to Church as I felt unwell, in the afternoon felt great headache and sent for Dr Herod. To day it was dry weather, I feel no worse and the head better, the Dr called again to day and required me to keep quiet for the next 24 hours at least and not go out.

TUESDAY 9

This was a fine day

WEDNESDAY 10

This is a very wet morning and heavy rain

May THURSDAY 11 1876

This is a fine morning. I made arrangements this forenoon to meet John Chambers at the Quarry hole to build retaining wall.

FRIDAY 12

This is a wet looking morning but no rain has fallen. It continued fair all day

SATURDAY 13

This is a fine morning, and as the day advanced it began to blow a stif Northery wind so that is was not so warm as some days ago. I was out at the Bridget farm with a Donald Cameron, with a view to let it

May MONDAY 15 1876

Yesterday was a moderately fine day, but got dull in the afternoon. I went to Church in the forenoon. This morning it was dry but during the forenoon it began to rain, and continued on during the afternoon pretty heavy. The Wellington Hotel is about half demolished, they are getting on much faster in taking it away than was expected.

TUESDAY 16

This is a dull wet morning, has been raining during the night, and lightly during the forenoon, but continues still very dull. William went down to Hamilton this forenoon, to attend meeting of Chilmans Creditors

WEDNESDAY 17

A great deal of Thunder and lightning last night and this morning, and a great deal of rain, and it is causing great delay in putting in the crops. The land are now all socking wet

May THURSDAY 18 1876

This has been a very fine day, and quite warm at times. I Have had some men repairing fence at, Back of cottage. William started for Ottawa this afternoon at 5 Oclock

FRIDAY 19

This is a fine morning, and the trees and bushes have made great progress, and the leaves are about full out on the Birch trees and on the chessnuts also, and the grass is looking beautiful. I have been drawing out a Plan of Mr Alexanders Cemetery Plot for Monument and where the graves are to be for they are not in their proper place. He having only bought a single lot on the day that his wife died as I was along with him and gave my opinion as to its selection & she was (Mrs Alexander) burried at a proper distance from the centre of that lot so as to admit of another grave beside her, as it was his intention to leave this country but having taken ill so soon after her and continuing to get worse, he ordered the other half to be bought and which is now 28 feet by 20 feet

SATURDAY 20

This was a very wet morning, raining heavy till 9 Oclock and then turned very warm. Had a telegram from Wm. at Ottawa enquiring the amt. owing by Wm. Hall of Perth. I wrote him enclosing Guests letter

May MONDAY 22 1876

Yesterday was a very warm day about 74º. This was a dull morning and looked like rain, but none fell. I did not feel well during the night and felt better about noon. Telegraphed to Wm. at Montreal, then Mr Stewart who replied at 5 p m. Only got a reply from Wm. at 8 p m

TUESDAY 23

There was hard frost during the night and this morning a little ice on the tubs at the spring was about the thickness of a Penny peice. But the day is turning out fine and warm

WEDNESDAY 24

This was a very fine morning, and moderate breese of wind cooled the air, there was no sporting with any more than one boat on the Dam a great many took advantage of the cheap fare's to Toronto & London & Hamilton. I shut down both Mill and Distillery. Had a Telegram from William that he would leave Montreal to night at 10 Oclock

May THURSDAY 25 1876

This is another very fine morning, and all the trees almost in full leaf. Have been employing whitewashers to day to finish their work at the Priory. Made every endeavour to pay the duties on spirits but had not enough funds and paper to cover cheque, and have to wait for word from Toronto. William came home at ½ past 2 p m

FRIDAY 26

This was another fine morning, and quite warm during the day. I have just read in the Scottish American of the death of Mr David Bryce Architect and R.S.A. aged 73, he died in Edinburgh at his own recidence 131 George Street. I have known him since a boy, his father was a Mason, and kept a night drawing school, at which my father was first a pupil & afterwards an assistant, his Mother was often in our house in Leith Walk, and were great friends for many years. I visited him several times in 1861 when in Scotland

SATURDAY 27

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May MONDAY 29 1876

There was very heavy showrs of rain this morning but the ceased about 11 Oclock, but it cooled the Air a good deal, and in the afternoon it became quite chilly. They are getting on very well with the excavation of the old stable of the Wellington Hotel and a man is underfitting or building a 2 feet wall, and which has to be very carefully done, and have recomended 2½ feet thick in preference, the other stores west of them are up to, and the first joists are laid. The chessnut trees are in full blossom & and all the Apples & cherry trees. I attended the Revision Committee in the Town Hall this evening. But as I was a day behind in entering my complaint they will consider by Friday night if it can be admitted

TUESDAY 30

This is a cool morning, and there was frost on the sidewalks. The foundation of the New Wellington Hotel and the Masonic Hall is now dug out and likely to be finished tomorrow. This is a warm day about 80º in the glass.

WEDNESDAY 31

This was another fine morning. The papers this morning announce a great Conflagration in in Quebec and 400 houses found to have been consumed, first report stated a 1000 houses destroyed, and the loss will not fall short of $800,000

June THURSDAY 1 1876

This is another fine morning. It is now confirmed that the Sulton of Turkey has been dethroned. I Went down to the Quarry and found that it will take Chambers another day to fill up the embankment. The masons have begun to build the Masonic Hall. The whole excavation is now taken out and the sides on Windham street protected. Met this night at Massies to consult about a testemonial to be presented to Mr Jas. Gow, Collector, on his removal to Windsor, when a large sum was subscribed to day 2d June the list is now made up to $349.00

FRIDAY 2

This is a very warm morning and the heat about ½ past 10 was 85º. This is our Fast Day and there was a very fair attendance. In the evening I attended the Revision committee in the Town Council Room but being a day too late they could not take up my case. I have a strong desire to go to Philadelphia to the Centennial to pick up some insight in many things I may see that may be of great use to me if I am spared

SATURDAY 3

This is a dull morning, and rain began to fall about Breakfast time and continued heavy for a considerable time. And then in the afternoon another heavy shower so that the ground is well socked this season.

{Newspaper cuttings - following dates handwritten on some - Nov 16 1876 and 30th Nov 1876}

June MONDAY 5 1876

Yesterday was our Communion Sabbath and was very well attended notwithstanding the appearance of rain in the morning, but the day turned out fine. This is a fine morning we are planting posts on the side of the embankment at the Quarry, for a fence, instead of a stone wall to hold up the embankment as intended, but owing to the great quantity of water, was prevented from laying the foundation, and regret now that I did not pump out the water originally intended, which would have taken up less room & been more durable.

TUESDAY 6

This is a very fine morning. We have the Photagrapher taking views of the Mill this morning, & other premises. 54 more cattle were shipped this morning from here, and the balance taken probably next week if I can sell a car load at the Fair tomorrow

WEDNESDAY 7

This is a fine morning, and every thing appears to be growing fast, the snowballs & Lelacks also. This is the Monthly fair day, a great many people are in Town & a good many cattle, but the demand was not very keen & the prices low & some would not accept the offers & took them home again. Mr James Gow took farewell of us to day as he leaves for Windsor tomorrow. Reeve's who bought all Hoods cattle, is very much put about at the dullness of the market not being able to sell a car of them to day as he expected. He has also the handling of Gooderham's cattle, 700 yet on hand

June THURSDAY 8 1876

This has also been a very fine day, and being dry weather and warm affects the quantity of water in the river, which is well tested with, 3 pair of stones night and day for the most of last week and this. We are only running 100 Bushels per day in the Distillery and that only untill the balance of the cattle is out. A considerable quantity of Indian Corn was sold to farmers yesterday for sowing for green feed.

FRIDAY 9

This was a fine warm morning, but somewhat threatning rain. I went down to Hamilton by the 10 Oclock train and was prepared with my umberella in place of my walking stick, but it was not required as it cleared up before noon clear and warm. Trade is dull and very littlle doing. I made more enquiry about fares &c. about the Centennial. I returned home by the last train

SATURDAY 10

This morning was warmer than yesterday, but we had during the day a gentle breeze, and yet it was very warm. We are getting the quarry hole nearly filled up, and on Monday will put up some planking on the posts to retain the earth

June MONDAY 12 1876

This is a very fine morning. It appears that there will be no cattle taken out of the stalls this evening for shipment tomorrow, as the markets are quite overstocked and prices very low

TUESDAY 13

The men got the fence at the quarry completed at noon to day or rather the middle of the afternoon. But I would like a little more earth put on to raise. Mr Donald Guthrie was nominated for member to night, for the House of Commons.

WEDNESDAY 14

This has also been a very warm day, and the water is failing fast in the river. Massie went down to Montreal yesterday. Mr John Awood & wife started for England this, p.m. William went off to St. Catharines at 2 p.m. The coffins of both Mr & Mrs Alexander were removed to day, their heads to within 2 feet of the Monument & 2 feet 6 inches apart, she lies on the left side of him. Barrels of Spirits was shipped yesterday

June THURSDAY 15 1876

This is a close morning and damp, and considerable rain must have fallen during the night, and has given every thing a refreshing appearance. George Booth of Toronto called this morning on his way to Windsor. The papers annonce the death of Judge Duggan in Toronto yesterday aged 64 years. I knew his father and his Brothers. It was very close warm sultry about the middle of the day, and after noon a ratling shower of Hail came on and soon turned into rain for a while, and shortly after that came on again when I was up in town and continued till about 6 Oclock & it was rather amusing to find one Counsilor and the cheif constable taking advantage of the only verandah's now left at Haddens & Days, in Windham street which elisited a good deal of fun

FRIDAY 16

This has been a dull forenoon, and close & warm, But as the day advanced it became clearer. The Pump of Rectifying House lately started was out of order & in adjusting it they broke the screw of the lower end of the Brass piston rod yesterday & it is being repaired at Ingles & Hunters to day. Mr Chubb began the foundation of the new Wellington Hotel, and Enslie & Taylor are nearly ready for the first teir of joists for the Masonic Hall. Recd. Telegram from William at Brantford will be home at 6, looks very much like rain

SATURDAY 17

This is a dull morning, but about a ¼ to 9 it began to rain heavy and continued the most of the forenoon, and nearly all the afternoon, and very heavy at times, no mason work was done to day.

June MONDAY 19 1876

This has been a close morning, and of any thing dull and like rain. The late rain has again raised the water in the River very considerably. A terrible fire broke out yesterday morning in St. John, Quebec and destroyed the principal part of the Town and over 3000 people left houseless, & the loss about one million dollars. Nat went to Toronto this morning. The Sale of the last 2 acres of the Glebe lands of St. Andrews Church took place this afternoon it was divided into 9 lots and brought $1320.00. A smart litle shower fell about 6 Oclock.

TUESDAY 20

This is somewhat more cool

WEDNESDAY 21

This has been a fine morning. We are cleaning out the boiler &c. in the Rectifying house and fixing the new Pump

June THURSDAY 22 1876

This is a fine morning. I am making anxious enquiries about any one going to Philadelphia so as to have company. Saw Mr Alexr. Drysdale to day who is going there on his way home but he will not leave here till Monday week the 3d July. Have got the pump finished in the Rectifing house this afternoon

FRIDAY 23

This is another fine morning, but close and likely to be very warm

SATURDAY 24

This was a fine cool pleasant morning, but as the day advanced it became very warm. Have been making enquirey for places to stay in when in N. York and Philadelphia

June MONDAY 26 1876

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TUESDAY 27

This is a fine morning. I have made up my mind to start on my journey to N. York and thence to the Grand Centennial at Philadelphia and will leave here by the midday train.

WEDNESDAY 28

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June THURSDAY 29 1876

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FRIDAY 30

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July SATURDAY 1

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July MONDAY 3 1876

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TUESDAY 4

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WEDNESDAY 5

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July THURSDAY 6 1876

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FRIDAY 7

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SATURDAY 8

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July MONDAY 10 1876

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TUESDAY 11

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WEDNESDAY 12

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July THURSDAY 13 1876

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FRIDAY 14

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SATURDAY 15

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July MONDAY 17 1876

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TUESDAY 18

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WEDNESDAY 19

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July THURSDAY 20 1876

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FRIDAY 21

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SATURDAY 22

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July MONDAY 24 1876

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TUESDAY 25

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WEDNESDAY 26

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July THURSDAY 27 1876

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FRIDAY 28

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SATURDAY 29

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July MONDAY 31 1876

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August TUESDAY 1

This is a fine warm morning, but yet reports are comming in for the failure of the Fall wheat from Rust during the late close damp weather. I was all through Mr James Morrison's new stone dwelling house which is nearly ready for the Painter. I also examined Mr Thos. Gowdy's new red Brick house which is large & roomey, and are now lathing it ready for the plasterer, both situate on Liverpool Street. The council are making great improvements on Liverpool Street cutting down the hill behind Mr Elliots and filling up opposite Walkers and Bells new houses.

WEDNESDAY 2

This is another very warm morning. And my Brother James D. Allan is busey loading up a Car with his furniture to be landed at Goderich, thence to be conveyed by waggon to Bayfield, where he has now got a house erected on his own land ready for his family of Wife, 2 sons & 2 daughters, and intends leaving here tomorrow

August THURSDAY 3 1876

This is also a fine morning and warm & dry. We all went up to the train at ½ past 9 to take farewell of James Allan and his family, who left at 9.45 for Goderich, the Car with all their furnature having started before them at 6 Oclock a m. I observe by this morning papers that Douglas & Bannermans saw mill near Georgetown was all Burnt up yesterday afternoon.

FRIDAY 4

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SATURDAY 5

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August MONDAY 7 1876

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TUESDAY 8

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WEDNESDAY 9

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August THURSDAY 10 1876

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FRIDAY 11

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SATURDAY 12

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August MONDAY 14 1876

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TUESDAY 15

This is a very warm morning 80º by 9 oclock a.m. Peter Idington came up this afternoon.

WEDNESDAY 16

This is not quite so warm this morning as yesterday, but still dry and warm. We are making preparations for starting the Steam Engine, and have been getting some new patent packing for the Piston rod

August THURSDAY 17 1876

This is another dry morning, and no appearance of rain. There is reports of great fires in the woods in the Eastern provinces. We got the Engine a going this forenoon and began to smutt some wheat and after dinner all three runs were grinding

FRIDAY 18

This was also a warm morning, and during {blank}. Had Mr Robert Glendenning of Philadelphia & his daughter Mrs Norman to tea & a few friends to meet them. John C. Allan returned from Sullivan after viewing his land there

SATURDAY 19

This morning was not quite so warm as yesterday morning, but as the day advanced it became quite warm. William went off to Kincardine by the 12.30 train. John McPherson has been busey these several days in replacing the broken lights of the Green=house with sound ones, and puttying up all defects, and painting the bars above the putty. Sherrif Grange died to night at 10 Oclock

August MONDAY 21 1876

Yesterday was a cool morning, but the middle of the day got warm. But last night was quite cool and extra clothes were required on our Bed frost was seen early on the shingles.

TUESDAY 22

This is a warm morning. I attended the Funeral of Sherrif Grange as Paul=bearer at 3 Oclock this afternoon,the attendance was large, his age on the Coffin was 68 years

WEDNESDAY 23

This is another fine morning

August THURSDAY 24 1876

This is a dull morning and looks like rain. We intended to have started for King to visit the Revd. Mr Tawse family, but Mrs A. did not feel well enough to go to day. The Unuion Pic'nic comes off this afternoon. After all parties were on the ground and the children busey at their sports and before they had time to get any refreshments It began to rain and drove them off, some went home others took shelter under Mr Guthrie's verandah, and went at it again after it got fair. I discharged Nat's Mortgage on the back of the Hill property to day

FRIDAY 25

There has been rain during the night, and looked dark and gloomy yet. Wm. went down to Toronto by the 9 Oclock train Mrs A. & I go at 11 on our way to King, station.

SATURDAY 26

Mr Robert Holt of Dundas died to day aged 76 years a native of Sussex England & settled in Dundas in 1834 and carried on Brewing ale for many years there of an excelent quality, and {blank}

August MONDAY 28 1876

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TUESDAY 29

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WEDNESDAY 30

This has been another very warm day. Mrs Allan and I left Lake Couchichen 88 miles North of Toronto this morning at ½ past 9 and arrived in Toronto at ½ past 2 p.m

August THURSDAY 31 1876

This is a very warm morning, and every thing very dry and the grass becoming quite Brown. At 2 Oclock the Thermometer stood at 86º

September FRIDAY 1

This is a dull morning, but much cooler than yesterday, a very fine shower fell during the night and looks as if we were going to have more. This is our Fast Day. A smart shower of rain fell this afternoon.

SATURDAY 2

This was a dry morning. It {blank}

September MONDAY 4 1876

This is a dull morning and looked like rain but the signs dissapear as the day advances. At 1.30 yesterday afternoon a fire broke out at the City of St. Hyacinthe at the West End, and fanned by a high North West wind, and before it was arrested 600 houses were destroyed, and the loss roughly estimated at $2,000,000. A large fire broke out in the Town of Seaforth this morning about 2 Oclock when property to the amount of between $80,000 and $100,000 was destroyed, Mr James Murphy among the rest, formerly of Guelph.

TUESDAY 5

This is rather a cool morning. A fire broke out in Dunbar's or rather Lowell's swamp East of the Bridget farm and set fire to a couple of pannels of my fence which was soon put out, but I had to keep watch till late, for if the wind which was fortunately N. West had turned towards the N. East would have destroyed the Road (Boundry line of Town) which is founded with Brush and timber & covered with swamp earth and gravel, and would burn deep into the ground if once it catched in my meaadow

WEDNESDAY 6

This also is a cool morning 45º, and no signs of rain as yet. This is the Monthly Fair Day. The attendance to at the Fair is but small. There was a very few drops of rain fell on our way to the Prayer meeting

September THURSDAY 7 1876

This morning looks dull, but yet no rain comes down

FRIDAY 8

This morning looked very much like rain, but none fell. The Glue factory near Berlin was destroyed by fire last night. It was insured in the Waterloo Mutual for $4,000 & Wellington for $2,000

SATURDAY 9

This has been another dry morning, and still there is a strong appearance of rain. It continued dry the whole day

September MONDAY 11 1876

We had a fine rain yesterday morning, which lasted till 11 Oclock when going to Church, but nothng more after that. The rain began slowly about 6 Oclock & appears likely to continue

TUESDAY 12

This was a fine morning though a little dull yet it was a splended day, for the Guelph Caadonian Society, holding their first annual gathering, which was large, and all went off in splended style

WEDNESDAY 13

This was a dull morning. Had some light rain but soon went off again

September THURSDAY 14 1876

This morning is a little wet, and threatens to rain this forenoon

FRIDAY 15

This is a dullish morning and looks a good deal like rain, preparing to start to Toronto. Got down to Toronto by noon, and had great trouble and exertion to fall in with Sir John A Macdonald, and after being at his house found that he had left at 11 and went off in the Northeren train, & would not be back untill Monday. The Offices in the New Custom House are now being occupied. The British American Assurance Cos. new Office is far advanced and they are now building at the 3rd story, the workmanship & design is very splended

SATURDAY 16

This is a very fine morning. My clerk Mr Alexr. MacKenzie went off by the early train to New York thence to Philadelphia. Higinbotham wife & children, William wife & children, & Mr Thom went down to P. Idingtons at 3 p m & retd. ½ past 9.

September MONDAY 18 1876

Yesterday was pleasant and cool. In the afternoon it began to look rainey like, and began while in Church but not heavy, but heavier at night. This morning it was quite wet and continued till about 8 Oclock. It is determined now that Higinbotham and William will leave for Britian on Wednesday, if alls well. I went up to fergus to day at One Oclock to see Mr George Ferguson & got a Introductory letter to his Brother Robert in London, business is but very moderate in Fergus no wheat offered as yet and the River almost dry, lower than ever I saw it

TUESDAY 19

This is a dull morning, & threatning rain there must have been some falling through the night. No rain fell and it cleared up very fine. Peter Idington & wife were here to day

WEDNESDAY 20

This is a fine morning, though dull and heavy looking. I missed the first train going to Hamilton but went by the ½ past 9 train to attend the Provincial Show held there this week. On my return home at night I was told of a fearfull accident that happened about 6 Oclock, that a heavy stone wall had fallen and killed one man named John Watt and injured another, they were masons, engaged at an inside wall next the Court yard

September THURSDAY 21 1876

This is a dry morning, went up to see the building where the wall fell

FRIDAY 22

This morning was a little wet. At 2 Oclock to day we took leave of Higinbotham & William who started for Liverpool & to sail on Wednesday the 27th.

SATURDAY 23

This has been a wetish kind of a morning and cloudy looking, falling like a fine mist. James D Allan came down this evening from Bayfield to see his wife.

September MONDAY 25 1876

Yesterday was somwhat of a dull day, yet no rain but only a kind of drizzle. This morning it is quite mild and soft, yet no rain. James D Allans wife is very low this morning and scarcely knows any one, she could hardly speek yesterday to be understood. It began to rain about 9 Oclock very heavy and continued after, ten and during the night.

TUESDAY 26

This morning is fair, but shows great signs of heavy rain having fallen through the night

WEDNESDAY 27

This is a cold dissagreable morning, it rained and blew hard a great part of the night. The day was cold and stormy. The Mill was shut down to allow the men to attend the Funeral of James Allans wife at 3 Oclock it was well attended.

September THURSDAY 28 1876

This is a dull morning

FRIDAY 29

This is also a dull and coldish morning and the eves dropping as if there had been rain last night. Alexr. McKenzie returned home this evening by the 6 Oclock train

SATURDAY 30

This was of any thing a cool morning. Yet it continued fair, and a great many people attended the market to day which was very large, probably with all kinds of supplies for the central Exhibition next week. We have hard times in the Priory without a servant, Phebe started off last night.

October MONDAY 2 1876

This is a fine morning and likely to be a fine week for the Central Fair which begins tomorrow. We have drawn off all the water in the Mill Dam for the repairs of the gates, flume, &c., before the cold weather sets in. We are putting in another centre post for the gates of the outlet flume next the Steam Mill

TUESDAY 3

This appears to be a fine morning Bright and pleasant for the show. A change in the weather has come about between 9 & 10 Oclock it became quite dull, and a fine rain began to fall, George Corbet from Owens Sound, called this forenoon

WEDNESDAY 4

This was a dullish morning but it cleared off during the forenoon, and seems to continue dry but it is yet chilly, a great many carriages of all descriptons fill the streets, fully as many as ever I have seen. Peter Idington wife, son & daughter here to day.

October THURSDAY 5 1876

This is a fine clear morning but the wind is chilly. But the day after all has turned out to be a fine dry day and the attendance at the Show very large said to be over 10,000 people. Upon examination we find that all the ceder joists over the flume in the Steam Mill and the Elm beams are quite rotten, and have begun to lift the floor to replace them with sound ones.

FRIDAY 6

This was a wet morning, and had rained heavy during the night, the forenoon was tolerably dry but the afternoon was cold and wet. The Show breaks up at 2 Oclock, this afternoon is cold and dissagreable. My brother James & children started off by the 10 Oclock train for Bayfield Miss Hooper went with them

SATURDAY 7

This is a wet cold morning, more in the way of showers of sleet, hail, and snow. And continued with a cold wind all day. We had notice by Telegram from Montreal this afternoon that the Sythia Steam Ship had arrived to day at Queenston, yesterday

October MONDAY 9 1876

Yesterday was a chilly wintry kind of a day with frost enough during the night to make ice on the pools. This day is very wintry like with frequent showers of fine snow &c. Charles Davidson started with his daughter to Philadelphia at 2 Oclock.

TUESDAY 10

This morning is also much the same as yesterday and through the day it was somewhat better, though the roofs were white. Miller of Ingersoll got a sample of flour and was to make an offer tomorrow. Mr Alexr. Thomson of Thomson Birket & Bell of Hamilton is at present laying very ill with a Brain fever, a consultation of 3 Doctors was held to day, and thought the case very precarious.

WEDNESDAY 11

This morning the roofs were not so much covered and the day has been fine clear and dry, yet a cold wind is blowing. No change in Thomsons case for the better

October THURSDAY 12 1876

This is a cold raw morning, with cold wind. We are still working at the flume next the Water Wheel the plate beam on the top of the posts of the Breast above the Moat was completely rotten and not wishing to desturb the posts nor the front planking this season pu cut off the old tennants and a portion of the worst of the posts, put in a new beam lower down where they were sounder, then removed the iron stay back to stone where we got a good hold to support the pressure of the water.

FRIDAY 13

This is a very fine morning, and dry and bright. Thermometer 28º. The day has turned out remarkably fine, and looks as if it was going to be the beginning of the Indian Summer.

SATURDAY 14

This is a wet morning with light rain, but it must have rained heavy during the night as the ground is very wet. The day has continued fair but windy and very cold and wintry like. Have begun to day to repair the Water Wheel.

October MONDAY 16 1876

Very hard frost, Saturday night & yesterday morning the ice on the water Barrel in the Garden was over one inch thick, the day was dry windy & cold. This morning is cold, 2º below freezing and still blowing cold from the North. People of the Town have begun to vote on the By-law for $30,000. Bot. of Horseman 25 coach screws 4 inch x ⅜ at $3.30 per 100. The death of young Cosset & Robertson near Philadelphia is announced this forenoon.

TUESDAY 17

This has the appearance of a fine morning hardly any frost. I find that 2 whole quarters of the inside lining of the Water Wheel is completely gone & I propose to put a ½ inch bolt down through the shrouding with a nut on the inside.

WEDNESDAY 18

This is beautiful morning, a little frost on the ground. The glass at 7 a m was 24º above zero.

October THURSDAY 19 1876

This morning was not so cold, yet there waas frost on the ground, but the day was beautifull, and a good deal of Barley brought to town. Wheat on account of the War like news has gone up 5 cents since yesterday. I attended the funeral of of young Robertson and Cosset, their graves were near together, it was the largest funeral I ever saw in this Town

FRIDAY 20

This appears to be a fine morning, not quite so bright as yesterday morning, am hurrying to finish my only letter to my Son, this being the last Friday morning that we can send by the Allan line, and have great doubts, if it will reach England before, they leave. John Black a Mason, but laterly a farmer in Puslinch died this morning after a protracted illness, aged 78 years he acted as our foreman at the Building of the Court House here in 1842 & 3.

SATURDAY 21

This was a warm morning, and there had been rain during the night, at 7 a m the glass was 48º and at 10 it was between 50º & 60º and as high as 70º went out for a short drive in the afternoon. John Manderson died to day aged 70 years, originally a mason but laterly a farmer in the Paisley Block.

October MONDAY 23 1876

Yesterday was a fine mild day, at 1 Oclock the glass stood at 65º. But to day it is very wet having rained very heavy all night, and seems to continue this forenoon also. There was no mason or outside carpenter work done to day, the afternoon chilly and raw & a little wet. Had news from England to day, a letter from Willie to his wife from Queenston and one from Higinbotham to his wife from Liverpool & all well.

TUESDAY 24

This morning was dray, but it became showrey in the forenoon. This afternoon has been also showrey and chilly.

WEDNESDAY 25

This has been a dissagreable day wet showry weather. Our old Millwright Johnson Gibson died at Brant this morning aged 58 years, 5 mos. he entered my fathers employ and has continued with ever since with the exception of a few months this summer. I had 3 newspapers from William, 1 from London of the 7th inst. & 2 from Edinburgh of the 9th Inst.

October THURSDAY 26 1876

Chilly morning glass 34º, and a light shower of hailstones and snow. Have got the water wheel started to day and, now elevating Spring Wheat. Have been sadly detained in completing a quantity of flour that is sold, for a delay in getting Fall wheat forward from Detroit, but is now reported to be near at hand

FRIDAY 27

This is a dull morning, with frost on the ground. Have got a load of fall wheat from McDonald of Aberfoyle to enable us to finish a shipment that should have been sent of last week, and have the steam on again to finish it. Have also begun this morning to grind up the middlings as it is a loss of money to keep them on hand, and have plenty of water to drive the Mill.

SATURDAY 28

A good deal of Snow has fallen through the night and on the level places measured 3½ inches deep, and likely to lay over to day as there is thaw nor frost of any consiquence. Saw P. Idington in Town to day

October MONDAY 30 1876

Yesterday was a tolerably fine day, and the snow is melting away gradually. This is a mild morning amd the snow is melting fast away. Have a Meeting of Directors of the Mutual Fire Insurance Co., to day. I am lifting the covering of the rain water Cisteren & going to Pump it all out as it has been spoiled by the kitchen dishwater running in to it

TUESDAY 31

This is quite a mild morning and very foggy, almost enough to make a fine shower of rain. I had a letter from William, dated Glasgow 19th Octr. McLagan, had one from Nat. Working at the Cistern to day also

November WEDNESDAY 1

This is a warm close foggy morning, with the Thermometer at 54º. This is our Monthly Fair day. We are grinding flour with 3 pair of stones with steam, and 2 pair on middlings with water

November THURSDAY 2 1876

This is a very mild morning, but of any thing cloudy went up to the train & met with Revd. K. McLennan who s son is about to enter the Bank of Commerce, here. About 1 Oclock it began to rain, and continued more or less through the afternoon. All buisness was suspended to day

FRIDAY 3

This is a cool raw day but no frost. They are hurrying on with the New Post office, and close up for the winter when the 2d story joists are laid, and that the walls are nearly ready for them. Sandy Glass, lost a fine little girl this afternoon one year and ten months old, of Hooping cough & deptheria. Alexr. Thomson Esqr. of Hamilton died at 8 Oclock of brain fever.

SATURDAY 4

This morning there was a slight touch of frost on the side walks, but the forenoon was fine weather but damp in the afternoon. Had 1 load of coal to the Office. The Steamer {blank} passed father point at 4 a m this morning, the names of F.W. Stone & his 2 daughters & Mrs Webster are among the passengers

November MONDAY 6 1876

Yesterday was a very fine day, attended funeral of Alexr. Glass child. This was a dull morning, but raw & damp, Glass at 40º. It began to rain about 10 Oclock, and continued with little intermission all the afternoon, at 8 Oclock it was very heavy. The Assizes began to day Justice Galt on the bench. Church Meeting to day at 2 Oclock

TUESDAY 7

This is also a dull morning. But as the day advanced it appeared more settled and kept dry. At 3 Oclock I attended the funeral of Mr Alexr. Thomson late of Hamilton to his last resting place in Guelph it was largely attended by no less than 56 gentlemen from Hamilton. Great doings to in the United States, for the Election of the New President, Tilden or Mays

WEDNESDAY 8

This is another doubtful morning, no frost but a very few snow flakes fell this forenoon

November THURSDAY 9 1876

This is of any thing a more promising morning yet by no means clear. Yet during the forenoon the Sun shone out pretty fair for a while. In the afternoon it again got cloudy & heavy. I had a visit from my old friend Mr James Gow of Windsor, for a short time

FRIDAY 10

This is a dullish morning, yet it is dry, and there had been sufficient frost during the night to make ice on the tubs &c. ¼ of an inch thick, The Sun shone out in the forenoon. No proper dicision yet as to who has the majority as President, but the general opinion is that Tilden will be the man. Have got our Hall Stove rigged up to day and the Parlour one also

SATURDAY 11

Fine morning. Have got the tin gutters in front of the verandah leading to the soft water cisterns. The gardner Busby & Bulger have been cleaning out all the short dung out of the hot Beds &c. and top dressing the cow park with it and as soon as the parsnips are out of the ground will have no farther need of Busby after the vines in the Grapery are wound round with straw ropes. The day has been fine, large market & have seldom seen so many fowls offered at this time of the year. The Assizes closed this afternoon

November MONDAY 13 1876

Sabbath morning the glass was about 28º or say 4º below freezing, the frost during the night must have been hard as the ice on the tubs in the garden was ½ inch thick and the Mill Dam was frozen over for the first time this season. This morning glass at 30º the ice on the dam gone, the ground is white, repairing the covering of the mill race at the old House and the stairs, also the wooden exaust pipe from the Engine is quite rotten in places, and caved in so as to interupt the escape of the steam. War News looks more eminent and exciting in Europe

TUESDAY 14

This morning the glass was between 30º & 40º but gradually got colder, and in the afternoon became quite dull. Peter Idington in town & both of us called at Guthries & Mr Watt set Tuesday the 28th inst. for Meeting of Miss Worsleys Executors, at 12 Oclock. Some few flakes of snow fell. It is reported that Hon. John H. Cameron died at 3½ Oclock this afternoon, going in his 60th year

WEDNESDAY 15

The ground was all white this morning with Snow but so light that, it mostly melted all away during the day. The Hon, John Hillyard Cameron was born at Beaucaire, Languedoc, France, in April 14th 1817 received part of his early Education Kellkenny College, and came to Canada in 1825. The funeral is to take place on Friday at 3 Oclock.

November THURSDAY 16 1876

This is a cold raw morning, though not freezing hard just now, yet it must have froze hard last night as the ice on the Barrel is over ½ inch thick. The day however was dry and chilly.

FRIDAY 17

This was a fine mild morning, and the day turned out a moderate day. We took a drive out to Helenburn and then to the Cemetery

SATURDAY 18

This morning was milder than yesterday and continued so through the forenoon. The afternoon was dull and looked like rain, but only a few drops fell. We have been talking about our dear Son & Son=in=law likely to have left England to day.

November MONDAY 20 1876

Yesterday was of any thing a wet day, a constant drizzle of fine rain or disolving mist. To day the weather is much the same, wet for the most of the time, the roads are getting very muddy now

TUESDAY 21

This is also a soft morning, fine close rain like mist falling, and continued during the forenoon. The afternoon was much the same as the forenoon, with a fine drizzling rain was down at Mr Stones house, Mr Lemon called. John Stone is very ill & not able to speak, and is quite helpless & can take no food.

WEDNESDAY 22

This has been a drizzling morning, yet not cold the glass about 35º. In the forenoon it continued to blow a little colder and slight flurries of snow fell, and towards the afternoon the cold increased. Have been taking up my Parsnips to day and the salery tomorrow

November THURSDAY 23 1876

There has been a little frost during the night but enough to produce thin ice on the tubs out in the garden, but it is becoming milder again and dark and dull as if there was going to be a fall of snow. I feel somewhat dissapointed in not getting a letter this week from William in England. But have hopes yet that one or other of us may hear from them before the end of the week. My daughter got a letter from her Husband to day from London dated the 10th Instant. stating that they were to sail on the 18th for home in the steam ship

FRIDAY 24

There was a little ice on the water in the garden this morning, and white on the tops of the Celery and leeks, both of which are being taken up this morning. The day is clear and as the wind is from the North it is getting colder. I am also getting the double windows put in. Attended a Lecture by Professor Delaney on the Catacombs of Rome.

SATURDAY 25

There was a light sheet of ice on the Dam this morning and the ground frozen, but as the day advanced it became mild and the side walks and roads slopy. Have been grinding with three pair of stones in the water Mill this morning but as the day advanced the water got short and had to take of one run. It has begun to Snow to night, but hope it may all melt yet and produce more water, both for the River and also for our soft water Cisterns which are empty

November MONDAY 27 1876

There was about 2 inches deep of Snow on the ground yesterday morning & a part of it melted away where the Sun beat on it. But this morning other 2 inches have fallen, and still falling lightly this morning. But the Snow continued to fall heavier during the afternoon. Had a Telegram from a Mr Carpenter of Jolliett Minois to meet him at the Royal Hotel. Mr John Stone, 2d son of Mr Fredk. Stone, died yesterday afternoon. Met with Mr Carpenter of Jolliett M.S. this evening

TUESDAY 28

Meeting of Miss Worsley Executors a 12 Oclock Balce. to divide $408.28, Revd. E. Ebbs $99.05 & Miss Reeve $198.12 less our fees $12.00. This morning looks wintry like, more light snow falling and, the Dam all covered with ice and snow. I attended the funeral of Mr John Stone this afternoon at 2 Oclock.

WEDNESDAY 29

This is a dull dark morning, with light showers of snow, but about the middle of the day it was quite pleasant weather several sleighs are seen driving about town

November THURSDAY 30 1876

There was sharp frost this morning, the Snow is laying all over, and a few flakes fell this morning. The mail announces the arrival of the Parthia Steamer at New York yesterday. Had a Telegram from William that he would leave New York to night

December FRIDAY 1

This is the coldest morning we have had this season at ½ past 6 a m the Thermometer stood at 5º above zero & no wind. It was quite cold the whole day. This being our Fast Day the yet the attendance was not large. The wind North West. William got home this evening at 6 Oclock quite well

SATURDAY 2

This is not such a cold morning as yesterday the glass about 15º above zero, have been drawing off all the water of the distillery pipes, even at this early period of the Winter som of the cast iron elbows have burst. N. Higinbotham arrived this evening at 6 Oclock quite well with the exception of a black eye, he got from a heavy lurch of the Ship in a storm

December MONDAY 4 1876

Yesterday was a fine moderate winter day and the Churches were well attended. This morning at 7 the glass stood at 15º above zero, and during the day was milder. Have been confined to the House all day with a sore heel, having skined it with my Boot pressing on it where there was a hole in my sock.

TUESDAY 5

This is a very moderate winter morning yet the frost has burst some of the elbows in the pipes

WEDNESDAY 6

This morning has not been severe and as the Sun got stronger about the middle of the day, it softened the ridges on the roads. This being the Monthly Fair a good many people were in town

December THURSDAY 7 1876

This was a moderate morning, and the ground bare

FRIDAY 8

It froze pretty hard last night, and a little snow fell

SATURDAY 9

This is a very stormy morning, and has been all night, the wind is very fearce, and the snow drifting very hard all day, the Thermometer about 10º above zero. It is by far the most stormy day we have had

December MONDAY 11 1876

Yesterday the 10th the morning was calm and hardly a breath of wind, at 7. a.m the Thermometer stood at 5º below zero, the ground generally covered wth snow several inches and enough in places to make tolerable sleighing, it snowed in the afternoon. To day the glass was 5º above zero at 7. a.m and what snow that fell during the night has made

TUESDAY 12

This morning was quite mild about 7 a m the glass stood about the Freezing point and milder as the day advanced, a good deal more snow fell during last night and has made tollerable sleighing. A great many cattle are comming into town this afternoon to be exhibited at the fat cattle show tomorrow, the days are very short just now having to light lamps at ¼ to 5 Some of the Workshops close at ½ past 4, and start about 8 in the morning. We are very dull now, the Distillery standing so long, and the Mill doing but very little, & only 4 hands working at work & the Pedler

WEDNESDAY 13

This is a mild morning, the glass just about Freezing and no more. This being the Fat Cattle show day, a great number were shown as Prize Cattle and a great many ordinary cattle for sale, as well as a splended lot of fat Hogs & Sheep as well as a large lot of fat Poultry, it was thought to have been the largest show that has been yet, the weather was all that could have been wished for, and much of the Snow thawed away. Nat & William went down to Toronto to see the President of the Bank of Commerce. Wm returned to night but Nat remained over till tomorrow

December THURSDAY 14 1876

This morning was much colder than yesterday and a cold wind blowing, and no such thing as thaw to day. Had a letter from John Smith of Bridge of Allan announcing the birth of a Son

FRIDAY 15

This is a cold morning, with a little more snow having fallen during the night. During the forenoon the wind increased in coldness and after One O'clock, the wind increased to a furious snow storm and continued all the afternoon and evening, but during the night it blew still harder and the cold increased

SATURDAY 16

This is a very cold stormy morning, and the glass at 8 a m stood below zero a little. The sleighing is but poor yet. It is rather a dull cheerless cold day, and all our works standing still, makes it more so.

December MONDAY 18 1876

Yesterday was another cold morning at 8 a m the glass stood at zero and during the day only got to 3º above zero. This morning it was also about zero but about the middle of the day 7º above there had been a considerable fall of Snow during the night which has made very good sleighing, which makes somewhat more still in Town. One of the Twins in my Brother John's family died this afternoon at ½ past 3 named Winstanley.

TUESDAY 19

This is a stormy morning, but not so cold as yesterday morning. Thermometer stood at 13º above zero at 9 Oclock, it blew hard last night. It is nowing heavy this forenoon, and the wind from the West. H.B. Gordon Architect X of Toronto, called on the 21st

WEDNESDAY 20

This morning at 7 a m Glass 2º below zero and the day was cold. F.W. Stone, N. Higenbotham, William and A. Mackenzie, went down to Toronto to day to see the President of the Bank of Commerce about the arrangement of my affairs, and were engaged over 3 hours. I attended the funeral of Johns child this afternoon and got my hands almost froze in driving. The Grave was dug according to order 7 feet deep. Nat and William returned to night by the 8 Oclock train

December THURSDAY 21 1876

X This morning was more mild at 7 it was 10º above zero and more snow had fallen during the night, and the sleighing was splended, and a large Market to day of all kinds of Produce, hoggs especially the highest price $7.00. Recd. from Thomson & Jackson interest on Mrs McLeans Mortgage $20.00 (is not so much as last time)

FRIDAY 22

This was a moderate morning about 10º to 14 above zero, with a little more snow. There was again another large market this morning, the sleighing is very good. I desided to put on the fire in the Distillery on Tuesday next, to test the pipes &c. Our Sabbath school children's meeting to night was largely attended by both parents & strangers, & all went off exceedingly well.

SATURDAY 23

This morning is also mild and snowing a very little, glass about 18º above zero.

December MONDAY 25 1876

Yesterday at 8 a m the glass was at zero and calm. Christmas Day was a very fine morning the Thermometer stood at 10º above zero at 7 a m the sleighing was very good, calm & pleasant.

TUESDAY 26

This was also a pleasant morning, and a large market. This afternoon according to notice given the principal part of my Creditors met in my Office, when the state of my affairs was laid before them.

WEDNESDAY 27

This morning was also calm and pleasant the sleighing was improved by the light fall of snow through the night. Had a meeting of the Directors of the Wellington Mutual Fire Insurance Co. to day, there was a full meeting and a good deal of business done, and an Assessment of 6 per cent called ordered. We got notice that the Bank folks from Toronto are to be here tomorrow.

December THURSDAY 28 1876

This is a moderate morning. We have been informed that the President Mr. Wm McMaster and the Manager will not be here before the ½ past one having had to go round by Hamilton, (he missed the train). When only Mr. Anderson came, & part of time Mr. Wm Smith also, Mr. Andw. Lemon, Mr. F.W. Stone John Idington, and Wm. & I sat the whole day talking over what way the funds could be raised and the Works kept going Mr. Anderson taking part in the conversation and at the same time had in his pocket Insolvency papers that were signed in Toronto on the 27th. John Idington went on home by the 6 Oclock train

FRIDAY 29

This is quite a stormy morning, blowing & drifting at a fearfull rate. The 11 Oclock train going East was far behind time & did not go past here till ¼ past 12, when Mr. Wm Smith, Manager of the Bank of Commerce handed me a document requiring me to hand over my Estate & effects as per Insolvment act of 1875. And the same to William in the afternoon. But not being a partner of mine not yet a Trader according to the Act, he will require to be treated differently.

SATURDAY 30

This morning is moderately cold say about 20º with a little snow, & some had fallen during the night. We were all surprised to find this morning that The Engineers of the Grand Trunk Railway, throughout the whole line had struck work at 8.30 last night. The duetch mail as it is called uncoupled on the track here near the market, and a freight train with 12 cars of live Piggs left at the freight station with all the feed pipes dissconected & the water run off the boilers, some at Breslau Station & all over as far as Portland & Sarnia.

December SUNDAY 31 1876

This was a fine morning 12º above zero plenty of snow for good sleighing, and the Churches well attended.

Monday, 1st January 1877

This is a very fine morning. William Dickson Esqr. of Galt Died this day aged 77 years & 6 months entered all in new Book

Tuesday 2d Jany. 1877

Fine weather all day. Have been waiting all day expecting Mr John Idington down from Stratford to consult on matters of Insolvency. But towards the end of the afternoon I went up to Mr John Smith's Office and, signed the document of Assignment.

Wednesday 3d Jany. 1877

At 7.a.m Thermometer 2º below zero and quite calm. This Being the Monthly Fair Day a great many people are in Town but, very few cattle that are fit for Beef

Thursday 4th Jany.

This morning was not so cold. William went to Stratford this afternoon

Friday 5th

Fine winter morning Glass at 7 am at 10º above zero, calm and fine sleighing. Peter Idington here and his Grandson Patrick

Saturday 6th Jany.

This was a milder morning and thawed a very little about the Middle of the day there was a good many teams in Town


Sabbath 7th Jany. 1877

This was a fine day about 10º above at Church time

Monday 8th Jany. 1877

This was a fine moderate day and the sleighing improved again by a light fall of Snow, all busy laying all things in order so as to take an Inventory of them

Tuesday 9th Jany.

This is another moderate morning a little more snow has fallen during the night. Mrs Wm Scott Stewart was here & went to Waterloo by noon train

Wednesday 10th Jany.

This is a moderate morning, clear, and pleasant the frost during the night was about {blank} But at 10 a m it was 21º above zero

Thursday 11th Jany.

Was also moderate, this is my Birth Day. Towards night it began to blow & snow a little went up to the Station expecting to meet John Idington, who wired that he would come, but did not then, but came by the late train, and had an interview with the Banker & Lemon on Wm account. Dr. Hogg is not well this week

Friday 12th was a very cold morning at 7 it was 11º below zero, and even up to 10 Oclock it was 5º below. The Annual Meeting of Directors of The Wellington Mutual at the Queen's we dined together & had the General Meeting for the Election of the new board of Directors upstairs, when all the old ones were re elected, there was a much larger meeting of strangers than formerly

Saturday 13th Jany.

This is not so cold a morning 5º above zero but the wind from the North began to get up during the Day and the cold increased very much towards evening. I called on Dr. Hogg and found that he was better to day than yesterday

Monday 15th Jany.

Yesterday was a moderate day at 7 a m it was 10º above zero, but in the afternoon it got to be colder, a Mr Frazer, Preached for us yesterday (a student from Toronto). Dr. Hogg passed a bad night. And this morning was about the same temperature, and a change came on in the forenoon as if there was going to be a thaw or snow storm, when after 2 pm the wind sprung up from the N. West with a continuos fall of snow and cold going against the wind. Dr. Hogg no better to day, and spitting up Blood from the lungs

Tuesday 16th

Moderate morning 10º above zero at 7. a.m a good deal of snow fell last night and is laying still there being no wind to drift it, but the trains are very irregular in arriving

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“David Allan Diary, 1876,” Rural Diary Archive, accessed September 15, 2019, https://ruraldiaries.lib.uoguelph.ca/transcribe/items/show/169.

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