Clara, Olive, & Elizabeth Philp Diary, 1902

Title

Clara, Olive, & Elizabeth Philp Diary, 1902

Date Created

January 1, 1902

Is Part Of

Philp Family Diary Collection

Medium

Scanned Manuscript

Transcription

{Front cover of diary}

DAILY JOURNAL

1902

{Printed Page: CALENDAR FOR 1902.}

DOMINION DIARY

DAILY JOURNAL

...FOR...

1902

PUBLISHED ANNUALLY BY

THE COPP, CLARK COMPANY, LIMITED

64 & 66 FRONT STREET WEST, TORONTO

{Printed Page: STERLING EXCHANGE}

{Printed Page: Sterling Exchange/Legal weights and measures in Canada.}

CANADIAN TARIFF OF CUSTOMS

                 

MEANING OF TERMS USED.

In this Act, and in any other Act relating to customs, unless the context otherwise requires,--

The initials "n.e.s." represent and have the meaning of the words "not elsewhere specified";

The initials "n.o.p." represent and gave the mean- ing of the words "not otherwise provided for";

The expression "gallon" means an imperial gallon ;

The expression "ton" means two thousand pounds avoirdupois;

The expression "proof" or"proof spirits," when applied to wines of spirits of any kind, means spirites of a strength equal to that of pure ethly alcohol compound- ed with distilled water in such proportions that the resultant mixture shall at a temperature of sixty degrees Fahrenheit have a specific gravity of 0 9198 as compared with that of distilled water at the same temperature ;

The expression "gauge," when applied to metal sheets or plates or to wire, means the thicknes as determined by Stubbs's standard gauge ;

The expression "in diameter," when applied to tubing, means the actual inside diameter ;


The expression "sheets," when applied to metals, means a sheet or plates not exceeding three-sixteenths of an inch in thickness.


FISH FROM UNITED STATES AND NEWFOUNDLAND.

The whole or part of the duties hereby imposed upon fish and other products of the fisheries may be remitted as respects either the United States or Newfoundland, or both, upon proclamation of the Governer in Council, which may be issued whenever it appears to his satis-faction that the Governments of the United States anD Newfoundland, or either of them, have made changes in their tariffs of duties imposed upon articles imported from Canada, in reduction of repeal of the duties in force in the said countries respectively.


EXPORT OF GAME PROHIBITED.

The export of wild turkeys, quail, partridge, prairie fowl and woodcock, in the carcase or parts thereof, is hereby declared unlawful and prohibited ; and any person exporting orattempting to export any such article shall for each offence incur a penalty of one hundred dollars, and the article so attempted to be exported shall be forfeited, and may, on reasonable cause of sus-picion of intention is poved, shall be dealt with as for breach of the customs laws : Provided, that this section shall not apply to the export, under such regulations as are made by the Governor in Coun-cil, of any carcase or part thereof of any deer raised or bred by any person, company or association of persons upon his or their own lands.

{MIDDLE COLUMN}

articles) as to the duties to which they are subject under the tariff shall be final and conclusive, unless upon appeal to the commissioner of custons within thirty days from the rendering of such decision, such decision is, with the approval of the controller, changed ; and the decision of the commissioner with such appro- val shall be final.

DUTIES ON WINES AND SPIRITS

In the case of all wines, spirits, or alcoholic liquors subject to duty according to their relative strength of proof, such strength shall be ascertained either by means of Sykes's hydrometer or of the specific gravity bottle, as the controller of customs directs ; and in case such relative strength cannot be correctly ascertained by the direct use of the hydrometer or gravity bottle, it shall be ascertained by the distillation of a sample and the subsequent test in like manner of the distillate.


MEDICINAL AND TOILET PREPERATIONS.

All medicinal or toilet preparations imported for com- pleting the manufacture thereof , or for the manufacture of any other article by the addition of any ingredient or ingredients, or labelling the same, alone or with other articles or compounds, under any proprietary or speacial name or trade mark, shall be valued for duty under the provision of subsection two of section sixty-five of The Customs Act, as amended by section fifteen of chapter fourteen of the statutes of 1888.

MEDICINAL PREPERATIONS TO BE LABELLED.

All medicinal preparations, whether chemical or other, usually imported with the name of the manufacturer, shall have the truw name of such manufacturer and the place where they are prepared, and the word "alcoholic" or "non-alcoholic," permanently and legibly affixed to each parcel by stamp, label or otherwise ; and all medi- cinal preparations imported without such names and word so affixed may be forfeited.


DUTY ON PACKAGES.

Packages shall be subject to the following provisions:


All bottles, flasks, jars, demijohns, carboys, casks, hogsheads, pipes, barrels, and all other vessels or pack- ages, manufactured of tin, iron, lead, zinc, glass or any other material capable of holding liquids, and all pack- ages in which goods are commonly placed for home consumption, including cases, not otherwise provided for, in which bottled spirits, wines or malt liquors or other liquids are contained, and every package being the first receptacle or covering inclosing goods for the purpose of sale, shall in all cases, not otherwise provided


{RIGHT SIDE COLUMN}

PENALTY FOR HAVING BLANK INVOICE WITH CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTNESS.

Any person who, without lawful excuse, the proof of which shall be on the person accused, sends or brings into Canada, or who, being in Canada, has in his posses- sion, any bill-heading or other paper appearing to be a heading or blank capable of being filled up and used as an invoice, and bearing any certificate purporting to show, or which may be used to show, that the invoice which may be made from such bill-heading or blank is correct or authentic, is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to a penalty of five hundred dollars, and to imprisonment for a term not exceeding twelve months, in the discertion of the court, and the goods entered under any invoice made from any such bill-heading or blank shall be forfeited.


AFFIDAVIT OF IMPORTER CLAIMING LOWER RATE OF DUTY ON CERTAIN GOODS.

With respect to goods imported for manufacturing purposes that are admissible under the Act for any specific purposes at a lower rate of duty than would otherwise be chargeable, or exempt from duty, the importer claiming such exemption from duty, or pro- portionate exemption from duty, shall make and sub- scribe to the folllowing affidavit or affirmation before the collector of customs at the port of entry, or before a notary public or a commissioner for taking affidavits :


I, (name of importer) the undersigned, importer of the (names of the goods or articles) mentioned in this entry, do solemnly (swear or a ffirm) that such (names of the goods or articles) are imported by me for the manu- facture of (names of the goods to be manufactured) in my own factory, situated at (name of the place, county and province), and that no portion of the same will be used for any other purpose or disposed of until so manufactured.


BRITISH PREFERENTIAL TARIFF.

On and after the 1st day of August, 1898, section 17 of the said Act shall be repeled, and the following shall be substituted therefor :--


"Articles which are the growth, produce or manu- facture of any of the following countries may, when imported direct into Canada from any of such coun- tries, be entered for duty or taken out of warehouse for consumption in Canada at the reduced rate of duty provided in the British preferential tariff set forth in Schedule D to this Act:--(a) The United Kingdom ; (b) The British colony of Bermuda ; (c) The British colonies, commonly called the British West Indies, in- cluding th efollowing : the Bahamas, Jamaica, Turks and Caicos Islands, the Leeward Islands (Antigua, St. Christopher-Nevis, Dominica, Montserrat, and the Virgin Islands, the Windward Islands (Grenada, St. Vincent and St. Lucia), Barbados, Trinidad and To- bago ; (d) British Guiana ; (e) Any other British colony or possession the customs tariff of which is, on the whole, as favourable to Canada as the British prefer-

{TOP RIGHT COLUMN}

Deer when for sport, under license, may be ex- ported under regulations of the Customs Depatment.


Regulations respecting the export of "Home-bred Deer."


Any person who wishes to export any carcase or parts thereof of deer raised or bred upon his own land, or upon lands owned by a company or association of per- sons of which he is a member, shall make affidavit upon the face of the export entry to the effect that the deer, the carcase of parts whereof is so entered for exporta- tion, was raised or bred upon his own lands or upon persons of which he is a member (describing the location of such lands, and naming the association or company holding the same).


DUTIES ON MOLASSES AND SYRUPS

Regulations respecting the manner in which molasses and syrups shall be sampled and tested for the purpose of determining the classes to which they belong with reference to the duty chargeable thereon shall be made by the controller of customs, and the instruments and appliances necessary for such determination shall be designated by him and supplied to such officers as are by him charged with the duty of sampling and testing such molasses and syrups ; and the decision of any officer (to whom is so assigned the testing of such


{TOP MIDDLE COLUMN}


for, in which they contain goods subject to an ad valorem duty or a specific and ad valorem duty, be charged with the same rate of ad valorem duty as is to be levied and collected on the goods they contain, and the value of the packages may be included in the value of such goods ;


All such packages as aforesaid containing goods sub- ject to a specific duty only, and not otherwise provided for, shall be chrged with a duty of twenty per cent. ad valorem ;


Packages not hereinbefore specified, and not herein specially charged with or declared liable to duty, and being the usual and ordinary packages in which goods are packed for exportation, according to the general usage and custom of trade, shall be free of duty ;


All such special packages or coverings as are of any use, or apparently designed for use other than the importation of the goods they contain, shall be subject to the same rate duty as would thereon be levied if imported empty or separate from their contents ;


Packages (inside or outside) containing free goods shall be exempt from duty when the packages are of such a nature that their destruction is necessary in order to release the goods.


{TOP RIGHT COLUMN}


ential tariff herein referred to is such colony or possession.


Provided however, that manufactured articles to be admitted under such preferential tariff shall be bona fide the manufactures of a country or countries entitled to the benefits of such tariff, and that such benefits shall not extend to the importation of articles into the production of which there has not entered a substantial portion of the labour of such countries. Any question arising as to any article being entitled to such benefits shall be decided by the Minister of Customs, whose decision shall be final.


"Raw sugar, including all sugar described in item 436 of Schedule A, may, when imported direct from any British colony or possession, be entered fot duty or taken out of warehouse for consumption in Canada at the reduced rate of duty provided in the British preferential tariff.


"The Minister of Customs, with the approval of the Governor in Council, shall determine what British colonies or possession shall be entitled to the benefits of the preferential tariff under clause (d) of subsection 1 of this section.


"The Minister of Customs may, with the approval of the Governor in Council, make such regulations as are deemed necessary for carrying out the intention of this section."


                                                     
                                                     

THE FRENCH TREATY

(Circular from the Customs Department, dated 14th October, 1895.)

I beg to send herewith, for your information and guidance, text of a proclamation by the Governor in Council, dated the 10th day of October, 1895, declaring the provisions of the French Treaty Act in force on, from and after the 14th October, 1895.


{BOTTOM LEFT COLUMN}


You are hereby advised that the said Act provides as follows:--


"Wines, sparkling and non-sparkling, common soaps, savons de Marseille (Castile soaps) and nuts, almonds, prunes and plums of French origin entering Canada shall enjoy the folloeing advantages:


1. Non-sparkling wines gauging 15 degrees by the centesimal alcoholometer or less, or according to the Canadian system of testing, containing 26 per cent. ot less of alcohol, and all sparkling wines shall be ex- empted from the surtaxe or ad valorem duty of 30 per cent.


2. The present duty charged on common soaps, savons de Marseille (Castile soaps) shall be reduced by one-half.


3. The present duty charged on nuts, almonds, prunes and plums shall be reduced bu one-third.


The following articles of Canadian origin imported direct from that country accompanied by certificates of origin shall receive the advantage of the minimum tariff on entering France, Algeria or the French colonies :--


Canned meats.

Condensed milk, pure.

Fresh water fish, eels.

Fish preserved in their natural form.

Lobsters and crayfish preserved in their natural form.

Apples and pears, fresh, dried or pressed.

Fruis preserved, others.


{BOTTOM MIDDLE COLUMN}


Building timber in rough or sawm.

Wood paavement.

Staves.

Wood pulp (cellculose).

Extract of chestnut and other tanning extracts.

Common paper, machine-made.

Prepared skins, others, whole.

Boots and shoes.

Furniture of common wood.

Furniture other than chairs, of solid wood, common.

Flooring in pine or soft wood.

Wooden sea-going ships.

It is understood that the advantage of any reduction of duty granted to any other power on any of the articles enumerated above shall be extended fully to Canada"

Your attention is also directed to the following pro- visions of "An Act respecting Commercial Treaties affecting Canada," Chap. 3, 58--59 Vict., viz.:--

"1. So soom as The French Treaty Act, 1894, chapter two of the Statutes of 1894, is brought into force by proclamation of the Governor General, the advantages granted to France by the treaty with that power men- tioned in the said Act, with respect to its commerce with Canada, shall extend to any and every other foreign power which by reason of the operation of such treaty is, under the provisions of a treaty with Great Britain, entitled, in whole or in part, to the same or to


{BOTTOM RIGHT COLUMN}

the like advantages with respect to its commerce with Canada, to the extent to which in manner aforsaid such other foreign power is entitled thereto ; and such advantages shall continue to so extend to such other foreign power so long as the said Act remains in force, or until the right of such other foreign power to such advantages under its treaty with Great Britain is sooner determined.

3. The advantages so granted to France by the said treaty shall extend also to Great Britain and to the several British colonies and possessions with respect to their commerce with Canada, so long as France con- tinues to be entitled to such advantages ; and during the period for which France is so entitled to such advantages, all laws inconsistent with the enjoyment thereof by Great Britain and such British colonies and possessions shall be suspended to the extent to which they are so inconsistent."

The Foreign Powers entitled to the same advantages under the provision of the said Act, as are granted to France by the Treaty in question, with respect to its commerce with Canada, are :--Argentine Republic, Ger- many (Zollverein), Austria Hungary, Muscat, Belgium, Russia, Bolivia, Salvador, Chili, Sweden, Norway, Columbia, Spain, Costa Rica.

Satisfactory proof of the origin of the goods in question shall be furnished to the collector at the time of entry.

CANADIAN TARIFF OF CUSTOMS.

REVISED AND CORRECTED TO THE LATEST DATE.

                                               

{LEFT COLUMN}

{Small design on top right of column} c.ad val.

Absinthe, $2.40 per Imp.Gal.

Acetate of Lime................20

Acetate and Nitrate of Lead, not ground.................Free Acid, Acetic Acid and Pyroligne- ous, n.e.s., &vinegar, a specific duty of fifteen cents for each gallon of any strength not ex- ceeding the strength of proof, and for each degree of strength in excess of the strength of proof an additional duty of two cents.

The strength of proof shall be held to be equal to six per cent. of absolute acid, and in all cases the strength shall be determined in such a manner as is established by the Gover- nor in council.

Acid, Acetic Acid crude, and Pyroligneous crude, of any strength not exceeding thirty per cent ....................25

Acid, Muriatic and Nitric, and all mixed acids............... 20

Acid, Oxalic and Boracic ......Free

Acid, Phosphate, n.o.p..........25

Acid, Sulphuric................25

Acid, Tartaric, in crystals......Free

Acid, Tannic ..................Free

Acids, other acids n.e.s......... 20

Aconite Root..................Free

Acorns as Nuts... 2 cts. per 1b.

Advertising and printed matter, viz.--Advertising pamphlets, advertising pictorial show cards, illustrated advertising periodicals ; illustrated price books, catalogues and price lists ; advertising almanacs and calendars ; patent medi- cine or other advertising cir- culars, fly sheets or pamphlets ; advertising chromos, chromo- types, oleographs or like work produced by any process other than hand painting or drawing and having any advertisement or advertising matter printed, lithographed or stamped there- on, or attached thereto, includ- ing advertising bills, folders, and posters, or other similar artistic work, lithographed, printed or stamped on paper or cardboard for business or advertisement purposes, n.o.p., 15 cts. per1b.

Albaster, Spar, Terra Cotta or Composition Ornaments. ....35

Ale, Beer and Porter, in Bottles

(6 q. or 12p. to Imp.gal.) 24c.


{MIDDLE COLUMN ON THE LEFT}


{small design on top right of the middle column} c.ad val. subjects dying abroad, but domiciled in Canada ....... Free

Apples, including the barrel.... 40c. per barrel.

Apples, dried ....... ........25

Apple trees all of all kinds..3c.each

Argols ........................Free

Artist color boxes Japanned.... 25

Arms, including Muskets, Rifles and other fire a rms, n.e.s.... 30

Army and Navy and Canadian Military Arms, Clothing, Mus- Instruments for Bands, Mili- tary Stores and Munition of War ........................Free

Arrowroot .................... 20

Artificial Flowers ............ .25

Artificial Limbs ..............Free

Arsenic........................Free

Arseniate of Aniline............Free

Articles for the use of Governor- General ......................Free

Articles imported by and for the use of the Dominion Govern- ment of any of the Depart- ments thereof, or by or for the Senate or House of Commons.Free Articles for personal use of Con-suls-General, who are natives or citizens of the country they represent, and who are not engaged in any other business or profession ...............Free

Articles ex-warehoused for ship's stores ......................Free

Abestos, in any form other than Crude, and all manufactures thereof ...................... 25

Ashes, Pot and Pearl, in pack- ages or not less than twenty- five pounds weight ..........Free

Asparagus .................... 25

Asphalt or Asphaltum, and Bone Pitch, Crude only............Free

Awnings and Tents .......... 35

Axle Grease ................... 25


Babbit Metal .............. 10 Bacon and Hams, Shoulders and Sides.......... 2 cents per 1b.

Bacteriological products or se- rums for subcutaneous injec- tion .........................Free

Bagatelle Tables or Boards, with Cues and Balls .............. 35

Baggage, Travellers' ...........Free

Bags, Cotton, Seamless......... 20

Bags, Cottom, made up by the use of the needle ........ ... 35

Bags, Carpet Bags.............. 30

Bags, paper sacks or bags of all kinds, printed or not......... 25

Bags, Jute, Hemp, Linen and


{MIDDLE COLUMN ON THE RIGHT}

{Small design on the top right of the column} c. ad val.

Biscuits, sweetened ............ 27 1/2

Bismuth, Metallic in its natural state ........................Free

Bitters, n.e.s., $2.40 per Imp. gal.

Blacking, Shoe and Shoemakers' Ink, shoe, harness and leather dressing, and harness-soap .... 25

Black Lead,plumbagomanufac're 25

Black Book Muslin.............. 35

Blackberries, gooseberries,rasp- berries, strawberries, cherries and currants, n.e.s., the weight of the package to be included in the weight for duty, 2c. per. 1b.

Bladders ....................... 20

Blanketing and lapping,and discs or mills for engraving copper rollers, imported by cotton manufacturers, calico printers and wall paper manufacturers, for use in their own factories only ........................Free

Blinds of wood, metal or other material not textile or paper.. 30

Blood albumen, tannic acid, an- timony salts, tartar emetic and grey tartar ..................Free

Blueing, Laundry, of all kinds.. 25

Blue Vitriol....................Free

Bolting Cloth, not made up ....Free

Bone Dust and Ash for manuf. of Phosphate and Fertilizers..Free

Bone Dust, unmanufactures....Free

Bone Black ....................Free

Bones, cude, not manuf., burnt, calcined, ground, or steamed.Free

Bones, burnt, calcined ........ 20

Bone, manufactures of, fancy ... 35

Bone, manufactures of, n.e.s... 20

Bone Pitch, crude only ........Free

Bone, Cuttle Fish..............Free

Bonnets, n.e.s................. 30

Books, viz:--Novels or works of fiction, orliterature of a similar character, unbound or paper- bound, or in sheets, including freight rates for railways and telegraph rates, bound in book or pamphalet form, but no to include Christmas annuals or publications commonly known as juvenile and toy books .... 20

Books, Printed, Periodicals and Pamphelets, or parts thereof, n.e.s.,--not to include blank account books, copy-books, or books to be written or drawn upon ........................ 10

Books, viz. : Books on the appli- cation of science to industries of all kinds, including books on agriculture, horticulture, forestry, fish and fishing, min-


{RIGHT COLUMN}

{Small design on top right column} c. ad val.

Boots and Shoes, Rubber ...... 25

Boot and Shoe Counters, made from Leather Board.......... 25

Boot and Shoe Dressing ......... 25

Boot, Shoe and Stay Laces, of any material................ 30

Botanical Specimens...........Free

Borax, ground or unground, in bulk of not less than twenty- five pounds only.............Free

Box Wood Rules ............... 25

Boxes,paperboxes,empty,plain. 35

Boxes, cash............ ....... 25

Boxes and Writing Desks, fancy and ornamental.............. 35

Braces or Suspenders and metal parts thereof ................ 35

Braids of all kinds ............ 35

Bran, Mill Feed............... 20

Brass, drawn, plain and fancy tubing not bent or otherwise manufactured, in lengths not less than six feet ............Free

Brass, old, scrap, and in sheets or plates, not polished .......Free

Brass bars in bolts, bars and rods in coil or otherwise, not less than six feet in length,unmanu- factured ...................Free

Bras Cups, being rough blanks, for the manufacture of brass and paper shells and cartridges for use in their own factor- ies ..........................Free

Brass Wire, plain .............. 10

Brass, ribs of iron or steel, run- ners, rings, caps, notches, fer- rules, mounts and sticks or canes in the rough or not further manufactured than cut into lengths suitable for um- brellas,etc.,imported by manu- facturers of umbrellas, para- sols and sunshades for use in their factories in the manufac- ture of umbrellas, etc., only..Free

Brass Pumps................... 30

Brass, twisted Brass, Copper, Zinc, Iron or Steel Wire, when imported by manufacturers of boots and shoes for use in their factories ...............Free

Brass, in strips, for printers' rules, not finished ...........Free

Brass and copper nails, rivets, tacks and burrs.............. 30

Brass tubing, cased ............ 30

Brass, manufactures of, n.e.s... 30

Breadstuffs, Grain and Flour, and Meal of all kinds, when damaged by water in transitu, upon the appraised value .... 20

Brick, Fire, n.e.s............... 20

{LEFT COLUMN}

Imp.gal

Ale, Beer and Porter, in Casks, or otherwise than Bottles....16c.

Imp.gal

Albumen, Blood...............Free and films chemically prepared for photographers' use ....... 30

Albums, insides of paper.......Free

Ale, Ginger .................... 20

Alkanet root, crude, crushed or ground ......................Free

Almonds, shelled, 5 cents per 1b. not shelled, 3 cents per 1b.

Almond Paste as Confectionery, 1/2c. a 1b. and ................. 35

Aloes, unground...............Free

Alum, in bulk only, ground or unground ...................Free

Alum, burned or calcined....... 20

Aluminum, or Aluminium and Alumina and Chloride of Alu- minium ofChloralum,Sulphate of Alumina and Alum Cake..Free

Chloralum... ...............Free

Ambergris ....................Free

Ammonia, Sulphate of ........Free

Anatomical Preparations and Skeletons or parts thereof....Free

Anchors for vessels ...........Free

Animals,Living, n.e.s........... 20 Stock, horses, cattle, sheep, swine, and dogs .............Free

Animals, live hogs,1 1/2c. per 1b...

Animals brought into Can.temp. & for a period not exceeding 3 months, for the purpose of ex- hibition.......................Free

Aniline Dyes and Coal Tar Dyes, in bulk or packages of not less than one pound weight, includ- ing Alizarine and artificial Alizarine ....................Free

Aniline Oil, Crude ............Free

Aniline Salts, and Arseniate of..Free

Annato, liquid or solid and seed.Free

Antimony not ground,pulverized or otherwise manufactured... Free

Antiquities, collections of......Free

Antiseptic surgical dressing, such as absorbent cotton, cotton wool, lint, lambs' wool, tow, jute, gauzes, and oakum, pre- pared for use as surgical dress- ings, plain or medicated....... 20

Anvils............... ......... 30

Apricots, green ................ 20

Apparatus and Philosophical Instruments imported by and for use of Colleges, Schools, Scientifi, and Literary Socie- ties, such as are not manu- factured in Canada ..........Free

Ap'atus for Colleges and Schools which are manufactures in Canada, to be rated according to material.

Apparel, wearing, and other per- sonal and household effects (not merchandise) of British

{MIDDLE LEFT COLUMN}

Cotton seamless............. 20

Baking Powders, 6 cents per 1b. The weight of the packages to be included in the weight for duty.

Bamboos, unmanufactured ....Free

Bamboo Reeds, not futher manfd. than cut into suitable lengths for Walking Sticks, or Canes, or Sticks for Umbrellas, Parasols, or Sunshades ......Free

Bank notes, bonds, bills of ex- change, cheques, promissory notes, drafts and all similar work unsigned, and cards or other commercial blank forms printed or lithographed, or printed from steel or copper or other plates, and other printed matter, n.e.s......... 35

Barilla ........................Free

Bark, Oak and Tanners ........Free

Barley ........................ 30

Barley, Pot, Pearl and Flour .... 20

Barometers .................... 25

Barrels,Can.manuf.,exp.filled & ret'd empty, under such reg'ns as the Min. of Cus. shall direct.Free

Barrels, count. Petroleum, or its products, or any mixt.of which petroleum is a part, when such contents are chargeable with a specific duty ......... 20c. each

Beads and Bead Ornaments .... 35

Beans ..........15cts. per bush.

Bean, Tonquin, Vanilla & Nux Vomica, crude only ..........Free

Bed Comforters, or Quilts of Cotton, white or colored ..... 30

Beef, salted in barrels, the barrel containing the same to the free of duty .... .......2c. per 1b.

Bees...........................Free

Belladonna Leaves ............Free

Bells, when imported by and for the use of churches only .....Free

Bells, n.e.s....................... 30

Belts of all kinds .............. 35

Belting of leather or other ma- terial, except rubber, n. e. s... 20

Belting Rubber ................ 25

Benzole, n.e.s., 5c. per Imp. gal.

Berries for f=dyeing, or used for composing dyes..............Free

Bicycles, Tricycles or Velocipedes 30

Billiard Tables, with or without pockets, and bagatelle tables or boards, cues, balls and cue racks and cue tips ............ 35

Billiard Balls, papier mache, when imported separately .... 35

Billiard Balls, bone or ivory, when imported separately .... 35

Billiard Balls celluloid. when im- ported separately ............ 35

Birds, Canary Birds and n.e.s.... 20

Birds Skins, for taxidermic pur- poses...........................Free

Bird Cages ..................... 35

Biscuits of all kinds, not sweet- ened ......................... 25

{MIDDLE RIGHT COLUMN}


ing, metallurgy, architecture, electric and other engineering, carpentry,ship-building,mech- anism, dyeing, bleaching, tan- ning, weaving and other me- chanic arts, andsimilar indus- trial books ; also books printed in any language other than the English and French languages, or in any two languages not being English and French, or in any three or more languages ; and bibles, prayer-books, psalm and hymn-books, and religious tracts, and Sunday School les- son pictures..................Free

Books, embossed, for the blind, and books for the instruction of the deaf and dumb and blind........................Free

Books printed by any Govern- ment or by any association for the promotion of science or letters, and official annual reports of religious or benevo- lent associations, and issued in the course of the proceedings of the said associations, to their members, and not for the purpose of sale or trade...Free

Books, not printed or reprinted in Canada, which are included and used as text books in the curriculum of any university, incorporated college or normal school in Canada ; books speci- ally imported for the bona fide use of incorporated mechanics' institues, public libraries, li- braries of universoties, colleges and schools, or for the library of any incorprated medical, law, literary, scientific or art asso- ciation or society, and being the property of the organized authorities of such library, and not in any case the property of individuals,--the whole under regulations to be made by the Controller of Cusoms,--pro- vided that importers of books who have sold the same for the purpose mentioned in this item, shall upon proof of sale and delivery for such purpose be entitled to a refund of any duty paid thereon.... ......Free

Books, bound or unbound, which have been printed and manu- factured more than 12 years..Free

Books and clothing, donations of, for charitable purposes and photographs, not exceeding 3, sent by friends and not for the purpose of sale ...............Free

Book Binders' Cloth ...........Free

Book Binders' tools and imple- ments............ .......... 30

Boots and Shoes, Leather or Rubber, and slippers of any material, n.e.s ............... 25


{RIGHT SIDE COLUMN}


Brick, hollow and porous...... 20

Brick, Building................ 20

Brick, Bath Brick.............. 20

Brick, Fire Brick, for use in pro- cesses of manufacture, or for manufacturing purposes .....Free

Brimstone, crude or in roll or flour...... ..................Free

Brim Moulds, for gold beaters and gold beaters' skins......Free

British Gum, Dextrine, Sizing, Cream and Enamelled Sizing. 10

Bristles..........................Free

Britannia Metal in pigs and bars Free manufactures of, if not plated. 25


manufactures of, if plated.... 30

Bromine........................Free

Brooms........................ 20

Brushes......................... 25

Broom Corn ...................Free

Bronze or Dutch Metal.... .... 25

Buckles of iron, steel, brass or copper, or all kinds, n.o.p. (not being jewllery)......... 30

Buckskins, tanned or dressed (Glove leather) .............. 10

Bronze Statuetted.......... .. 35

Buckwheat......10c. per bushel meal or flour......1/4c. per 1b.

Buchu Leaves............. ...Free

Buckles, tin, for suspenders..... 35

Buckram, for the manufacture of hat and bonnet shapes.....Free

Builders' Hardware............. 30

Bulbs, flower, palms, corms, tubers, rhizomes, Arucaria, Spirea, and Lilies of the Val- ley, seedling stock for grafting, viz : plum, pear, peach, and other fruit trees ...............Free

Bullion, gold and silver, in bars, blocks or ingots, drops, sheets or plates, unmanufactures, gold and solver sweepings and buillion frings ...............Free

Burr Stones, in blocks, rough unmanufactured, not bound up or prepared for binding into mill stones..............Free

Burgundy Pitch ...............Free

Butchers' Steels and table steel 30

Butter .....4 cents per pound

Butter Triers........... ...... 30

Butterine, or other substitute for Butter, importation prohibited.

Buttons, pantaloon, metal, and shoe buttons, n.e.s.......... 25

Button, Shoe, papier mache....Free

Buttons of all kinds, covered of not, n.o.p., including recogni- tion buttons, and cuff or collar buttons (not being jewllery). 35


Cabinet of Coins, collection of medals and other antiqui- ties, including collection of Postage Stsmps...........Free

Cabinet Ware or Furniture(wood or iron)............ .......... 30

Cages, bird, parrot, squirrel and rat cages, of wire, and metal

CANADIAN TARIFF OF CUSTOMS (Continued)

{LEFT COLUMN}


{Small design on right corner} c.ad val.

parts thereof ................ 35

Calcareous tufa.................Free

Calumba Root, unground......Free

Camwood and Sumac, and Ex- tract of, for dyeing or tanning.Free

Candied Peel, lemon, orange and citron ..........1/2c per 1b. and 35

Candles, Tallow................ 25

Candles, Paaraffline Wax ........ 30

Candles and Tapers, all others, including Sperm.............. 25

Candle Wick and Lamp Wicks.. 25

Cane or Rattan, not manufac- tured........................Free

Canoes, skiffs, or open pleasure sail boats of any material .... 25

Canton Flannel, white ......... 25

Canton Flannel, printed or dyed 35

Canvas, "Jute," not pressed or calendered, when imported by the manufacturers of carpets, rugs and mats, jute webbing or jute cloth, for use in the manufacture of or any of these articles only, in their own factories ....................Free

Canvas of flax oe hemp and sail twine, to be used for boat and ship sails .................... 5

Caoutchouc, unmanufactured...Free

Caplins, unfinished Leghorn hats.Free

Caps, Hats, Bonnets and shapes, n.e.s ........................ 30

Caps, Percussion, for guns, rifles and pistols .................. 30

Caps, Percussion Copper, for blasting............. 30

Capsules for Bottles, to be rated according to material.

Carbons, electric light, and car- bon points of all kinds, n.e.s. 35

Carbons, over six inches in cir- cumference .................. 15

Cardboard ................... 35

Cards, show cards, 15c. per 1b.

Cards, for p;aying, 6cts. per pack.

Carpet bags, trunks, and valises, hat boxes, tool bags or baskets, satchels, reticules, musical in- strument cases, purses, port- manteaus, pocket books, fly and baskets of all kinds...... 30

Carpets, Turkish or imitation Turkish or other rugs or car- pets, and carpets n.e.s........ 35

Carpeting, rugs, mats, and mat- ting of cocoa, straw, hemp or jute, carpet linings and stair pads ....................... 25

Cartridges, for guns, rifles and pistols, and Cartridge Cases.. 30

Carriages, Buggies and Pleasure Carts, amd similar vehicles,


{MIDDLE COLUMN-LEFT SIDE]

{Small design on top right of column} c. ad val.

Chloride of Barium ............ 20

Chloride of Lime, in packages of not less than 25 1bs. weight...Free

Chronometer Clocks, as Clocks . 25

Chronometer Watches.......... 25

Chronometers and Compasses for Ships........................Free

Chromos, Chromotypes, Oleo- graphs, photographs, drawings, types, paintings, arto- pictures, engravings or prints, or proofs therefrom and similar works of art, n.o.p., blue prints, building plans, and maps and charts, n.e.s........ 20

Chuurch Vestments ............ 20

Churns, brooms, pails, tubs, pounders and rolling pins, whisks and washboards....... 20

Cider, not clarified or refined, 5 cents per im. gallon.

Cider, clarified or refined,10cents per im. gallon.

Cigars and Cigarettes, the weight of the cigarettes to in- clude the weight of the paper covering, $3 per1b. and ...... 25

Cinchona Bark ................Free

Cinchona Bark, powdered ...... 20

Cinnabar.......................Free

Citrons, rinds of, in brine....Free

Citric Acid................... 20

Clays ...........................Free

Cliff Stone, unmanufactured....Free

Cliff Stone, manufactured...... 30

Clocks, and clock cases of all kinds......................... 25

Clock springs and clock move- ments, complete or in parts .. 25

Clothes Wringers for domestic use and parts thereof......... 35

Clothing, Cotton, Silk and Linen 35

Clothing, ready-made, and wear- ing apparel of every descrip- tion, composed wholly or in part of wool, worsted, the hair of the alpaca goat or other like animal, n.o.p................ 35

Clothing, donations of, for chari- table purposes................. Free

Clothing imported by and for use of army and navy, or for Canadian Militia. Dutiable ac- cording to material. Duty re- funded upon reference to De- partment

Cloths, not rubbered or made waterproof, whether of wool, cotton, unions, silk or ramie, sixty inches or over in width and weighing not more than seven ounces to the square yard, when imported exclu- sively for the manufacture of mackintosh clothing, under regulations to be adopted by


{MIDDLE COLUMN - RIGHT SIDE}


{Small design on the top right side} c. ad val.

Coffee, roasted or ground, and all imitations of and substi- tutes for, n.e.s., 2 cts. per 1b.

Coffee, extract of, or substitutes for, of all kinds ..3 cts. per 1b.

Coffee and Milk................ 30

Coffee Mills ................... 30

Coffins and Caskets, of any ma- terials and metal parts thereof 25

Coins, Silver Coins from the U.S. 20

Coins, Gold and Silver, except U.S. silver coins..............Free

Coir and Coir Yarn.............Free

Collars of linen, cotton, celluloid, xylonite, or xyolite....... 35

Collars, lace collars............. 35

Collodian ...................... 20

Cologne water, alcoholic per- fumes, and perfumed spirits, bay rum, and lavender waters, hair, tooth and skin washes and other toilet preparations containing spirits of any kind, when in bottles or flasks weigh- ing not more than 4 oz. ezch.. 50

When in bottles, flasks, or other packages weighing more than 4 oz. ezch. $2.40 per gal. and.............. 40

Combs, dress and toilet, all kinds 35

Combs, curry combs, as Sad- dlers' hardware .............. 30

Commercial blank forms........ 35

Communion Plate imported by and for use in Churches......Free

Composition Metal for the manu- f'cture of filled g'ld watch-cases. 10

Compasses and chronometers for ships......................Free

Composition Nails, Spikes and Sheathing Nails.............. 15

Composition Fuel, in blocks.... 20

Concentrated Lye............... 20

Condensed Coffee .............. 30

Condensed Milk. 3 1/4 cents per 1b.

Confectionery and Sugar Candy, 1/2c. per 1b. and................ 35

Copper, old and scrap in pigs, bars, rods, bolts, over six feet in length, ingots and sheathing not planished or coated, and copper seamless drawn tubing Free

Copper Wire................... 15

Copper Rollers, for use in calico printing, when imported by calico printers for use in their factory in the printing of calico and for no other purpose, such rollers not being manufactured in Canada. ...................Free

Copper, in sheets, not planished, polished, or coated...........Free

Copper Bath, finished .......... 30

Copper,all manufactures of,n.e.s. 30

Copper, precipitate of, crude ..Free

Copperas, Sulphate of Iron.....Free


{RIGHT SIDE COLUMN}

{Small design on the top right of column} c. ad val.

Cotton warps and cotton yarns, dyed or undyed, n.e.s... ..... 25

Cottons, Jeans and Coutilles and sateens for corset and dress stay makers, for use in their factories... ..... ............. 20

Cottons, manufactures of, n.e.s.. 35

Cotton Waste and Cotton Wool..Free

Cotton Seed Cake..............Free

Cow Hair, unmanufactured ....Free

Cow Hair manufactures,n.e.s... 20

Cracked Corn and Wheat ...... 20

Cranberries, plums and quinces 25

Crapes, black................... 20

Crocus, Composition.......... 25

Crocks, earthenware.............. 30

Crowbars ...................... 30

Cream of Tartar in Crystals....Free

Cream of Tartar, other, n.e.s.... 20

Crucibles of Plumbago or clay..Free

Cucumbers..................... 25

Cuffs, of Paper, Linen, Cotton, Celluloid, Xylonite or Xyolite 35

Cultivators and parts thereof... 20

Cups or other prizes won in bona fide competitions.......Free

Curry Cards and Combs......... 30

Curry Powders................ 25

Curling stones.................Free

Curtains,trimmed or untrimmed 35

Cutlery : carvers, knives and forks of steels, butcher and table steels, oyster, bread, kitchen,cooks', butcher, shoe, farrier, putty, hacking, and glaziers' knives, spatulas or palette knives, razors, erasers, or office knives, pen, pocket, prunning, sportsman and hunt- ers' knives, manicure flies, scissors, trimmers, and bar- bers', tailors' and lamp shears, horse and toilet clippers, and all like cutlery, plated or not, n.o.p... ..................... 30

Cut Flowers..................... 20


Damask of Cottom, or linen ........................ 30

Decalcomanie, or transfer pict's. 15c. per 1b.

Deer, (glove leather) tanned or dressed, colored or not colored 10

Deer Hair.......................Free

Degras........................Free

Degras and Oleo-Stearine.......Free

Dental and surgical instruments, and surgical needles (not being furniture).............Free

Diamonds, set.................. 30

Diamonds, unset, dust or bort, and black Diamonds for borers.Free

Diamond drills for prospecting for minerals, not to include motive power....................Free

Dice, Ivory or bone, fancy...... 35

{LEFT COLUMN}

n.e.s., including cutters, child- ren's carriages and sleds, and finished parts thereof, n.o.p.. 35

Farm & Freight Wagons,Carts, Drays and similar vehicles.... 25

Carriage Hardware ............ 30

Carriages of travellers, and Car- riages laden with merchandise, and not to include circus troupes or hawkers..........Free

Cash Boxes.................... 25

Casts, as models for the use of schoold of designs............Free

Catgut Strings, or Gut Cord for Musical Instruments..........Free

Catgut or Whipgut, unmanufact- tured .......................Free

Caustic Soda ..................Free

Cases, for jewels, watches, silver and plated ware, cutlery, and other like articles of any ma- terial ........................ 35

Celluloid, Xylonite or Xyolite, in sheets, lumps, balls, or blocks, in rough....................Free

Celluloid moulded into sizes for handles of knives and forks not bored or otherwise manf., also moulded celluloid balls and cylinders coated with tin- foil or not, but not finished or further manufactured, and celluloid lamp shade blanks. 10

Celluloid Collars and Cuffs..... 35

Cement, Hydraulic or Water- lime, Portland, in bags, barrels or casks, the weight of the package to be included in the weight for duty, 12 1/2c. per 100 1bs.

Chalk stone, china or Cornwall stone, feldspar, and cliff stone, ground or unground ........Free

Chalk, manufactured .......... 20

Chamomile Flowers............Free

Chamomile Flowers, powdered.. 20

Chamois Skins ................ 17 1/2

Charts, admiralty, Free. Other 20

Charcoal ..................... 20

Cheese, 3 cents per 1b.

Cheese Cloths, white .......... 25

coloured.................... 35

Cheques, also bank notes, cheques, bonds, promissory notes, bills of exchange, drafts and all similar work unsigned, and cards or other commercial blank forms orinted or litho- graphed, or printed from steel or copper or other plates, and other printed matter, n.e.s... 35

Cherry Trees, 3 cents each

Chewing Gum, if sweetened, 1/2c. per 1bs. and................... 35

Chewing Gum, not sweetened .. 20

Chicory, raw or green, 3c. per 1b.

Chicory, dried roasted or ground, 4 cents per 1b.

China Clay, natural or ground..Free

Chloralum or Choride of Alum.Free

China and Porcelain Ware..... 30



{MIDDLE COLUMN -LEFT SIDE}

the Governor in Council...... 15

Coal, and Coal Dust,Anthracite.Free

Coal, bituminous slack, such as will pass through a half inch screen, subject to regulations to be made by the controller of customs, 20 per cent., but not to exceed 13c. per ton of 2000 1bs.(being the equivalent of 15c. per ton of 2240 1bs.), provided that if the U.S. Con- gress fixes the duty on such slack coal at a rate not exceed- ing 15c. per ton of 2240 1bs., then the duty on such coal imported into Canada, as pro- vided in this item, shall be the minimum duty on such coal from all countries, notwith- standing section 17 of this Act.

Coal bituminous, round and run of mine, and coal n.e.s., 53c. per ton of 2000 1bs. (being the equivalent of 60c. per ton of 2240 1bs.), provided that if the U.S. Congress fixes the duty on such coal at a rate not ex- ceeding 40c. per ton of 2240 1bs., the Governor-in-Council may by proclamation reduce the duty mentioned in this item to 40c. per ton of 2240 1bs. or the equivalent thereof per ton of 2000 1bs., and the duty declared by such procla- mation shall then be the minimum duty on such coal from all countries, notwith- standing section 17 of this Act.

Coke..........................Free

Coal Tar and Coal Pitch.......Free

Cobalt, ore of.................Free

Cochineal......................Free

Cocoa Mats and Matting........ 25

Cocoanuts, imported from place of growth by vessel direct to a Canadian port....50c. per 100.

Cocoanuts, not imported direct, .............$1 per hundred.

Cocoa Paste and Chocolate Paste, Cocoas and Cocoa Butter, 4c. per. 1b.

Cocoa Shells and Nibs, Chocolate and other preparations of cocoa........................ 20

Cocoanut, dessicated, sweetened or not, 5 cents per pound......

Cocoa Beans, not roasted, crushed or ground ..........Free

Coffee, Green, n.e.s............10

Coffee, Green, imported direct from the country of growth and production, or purchased in bond in the United King- dom, such as might be entered for home consumption in the United Kingdom............

Coffee roasted or ground, when not imported direct from the country of growth and produc- tion, 2c. per 1b. and .......... 10


{MIDDLE COLUMN -RIGHT SIDE}


Copy Books.................... 35

Copying Presses .............. 30

Cords and Tassels of silk or any other material............... 35

Cordage of all kinds........... 25

Cordials (see Spirituous Liquors)

Corduroy, white............... 25

colored.............. 35

Corn, Indian, n.e.s.............Free

Corn, Indian, for purposes of dis- tillation,subject to regulations to be approved by the Gover- nor in Council, 7 1/2c. per bush.

Cornmeal, including the duty on the barrel........25c. per bbl.

Corks and manufactures of Cork- wood or Cork-bark ........... 20

Cork-wood or bark, unmanufa..Free

Corkscrews and Cork Drawers.. 30

Cornice Poles .................. 30

Corsets ......................... 35

Corset clasps, busks, blanks and steels, and corset wires, tipped or untipped .................. 35

Cottolene, sub. for lard, 2c. p. 1b.

Cotton, raw ....................Free

Cotton covered Wire............ 30

Cotton Seed in bulk............ 10

Cotton Duck, grey or white,n.e.s. 22 1/2

Cotton Quilts.................. 30

Cotton Belting ................. 20

Cotton and Jute Tapestry...... 35

Cotton and Linen Damasks..... 30

Cottons, grey or unbleached, fabrics...................... 25

Cotton fabrics, white or bleached 25

Cottons, Fabrics, printed, dyed, or colored.................... 35

Cotton, Linen and Silk Clothing, Corsets and other articles made from cotton fabrics .... 35

Cotton Handkerchiefs,printed or plain......................... 35

Cotton or linen shirts, cotton undershirts and drawers, knitted, and shirts of NY material, ladies' and misses' blouses and shirt waists..... 35

Cotton warps and cotton yarns, dyed or undyed, n.e.s......... 25

Cotton Yarns, number forty and finer.........................Free

Cotton Lamp Wicks ............ 25

Cotton or Linen Collars.......... 35

Cotton Parasols and Umbrellas.. 35

Cotton Prunella...............Free

Cotton Pillow Cases ............ 35

Cotton seamless bags........... 20

Cotton sewing thread, and crochet cotton on spools or in balls.... 25

Cotton thread, all other, n.e.s .. 25

Cotton Twine .................. 25

Cotton Towels and shawls ...... 30

Cotton Velveteens, Cotton Vel- vets and Cotton Plush......... 30

Cotton Fire Hose, lines with rubber......................... 35

Cotton wadding, batting, batts dyed or not.................. 25



{RIGHT COLUMN}


Dogs .................... 20

Doors, for safes and vaults, of iron or steel.................... 30

Dragon's Blood ................Free

Drain tiles, not glazed.......... 20

Drain pipes,sewerpipes, chimney linings or vents, and inverted blocks glazed or unglazed, and earthenware tiles ............ 35

Draughts and Chessmen of Ivory or bone, fancy ............... 35

Drawing Paper, mounted ...... 30

Drawings, n.e.s. .............. 20

Dried Flowers ................. 25

Dried Roots, n.e.s..............Free

Dried Vegetables............... 25

Druggets(dyed cotton).......... 35

Drugs, in a crude state, used in dyeing or tanning............Free

Dryers, Japan 20c. per gal. and. 20

Dualin, Dynamite, Giant Powder and Nitro, 3c. per 1b.

Duck, cotton, grey or white, n.e.s........................... 22 1/2

Duck, for belting and hose, when imported by mfrs. of rubber goods for use in their factories.Free

Dutch Metal or bronze ......... 25

Dye Wood, ground logwood and fustic .......................Free

Dyes, patent prepared...... ..Free

Dyes, Aniline, and coal tar dyes, in bulk or packages of not less than 1 lb. weight, including alizarine and artificial aliza- rine ....................Free

Dyes,Aniline,n.e.s.,less than 1lb. 20

Dye, jet black.................Free

Dyeing or Tanning Articles in a crude state, used in dyeing or tanning, n.e.s................Free


Earth Closets.............. 30

Earthenware Tiles............. 35

Earthware Drain Tiles, not glazed....................... 20

Earthenware and Stoneware Demijohns or Jugs, Churns and Crocks.................. 30

Earthenware and Stoneware, brown or col'd, and Rocking- ham ware, white granite, or iron stoneware and C.C ware, decorated, printed or sponged, and all earthenware n.e.s..... 30

Eggs. .............3c. per doz.

Elastic Rubber Thread .......Free

Electric and Galvanic Batteries. 25

Electric Lights, apparatus, parts of, when imported separately. 25

Electro-plated Ware, wholly or in part electro or gilt ........ 30

Electrotypes, Stereotypes, and celluloids of newspaper columns, in any language other than French and Eng- lish, and of books and bases, and matrices and copper shells for the same, whether composed wholly or in past of metal or celluloid..........Free

CANADIAN TARIFF OF CUSTOMS (Continued)

{LEFT COLUMN}


{Small design on top right side of column} c. ad val.


Electrotypes, Stereotypes, and celluloids for almanacs, calen- dars, illustrated pamphlets, newpaper adavertisements or engravings, and all other like work for commercial, trade or other purposes, n.e.s. ; and matrices or copper shells of the same, 1 1/2c. per sq. inch.

Electrotypes,Stereotypes,andcel- luloids of newspaper columns, and bases for the same, com- posed wholly or partly of metal or celluloid, 1/4c. per sq. in.,and matrices or copper shells of the same, 1 1/2c. per sq. inch.

Embalming Boards ............ 30

Embossed Paper, extra heavy, for cracked and damaged walls 35

Embroideries, n.e.s.............. 35

Embroideries, white cotton..... 25

Emeryin bulk, crushed or ground Free

Emery and Sand Paper......... 25

Emery Wheels ................ 25

Enamelled Iron Hollow-ware.... 30

Engines, Locomotives.......... 35

Engines, Fire.................. 35

Engines, Fire, Chemical........ 35

Engines, steam, of ships or other vessels built in any foreign country, etc .................. 25

Engines, all others, and boilers, n.e.s.......................... 25

Engravings and Prints.......... 20

Enthomology,specimens of .......Free

Envelopes, paper, of all kinds... 35

Ergot...........................Free

Esparto, or Spanish Grass, and other grasses and pulp of, in- cludingfancy grasses,dried,but not colored or otherwise mf'd.Free

Essences or Extracts, mixed with spirits......$2.40 per I.G., and 30

Essential Oils............ .... 10

Ether, Sulphuric............... 25

Excelsior for Upholsterer's use.. 25

Extract of Logwood,fustic, oak, and of oak bark ............Free

Extract of Malt, for medicinal and baking purposes, n.e.s.... 25

Extract of Fluid Beef, not medi- cated, and soups............ 25

Eyelets of Brass, Shoe..........Free

Eye glasses,finished............ 30

Eye glasses, unfinished, and metal parts thereof............ 20


Fancy Grasses,dried,but not colored nor otherwise mf'd....Free

Fancy workboxes, writing desks, glove - boxes, handkerchief boxes, manicure cases, per- fume cases, toilet cases and fancy cases for smokers' sets, and all similar fancy articles made of bone, shell, horn,


{MIDDLE COLUMN - LEFT SIDE}

{Small design on the top right side of column} c. ad val.

Anchovies and Sardines, pack- ed in oil or otherwise, in tin boxes, measuring not more than 5 in. long, 4 in. wide, and 3 1/2 in.deep..5c. per box.

In half boxes, measuring not more than 5 in. long, 4 in. wide, and 1 5/8 deep, 2 1/2c. per half box.

In quarter boxes, measuring not more than 4 3/4 in. long, 3 1/2 in. wide, and 1 1/4 deep, 2c. per quarter box

Imported in any other form... 30

Fish preserved in oil, except Anchovies and Sardines ... 30

Salmon and all other fish pre- pared or preserved, includ- ing oysters, n.e.s........... 25

Oysters shelled in bulk, 10 cents per gal.

Oysters, canned, in cans not over one pint, 3 cents per can,including the cans.

Oysters in cans, over one pint and not over one quart, 5c per can including cans.

Oysters in cans exceeding one qt., 5c. for each qt. or franc- tion of a qt., including the cans, 5c. per quart.

Oysters in the shell .. ....... 25

Oysters--Seed and Breeding imported for the purpose of being planted in Canadian waters......................Free

Packsges containing Oysters or other Fish, not otherwise provided for ............... 25

Oils, spermaceti, whale and other fish oils, and all other articlles the produce of the fisheries,n.e.s.............. 20

Fish hooks, for deep sea or lake fishing, not smaller in size than number 2 0 ; bank, cod, pollock and mackerel fish lines ; and mackerel,herring,salmon, seal, seine, mullet, net and trawl twine in hanks or coil, barked or not,--in variety of sizes and threads,--including gilling thread in balls, and head ropes, barked marline, and net morsels of cotton, hemp or flax, and deeo sea fishing nets or seines, when used exclusively for the fish- eries,and not to include hooks, lines or nets commonly used for sportsmen's purposes.....Free

Trawls, trawling spoons, fly hooks, sinkers, swivels, and sportsmen's fishing bait, and fish hooks, n.e.s.............. 30

Fish Hooks, n.e.s.............. 30


{MIDDLE COLUMN - RIGHT SIDE}


{Small design on the top right corner of the column} c. ad val.

Gooseberries, Raspberries, Strawberries, Cherries, and Currants. The weight of the package to be included in the weight for duty,2c.per1b.n.e.s.

Fruits in air-tight cans or other packages. The weight of the cans or packages to beincluded in the weight for duty, 2 1/4 cts. per 1b.

Fruits preserved in brandy and other spirits.....$2.00 per I.G.

Fuller's Earth, in bulk..........Free

Fuller's Earth, prepared........ 30

Furniture, of wood, iron or any other material, for house, cabinet or office,fin.or in parts, including hair and spring and other mattresses, bolsters and pillows ........................ 30

Fur Skins, of all kinds, not dressed in any manner........Free

Fur Skins, wholly or partially dressed, n.e.s.................. 15

Fur hats, caps, muffs, tippets, capes, coats, cloaks and other manufactures of fur.......... 30


Galvanized Nails and Spikes,wrought and pressed. 30

Galvanized sheet iron, number 17 gauge and thinner......... 5

Galvanic Batteries............. 25

Game........................... 20

Gannister .....................Free

Gas and Coal Oil, or Kerosene Fixtures, or parts thereof .... 30

Gas Coke......................Free

Gas Meters ..................... 35

Gas, for dentists and others..... 20

Gelatine ...................... 25

Gentian and Giseng Root......Free

German spirits of nnitrous ether (sweet nitre),$2.40 per imperial gallon, and.................. 30

German and Nickel Silver, manu- factures of, not planted......... 25

German and Nickel Silver, plated n.e.s......................... 30

German Silver, and Silver in sheets, ingots, blocks, bars, strips or plates, unmanufac- tured .........................Free

Giant powder, dualin, dynamite and other explosives 3c. per lb.

Gilling Twine, imported for the use of the fisheries.. ........Free

Gilling Twines, linen thread.... 25

Gilt ware, of all kinds.......... 30

Gin. See Spirituous Liquors.

Ginger, Preserved.............. 30

Glacier, window decorations,15c. per lb.

Glass, ornamented, figured, and enamelled colored glass; paint- ed and vitrified glass ; figured,



{RIGHT COLUMN}

{Small design on the top of the column} c. ad val.

of, n.e.s .................... 30

Gongs for doors, as bells. ...... 30

Gooseberry bushes.............. 20

Grafting Stock. (See Seeding Stock) ..................Free

Grape Vines........................Free

Grain, of all kinds when dam- aged by water in transitu (on appraised value) ............ 20

Granite Ware, Enamelled Iron Ware ..... ................ 35

Grass, Manilla and Sea Grass...Free

Grass, manufactures of, n.e.s.... 20

Gravels ........................Free

Grease, Axle........ ......... 25

Grease, Foot, refuse of cotton seed after oil is pressed out, but not when treated by alka- lies .......................Free

Grease, other, n.e.s.. ....... .. 20

Grindstones, not mounted, and not less than 36 inches in diameter...................... 15

Grindstones, n.e.s.............. 25

Grindstone Fixtures............ 30

Guano, and other animal and vegetable manures ..........Free

Gums,Amber,Arabic,Australian, Elemy Copal, Damar, Kaurie Mastic, Sandarac, Senegal, and Shellac ; and White Shellac in gum or flake, for manufactur- ing purposes ; and Gum Tra- gacanth, Gum Gedda and Gum Barberry ...................Free

Gum, British, Dextrine, Sizing Cream and Enamel Sizing... 10

Gum,sappato and chicle, crude.Free

Gum Opium, powdered, $1.35 per lb.

Gum Opium, prepared for smok- ing, $5 per lb.

Gum, opium (drug), $1 per lb.

Gums, Assafoetida, Camphor and others in a crude state, n.e.s..Free

Gunpowder, Gun,Rifle,Sporting, Cannon and Musket, Canister, 3c. per lb.

Gunpowder, blasting and min- ing, 2 cents per lb.

Guns,Rifles and Muskets ...... 30

Gut and Worm Gut, manufac- tured or unmanufactured, for whip and other cord..........Free

Gutta Percha clothing or cloth- ing made waterproof with Gutta Percha................ 35

Gutta Percha, crude ..........Free

Gutta Percha, manf. of......... 25

Gypsum,crude (sulphate of lime)Free


Hair,cleaned or uncleaned, but not curled or otherwise manu-

{LEFT COLUMN}


ivory, wood, leather, plush, satin, silk, satinette, or paper ; dolls and toys of all kinds, and toy whips, ornaments of alabaster, spar, amber, terra cotta or composition statu- ettes and bead ornaments n.e.s............. ....... 35

Fans, to be rated accor. to mat.

Farina ............. 1 1/2c. per lb.

Fashion plates, tailors', milliners' and mantle makers'...........Free

Featherbone, plain or covered, in coils................... 20

Feathers, Undressed ........... 20

Feathers, n.e.s................ 30

Feather Beds, Bolsters and Pillows..................... 30

Felt, pressed of all kinds, not filled or covered by or with any woven fabrics............ 20

Felt, adhesive, for sheathing vessels......................Free

Felt, printed as carpets......... 35

Felt, Roofing, tarred or coated 25

Felt, Roofing, not tarred ........ 25

Felth Cloth, n.e.s............... 35

Ferro - manganese and Ferro- silicon ...................... 5

Fertilizers, Compounded or Manufactured..... ......... 10

Fibre,Mexican,Tampico or Istle.Free

Fibre Ware,indurated fibre ware, vulcanized fibre ware and all articles of like material .... . 25

Fibre, vegetable...........Free

Fibrilla...................Free

Filberts.......... 2 cents per lb.

Files and Rasps............ .... 30

Fillets of Cotton and Rubber not exceeding 7 inches wide, for manufactures, or for manu- facturing purposes...........Free

Fire brick, n.e.s................ 20

Fire Clay gas logs.............. 20

Fire Clay gas retorts ........... 20

Fire Clay crucibles.............Free

Fire Clay ...................Free

Fire Hose, of cotton or linen, lined with rubber, or of rubber 35

Fire Dogs, iron ................ 30

Fish Skins and find offal......Free

Fish.--Mackerel, fresh, 1c. p. lb. Herrings, Pickled or Salted, 1/2 cent. per lb.

Salmon ,Fresh,n.e.s.,1/2c. per lb.

All other Fish, pickled or salt- ed, in bbls.......1c. per lb.

Foreign caught fish, imported otherwise than in bbls. or half bbls., whether fresh, dried, salted or pickled, n.e.s , 50 cents per 100 lbs.

Smoked and Boneless Fish, 1 cent. per lb.


{MIDDLE COLUMN - LEFT SIDE}


Fish Nets, sportsmen's.......... 30

Fishing Rods.................. 30

Fishing Hooks, with Flies...... 30

Flagstones, dressed ............. 20

Flagstones, not hammered or chiselled.................. 15

Flannels, of every description, n.e.s. (wool).................. 35

Flax, fibre ....................Free

Flax, tow of..................Free

Flax Seed .....................Free

Flax Sail Twine................ 5

Flax, manufactures of, n.e.s.... 25

Flint, flints and ground flint stones ....................Free

Floor Earthenware Tiles ...... 35

Florist Stock, viz., palms, bulbs, corms, tubers, rhizomes, aru- caria, spirea, and lilies of the valley ......................Free

Flour, Buckwheat or Meal, 1/4c. per lb.

Flour, of Corn ....... 1 1/2c. per lb.

Flour of Rye, 50c. per bbl., in- cluding the duty on the bbl.

Flour of Rice or Sago .......... 25

Fluting Machine, Iron.......... 30

Fly Paper...................... 35

Fly books and parts thereof, n.o.p............................ 30

Fog Signals, detonating....... 30

Folding Machine'.............. 10

Folia Digitalis...............Free

Food, Milk, and all similar prep. 30

Foot Grease, refuse of cotton seed, but not when treated with alkalies ................Free

Forks, knife blades or blanks, table, cast iron, in the rough, not handled nor ground, or otherwise further manufac- tured ....................... 10

Fossils..........................Free

Fowls, domestic, pure bred, also Homing or messenger pigeons, pheasants and quails for im- provement of stock ..........Free

Fowls, other ................. 20

Frames, Clasps and Fasteners, for purses and chatelaine bags or reticules, not more than 7 inches in diameter, when im- ported by the manufacturers of same in their factories..... 20

Fringes...................... 35

Fruits Syrups, Lime-juice, and fruit juices, n.o.p ........... 20

Fruits dried, dessicated, or evap- and Prunes, 1ct. per lb.

Fruits, Bananas, plantains, pine- apples pomegranates, guavas, manges, and shaddocks ; wild blueberries, strawberries, and raspberries and trees, n.e.s...Free

Fruits,green, Grapes, 2c. per lb.

Fruits, Green, Blackberries,


{MIDDLE COLUMN - RIGHT SIDE}


enamelled and obscured white glass ; and rough rolled plate glass ........................ 30

Glass Stained Windows . ...... 30

Glass, Carboys and Demijohns, empty or filled bottles and de- canters, flasks and phials .. 30

Glass Jars and Glass Balls, Lamp Chimneys, Glass Shades or Globes, cut, pressed or mould- ed, Crystal or Glass Table- ware, decorated or not, and Blown Glass Tableware....... 30

Glass, Lamps, Gas and Electric Light Shades, LampsandLamp Chimneys, side lights and head lights, Globes for Lanterns, Lamps,Gas and Electric Lights, n.e.s ....................... 30

Glass bulbs for electric lights... 10

Glass, common and colorless window glass ; and plain color- ed, stained, tinted or muffled glass in sheets................. 20

Glass,imitation porcelain shades, and colored glass shades, figured, painted, enamelled or engraved................... 30

Glass and emery paper, sand and flint paper................... 25

Glass, plate, not bevelled, in sheets or panes, not exceeding 25 square ft. each, n.o.p..... 25

Glass, plate, not bevelled, in sheets or panes, n.e.s......... 35

Glass, plate, bevelled, in sheets or panes, n.o.p............... 35

Glass, German looing glass, un- silvered or for silvering...... 20

Glass, silvered, bevelled or not, and framed or not............ 35

Glass, all other, and manufac- tures of, n.o.p.,including bent plate glass .................. 20

Glazier' hacking and putty knives....................... 30

Gloves and Mitts, of all kinds.. 35

Glove fasteners, metal..........Free

Glue, sheet, broken sheet and ground ...................... 25

Glue, liquid ................... 25

Glucose and Glucose Syrup, 3/4c. per lb.

Glycerine.................... 20

Glycerine, when imported by the manufacturers of explosives, for use in the manufacture thereof in their own factories. 10

Goat Hair, unmanufactured....Free

Gold Beaters' moulds and skins Free

Gold Laces, Gold and Silver Cloth or Thread.............. 30

Gold and Silver Bullion, in Bars, Blocks or Ingots, and Bullion Fringe ......................Free

Gold and Silver Ware, plated, n.e.s........................ 30

Gold Medals ................... 30

Gold and Silver leaf, and Dutch or schlag metal leaf.......... 25

Gold and Silver, manufactures


{RIGHT COLUMN}


factured ......................Free

Hair brush pads...............Free

Hair,horsehair, not further man- ufactured than simply cleaned and dipped, or dyed, imported by manufacturers of haircloth for use in the manufacture of such articles in their own factories.....................Free

Hair, curled .................... 20

Hair Cloth of all kinds ........... 30

Hair Mattresses................ 30

Hair, manufactures of, n.e.s.... 35

Hair Oils, Pomatums and Pastes, and all other perfumed prep- arations used for the hair, mouth and skin............... 30

Hair Pins and pins manufactured from any metal.............. 30

Hammers,Blacksmith Hammers. 30

Hammers, other, n.e.s........... 30

Hammocks and lawn tennis nets and other like articles manu- factured or twine, n.e.s ...... 30

Hams, salted, dried or smoked, and meats, n.e.s., 2cts. per lb.

Harness and saddlery of every description, and parts of same 30

Hatchets, nn.e.s................ 30

Hat Boxes .................. 30

Hats, caps and bonnets, n.e.s.... 30

Hatters'bands,bindings,tips and sides, linings, both tips and sides, hat sweats, when im- ported by hat manufacturers for use in their factories in the manufacture of hats.............Free

Hatters' plush, of silk or cotton, and furs, not on the skin.....Free

Hay..............$2 per ton.

Hemlock, Bark, crude.........Free

Hemp Paper, made on four- cylinder machines and calen- dered to between .006 and .008 inch thickness, for manufac- ture of shot shells, primers for the manufacture of shot shells and cartridges and felt board, uncovered with paper or ture of gun-wads, when such articles are imported by the manufacturers of shot shells, cartridges, and gun-wads to be used for these purposes only in their own factories ; until such time as the said articles are manufactured in Canada ; provided always that the said articles when imported shall be entered only at such port or ports as may be named by the Controller of Customs and at no other place ........Free

Hemp undressed .............Free

Hemp, manufactures of, n.e.s... 25

Hickory Spokes, rough turned, not tenoned, mitred, throat- ed, faced, sized, cut to length, round tenoned or polished ..Free

CANADIAN TARIFF OF CUSTOMS (Continued)

{LEFT COLUMN}

{Small design on the top right side}c. ad val.


Hides, raw whether dried, salted or picked ..................Free

Hob Nails ..................... 30

Hoes ......................... 25

Holly.......................... 20

Hominy, in bbls, 25 cts. per bbl.

Honey, in the comb or other- wise, and adulterations and imi- tations thereof ..3 cts. per lb.

Hoofs, horns and horns tips ....Free

Hoop Skirts & similar goods,n.e.s. 35

Hops, 6 cents per lb.

Hop extract and hop roots ..... 20

Horn Strips ....................Free

Horse clothing, shaped, n.o.p .. 35

Horse clothing of jute, shaped or otherwise manufactured..... 30

Horses, n.e.s................... 20

Hosiery, of Silk................ 35

House Furnishing Hardware, rated according to material.

Hubs, rough hewn or sawn only.Free

Hymn Books ....................Free

Hydrants, Valves and Watergates (iron).................... 30


Ice...........................Free

Ice Boxes..................... 30

Illuminating Oils, composed wholly or in part of the pro- ducts of petroleum, coal, shale or lignite, costing more than 30c. per gal ......... ....... 25

Incense.................... 20

Indian Corn, n.e.s................Free

Indian Corn, for purposes of dis- tillatio, 7 1/2 cents per bush.

Indian Corn Meal, 25c. per bbl.

IndianCorn and Corn Meal, when damaged by water in transitu on appraised value ........... 20

India Rubber Boots and Shoes and other manufactures of India Rubber, n.e.s .......... 25

India Rubber Clothing, or cloth- ing made waterproof with India Rubber, n.e.s ........... 35

India Rubber Hose, Belting, Packing, Mats and Matting, and Cotton, and Linen Hose, lined with rubber.............. 35

India Rubber, unmanufactured.Free

India Rubber, Crude and Hard Rubber in sheets, but not fur- ther manufactured, and re- covered Rubber and Rubber substitute ....................Free

Indigo .....................Free

Indigo Auxiliary or Zinc Dust ..Free

Indigo Paste and Extract of....Free

Infants' Food, all kinds......... 30

Ink, for writing................ 20

Ink, for printing .............. 20

Instands, n.e.s.... ........... 30

Insect Powder, n.e.s............. 20

Insulators of all kinds.......... 25


{MIDDLE COLUMN - LEFT SIDE}


{Small design on the top right of the column} c. ad val.

Bowls for Cream Separators, steel .....................Free

Bridge plates of steel, univer- sal mill or rolled edge, when imported by manufacturers of bridges ................. 10

Bridges, iron and steel, or parts thereof, iron or steel structural work, columns, shapes or sections, drilled, punched, or in any further stage of manufacture than as rolled or cast, n.e.s....... 35

Canada plates................. 5

Cast Iron Stoves of all kinds, oil,gas,coal or wood, Plates, Stove Plates and Irons,Sad Irons,Hatters' Irons, Tailors' Irons.................... 25

Castings, other, n.e.s., iron or steel in the rough.......... 25

Chain Traces, iron............ 30

Chains, coil chain. coil chain links, and chain shackles, of iron or steel, 5/16 of an inch in diameter and over....... 5

Chains, other, n.e.s. ......... 30

Chrome steel................... 15

Clock Springs................ 25

Crowbars.................... 30

Crucible cast steel wire......Free

Crucible Sheet Steel, 11 to 16 gauge, 2 1/2 to 18 in. wide, when imported by manufac- turers of mower and reaper knives for the manufacture of such knives in their own factories...................Free

Engines, Locomotive........ 35

Engines, Steam Engines, boil- ers, ore crushers and rock crushers, stamp mills, Cor- nish and belted rolls, rock drills,air compressors,cranes, derricks, percussion coal cut- ters, pumps, n.e.s., wind- mills, horse-powers, portable engines, threshers, separa- tors, foddler or feed cutters, potato diggers, grain crush- ers, fanning mills, hay ted- ders, farm wagons, slot ma- chines and type writers, and all machinery composed wholly or in part of iron or steel, n.o.p.................. 25

Fencing, Buckthorn and Strip, iron or steel, and woven wire fencing ..................... 15

Ferro-silicon,ferro-manganese, and spiegeleisen........... 15

Files and Rasps, n.e.s.......... 30

Files, Steel, for the manufac- ture of, when imported by file manufacturers for use in their factories...........Free


{MIDDLE COLUMN -RIGHT SIDE}


{Small design on the top right column} c. ad val.

for use in the construction of ships or vessels............Free

Iron or steel fittings for iron or steel pipe, of every descrip- tion, and chilled iron or steel rolls........................ 30

Iron or steel ingots, cogged ingots, blooms,slabs, billets, puddled bars, and loops or other forms, n. o. p., less finished than iron or steel bars, but more advanced than pig iron, except cast- ings, $2 per ton.

Iron or steel railway bars or rails of any form, punched or not punched, n.e.s., for railways, which term for the purposes of this item shall include all kinds of railways, street railways and tram- ways, even although the same are used for private purposes only, and even al- though they are not used or intended to be used in con- nection with the business of common carrying of goods or passengers ................ 30

Iron or steel scrap, wrought, being waste or refuse, in- cluding punchings, cuttings or clippings of iron or steel plates or sheets having been in actual use; crop ends of tin plate bars, or of blooms, or of rails, the same not having been in actual use $1 perton. Nothing shall be deemed scrap iron or scrap steel ex- cept waste or refuse iron or steel fit only to be re-manu- factured in rolling mills.

Iron, wrought iron or steel nuts and washers, iron or steel rivets, bolts with or without threads, nut and bolt and hinge blanks, n.e.s. and T and strap hinges, 3/4c. per lb.and................. 25

Knife Blades or Knife Blanks in the rough............... 10

Knives, Reapers and Mowers' Knnives................... 30

Locomotive and Car Wheel Tires of Steel, in the rough.Free

Manufactured articles of iron, brass or steel which at the time of their importation are of a class or kind not manufactured in Canada, imported for use in the con- struction or equipment of ships or vessels.............Free

Manufactures, Articles, or


{RIGHT COLUMN}


{Small design on the top right column} c. ad val.


Picks, mattocks, adzes, hatch- ets, and eyes or poles for same, and tools of all des- criptions, n.e.s..........30

Pipes, cast iron of every des- cription, $8 per ton.

Planing Mills and parts of, in any stage of manufacture... 25

Plates, Scraper Plates........ 30

Plates engraved on steel....... 20

Plates, Steel Plates, not less than 30 inches wide and not less than 1/4 of an inch thick. 10


Plough Plate, mould boards, and land sides, and other plates for agriculture im- plements, when cut to shape from rolled plates of steel, but not moulded, puched, polished or otherwise manu- factured................... 5

Puddled Bars, $2 per ton.

Rolled iron or steel sheets No. 17gauge, anf thinner, n.o.p.; Canada plates ; Russia iron ; flat galvanized iron or steel sheets, terne plate, and rolled sheets of iron or steel coated with zinc, spelter or other metal, of all widths or thicknesses, n.o.p., and rolled iron or steel hoop, band, scroll or strip, thinner than No. 18 gauge, n.e.s.... 5

Rolled iron or steel sheets or plates, sheared or unsheard, and skelp iron or steel, sheared or rolled in grooves, n.e.s., $7.00 per ton.

Rolled iron tubes, not welded, under 1 1/2 inch in diameter, Angle Iron, 9 and 10 gauge, not over 1 1/2 inch wide, Iron Tubing, lacquered or brass covered, not over 1 1/2 inch dia- meter, all of which are to be cut to lengths for the manu- facture of bedsteads, and brass trimmings for bed- steads, and to be used for no other purpose; when import- ed for the manufacturers of iron bedsteads,to be used for these purposes only, in their own factories, until such time as any manufactured in Canada....................Free

Rolled round wire rods in the coil, of iron or steel, not iver three-eights of an inch in diameter, when imported by wire manufacturers for use in making wire in the coil, in their own factories.......Free

Rope, Raw Hide, as Belting,

Iodine, crude.................Free

Iodine, resublimed..............20

Iris, Orris Root.................Free

Isinglass...................... 25

Iron Sand or Globules and Dry Putty, for polishing granite ..Free

Iron Liquor, solution of acetate of iron for dyeing and calico printing ....................Free

Iron, Oxide of, dry ....... ...... 25

IRON & STEEL & MANUFAC. OF:--

Adzes .......................... 30

Anchors .................. ,Free

Angles, rolled iron or steel angles, tees, beams, chan- nels,girders,and other rolled shapes or sections, weighing less than 35 lbs. per lineal yard, not punched, drilled or furthur manufactured than rolled, n.o.p., $7.00 per ton.

Angles, rolled iron or steel an- gles, tees, beams,channel, joists, girders,zees, stars, or other rolled shapes, or trough, bridge, building or structural rolled sections or shapes, not punched, drilled or furthur manufactured than rolled, n.e.s., and flat eyebar blanks not punched or drilled ........................ 10

Angles for iron or composite ships or vessels......................Free

Axes, scythes, sickles or reap- ing hooksm hay or straw knives, hoes, rakes, pronged forks, snaths, farms, road or field rollers, post-hole dig- gers and other agricultural implements, n.e.s............. 25

Adzes, Hatchets, and Ham- mers, n.e.s...................... 30

Axles, springs and parts there- of,axle bars and axle blanks of iron or steel, for railway or tramway or other vehi- cles, not elsewhere specified. 35

Balances........................ 30

Bars, Crowbars ................ 30

Bar Iron or steel,rolled,wheth- er in coils, rods, bars, or bundles, comprising rounds, ovals, squares, n.o.p.; and rolled iron or steel hoop, band, scroll or strip, eight inches or less in width, No. 18 gauge or thicker, n.e.s., $7 per ton.

Barbed Wire Fencing of iron or steel,and buckthorn strip fencing........................... 15

Boiler tubes of wrought iron or steel, including corrugated tubes or flues for marine boilers.......................... 5

Bolts with or without threads or nuts, and bolt blanks, washers and rivets, T and strap hinges, 3/4c. per lb. and 25


{MIDDLE COLUMN -LEFT SIDE}


Fire Engines and fire extin- guishing machines,including sprinklers for fire protection. 35

Fish Plates, Railw'y Fish Plates and steel axle, steel billets imported by manufacturers of carriage springs and car- riage axles for use exclusive- ly in the manufacture of springs and axles for carri- ages or vehicles other than railway or tramway, in their own factories..............Free

Flat steel wire, of No. 16 gauge or thinner, when imported by the manufacturers of crino- line or corset wire and dress stays, for use in the manu- facture of such articles in their own factories..........Free

Forgings or iron and steel, of whatever shape or size, or in whatever stage of manufac- ture, n.e.s., and steel shaft- ing, turned, compressed or polished,and hammered iron or steel bars or shapes, n.o.p. 30

Forks, table, cast iron, and knife blades or blanks, not handled nor ground or other- wise further manufactured.. 10

Furniture of any material.... 30

Galvanized iron or steel wire, No. 9, 12 and 13 gauge, after January 1st, 1898..........Free

Garden Rakes, Hay Knives, Scythes,Rakes,n.e.s.,prong- ed Forks of all kinds and hoes.......................... 25

Hinges, T and strap, and Hinge Blank, 3/4c. per lb. and...... 25

Hollow-ware, agate, granite or enamelled iron or steel hol- low-ware................... 35

Hollow-ware, enamelled iron or steel ware, n.e.s; plain, black, tinned or coated, and nickel and aluminum kitchen or household hollow-ware, n.e.s........................... 0

Horse Shoes, and horse shoe nails............. ........ 30

Hoop Iron,not exceeding three eights of an inch in width and being No. 25 gauge or thinner, used for the manu- facture of tubular rivets.. Free

Iron and manufactures of, or part iron or part steel, n.e.s. 30

Iron in pigs, iron kentledge, and cast scrap iron, $2.50 per ton.

Iron Mastsfor ships, or parts of Free

Iron or Steel Bems, Sheets, Plates, Angles and Knees, for iron or composite ships or vessels ; and iron,steel or brass manufacture of a class not manufactured in Canada,


{MIDDLE COLUMN - RIGHT SIDE}


Wares not specially enumer- ated or provided for, com- posed wholly or in part of iron or steel, and whether partly or wholly manufact'd. 30

Mattocks .................... 30

Mining, sinelting and reducing machinery, viz.,coal cutting machines except percussion coal cutters, coal heading machines, coal augers and rotary coal drills, core drills, miners' safety lamps, coal washing machinery, coke- making machinery, ore dry- ing machinery, ore roasting machinery, electric or mag- netic machines for separat- ing or concentrating irom ores, blast furnace water jackets, converters for metal- lurgical process in iron or copper, briquette making machines, ball and rock emery grinding machines, copper plates, plated or not, machinery for extraction of precious metals by the chlor ination or cyanide processes monitors, giants and eleva- tors for hydraulic mining, amalgam safes, automatic ore samplers,automatic feed- ers, jigs, classifiers, separa- tors, retorts, buddles, van- ners, mercury pumps, pyro- meters, bullion furnances, amalegam cleaners, gold min- ing slime tables, blast furnace blowing engines, wrought iron tubing, butt or lap welded, threaded or coupled or not, not less than 2 1/2 inches diameter, when imported for use exclusively in mining, smelting, redu- ing or refining.............Free

Nails and Spikes, wrought and pressed, Horseshoe Nails, trunk, clout, coppers', cigar box, Hungarian, and all other Wrought Nails, n.e.s., and Horse,Mule or Ox Shoes. 30

Nails, cut Nails and Spikes of iron or steel, including rail- road spikes, 1/2c. per lb.

Nails Rods, Swedish rolled iron, under 1/2 in. in diameter, for the manufacture of horse shoe nails and Swedish rolled steel rods, under 1/2 in. in diameter............... 15

Nails, composition, spikes and sheathing nails.............. 15

Nails, wire, of all kinds, n.o.p. 3/5c. per lb.

Name Plates, enamelled...... 30

Needles, steel, viz, Cylinder Needles, Hand Frame Need- les and Latch Needles, and needles of any material or kind 30


{RIGHT SIDE COLUMN}


being so used .............. 20

Safes, doors for safes and vaults, scales, balances and weighing beams of iron or steel ...................... 30

Saws of all kinds........ .. 30

Scrap iron and scrap steel,old, and fit only to be re-manufac- tured, being part of or re covered from any vessel wrecked in waters subject to the jurisdiction of Canada..Free

Screws, commonly called Wood Screws, of iron or stee;, brass, or other metal, in- cluding lag or coach screws, plated or not, and machine or other screws, n.o.p....... 35

Scythes.................... 25

Sheet Iron, common or black, No.17 gauge and thinner... 5

Sheet Iron Signs............ 30

Sheet Iron. (See iron or steel sheets, etc.)

Sheet Iron, for iron or compo- site ships....................Free

Sheets, Crucible Sheets, steel, 11 to 16 gauge,2 1/2 to 18 inches wide, imported by manufac- turers of mower and reaper knives for manufacture of such knives in their own fac- tories......................Free

Shoes, horse, mule and ox shoes...................... 30

Shovels and spades, shovel and spade blanks, and iron or steel cut to shape for same. 35

Skates, of all kinds............ 35

Skelp iron or steel, sheared or rolled in grooves, when im- ported by manufacturers of wrought iron or steel for use only in the manufac- ture of wrought iron or steel pipe in their own factories.. 5

Sledges..................... 30

Spiral spring steel for spiral springs for railways, when imported by th emanufactur- ers of railway springs, for use exclusively in the man- ufacture of railway spiral springsin theirown factories Free

Steel for saws and straw cut- ters cut to shape, but not further manufactured. Cru- cible sheet steel, 11 to 16 gauge, 2 1/2 to 18 inches wide, for the manufacture of mow- er and reaper knives, when imported by the manufac- turers thereof for use of such purpose in their own fac- tories...........................Free

Steel for the manufacture of bicycle chain, when imported by the manufacturers of bi- cycle chain for use in the manufacture thereof in their own factories...............Free

Steel for the manufacture of

files,augers,auger bits,ham-

mers,axes,hatchets,scythes,

reaper hooks, hoes, rakes,

hay or straw knives and

wind-mills, agricultural or

harvesting forks, when im-

ported by the manufactur-

ers of such or any of such

articles for use exclusively

in the manufacture thereof

in their own factories......Free

Steel, in bars, bands, hoops.

plates, of any size, thickness

or width, when of greater

value than 2 1/2 cts. per lb.,n.o.p. 5

Steel, manufactures of, or parts

of iron and parts steel, n.e.s. 30

Steel of No. 12 gauge and thin-

ner, but not thinner than

No. 30 gauge, for the manu-

facture of buckle clasps and

ice creepers, bed fasts, furni-

ture casters, when imported

by the manufacturers of such

articles, for use exclusively

in the manufacture thereof

in their own factories......Free

Steel of No. 20 gauge and thin-

ner, but not thinner than No. 30 gauge, for the manu-

facture of corest steels, clock

springs and shoe shanks,

when imported by the manu-

facturers of such articles for

exclusive use in the manu-

facture thereof in their open

factories...................Free

Steel of No. 24 and 17 gauge,

in sheets 63 inches long, and

from 18 inches to 32 inches

wide, when imported by the

manufacturers of tubular

bow sockets for use in the

manufacture of such articles

in their own factories......Free

Steel rails, weighing not less

than 45lb. per lineal yard,

for use only in the tracks of

a railway which is employed

in the common carrying of

goods and passengers, and is

operated by steam motive

power only ; provided that

this item shall not extend to

rails for tracks of a railway

which is used for private pur-

poses only, nor shall this item

extend to rails for use in the

tracks of any electric railway,

street railway or tramway..Free

Steel springs for the manufact-

ture of surgical trusses when

imported by the manufac-

turers for use exclusively in

fancy manufactures...........35

Ivory and Ivory Nuts, unmanu-

factured and Veneers, sawn

only......................Free

Ivory, manufactures of, n.e.s....20

Ivory Vaccine Points........Free


Jack Screws of every descrip-

tion, n.e.s.....................25

Jalap Root.....................Free

Jams, Jellies, and Preserves,

3 1/4cts. per lb.

Japanned and Stamped Tinware,

&c..............................25

Jewellery and manufactures of

gold and silver.................30

Jews Harps...................35

Junk, old....................Free

Jute and Jute Butts..........Free

Jute, carpeting or matting&mats 25

Jute cloth, as taken from the

loom, neither pressed, mangl-

ed, calendered, nor in any way

finished......................Free

Jute cloth, uncoloured,not other-

wise finished than bleached or

calendered....................10

Jute horse clothing, shaped or

otherwise manufactured........30

Jute, man ufactures of, n.e.s.25

Jute Yarn, flax or hemp, plain,

dyed or colored, when im-

ported by manufacturers of

carpets, rugs, mats, jute web-

bing or cloth, and twines, for

use in their own factories....Free


Kainite, or German potash

salts for fertilizers.........Free


Kelp..........................Free

Kerosene and Coal Oil fixtures

or parts thereof...............30

Knives, oyster knives..........30

Knitting Machines..............30

Knitting Needles and Machine

Needles and needles of all

kinds..........................30

Kryolite or Cryolite.........Free


Labels, for cigar boxes, for

fruits, vegetables, meats, fish,

confectionery or other goods or

wares ; shipping, price or other

tags, tickets or labels ; and

railroad or other tickets,

whether lithographed or

printed, or partly printed,

n.e.s........................35

Lac- Dye, crude, seed, buttons,

stick and shel..............Free

Laces, boot, shoe and stay....30

Laces, braids, fringes, embroi-

deries, cords, tassels, and

bracelets, elastic round or flat,

including garther elastic, braids,

chains, or cords of hair and

other mfrs. of hair n.e.s; lace

Steel strip and {illegible} wire

when imported into Canada by manufacturers of buck-

thorn, and plain strip,fenc-

ing, for use in the manufac-

ture of such articles in their

own factories ; and barbed

fencing wire of iron or steel

after January 1st, 1898 . . . . . Free

Steel, under 1/2 in. in diameter,

or under 1/2 in. square, when imported by the manufac-

turers of cutlery, or of knobs,

or of locks, for use exclu-

sively in the manufacture of

such articles in their own

factories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Free

Steel valued at 2 1/2 c. per lb. and upwards, when imported by

the manufacture thereof in their own factories

{Printed page} CANADIAN TARIFF OF CUSTOMS (Continued)

{LEFT SIDE COLUMN}

{Small design on the top right corner of column} c. ad val.


Mouldings of wood, plain, gilded

or otherwise further manuf... 25


Mowing Machines, self-binding

harvesters, harvesters without

binders, binding attachments,

reapers, ploughs, harrows, cul-

tivators, seed srills and horse

rakes, manure spreaders,

weeders, and malleable

sprocket or link belting chain

for binders ................... 20


Muslin, plant bed muslin, white

cotton.................. 25


Music, printed, bound or in

sheets...................... 10


Musical instruments of all kinds,

pianofortes and organs...... 30


Musical instruments, brass band,

parts of pianofortes or organs 25

Provided that musical instru-

ment cases shall be dutiable at

the same rate as their contents

when imported containing the

instruments.


Musk, in pods or in grains......Free


Mustard Cake.................. 15


Mustard, ground .............. 25


Mustard, French mustard,liquid,

as sauce.................... 35



Naphtha, wood naptha or

wood alcohol, $2.40 per im. gal.


Naptha, n.e.s., 5c. per imp. gal.


Needles, Knitting............... 30


Needles, Steel, all other .......... 30


Newspaper or supplemental edi-

tions or parts thereof, partly

printed and intended to be

completed and published in

Canada ......................... 25


Newspapers, and quarterly,

monthly and semi-monthly

magazines, and weekly liter-

ary papers, unbound ; and tail-

ors', milliners' and mantle-

makers' fashion plates.......Free


Newspapers and Magazines, if

bound....................... 10


Nickel ........................Free


Nickel Anodes................. 10


Nickel and German Silver, manf.

of, not plated......... 25

if plated ..................... 30


Nitrate of Soda or Cubic Nitre..Free


Nitrite of Soda ......................Free


Nitrate of Lead, not ground....Free


Nitro-Glycerine......3c. per lb.


Noils, being the short wool

which falls from the combs in

worsted factories.............Free


Numbering Machines, not to be

classed with ptg. presses, to pay 25


Nuts, shelled, n.e.s...5c. per lb.


Nuts, Almonds, Walnuts. Brazil

{MIDDLE COLUMN- LEFT SIDE}


{Small design at the top right corner} c. ad. val.


Optical Instruments, n.e.s..... 25


Oranges, Lemons, and Limes in

boxes of capacity not exceed-

ing 2 1/2 cb. ft., 25 cts. per box..

In half boxes, capacity 1 1/4 cb,

ft., 13cts, per box

In cases and all other packages

10 cts. per cb. ft. capacity.

In bulk, $1.50 per thousand.

In barrels nt exceeding in

capacity that f the 196 lbs.

flour barrel, 55 cts. per bbl.


Ores of metals, of all kinds ....Free


Organs, Cabinet................ 30


Organs, set or parts of sets of

reeds for Cabinet Organ...... 25


Organs, Pipe Organs........... 30


Ornaments of alabaster, spar,

amber and terra cotta, or com-

position........................ 35


Osiers .....................Free


Osiers and Willow Furniture.... 30


Ottar of Roses, and Oil of Roses.Free


Oxide of Copper, Black and Pla-

tinum, for use in the manufac-

ture of Chlorate ..............Free



Pails, tubs, churns, brooms,

washboards, pounders, rolling

pins and whisks.............. 20


Paints and Colors, ultra marine

blue, dry or in pulp, metallic

colors, viz : oxides of cobalt,

copper and tin, n.e.s. ........Free


Ochers, Ochery earths,raw si-

enas and colors dry, n.e.s. 20


Oxides,dry fillers, fire-proofs,

umbers,and byrnt siennas,

n.e.s...................... 25


Fire-proof paint dry........ 25


Paints and colors,rough stuff

and fillers, anti-corrosive

and anti-fouling paints,

commonly used for ships

hulls, and ground and

liquid paints, n.e.s....... 25


Ground in spirits and all

spirit varnishes and lac-

quers .... $1.12 1/2 per. gal.


Paris Green,dry.......... 10


Dry White and Red Lead,

Orange mineral and Zinc

white ................... 5

White Lead, mixed ........ 25


Painter' metal graining combs.. 30


Painter pallet knives.......... 30


Paintings in Oil or Water Colors,

by artists of well-known merit,

or copies of Old Masters by

such artists..................Free


Paintings in Oil or Water Colors,

production of Canadian artists.Free


Paintings, prints, engravings,

drawings and building plans.

{Next sentence cannot be seen from image}


{MIDDLE COLUMN - RIGHT SIDE}


{Small design on the top right corner of the column} c. ad val.

4 ounces ..................... 50


Perfumes Spirits in bottles, flasks

or other packages, weighing

more than 4 oz., $2.40 per i.g.& 40


Persis or ext.Archill and Cubd'r.Free


Petroleum. (SeeOils.)


Pheasants for improvm't of stock.Free


Pheasants, other........... ...... 20


Philosophical Instruments and

Apparatus, not manufactured

In the Dominion, and when im-

ported by or for the use of

universities, colleges and

schools, and scientific societies

and public hospitals..........Free


Philosophical, Photographic,

Optical and Mathematical In-

struments and Apparatus,

n.e.s.. ..................... 25


Phosphorus ...................Free


Phosphor Bronze in blocks, bars,

sheet and wire.......... 10


Photographs, chromos, chromo-

types, artotypes, oleographs,

paintings, drawings, pictures,

engravings or prints, or proofs

therefrom, and similar works

of art, n.o.p. ; blue prints,

building plans, and maps and

charts, n.e.s..................... 20


Photographs, not exceeding

three, sent by friends, and not

for the purpose of sale.........Free


Photograph Albums............. 35

Albums, insides of paper .....Free


Photographers' albumenized

paper......................... 30


Photographic Dry Plates....... 30


Piano covers, rubber and cotton 35


Piano Stools ........................... 30


Pianofortes ................... 30


Pianofortes, parts of ........... 25


Pickers, raw hide, for cotton

looms..................... 25


Pickles, Sauces and Catsups,

including Soy................ 35


Pictorial illustrations of insects,

&c., when imported by and for

the use of colleges and schools,

scientific and literary societies.Free


Picture & Photographic Frames,

of any material.................... 30


Picture Nails ..... ............ 30


Pictures, framed...... ......... 30


Pillows and Bolsters............. 30


Pins, manufactured from wire of

any metal ................... 30


Pipe Clay, unmanufactured ....Free


Pitch, Burgundy..............Free


Pitch (pine) in packages of not

less than 15 gal..............Free


Pitch (pine) other............ 20

Pitch, coal .......................Free


Pitch, bone, Crude only.........Free


{Last line is not viewable}


{RIGHT COLUMN}


{Small design on the top right corner of the column} c. ad val.

Potash, German Mineral........Free


Potash, red and yellow prussiate

of ..... ....................Free


Potassium, cyanide of..........Free


Potatoes, sweet, 10 cts. per bush.


Pork, barrelled inbrine,2c. per

lb. Barrels containing same

to be free of duty.


Potatoes, other, 15c. per bush.


Polutry and Game of all kinds... 20


Precious Stones, also imitations,

polished, but not set, pierced

or otherwise manufactured,

n.e.s.........................


Printed music, bound or in

sheets.......................... 10


Printing presses, printing ma-

chines, lithographic presses

and type-making accessories

therefore ; folding machines,

book-binders', book-binding,

ruling, embossing and paper

cutting machines, and parts

thereof .............. ...... 10


Prunella ........ ............Free


Pulp of wood ...................... 25


Pulp of grasses .................Free


Pumice or Pumice Stone, ground

or unground..................Free


Pumps, brass, all kinds, and gar-

den and lawn sprinklers. ..... 30


Pumps, Steam................. 25


Putty. ........................ 20


Putty, dry, for polishing granite.Free


Quills, in nat. state or unpl'd.Free


Quills, other...................... 20


Quince Trees of all kinds..3c.ea.


Quinine, salts of.....................Free


Rags of cotton, linen, jute,

hemp and wollen, paper waste

or clippings, and waste of any

kind except mineral waste....Free


Railway cars, or other cars,

whee;barrows, trucks, road or

railway scrapers and hand

carts .......................... 30


Railway Rugs of all materials.. 30


Raisins, 1c. per lb.


Raspberry and Blackberry bushes 20


Rattans and reeds manf. or

partly manf................... 15


Rattans and reeds in their natural

state .........................Free


Red Liquor for dyg. & calico ptg.Free


Refrigerators ...................... 30


Rennet, raw, or prepared ......Free


Resin,in pkgs mot less than 100lbsFree


Resin or Rosin Oil............Free


Resin, other, n.e.s............... 20


Ribbons of all kinds and ma-

terials.......................{number not viewable}

{LEFT SIDE COLUMN}


Nuts, Cocoa..........$1 per 100


Nuts, Cocoa, when imported

direct....... .....50c. per 100


Nuts, all kinds, n.o.p., 2c per lb.


Nutgalls and extracts thereof ..Free


Oakum .......................Free


Oak Bark.....................Free


Oats, 10 cts. per bush.


Oat Flour .................... 20


Oatmeal.... ..................... 20


Oil, Aniline, crude........... Free


Oil, Coal, Illuminating Oils com-

posed wholly or in part of the

products of petroleum, coal,

shale or lignite costing more

than 30c. per. gal.............. 25


Oil, Coal and Kerosene, distilled,

purified or refined, Naphtha,

Petroleum and products of,

n.e.s., 5c. per Imp. gal.


Oils, Petroleum, Crude, fuel and

gas oils (other than Naphtha,

Benzine or Gasoline, when

imported by manufacturers

other than refiners) for use in their factories for fuel pur-

poses, or for the manufacture

of gas, 2 1/2c. per Imp. gallon.


Oils, Essential .................. 10


Oil, Resin .......................Free


Oil, Carbolic, or heavy oil......Free


Oil, Castor ..................... 20


Oil, Cod Liver................... 20


Oils, Cocoanut and Palm, in their

natural state .................Free


Oil, Colza...................... 20


Oil, Flax Seed or Linseed, raw or

boiled.. ..................... 25


Oil, Lard Oil...................... 25


Oil, Lubricating, composed

wholly or in part of petroleum,

costing less than 25c.imp.gal.,

5c. per imp. gal.


Oils, Lubricating, all other..... 25


Oils, Neatsfoot ................ 25


Oil,Olive,for manufacturing soap

or tobacco or for canning fish.Free


Oil, Olive, n.e.s................... 20


Oil, Sesame seed.................. 25


Oil, Tallow ........................ 20


Oil, all other, n.e.s............... 20


Oil Cake and Meal, Cotton Seed

Cakw and Meal, Palm Nut Cake

and Meal .................. .. Free


Oil Cloths and oiled silk, and

tape or other textile India-

rubbered, flocked or coated

n.o.p............................. 30


Oil Cloth, table and shelf, ena-

melled carriage, cork matting

or carpet, and linoleum...... 30


Oiled paper...................... 35


Oleo-Stearine and Degras ......Free


Opium, prepared for smokinh=g,

$5 per lb.


Opium, powdered, $1.35 per lb.



{MIDDLE COLUMN -LEFT SIDE}


Palm Leaf, unmanufactured....Free


Palm Leaf, when manuf., n.e.s.. 20


Paper Weights, glass............. 20


Paper Cutters & Printing Presses 10


Paper Sacks or Bags of all kinds,

printed or not............... 25


Paper Boxes, empty............. 35


Paper, drawing or parchment... 25


Paper, Wall, or paper hangings,

borderse or bordering, and win-

dow blinds of paper of all kinds 35


Paper files, clips.................. 30


Paper Mache, manufactures of.. 35


Paper of all kinds, n.e.s .......... 25


Paper kites, as toys............. 35


Paper, ruled, oiled or waxed..... 35


Paper, Tarred ................... 25


Paper, Unoin Collar Cloth,in rolls

orsheets,notglossed or finished 15


Paper, Union Cloth, in rolls or

sheets, glossed or finished..... 20


Paper, filter paper, in sheets.... 25


Paper, fly paper................. 35


Paper Letters, gummed, plain,

or colored, in bulk ............. 35


Paper waste or clippings ..........Free


Paper, pressed, in sheets......... 35


Paper, Glazed, Plated, and Card

Board, similarly finished,n.e.s. 35


Paper, manufactures of, includ-

ing ruled and bordered papers,

papeteries, boxed papers and

envelopes and Blank Books.. 35


Parafine Wax.................. 30


Parasols, (See Umbrellas.)


Paaover Bread for free distribu-

tion among the Hebrew com-

munity in connection with

their religious rites............Free


Patterns of brass, iron, steel or

other metal (not being models) 30


Paving blocks, made from slag of

blast furnace ................. 20


Peaches, n.o.p., the weight of

the packages to be included in

the weight for duty..1c. p. lb.


Peach Trees ..........3c. each.


Pears, green fruit.......... .... 20


Pear Trees of all kinds..3c. each.


Peas, 10c per bush.


Pearl, mother of, not manufac-

tured .................... ...Free


Pearl card cases.................. 35


Pearl collar buttons or studs.... 35


Pearl, ,manufactures of, fancy .. 35


Pelts, raw ........................Free


Pencils lead, wood or otherwise. 25


Pencils, slate .................... 25


Penholders, wood .............. 25


Pens, steel,25 p.c; gold......... 25


Pen racks, iron................. 30


Perfumery, including toiler prep-

arations (non-alcoholic), viz :--

Hair oils, tooth and other

powders and washes, pome-

tums, pastes and all other per-

fumed preparations used for

the hair, mouth and skin.... 30


Perfumed Spirits in bottles or

flasks not weighing more than



[MIDDLE COLUMN - RIGHT SIDE}


not to include braid or fancy

trimmings......................Free


Planing Mills and parts of, in any

stage of manufacture......... 25


Plants, viz :--Fruit, shade, lawn

and ornamental trees, shrubs

and plants, n.e.s ................ 20


Plaster of Oaris or Gypsum,

ground not calcined ......... 15


Plater of Paris, calcined or

manufactured, the weight of

the package to be included in

the weight for duty, 12 1/2c. per

100 lbs.


Plasters, medicated, all kinds... 25


Plated Ware and Gilt Ware, of all

kinds, whether plated wholly

or in part......... ......... 30


Platinum,manufactures of,n.e.s. 20


Platinum and Black Oxide of

Copper for the manufacture

of Chlorate..................Free


Platinum wire and platinum in

bars, strips, sheets or plates ;

platinum retorts, pans, con-

densers, tubing and pipe,

when imported by manufac-

turers of sulphuric acid for

use in their works in the manu-

facture or concentration of

sulphuric acid................Free


Plates, engraved on wood, steel

or other metal, and transfers

taken from the same, includ-

ing engravers' plates of steel,

polished, engraved, or for en-

graving thereupon........... 20


Playing Cards...... 6c. per pack


Plum Trees of all kinds, 3c. each.


Plumbago, crude............... 10


Plumbago, all manufactures of,

n.e.s........................... 25


Plush, of cotton ................. 30


Plush, Silks, other .............. 30


Pocketbooks and Purses........ 30


Pomades, French or flower odors,

preserved in fat or oil for the

purpose of conserving the

odors of flowers which do not

bear the heat of distillation,

when imported in tins of not

less than 10 lbs. each......... 15


Pomades, all others............. 30


Pop Corn, in cakes or balls, 1/2c.

per lb., and.................. 35


Porcelain Ware, n.e.s........... 30


Porcelain Shades............... 30


Portable machines, portable

steam engines, threshers and

separators, horse powers, port-

able saw mills and planing

mills and parts thereof in any

stage of manufacture ........ 25


Potash, caustic....................Free


Potash and pearl ash, in pkgs.

not less than 25 lbs...........Free


Potash, muriate and bichromate

of, crude.... ............ ..Free


Potash, Chlorate of, in crystals,

or ground only, when imported

for manufac. purposes only...Free


{RIGHT SIDE COLUMN}


Rice, other, 1 1/4c per lb.


Rice and Sago Flour and Sago

and tapioca............... .. 25


Rice, when imported by makers

of rice starch, for use in their

factories.... 3/4 of a cent per lb.


Rope, Iron Wire................. 25


Rope, or cordage of all kinds 25


Roots, medicinal, viz : Aconite,

Calumba, Ipecacuanha, Rhu-

barb, Sarsaparilla, Squills,

Taraxicum and Valerian ....Free

The same ground or powdered 20


Rose bushes .................. 20


Rotten Stone ................. 20


Rove, when imported for the

manufacture of twine for har-

vest binders..................... 5


Ruling Pens ..................... 10


Rye, 10c. per bush.


Rye Flour, 50c. per bbl.


Saccharine..................... 20


Saddlers' Soap ....... ........ 25


Saddlery of every description.. 30


Saffron and Safflower, and ex-

tract of, and Saffron Cake....Free


Sago............................. 25


Sago Flour............. ............. 25


Sails, for boats and ships........ 25


Sal-Ammoniac and Sal-Soda....Free


Saleraus ..................... 20


Salt imported from the United

Kingdom or any British pos-

session, or imported for the

use of the sea or gulf fisheries,

n.e.s ..........................Free


Salt, fine, in bulk, and course

salt, n.e.s.......5c per 100 lbs.


Salt,in bags,bbls.,or other pkgs.,

7 1/2c per 100 lbs. [Pckgs. same

duty as if imported empty.]..


Saltpetre ....................Free


Salt Cake(sulphate of soda)crude.Free


Sand ............................Free


Sand, colored...................... 20


Sand Cloth....... ................ 25


Sand (iron)or globules for polish-

ing granite...................Free


Sand, Glass, Flint and Emery

Paper ......................... 25


Satchels ...................... 30


Sateens, for use of corset manu-

facturers, etc........... ...... 20


Sauces, Catsups and Pickles, in-

cluding Soy .................... 35


Sausage Casings, n.e.s........... 20


Sausage SkinsorCasings.not cl'd.Free


Saw dust, of the following

woods :--amaranth, cocoboral,

boxwood, cherry, chestnut,

walnut, gumwood, mahogany,

pitch pine, rosewood, sandal

wood, sycamore,spanish cedar,

oak, hickory, whitewood, Afri-

can teak, black heart ebony,

lignum vitae, red cedar, red-

wood, satin wood, white ash,

persimmon and dogwood....Free


Scales, and Weighing Beams.... 30


Scenery, Theatrical and other. 20

CANADIAN TARIFF OF CUSTOMS (Continued)

{LEFT COLUMN}


{Small design on the top right side of column} c. ad val.


School Ink Wells, earthware.. 30

" " glass............ 20


School bags...................... 30


Screws commonly called wood

screws, of iron or steel, brass,

or other metal, including lag

or coach screws, plated or not,

and machine or other screws,

n.o.p. ........................ 35


Screw Jacks of every description 25


Seeds--Beet, Carrot, Turnip,

Annatto, Flax, Mangold, and

Mustard ................... Free


Seeds--Flowers,garden, fled and

other seeds for agricultural or

other purposes, when in bulk

or large parcels, n.o.p........ 10

The same in small parcels.. 25


Seeds--Aromatic, which are not

edible and are in a crude state,

and not advanced in value or

condition by grinding or refin-

ing or by any other process of

manufacture,Anise,Anise-star,

Caraway, Cardamon, Corian-

der, Cummin,Fennel and Fenu0

greek .......................Free


Seed Peas--imported from the

United Kingdom for the pur-

pose of seed ..................Free


Seedling stock for grafting, viz. :

Plum, pear, peach and other

fruit trees ...................Free


Senna leaves ................Free


Settlers' effects, viz. : Wearing

apparel, household furniture,

books, implements and tools of

trade, occupation or employ-

ment, guns, typewriters,bi-

cycles, musical instruments,

domestic sewing machines,

live stock, carts and other

vehicles and agricultural im-

plements in use by the

settler for at least six months

before his removal to Canada ;

not to include machinery, or

articles imported for use in any

manufacturing establishment,

or foe sale ; also books, pic-

turesm family plate or furni-

ture, personal effects and heir-

looms left by bequest ; provid-

ed that any dutiable article

entered as settlers' effects may

not be so entered unless

brought with the settler on

his first arrival, and shall not

be sold or otherwise disposed

of without payment of duty,

until after twekve months

actual use in Canada ; pro-

vided also that under regula-

tions made by the Controller

of Customs, live stock, when

imported into Manitoba or the


{MIDDLE COLUMN - LEFT SIDE}


{Small design on the top right corner of column} c. ad val.

of, n.e.s..................... 30


Sledges....................... 25


Soap, Castile, Mottled or White,

per lb.


Soap, n.e.s..................... 35


Soap powders, other, and pear-

line ......................... 30


Socks or Stockings of all kinds.. 5


Soda Ash Caustic in drumn ;

silicate in crystals or in solu-

tion ; bichromate nitrate or

cubic nitre, salsoda, sulphate

of soda, arseniate, binarseniate,

bisulphate, chlorate, chloride ;

sodium, sulphide of, and stan-

nate of soda...................Free


Soda, Bicarbonate of........... 20


Soda, Nitrite of ............... 20


Solder ........................ 30


Soups ........................... 25


Soy ........................ 35


Spectacles and Eye Glasses ..... 30


Spectacles, and Eye Glass frames,

and metal parts thereof....... 20


Spelter of zinc in bkocks and

pigs.......................Free


Spermaceti.................... 20


Spices of all kinds, except Mace

and Nutmegs, unground...... 12 1/2


Spices, ground................ 25


Spices, Mace and Nutmegs..... 25


Spirituous or alcoholic liquors

distilled from any material, or

containing, or compounded

from or with distilled spirits

of any kind and any mixture

thereof with water, for every

gallon thereof of the strength

of proof, and when of a greater

strength than that of proof at

the same rate on the increased

quantity that there would be

if the liquors were reduced to

the strength of proof. When

the liquors are of less strength

than that of proof, the duty

shall be at the rate herein pro-

vided, but computed on a re-

duced quantity of the liquors

in proportion to the lesser de-

gree of strength : provided,

however, that no reduction in

quantity shall be computed or

made on any liquors below the

strength of 15 per cent., under

proof, but all such liquors shall

be computed as of the strength

of 15 per c. under proof as

follows, viz :--

Ethyl alcohol or the substance

commonly known as alcohol,

hydrated oxide of ethyl, or

spirits of wine ; gin of all


{MIDDLE COLUMN - RIGHT SIDE}


{Small design on the top right corner of of column} c. ad val.

tres, textile leather or rubber

heads, thumbs and tips, and

steels, iron, or nickel caps for

whip ends, when imported by

whip manufacturers for use in

the manufacture of whips in

their own factories.......... Free


Starch, including farina, corn

starch or flour, and all prepar-

ations having the qualities of

starch, 1 1/2c. perlb., the weight

of the package to be included

in the weight for duty.


Stereotypes, see Electrotypes.


Stockinettes for the manufac-

ture of rubber boots and shoes,

for use exclusively in the man-

ufacture thereof in their own

factories..................... 15


Stones, burr, in blocks, rough or

unmanufactured and not bound

up or prepared for binding

into millstone................Free


Stone, flagstones, sandstone, and

all building stone, not ham-

mered or chiselled ; and marble

and granite, rough, not ham-

mered or chiselled ........... 15


Stone, marble and granite, sawn

only ; flagstone and all other

building stone dressed ; and

paving blocks of stone........ 20


Stone,lithographic,not engraved 20


Stone, grindstones, not mounted

and not less than 36 inches in

diameter .................... 15


Stone, grindstones, n.e.s........ 25


Straw and manufactures of,

n.e.s...................... 20


Straw Boards in sheets or rolls,

plain or tarred................ 25


Sugar of Milk.................. 20


Sugar of Milk Tablets, not fur-

ther sweetened................ 20


Sugar, glucose or grape sugar,

3/4 cent per pound.


Sugar, all above No. 16 Dutch

standard in colour, and all re-

fined sugars of whatever kinds,

grades or standards, testing

not more than 88 degrees by

the polariscope, /$1.08 per 100

lbs., and for each additional

degree 1 1/2c. per 100 lbs. Frac-

tions of 5/10 of a degree or less

not to be subject to duty, and

fractions of more than 5/10 to be

dutiable as a degress.


Sugar, Maple .................. 20


Sugar, n.e.s., not above No. 16

Dutch standard in colour,

sugar drainings, or pumpings

drained in transit, melado, or

concentrated melado, tank

bottoms and sugar concrete,

testing not mpre than 75


{RIGHT COLUMN}


{Small design on the top right corner of column} c. ad val.

electric motors, generators,

dynamos, sockets and electric

apparatus, n.e.s............... 25


Telescopes..... ............... 25


Tents and Awnings................ 35


Terra Japonica, Gambier or

Cutch .... ................Free


Terra Cotta panels, mouldings

and cornices................. 30


Terrali{?}e, Vases and Plaques... 35


Thermometers, all kinds....... 25


Terra Alba...................... 20


Thimbles, steel................ 30


Thimbles, brass................. 30


Thread, Linen, n.e.s............. 25


Tin, in blocks,pigs, bars&sheets,

and plates and tinfoil and tin

strips waste....................Free


Tin, Crystals and Tea Lead ....Free


Tin Plates in sheets or strips, de-

corated ...................... 25


Tin Whisk Holders, lacquered ..25


Tinned Iron Kettle Ears........ 30


Tinware stamped. japanned ware

and galvanized iron ware...... 25


Tinware, and manufactures of

tin, n.e.s ..... .............. 25


Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes,

including paper covering, $3

per lb. and ...... .............. 25


Tobacco manufactured and Snuff

n.e.s. ............ 50c. per lb.


Tobacco,cut. ......55c. per lb.


Tobacco, unmanufactured, for

excise purposes, under condi-

tions of the Inland Revenue

Act.


Tobacco Pipes of all kinds,

pipe mounts, cigar and cigar-

ette holderes and cases for the

same ............... ........ 35


Tobacco Pouches................ 35


Tools, mechanics' , of all kinds,

n.e.s........................ 30


Tools od trade, occupation or

employment, in the actual

possession at the time of a

workman arriving in Canada,

for his personal use, and

which have been bona fide in

use previously by him .......Free


Towels of every description..... 30


Towel racks and rollers......... 30


Toys, all kinds and materials ... 35


Tracing Cloth.................. 30


Travellers' Baggage, under regu-

lations to be prescribed by the

Minister of Customs.......... Free


Trees, n.e.s....................Free


Treenails .........................Free


Tripoli........................ 25


Trunks.................... 30


Trunk Trimmings.............. 30


Turmeric.....................Free


Turpentine, raw or crude.......Free


Turpentine, Spirits of.......... 5

{LEFT COLUMN}

North-West Territories by in-

tending settlersm shall be free

until otherwise ordered by the

Governor in Council .........Free


Sewing machine attachments...Free


Sewing Machines, or parts of... 30


Shades, Glass and Porcelain, for

lamps and gaslights.......... 30


Shawls and Travelling Rugs of all

kinds....................... 30


Shawls, silk.................... 30


Sheep, for improvement of stock Free


Sheep Skins, tanned only....... 15


Sheep Skins, dressed and waxed,

or glazed .................... 17 1/2


Shellac, white, for manufacturing

purposes ....................Free


Shells of all kinds, unmanuf.....Free


Shells, manufactured, fancy..... 35


Sheet, Music..................... 10


Sheet Iron Signs................ 30


Ships built in a foreign country,

on application for Canadian

register, except machinery.... 10


Shirts of any material, and

ladies' and misses' blouses and

shirt waists.................... 35


Shoemakers' Pitch and Wax .... 20


Show Cases...... ............. 35


Show Cards, framed............. 30


Silex or Crystallized Quartz.... Free


Silk, clothing .................. 35


Silk Hosiery ....... ................ 35


Silk, manufactures of, or of

which silk is the component

part of chief value, n.e.s..... 35


Silk, raw, or as reeled from the

cocoon, not being doubled,

twisted or advanced in any

way, silk cocoons, and silk

waste.......................Free


Silk, in the gum or spun, not

more advanced than singles,

tram, and thrown organzine,

not coloured.................. 15


Silk, in the gum or spun, when

imported by manufacturers of

silk underwear, in their own

factories ......................Free


Silk in the piece .................. 30


Silk Velvets, velveteens, plush

and silk fabrics................ 30


Silver Leaf..................... 25


Silver-plated Ware ............. 30


Skates of all kinds, roller or

other, and parts thereof...... 35


Skins, Bird, and skins of animals

not native to Canada for taxi-

dermic purposes, not further

manufactured than prepared

for preservation ..............Free


Slates, roofing, 25 per cent., pro-

vided that the duty on roofing

slate shall not exceed 75c. per

square.


Slates, school and writing.... 25


Slate Pencils..................... 25


Slate mantels and manufactures


{MIDDLE COLUMN - LEFT SIDE}


kinds, n.e.s. ; rum, whiskey,

and all spirituous or alcoholic

liquors, n.o.p. $2.40 per gal.


Amyl alcohol or fusil oil, or

any substance known as

potato spirit or potato oil,

$2.40 per gal.


Methyl alcohol, wood alcohol,

wood naphtha, pyroxylic

spirits,or anysubstance known

as wood spirit or methylated

spirits ; absinthe, arrack or

palm spirits, brandy including

artificial brandy and imita-

tions of brandy ; cordials and

liqueurs of all kinds, n.e.s. ;

mescal, pulque, rum shrub,

schiedam and otherschnapps

tafia, angostura, and similar

alcoholic bitters or bever-

ages...........$2.40 per gal.


Spirits and strong waters of

any kind mixed with any

ingredient or ingredients

as being or known or de-

signated as anodynes,elixirs,

essences, extracts, lotions,

tinctures, or medicines, or

medicinal wines (so-called),

or ethereal and spirituous

fruit essences, n.e.s. $2.40

per gal.and ................... 30


Alcoholic perfumes and per-

fumed spirits, bay rum, col-

ogne and lavender waters,

hair, tooth and skin washes

and other toilet preparations

containing spirits of any

kind, when in bottles or flasks

containing not more than 4

oz.each ................... 50


When in bottles, flasks or

other packages containing

more than 4 oz. ea., $2.40

per gal. and.............. 40


Nitrous ether, sweet spirits of

nitre and aromatic spirits

of ammonia, $2.40 per gal.

and ......................... 30


Vermouth,containing not more

than 36 per cent.,and ginger

wine, containing not more

than 26 per cent. of proof

spirits, 90c. per gal. ; if con-

taining more than these per-

centages, respectively, of

proof spirits, $2.40 per gal.


In all cases where the strength

of any of the foregoing arti-

cles cannot be correctly as-

certained by the direct ap-

plication of the hydrometer

or gravity bottle, it shall be

ascertained by the distilla-

tion of a sample, or in such

other manner as the Control-

ler of Customs may direct.


Sponges ........................ 20


Spurs and Stilts, used in the

manufacture of earthenware..Free


Square Reeds and raw-hide cen-


{MIDDLE COLUMN - RIGHT SIDE}


degrees by the polariscope,

40c. per 100 lbs., and for each

additional degree 1 1/2c. per 100

lbs. Fractions of 5/10 of a degree

or less not to be subject to

duty, and fractions of more

than 5/10 to be dutiable as a

degree. The usual packages

in which imported to be free.


Sugar Candy, brown or white,

and Confectionery, including

sweetened gums, candled peels,

and pop corn, 1/2c. per lb. and 35


Sugar Beet Seed................Free


Sulphate of Iron (Copperas) and

Sulphate of Copper (Blue Vit-

riol)..................... Free


Sulphur and Brimstone, in roll

or flour .......................Free


Sulphuric ether and chloroform,

and solutions of peroxides of

hydrogen.................... 25


Surgical and dental instruments

of all mkinds ... ................... Free


Surgical belts or trusses and

suspensory bandages of all

kinds........................ 20


Syrup, Glucose Syrup and Corn

Syrup, or any Syrups contain-

ing any admixture thereof,

3/4c. per lb.


Syrups--See Molasses.


Tags, tin, for plug tobacco.... 25


Tagging, Metal, plain, japanned

or coated, in coils, not over 1 1/2

inches in width, when imp. by

manufs. of Shoe and Corset

Laces,for use in their factories Free


Tails, undressed ............... Free


Tallow and Stearic Acid......... 20


Tallow Oil................... ... 20


Tape Measures..................... 25


Tapioca........................... 25


Taraxacum Root.................Free


Tarpaulin, Cotton, plain or

coated with oil, paint, tar or

other composition.............. 30


Tar (Pine), in packages of not

less than fifteen gallons each..Free


Tarred Paper .... ............. 25


Tassels .......................... 35


Tea Lead......... .............Free


Teas and Green Coffees import-

ed direct from the country of

growth and production, and

tea and green coffees pur-

chased in bond in the United

Kingdom, provided there is

sastisfactory proof that the

tea or coffee so purchased in

bond is such as might be

entered for home consump-

tion in the United King-

dom. ......... .............Free


Tea and Green Coffee, n.e.s.... 10


Teasels.........................Free


Telephones and Telegraph In-

struments ; telegraph, tele-

phone and electric lightcables;

electric and galvanic batteries,


[RIGHT COLUMN}

Turtles......................Free


Twine for harvest binders, of

hemp jute, manilla or sisal,

and of manilla and sisal mixed.Free


Twine, manuf.of, n.o.p...... .. 30


Type, for printing ............... 20


Type Metal ..................... 10


Type Writer .................... 25


Typewriters, Tablets with mov-

able figures, Geographical Map

and Musical Instruments, when

imported by and for the use of

schools for the blind, and be-

ing and remaining the sole

property of the governing

bodies of said schools, and not

of private individuals, the

above particulars to be veri-

fled by special affidavit on

each entry when presented Free


Ultramarine Blue, dry or

in pulp............... ......Free


Umbrellas, Parasols and Sun-

shades of all kinds and ma-

terials ...................... 35


Umbrella and Parasol, steel and

iron or brass ribs, runners,

rings, caps, notches, tin caps

and ferrules, for the use of

manufacturers of umbrellas...Free


Umbrella,Parasol,and Sunshade

sticks or handles, in the rough,

not further manufactured


than cut into suitable lengths.Free


Umbrella, Parasol and Sunshade

sticks or handles, n.e.s........ 20


Unenumerated Articles ......... 20


Vaccine and Ivory Vac-

cine Points......................Free


Valerian Root.......................Free


Varnishes, n.e.s., 20c. per gal.

and........................... 20


Varnish,black and bright for ship

use .........................Free


Varnish and Colours ground in

spirits $1.12 1/2 per gal.


Vaseline,and all similar prepara-

tions of petroleum for toilet,

medicinal or other purposes. 35


Vases, glass, plain or fancy .... 20


Vases, China and Porcelain .... 30


Vases, Earthenware............ 30


Vegetables, n.o.p............... 25


Vegetables, Sweet Potatoes and

Yams.......... 10c. per bush.


Vegetables, Tomatoes and other

vegetables, including Corn and

Baked Beans, in cans or other

packages, n.e.s.... 1 1/2c. per lb.

the weight for duty.


Vegetables,Onions,set-for plant-

ing, not fit for table use....... 25


Velveteens, and Cotton Velvets

and Cotton Plush ............. 30

Veneers of Wood, not over 3/32 of

CANADIAN TARIFF OF CUSTOMS (Continued)

{LEFT COLUMN}


{Small design on the top right corner of column} c. ad val.

an inch in thickness ......... 7 1/2


Velocipedes.................... 30


Veneers, Ivory, sawn only......Free


Veneers, Ivory, other, n.e.s..... 20


Vents, Fireclay Chimney Linings

glazed or unglazed........... 35


Verdigris or sub-ac'te cop'r(dry)Free


Vinegar, 15c per imp. gal., of

any strength not exceeding

the strength of proof, and for

each degree of strength in ex-

cess of the strength of proof,

an additional duty of 2 cents.


Vices.......................... 30


Wagons (freight), drays,

sleighs, and similar vehicles.. 25


Wall Decorations, Lincrusta

Walton..................... 35


Walking Sticks and Canes of all

kinds, n.e.s .................. 30


Watches ....................... 25


Watch Cases .................. 30


Watch, composition metal for

the manufacture of filled gold

watch cases................. 10


Watch Keys.................... 25


Watch actions or movement .... 10


Water Meters.................... 30


Wax, bees ...................... 10


Wax, Paraffline, and Animal

Stearine of all kinds, 2c. per lb.


Wax, manufactures of, other... 20


Webbing, elastic................. 20


Webbing, non-elastic........... 20


Whale Bone, unmanufactured..Free


Whale Bone, manuf'res of, n.e.s. 20


Wheat, 12c per bushel.


Wheat Flour, including the duty

on the bbl., 60c. per bbl.


Wheels, parts of, Hubs & Spokes,

in the rough.................Free


Wheelbarrows.................. 30


Whips, of all kinds, including

thongs and lashes............. 35


Whiting or Whitening, gilders'

Whiting and Paris White ....Free


Willow for basket makers .......Free


Willow and Osier Works, n.e.s.. 25


Window Curtain Poles........... 30


Window Blind Rollers, finished

or mounted.................. 35


Window shades in the piece, or

cut and hemmed or mounted

on rollers, n.e.s.............. 35


Window Shades, made of paper. 35


Wines of all kinds, except spark-

ling wines, including orange,

lemon, strawberry, rasp-

berry, elder and currant, con-

taining 26% or less of spirits

of strength of proof imported

in wood or bottles 25c per I.G.& 30


Wines for every degree above 26

up to 40 p. c.,3c more for each

degree of strength and....... 30


{MIDDLE COLUMN -LEFT SIDE}


{Small design on the top right corner of column} c. ad val.

thorns, plain strip fencing, for

use in their own factories in

the manufacture thereof.....Free


Wire, Iron or Steel, and all other

kinds, n.e.s.................. 20


Wire nails of all kinds, 3/5c. per lb.


Wire of iron,steel,brass,zinc,flat-

tened or corrugated, screwed

or twisted, for use in connec-

tion with nailing machines

for the manufacture of boots

and shoes, when imported by

manufacturers of boots and

shoes, to be used for such pur-

poses only in their own fac-

tories .......................Free


Wire phosphor, bronze blocks,

sheets and wire............... 10


Wire, picture or other twisted

wire........................ 25


Wire, Platinum Sheets ; retorts,

pans, condensers, tubing and

pipe made of platinum,import-

ed by manufact'ers if sulphuric

acid for use in the manf. or

concentration of sulphuric

acid. .......... .... .....Free


Wire Rigging for ships and ves-

sels ......................Free


Wire Rods, Brass, Copper, Iron

or Steel, rolled round, under 3/8

of an inch in diameter, when

imported by wire manufac-

turers making wire for use

in their own factories........Free


Wire Rope, of iron and steel,

n.o.p ........................ 25


Wire Screw Hooks and Eyes

(iron)........................ 30


Wire, Soft Drawn Bessemer

spring steel wire of Nos.10, 12

and 13 gauge, and Hom

spring steel wire of Nos.11 and

12 gauge respectively, when

imported by mnufacturers of

wire mattresses, to be used in

their own factories........... Free


Wire, stranded or twisted...... 25


Wire Window Screens .......... 30


Wire work, and manfs. of Iron

Wire, n.e.s................... 30


Wood, Cord Wood..............Free


Wood Furniture, house, cabinet

or office, including bedsteads,

hair, spring and other mat-

tresses, bolsters and pillows,

and picture frames........... 30


Wood Caskets and Coffins ..... 25


Wood for fuel................Free


Wooden Mallets................ 30


Wood Pumps .................. 25


Wood, Hubs,Spokes,Felloes and

parts of Wheels, rough hewn or

sawn onlly .....................Free


Wood, Felloes of Hickory, rough

sawn to shape only or rough


{MIDDLE COLUMN -RIGHT SIDE}


{Small design on the top right corner} c. ad val.

sticks, rough hewn or sawed

only ; felloes of hickory wood,

rough sawn to shape only, or

rough sawn and bent to shape,

not planed,smoothed or other-

wise manufactured ; hickory

billets, and hickory lumber,

sawn to shape for spokes of

wheels, but not further man-

ufactured ; hickory spokes,

rough turned, not tenoned,

mitred, throated, faced, sized

cut to length,round tenoned or

polished ; the wood of the per-

simmon and dogwood trees ;

and logs and rounds manufac-

tured timber, ship timber or

ship planking, not specially

enumerated or provided for in

this Act.......................Free


Wool and the hair of the camel,

alpaca, goat, or other like

animals, not further prepared

than washed, n.e.s.; and wor-

sted tops and noils, being the

short wool which falls from the

combs in worsted factories...Free


Wool and woolen manf.of fabrics,

manufactures, wearing appa-

rel and ready-made clothing,

composed wholly or in part of

wool, worsted, the hair of the

alpaca, goat or other like

animal, n.e.s ; blankets, bed

comforters or counterpanes,

flannels, cloths, doe-skins, cas-

simeres, tweeds, coatings,

overcoatings and felt cloth,

n.e.s...................... 35


Wool knitted goods, undershirts

and drawers, and hosiery of all

kinds, n.e.s.......... ....... 35


Wool, viz: Leicester, Cotswold,

Lincolnshire,Southdown comb-

ing wools, or wools known as

lustre wools, and other like

combing wools, such as are

grown in Canada, 3c. per lb...


Worsted tops made from such

wools as are mentioned in the

next preceding item.......... 15


Wool Noils.....................Free


Woollen Shawls and shawls of all

kinds......................... 30


Wollen Socks and Stockings... 35


Wollen Waste.................Free


Wringers, clothes, for domestic

use, and parts thereof........ 35


Wool, women's and children's

dress goods, coat linings, Ital-

ian cloths, alpacas, orleans,

cashmeres, henriettas, serges,

buntings, nun's cloth, benga-

lines, whip cords, twills, plains

or jacquards of similar fabrics,

composed wholly or in part of


{RIGHT COLUMN}


{Small design on the top right corner of column} c. ad val.

in the manufacture of such

articles only ................Free


Yarns, Mohair.................Free


Yeast, Compressed Yeast, not

over fifty pounds weight, the

weight of the package to be in-

cluded in the weight for duty

6 cts. per lb.


Yeast Cakes and Baking Pow-

ders, the weight of the pack-

age to be included in the weight

of duty ............6c. per lb.


Yeast, Compressed, in bulk or

mass of not less than fifty

pounds ............ 3c. per lb.


Yellow Metal, in Bolts, Bars and

for Sheathing................Free


Zinc, salts of..................Free


Zinc, in blocks, pigs and Sheets.Free


Zinc, seamless drawn tubing....Free


Zinc,manufactures of, n.e.s..... 25


Zinc plates....................Free


Zinc spelter................... Free


All goods not enumerated as

charged with any duty of Customs

and not declared free of duty, shall

be charged with a duty of 20 per cent.

as valorem, when imported into

Canada, or taken out of warehouse

for consumption therein.


SCHEDULE D.

BRITISH PREFERENTIAL TARRIF.


On articles entitled to the bene-

fits of this preferential tariff under

section seveteen, the duties men-

tioned in schedule A shall be reduced

as follows : The reduction shall be

one-third of the duty mentioned in

schedule A, and the duty to be

levied, collected and paid shall be

two-thirds of the duty mentioned

in schedule A.


Provided, however,that this reduc-

tion shall not apply to any of the

following articles and that such

articles shall in all cases be subject

to the duties mentioned in schedule

A, viz. : wines, malt liquors, spirits,

spirituous liquors, liquid medicines

and articles containing alcohol ;

tobacco, cigars and cigarettes.


Provided further, that the reduc-

tion shall only apply to refined sugar,

when evidence satisfactory to the

Minister of Customs if furnished

that such refined sugar has been

manufactured wholly from raw sugar

produced in the British colonies or

possesssions.

{LEFT COLUMN}


Champagne and all other spark-

ling wines, in bottles contain-

ing each not more than 1 qt.

and more than 1 pt.. $3.30

per dozen bottles, and...... 30


In bottles, containing not more

than a pint and more than

one-half pint, $1.65 per doz.

bottles, and................ 30


In bottles, containing one-half

pint each or less, 82c per doz.

bottles, and................ 30


In bottles, containing more

than one quart each shall

pay, in addition to $3.30 per

doz. bottles, at the rate of

$1.65 oer gallon on the quan-

tity in excess of one quart

per bottle, the quarts and

pints in each case being old

wine measure ; in addition

to the above specific duty,

there shall be an ad valorem

duty of 30 per cent.


But any liquors imported un-

der the name of wine, and

containing more than 40 per

cent. of spirits of proof, shall

be rated for duty as unenu-

merated spirits.


Wire, barbed wire and galvan-

ized wire for fencing, Nos. 9,

12 and 13 gauge.............Free


Wire, brass, plain.............. 10


Wire, brass rods cut to special

length......................... 30


Wire, Buckthorn and Strip Fenc-

ing, woven wire fencing, and

wire fencing of iron or steel,

n.e.s......................... 15


Wire, cable .................... 25


Wire Cloth of brass or copper... 25


Wire Cloth, iron or steel........ 30


Wire clothes line .............. 25


Wire, copper, plain, tinned or

plated....................... 15


Wire, covered with cotton,linen,

silk or other material......... 30


Wire, flat strip and flat steel,

when imported into Canada

by manufacturers of buck-


{MIDDLE COLUMN - LEFT SIDE}

sawn and bent to shape, not

planed, smoothed or otherwise

manufactured ....... .......Free


Wood, Sawed boards, planks

and deals, planed or dressed

on one or both sides, when the

edges thereof are pointed or

tongued and grooved........ 25


Wood, Shingles ............ ...Free


Wood, Pails, Tubs and Churns,

brooms, washboards, pound-

ers and rolling pins .......... 20


Wood Pulp .................... 25


Wood, manufactures of, n.e.s... 25


Wood,Lumber and Timber, man-

ufactured..................... 20


Wood veneers of not over 3/32 of

an inch in thickness.......... 7 1/2


Wood, D shovel handles wholly

of wood, and Mexican saddle

trees and stirrups of wood....Free


Wood, timber or lumber or wood,

viz., lumber and tinder planks

and boards of amaranth, coco-

boral, boxwood, cherry, chest-

nut, walnut,gumwood,mahog-

any, pitch pine, rosewood, san-

dalwood, sycamore, Spanish

cedar, oakm hickory, white-

wood, African teak, black

heart ebony, lignum vitae, red

cedar, redwood, satinwood,

and white ash, when not other-

wise manufactured than rough

sawn or split or creosoted, vul-

canized or treated by any other

preserving process ; sawed or

split boards, planks, deals and

other lumber when not further

manufactured than dressed on

one side only or creosoted,

vulcanized or treated by any

preserving process ; pine and

spruce clapboards ; timber or

lumber, hewn or sawd,squar-

ed or sided or creosoted ; laths,

pickets and palings; staves not

listed or jointed of wood of all

kinds ; firewood, handle, head-

ing, stave, and shingle bolts,

hop poles, fence posts, railroad

ties ; hubs for wheels, posts,

last blocks, wagon, oar, gun,

heading and all like block or


{MIDDLE COLUMN - RIGHT SIDE}


wool, worsted, the hair of the

camel, alpaca, goat, or like

animal, not exceeding in

weight six ounces to the square

yard, when imported in the

gray or unfinished state for

the purpose of being dyed or finished in Canada, under such

regulaions as are established

by the Governor in Council... 25


Xyolite, orCelluloid, in sheets,

lumps or blocks, in the rough

n.e.s........................Free


Yarns, Cotton and Cotton

Warps, dyed or undyed, n.e.s. 25


Yarns, composed wholly or in

part of wool, worsted, the hair

of the alpaca, goat or like ani-

mal costing 30c. per lb. and

over, when imported on the

cop, tube or in the hank

by manufacturers of woollen

goods for use in their products 20


Yarn, jute, flax or hemp yarn,

plain, dyed or coloured, jute

canvas, not pressed or calen-

dered, when imported by the

manufacturers of carpets, rugs

and mats,jute webbing or jute

cloth, hammocks, twines and

manufacture of or any of these

articles only, in their own

factories......................Free


Yarns, Woollen and Worsted,

n.e.s........... .. ..... .... 30


Yarn, spun from the hair of the

Alpaca or Angora Goat, when

imported by manufacturers of

braids, for use exclusively in

their factories in the manufac-

ture of such braids only, under

such regulations as may br

adopted by the Controller of

Customs.......................Free


Yarns, Cottom No. 40 and finer..Free


Yarn, coir.....................Free


Yarn of wool or worsted, when,

genapped, dyed and finished,

and imported by the manufs.

of braids, cords, tassels and

fringes,for use in their factories


{RIGHT COLUMN}



ARTICLES PROHIBITED.


Books, printed papers, drawings,

paintings, prints, photographs or

representations of any kind of a

treasonable or seditions, or of an

immoral or indecent character.


Reprints of Canadian copyright

works, and reprints of British copy-

right works which have been also

copyrighted in Canada.


Coin, base or counterfeit.


Goods manufactured or produced

wholly or in part by prison labor, or

which have been made within or in

connection with any prison, jail or

penitentiary. Also goods similar in

character to those produced in such

institutions, when sold or offered

for sale by any person, firm or cor-

poration having a contract for the

manufacture of such articles in such

institutions or by any agent of such

person, firm or corporation, or when

such goods were originally pur-

chased from or tranferred, by any

such contractor.


Oleomargarine, Butterine, or simi-

lar substitutes for butter.


Tea adulterated with spurious leaf,

or with exhausted leaves, or which

contains so great an admixture of

chemical or other deleterious sub-

stances as to make it unfit for use.


The importation into Canada of

any goods enumerated, described or

rederred to in schedule C to this Act

is prohibited ; and any such goods

imported shall thereby become for-

feited to the Crown and shall be

destroyed or otherwise dealt with as

the Minister of Customs directs ;

and any person importing any such

prohibited goods, or causing or per-

mitting them to be imported, shall

for each offence incur a penalty not

exceeding two hundred dollars.


{BOTTOM OF PAGE}


COINAGE IN CANADA.

{LEFT COLUMN}

In the early days all sorts of coin were used in British

North America.


The first step taken in Canada for a revision of cur-

rency was in 1795, when , to remedy the evils resulting

from the coined money in circulation being reduced in

weight, debased in value and composed of every variety

of pieces peculiar to all countries trading with this con-

tinenet, an Act was passed which fixed a standard of

value founded upon the average intrinsic worth of the

gold and silver coins of Great Britain, Portugal, Spain,

France and the United States.


{MIDDLE COLUMN}


Subsequently various Acts of the Legislatures estab-

lished a valuation for these pieces, at which they were

accepted in market overt.


Finally, in 1858, the Province of Canada adopted

dollars and cents, pounds, shillings and pence as the

only moneys of account. In 1871 the Federal Parlia-

ment passed the Act (Chap. 4, Acts of 1871) respecting

the currency, which gave to the provinces of the

Dominion a uniforn currency, the single gold standard

adopted being that of the British sovereign of the

weight and fineness prescribed by the laws of the


{RIGHT COLUMN}


United Kingdom, to pass current at $4.86 2/3. Provision

was also made that, until otherwise ordered by Her

Majesty's proclamation, the gold eagle of the United

States, of the fixed weight of 10 pennyweights and

18 grains troy, and of a settled standard of fineness,

should be legal tender in Canada. The same Act pro-

vided for a gold coinage for Canada, but special Cana-

dian gold coinage has not been minted.


Silver coins were made legal tender to $10,and bronze

coin to 25 cents.


The silver coins in use are 50, 25, 20, 20 and 5 cents

Banks in Canada with their Agencies.

{LEFT COLUMN}

PLACES. NAMES OF BANKS. MANAGER OR AGENT.


Acton........*Merchants.....I. B. Wallace.

Ailsa Craig...Standard........J. W. Osborne, Acting.

Alberton,PEIMerchants,P.E.IW. R. McKie.

Alexandris...Union..........J. R. Proctor.

" ...Ottawa ........J. Martin.

Alliston......Ontario ........J. Morris.

Almonte......Montreal .......R. W. Travers.

" ......Nova Scotia ....W. S. Moore.

Alvinston ....Molsons ........T. A. G. Gordon.

" ....*Merchants....Geo. Parker.

Amherst, N.S.Nova Scotis...John McKeen.

" Halifax Bk.Co...J. H. Morrison.

" Montreal.......A. Montizambert.

Annapolis,N.SNova Scotia....J. H. Lombard.

" Union of HalifaxE. D. Arnaud.

Antogonish ...Merchants, H...C. E. Harris.

" ...HalifaxBk.Co...J. M. Brough.

Arnprior .....Ottawa..........Gerald Jarvis.

" ......Nova Scotia .....H. S. Pethick.

Arthur.......Traders..........N. Ross.

Ashcroft, B.C.B. N. America..J. Cran.

Athens .......*Merchants.....H. P. Bingham.

Atlin, B.C....B. N. America..J. H. Gillard, Acting.

" ....Commerce .....T. R. Billett.

" ....Merchnats, H...W. A. Spencer.

Aurora......Ontario ........D. A. Radcliffe.

Avonmore....Ottawa.........J. D. Stewart.

Aylmer, O....Molsons ........H. A. Ambridge.

" ....Traders .........H. P. MacMahon.

Ayr..........Commerce......John Wyllie.

Barrie.......Toronto ....M. Atkinson.

" ........Commerce.......H. J. Grasett.

Barr'gton,N.S.Halifax Bk.Co...F. W. Homer

Barr'gton Pas.Union of HalifaxC. Robertson.

Bathurst, N.B.Merchants, H...J. F Barry.

Beamsville, O.Hamilton.......R. J. Hewat.

Bear R's, N.S.Com.B.ofWind'rL. A. Dodge.

Beauharnois,Q*Merchants.....L. Z. Leduc.

Bedford,Q....E. Townships...E. W, Morgan.

Belleville.....*Merchnats.....W. Hamilton.

" .....Montreal .......R. J. B. Crombie.

" ......Commerce.......C. M. Stork.

" .....Dominion.......J. W. Murray.

Bennett, B.C..Merchnats, H...J. H. Ferguson.

Berlin..... ..*Merchants.....W. E. Butler.

" ........Commerce.....E. P. Gower.

" .........Hamilton.......J. P. Bell.

" ........Nova Scotia ....A. E. Williams.

Berwick, N.S..Com.B.of Wind'rJ. W. Murray.

Blenheim ....Commerce......G. A. Holland.

Blyth ........Hamilton.......C. H. Bennett.

Boissevain, M.Union. .........J. J. Millidge.

Bothwell.....*Merchants.....W. J. Finucan.

Bowmanville..Ontario ........George McGill.

" Standard........W. J. Jones.

Bracebridge..Ottawa..........C. H. Kenny

Bradford.....Standard .......John Elliott.

Brampton...*Merchants ....W. A. Machaffie.

" ...B.N. America ..J. C. Nicoll, Acting.

" ...Imperial .. ....N. G. Leslie.

" ...Hamilton .....C. A. Patterson.

" ...B. N. America...{

{Printed Page: Banks in Canada with their Agencies.}

{LEFT COLUMN}

" ....Montreal.......E. M. Shadbolt.

" ....Commerce.......Jeffery Hale.

" ....Standard......W. T. Shannon.

Bridget'n,N.S.Nova Scotia....James Imrie.

" Union of HalifaxN. R. Burrows.

Bridgew'r,N.SMerchants, H...G. A. Spink.

" Halifax Bk,Co...H. H. Archibald.

Brighton.....Standard .......S. B. Gearing.

Brockville....Montreal .......Neil McLean.

" ....Molsons ........J. E. Fidler.

" .. Toronto .......T. A. Bird.

Brussels......Standard.......J. N. Gordon.

Buckingham QOntario ........W. E. Middleton.

Burlington...Traders.........F. B. Bennett.

Calgary, Alta..Imperial........M. Morris.

" ..Montreal.......J. O. Wilgress.

" ..Molsons ........W. C. Rhodes.

" ..Union..........T. N. Christie.

Campbellford..Standard.......W. C. Boddy.

Campbellton..Nova Scotia....D. R. Laird.

Cannington...Standard......John Houston.

Canning, N.S.Halifax Bk.Co...J. R. Forbes.

Canso.........People's, H......E. G. Coombs.

Carberry, M..Union.. ....R. M. Harrison.

" ..*Merchants.....E. J. McLelland.

Carleton Place.Ottawa.........J. A. Bangs.

" Union..........C. E. Watson.

Carman, M...Hamilton ......H. A. Aylwin.

" ...Union..........T. J. Tait.

Cayuga.......Commerce......W. C. T. Morson.

CharlottetownMerchants,PEI.J. M. Davison, Cashier.

" Merchants,H...W. F.Mitchell.

" Nova Scotia.... W. D. Ross.

Chatham,O...Commerce......J. E. Thomas.

" ...*Merchants.....W. Pringle.

" ...Montreal.......D. F. B. Glass.

" ...Standard.......G. P. Scholfield.

Chatham,N.BMontreal .......F. E. Winslow.

" Nova Scotia....R. H. Anderson.

Chesley ......Hamilton .......J. C. Telford.

" ......*Merchants ....J. R. Little.

Chesterville ..Molsons ..........H. P. D. Evans.

Chicoutimi, Q.La Banq. Nat ..P. A. Labadie.

Clarke'sH'rNSUnion of HalifaxC. Robertson, Acting.

Clinton .......Molsons .........H. C. Brewer.

Coaticook.....E. Townships...B. Austin.

Cobourg.......Dominion.......E. H. Osler.

" .......Toronto ........J. S. Skeaff.

Colborne.......Standard .......C. Larke.

Collingwood..Commerce......James Brydon.

" ..Toronto........W. A. Copeland.

Cornwall.......Montreal ......C. C. Abott.

" .....Ontario ...... A. Denny.

Cookshire....People's of H...F. E. Halls.

Cowansville...E. Townships...J. Mackinnon.

Cranbrook,BC.Commerce......J. W. H. Smythe.

CrystalCity,M.Union ..........H. W.Hettle,Sub.Man.

Danville,Q ...People's of H..M. Henry Richey.

Dartmouth,NSUnion of HalifaxJ. E. Allan.

Dauphin, Man.Ottawa........J. L. Irwin.

Dawson City..Commerce......H. T. Wills.

" ..B.N.America....D. Doig.

Delhi.........Hamilton.......A. B. Stennett.

Deloraine, M..Unoin..........B. W. Hughes.

Deseronto,OntMontreal ........F. W. Taylor.

Digby, N.S....NOva Scotia....Herbert Green.

Dorchester,NBMerchants, H..W. B. Meynell.

Drayton......Traders ........H. A. Mallory.

Dresden .......Commerce .....R. T. Museen.

Drum'ndv'leQ.Jacq.Cartier....J. E. Girouard.

Dundas.......Commerce......J. L. Barnu{not sure of letter}.


{MIDDLE COLUMN}


" ..PEOPLE'S, H....D. R Clarke, Cashier.

" .. North End..E. C. Helsby.

" ..Montreal........W. B. Graveley.

Hamilton.....HAMILTON ......J. Turnbull.

" ....do Barton St. BrR. B Davis.

" ....do East End Br.T. H. Brown.

" ....B. N. America...J. J. Morrison.

" ....Montreal........A. D. Braithwaite.

" ....*Merchants.....W. R. Travers.

" ....Traders.........Stuart Strathy.

" ....Commerce .....D. B. Dewar.

" ....Molsons........T. Beresford Phepoe.

" ....Imperial........F. S. Glassco.

Hamiota,Man.Hamilton ......H. Inman.

" Union.........J. F. Boulton.

Hanover......*Merchnats ....J. H. Adams.

Harriston ....Standard.......J. E. Gray.

Hartland,N.B Peeople's of H...P. Graham, Acting.

Hartney, Man.Union..........E. K. Strathey.

Hastings, Ont.Union..........A. U. Bailey.

Hawkesb'ry, OOtawa.........J. T. Brock.

Hensall........Molsons........F. E. Karn.

Hespeler .....*Merchants.....G. A. Miller.

Hochelaga....D'Hochelaga....J. H. Theoret.

Holland, Man.Union..........D. W. Banks.

Hull..........*Merchants ....H. A. Champagne.

" ..........Ottawa..........G. C. Wainwright.

Huntingdon,QE. Townships...E. S. Anderson.

Iberville, Q...St. Hyacinthe..J. M. Belanger.

Indian Head..Union..........Harold Shaw.

Ingersoll......Traders..........A. B. Ord.

" .......*Merchants.....H. Irwin.

" .......Imperial .......Charles White.

Jarvis........Hamilton ......R. R. MacLeod.

Joliette.......D'Hochelaga....H. Beaumier.

" .........La Banq. Nat...J. H. Pegram.

Kaslo, B. C...B. N. America...G. Bentley Gerrard.

Keewatin, O..Ottawa..........John Hood.

Kemptville, O.Ottawa ........H. Swan.

Kentville,N.S.Nova Scotia....J. M. Walker, Acting.

" Union..........A. D. McRae.

Killarney, M..Union..........J. M. Baldwin.

Kincardine....*Merchants.....A. M. Smith.

Kingston.....*Merchants.....G. E. Hague.

" ....Standard.......W. D. Hart.

" ....B. N. America...A. Harley.

" ....Montreal..........R. Mackenzie.

" ....Ontario.........A. J. Macdonell.

Kingston,N.B.Merchnats,H...W. Dickinson.

Kingsville, O.Molsons.. .....Geo. Willliamson.

Knowlton, Q.Molsons.. .....Wm. Russell Skey.

L'Assomption.St. Hyacinthe ..H. V. Jarry.

Lachine..... *Merchnats ....O. Constantineau.

Lachute......Ottawa.........J. R. Parris.

Lake MegaanicPeople's of H...R. A. E. Aitken.

Lanark.......Ottawa......... H. S. Walker.

LawrencetownUnion of HalifaxSub. to Bridgetown.

Leamington ..Traders.........Jas. Watson.

" ...*Merchnats....A. B. Patterson.

Lethb'dge,AlbUnion ..........Philip Vibert.

" Montreal.......R. F. Reeve.

Levis..........People's of H...L. J. Webster.

Lindsay ......Ontario. ...... H. J. Lytle.

" ......Montreal.. .....J. A. Paddon.

" ......Dominion.......Robt. Ross.

Listowel, Ont.Hamilton.......J. H. Stuart.

" Imperial........R. Arkell.

Lt. Glace Bay.Com.B.of Wind 'rH. E. Mosher.

Liverpool,N.S.Nova Scotia.....G. W. Babbitt, Acting.


{RIGHT COLUMN}

" .... do Centre Br.Jules Hamel.

" ....DU PEUPLE ......In liquidation.

" ....JACQ.CARTIER...

" ....VILLE MARIE.....In liquidtion.

" ....Quebec.........John Walker, Inspector

" ....do St.Cath.St.BrGeo. Leclerc.

" ....do Hochelaga...Allan McDougall.

" ....Ontario.........R. N. King.

" ....N. End Branch.T. J. Cochran.

" ....Toronto.........T. F. How.

do Pt.St.Ch's BrJ. G. Bird.

" ....Commerce......F. H. Mathewson.

" ....Union ...........Geo. H. Balfour.

" ....B.N. America...H.Sikeman,Gen.Man.

A. E. Ellis, Manager.

" ....La Banq Nat....L. DeGuise.

" ....Merchants, H...Edson L. Pease, Gen.Man.

A. E. Brock, Man.

" ....do, N. Dame St.R. H. Fulton.

" ....do Westmount..D. S. Benvie.

" ....Nova Scotia...J. Pitblado.

" ....Ottawa.........R. B. Kessen.

" ....Imperial .......J. A. Richardson.

" ....Dominion......Clarence A. Bogert.

Moosomin . ..Union...........A. E. Christie.

Moose Jaw ...Union..........B. B. Carter, Sub.

Morden, M...Union...........C. R. Dunsford.

" ...Hamilton..... H. A. Gray.

Morrisburg...Molsons.........W. S. Connelly.

Mount Forest.Ontario.........R. S. Bresdin.

Murray Bay, QNationale ......A. E. Couet.

Nanaimo,B.C.British ColumbiaG. Williams.

" .Merchants, H...J. W. Fulton.

Napanee .....*Merchants.....W. A. Belllhouse.

" ....Dominion.......T. S. Hill.

Neepawa,Man.Union ....... H. F. Forrest.

" .*Merchants.....W. A. Allan.

Nelson, B.C...Bk. B. ColumbiaG. V. Holt.

" ..Montreal ......A.H.Buchanan.

" ..Merchants, H ..George Kydd.

" ..Imperial........J. M. Lay.

N.Glasgow,NSNova Scotia.....C. H. Easson.

" Union of HalifaxR. C. Wright.

" Halifax Bk.Co...Boies Deveber.

Newcastle, O.Traders........W. G. Bryans.

Newcastle,N BNova Scotia.....P. C. Robinson.

" Merchants, H ..E. A. McCurdy.

N.Denver, BCMontreal.......C. M. Brown, Act. Man.

New Hamb'rg. Western ............ C. J. Fox.

N.Wmnstr,B CBkB.Columbia..G. E. Parkes.

" Montreal.........G. D. Brymner.

Newmarket...Ontario.........C. G. Ross.

N.Wmnstr,B CBkB.Columbia..G. E. Parkes.

" Montreal.........G. D. Brymner.

Newmarket...Ontario.........C. G. Ross.

Niagara Flls.Imperial......G. G. LeMesurier.

" .Hamilton.......H. H. O'Reilly.

North Bay....Traders........D Muir.

N.Sydney,C.BUnion of HalifaxC. W. Frazee.

" Nova Scotia.....W. S. Benson, Acting.

Norwich......Molsons........R. Elliot.

Norwood.....Union..........I. B. Waddell.

Oakville.... .*Merchants ...F.G. Oliver.

Orangeville...Commerce .....F. Y. Checkley.

" ..Hamilton ......J. S. Gordon.

Orillia ......Dominion ......J. Scott.

" .......Traders ........George Rapley.

Oshawa......WESTERN .......T.H. McMillan, Cashier.

" ......Dominion .....L. G. Cassels.

Ottawa. ......OTTAWA........Geo. Burn, Gen. Man.

D. M. Finnie, Manager.

" ...... do Bank St....P. B. Taylor.

" ...... do Rideau St . J. H.Neeve.

" ......B.N.America...W. E. Phillpotts.

BANKS IN CANADA WITH THEIR AGENCIES (Continued)

{LEFT COLUMN}

PLACES. NAMES OF BANKS. MANAGER OR AGENT.


Ottawa ......Montreal .......W.J. Anderson.

" ......Commerce .....Robt. Gill.

" ......Ontario ........A.Simpson.

" ......*Merchants. ...W. L. Marler.

" ......Quebec .........T. C. Coffin.

" .......La Banq. Nat...A. A. Taillon.

" .......Imperial........M. A. Anderson.

" .......Molsons ........A. B. Brodrick.

" .......Merchants,H...H. J. Gardiner.

Owen Sound..*Merchants.....M. S. Hodder.

" ..Hamilton ......Ewing Buchan.

" ..Molsons........J. R. Wainwright.

Oxford, N.S..Nova Scotia....W. M. Connacher.

Paisley.......Western.......S. M. Hutcheson.

Palmerston...Hamilton ......T. E. Haines.

Paris.........Commerce .....R. C. Macpherson.

Parkdale.....*Merchants.....H. T. McMillan.

" ......*Merchnats.....P. Dykes.

Parkhill......Commerce .....R. C. Macpherson.

Parrsboro'....Halifax Bk.Co...A. S. Townshend.

" ....Commercial....G. M. Wedd.

Parry Sound .Ottawa.........H. Y. Complin.

Paspebiac ....Nova Scotia....W. J. Hunt.

Pent'ng'sh'eneWestern........J. B. Jennings.

Perth ........*Merchants.....H. D. Wells.

" ........Montreal .......R. J Drummond.

Pembroke....Quebec........P.D.E.Stickland.

" ....Ottawa ........Hector Fraser.

Peterborough.Toronto ........P. Campbell.

" Montreal.......A. G. Parker.

" Commerce .....R. C. McHarrie.

" Ontario ........W. D. Parker, Acting.

Petrolia......Toronto........W. F. Cooper.

Phoenix, B.C.E. Townships...Wm. Spier.

Pickering ....Western........Geo. Kerr.

Picton ........Montreal........Geo Drummond.

" .......Standard .......E. A. Bog.

Pictou, N.S..Nova Scotia ....A. D. Munro.

" ..Merchants. ....G. R. Chisholm.

Pincher CreekUnion..........H. E. Hyde, Sub. Man.

PlumCoulee.MHamilton ......W. Russell.

Port Arthur..Ontario ........W. H. Nelson.

" ..Molsons..........E. E. Ward.

Port Colborne.Imperial .......J. H. Stidston.

Port Elgin....Hamilton ......A. H. Ridout.

P.HawkesburyMerchants. H...J. A. McIssac.

Port Hood,C.BPeople's,HalifaxR. H. MacDonald.

Port Hope....Traders .........J. L. Willis.

" ....Toronto........E. B. Andros.

Port Perry....Western........H. G. Hutcheson.

" ....Commerce......G. M. Gibbs.

Prt. la Prairie.Imperial .......W. Bell.

" " Ottawa..........A. H. Dickins

" " *Merchants.....A. G. Halstead.

Port Rowan,O.Hamilton.......R. R. MacLeod.

Prescott.......*Merchants ..F. Jemmett.

Preston ......*Merchants ....A. D. Pringle.

P. Albert,SaskImperial .......R. Davidson.

Quebec........QUEBEC.........T. McDougall, G. Man.

" ....... do ...........J. M. Johnston, Man.

" ....... do Upper TownC. C. Smith.

" ....... do St. Roch...C. B. Godwin.

" .......UNION...........E. E. Webb, Gen. Man .

" ....... do ............F. W. Smith, Local.


{MIDDLE COLUMN}

PLACES. NAMES OF BANKS. MANAGER OR AGENT.


St.Francois B.La Banq. Nat..Ls. Drouin.

St. Henri.....Quebec. .. ....H. Dorion.

" ....D'Hochelaga....J. F. Lacasse.

St.Hyacinthe.LA BANQUE DE..

ST.HYACINTHE.E. R. Blanchard.

" E. Townships....J. Lafromboise.

" La Banq. Nat...A. Clément.

St. John, N.B.N. BRUNSWICK...G. A. Schofield.

J. Clawson, Cahier.

" B.N.America...A. P. Hazen, Acting.

" Montreal ........E. C. Jones.

" Nova Scotia....T. B. Blair.

" Halifax Bk.Co...Jas. G. Taylor.

" Merchants, H...F. H. Arnaud.

St. John;s, Q..Bk. DE ST.JEAN..J. N. Gauthier.

" ..*Merchants.....H. Wurtele.

" ..La Banq Nat....G. P. Carreau.

St. Jerome....*Merchnays.....A. C. E. Delmege.

St. Marie, Q..La Banq. Nat...C. Lavoie.

St. Mary's ...Montreal .......J. Leslie.

" ..Traders ........C. S. Rumsey.

St. Peters,C.B.Union of HalifaxC. A. Gray.

St. Rémi, Q ..Bk. de St. Jean.C. A. Bédard.

St. Sauveur...Jacq. Cartier....A. Dion.

" ...*Merchants ...W. J. MacGowan.

St.Stephen NBST. STEPHEN'S...J. F. Grant.

" Nova Scotia....J. Black.

St. Thomas...*Merchants.....H. Blakeney.

" ...Imperial .......}M. A. Gilbert

" ... do. East End {CONNECTED WITH THE LINE ABOVE}

" ...Molsons........L. E. Tate.

Stellarton,N.S.Nova Scotia ....J. Morden.

Stouffvile ....Standard........H. J. Morden.

Stratford .....*Merchants.... C. H. S. Cooke, Acting.

" .....Montreal ........E. P. Winslow.

" .....Commerce......Wm. Maynard, jun.

Strathcona,AlbImperial........J. H. Wilson.

Strathroy.....Commerce......L. H. Dampier.

" .....Traders ........W. T. Smith.

Sturgeon FallsTraders .........M. C. Chalmers.

Sudbury......Ontario ...... G.M.Byres, Acting.

" ......Traders........N. T. Hillary.

Sum'side,PEI.SUM'ERSIDE BK..R.McC. Stavert.

" Nova Scotia....W. M. McCunn.

" Merchants, H...P. W. Morrison.

" Merchants,P.E.IJ. F. McMillan.

Sussex, N.B..Nova Scotia.....G. S Moore.

Sydney, C.B..Merchants, H...J. E. Burchell.

" ..Com.B.of Wind'rA. E. Lawson.

" ..B. N. America..O. H. Sharpe, Acting.

" ..Union of HalifaxH. W. Jubien.

" ..Merchants,P.E.IC. J. Stewart.

Sydney, N.S..Montreal........E. Pitt, Acting Manager

Tavistock....Western........B. D. Burn.

Thetf'rd MineQuebec........R. L. Y. Jones.

Thorold.... .Quebec.........D. B. Crombie.

Three River..Quebec.........Allan McDougall.

" ..D'Hochelaga....H. N. Boire.

Tilbury ......*Merchants ....G. Munro.

Tilsonburg. ..Traders .........E. C. Jackson.

" ....Western.........F. Biette.

Toronto ..... COMMERCE......B. E. Walker, G. Man.

J. H.Plummer,Asst.do.

" ..... do. Branch...J C. Kemp, Man.


{RIGHT COLUMN}

PLACES. NAMES OF BANKS. MANAGER OF AGENT.


Virden, Man..Union...........H. J. Pugh

Walkerton ...*Merchants.....A. V. Spencer.

" ...Commerce .....D. Macgillivray.

Walkerville... do .....J. L. Harcourt.

Wallaceburg..Montreal .......H. S. Dupuy.

Waterloo, Q..E. Townships...W. I. Briggs.

Waterloo,Ont.Molsons ........J. Hespeler.

" Commerce......A. W. Robarts.

Watford .....*Merchants ....F. A. Mann.

Wawanesa, M.Union..........A. H. Sutherland.

Welland ......Imperial ...... G. C. Brown.

Westport ....*Merchants ....R. F. Taylor.

Westville.....Nova Scotia.....Sub Ag'cy to Stellarton

Weymouth,NSMerchants.....D. Kemp.

Whitby .... Dominion ....E. Thornton.

" ......Western........E. D. Warren.

White Horse,

Yukon T...Commerce......H. M. Lay.

Wiarton, O...Union..........E. W. Bourinot.

Winchester...Union c.........D. B. Oliver, Sub. Man.

" ...Ottawa.........D. Macnamara.

Windsor, O...*Merchants ....G. V. J. Greenhill.

" ..Traders ........Geo. Mair.

" ..Commerce .....J. L. Hardcourt.

Windsor,N.S.COMMERCIAL ....Walter Lawson.

" Halifax Bk.Co...J. A. Russell.

Wingham ....Hamilton .......W. Corbould.

Winkler, Man.Hamilton.......W. Russell.

Winnipeg ....La Banq. Nat...J. H. Baker, Pro. Man.

" ....*Merchants ....A. Wickson.

" ....Molsons ....... E. F. Kohl.

" ....Montreal .......A. F. D. Macgachen.

" ....Imperial .......C. S. Hoare.

" ....D'Hochelags....A. J. C. Frigon.

" ....Dominion .....F. L. Patton.

" do North End BrS. L. Jones.

" ....Ottawa.........J. B. Monk.

" ....Commerce......John Aird.

" ....Union.........

" .... do ...........Geo. Bowles,Asst. Man.

" ....B.N.America...N. Bayly.

" ....Hamilton.......C. Bartlett.

" ....Nova Scotia....C. A. Kennedy.

Wolfville, N.S.Union of HalifaxJ. D. Leavitt.

" Peopl's,HalifaxGeo. W. Munro.

WoodstockOntCommerce......G. W. McKee.

" ..Imperial .......S. D. Raymond.

" ..Molsons.......E. W. Waud.

WoodstockNBNova Scotia....B. M. Macleod.

" People's,HalifaxG. A. White.

" Merchants,H. ..R. V. Dimock.

Yarmouth,N.SY ARMOUTH......T. W. Johns.

" Nova Scotia ....Blair Robertson.

Yorkton,NWTUnion..........C. W. R. Pearson.


  • Merchants Bank of Canada.


FOREIGN AGENTS.

In following list, Banks are arranged alphabetically.

BRITISH COLUMBIA, BANK OF--London, Head Office ; San

Francisco, Portland (Oregon), Branches ; Eastern

Provinces of Canada, Mer. Bk.of Canada, Bk.of Com-

merce, Molsons Bk.,Imperial Bk.,Bk.of Nova Scotia ;

{Printed Page: Banks in Canada with their Agencies (Continued)}


[LEFT COLUMN}

" ....... do St.Louis St.Geo. Veasey, do

" .......NATIONALE.....P. Lafrance.

" .......do St. John St..J. A. LaRue.

" . .....do St. Joseph St.N. Lavoie.

" ..... B. N.America...D. Cumberland.

" ........Montreal ......J. Macara.

" ........*Merchants.....J. C. More.

" .......People's of H..A. B. van Felson.

" .......D'Hochelaga ...Arthur Bruneau.

" ........Molsons........P. B. Dumoulin.

Rat Portage..Imperial .......W. A. Weir.

" ..Ottawa.........C. G. Pennock.

Regina........Montreal .......W. H. Hogg.

" ........Union...........R. S. Barrow.

Renfrew, O...*Merchants....F. A. W. Lister.

" ...Ottawa.........F. C. Mulkins.

Revelstoke BCImperial.......A. R. B. Hearn.

" Molsons.... ...J. D. Molson.

Richmond...E. Townships...W. L. Ball.

Richmond HillStandard .......J. F. Rowland.

Ridgetown....Molsons ........H. A. H. Thomson.

" ...Traders ........E. E. Newman.

Rimouski, Q..Nationale ......P. Vallée.

Roberval .....La Banq. Nat...L. Couet.

Rossland, B.C.Montreal .......J. S. C. Fraser.

" B. N. America..W. T. Oliver.

" Merchants, H...John M. Smith.

" Toronto ........A. B. Barker.

" Brit.Columbia..H. F. Mytton.

Sackville,N.B.Merchants, H. ..F. McDougall.

" Halifax Bk.Co...W. H. Harrison.

Sandon, B.C..Brit.Columbia..T. B. May.

Sarnia.........Commerce......A. D. McLean.

" ..........Traders........J.F. Winlow.

" .........Montreal .......G. H. Griffin.

SaultSte MarieCommerce......D. McGregor.

" Imperial .......R. A. Lyon.

" Traders.........A. F. H. Jones, Acting.

Seaforth ......Commerce......F. C. G. Minty.

" ......Dominion ......W. K. Pearce.

Shawinf'nF'IsOttawa .........W. Wilson Forrest.

Shawville.....*Merchants ...F. A. Parker.

Shediac, N.B..People's, HalifaxF. A. Borden.

Shelburne,OntUnion..........A. E. Motson.

Shelburne, NSHalifax B. Co...T. W. Magee.

Sherbrooks...E. TOWNSHIPS...Wm. Farwell, G. Man.

S. Edgell, Local.

" ....*Merchants.....G. Carruthers.

" ....La Banq. Nat...J. M. Dufresne.

" D'Hochelaga ...C. A. Sylvestre.

SherbrooksNSUnion of HalifaxF. O. Robertson.

Shubenacadie.Merchants, H...D. Cameron.

Simcoe........Commerce......E. Cowdry.

" ........Hamilton........J. Butterfield.

" ........Molsons........H. H. Groff.

Smith's Falls..Molsons ........F. A. Bethune

" " ..Union..........F. W. Ashe.

Sorel ..........Molsons .........J. F. Moreault.

" .........D'Hochelaga....J. F. Boulais.

Souris, Man...Union..........A. S. Jarvis.

" ...*Merchants.....H. M. P. Eckardt.

Souris, P.E.I..MerchantsP.E.I.G. W. Sutherland, Act.

Southampton.Hamilton.......A. H. Ridout.

Springhill ....Halifax Bk.Co...E. B. Fairbanks.

Stanstead.....E. Townships...S. Stevens.

Stayner ......Toronto ........F. A. Brodie.

St.Andr'w'sNBNova Scotia.....Sub. to St. Stephen.

St. Catharines.Imperial........C. M. Arnold.

" Commerce......F. O. Cross.

" Toronto .........G. W. Hodgetts.

Ste.Cèsaire,Q.St. Hyacinthe...M. N. Jarry.


{MIDDLE COLUMN}

M. Morris, Assistant.

" ...... do. E. Br.....J. G. Boyce.

" ...... do. N. Br.....R. J. Montgomery.

" ...... do. N.W.Br...W. Manson.

" ......do.Q'n St. W.Br..E. M. Playter.

" ......do.Ym.&Col.Br..T. S. Harrison.

" ......do.Parl'tSt.Br... V. E. Hart.


" .....do.Market Br...H. Smith.

" ......ONTARIO........Chas.McGill, Gen. Man.

" ...... do. Branch...W. H. Smith.

" ......do. Q'n St.W.Br.John McGill.

" ......do. Yn.&Rich.StsA. E. Hagerman.

" ......STANDARD ......Geo. P.Reid,Gen'l Mgr.

" ......DOMINION. .....T. G. Borough, G. Man.

" ...... do. Q'n St.E...R. M. Gray.

" ...... do. Q'n St.W ..J. H. Horsey.

" ...... do. Mk't Br...W. W. Nation.

" ...... do. Dundas &

Queen St. Br...A. A. Helliwell.

" ...... do. Spad.Av...

&Col.St.Br..F. O. Cayley.

" ...... do. N.Toronto..C. H. Stanley Clarke.

" ...... do. King & YorkA. R. Capriel.

" ......TORONTO........Duncan Coulson,G.Man

" ...... do. Branch.... W. R. Wadsworth.

" ......Toronto.King W.G. J. Cutbbertson.

" ......TRADERS......H S. Strathy, Gen. M.

" .......Montreal ........A. Kirkland.

" ...... do Yonge St.BrG.S. Crawford, sub Agt.

" ......B.N. America...E. Stanger.

" ......*Merchants ...D. Miller.

" ......Quebec.........W. P. Sloane.

" ......Ottawa.........Francis Cole.

" ......Molsons ........C. W. Clinch.

" ......Union...........F. W. Strathy.

" ......Hamilton.......F. J. Gosling.

" ......Nova Scotia ...H.A.Richarson, Man.

" ...... do H.A.Richardson, Man.

Toronto Jun..Commerce......R. C. Jennings.

" Molsons ........C. B. Marsland.

Treton, O....Molsons........J. H. Campbell.

Truro,N.S....Merchants, H...Martin Dickie.

" ....Halifax Bk.Co...J. Moorman.

" ....Com.of WindsorC. A. Armstrong.

Tweed .......Ontario ........A. C. Osborne.

Uxbridge.....Dominion........W. E. Carswell.

Valleyfield ...Molsons.........Alex. Boyer.

" D'Hochelaga ...S. Fortier.

Vancouver,BCBk. B. ColumbiaWm. Murray.

" B. N. America...W. Godfrey.

" Montreal.......C. Sweeny.

" Imperial........A. Jukes.

" Commerce .....H. H. Morris.

" Merchants, H ..C. E. Neill.

" do Eat Bra'chJ. W. Fulton.

" Molsons ........H. Lockwood.

" Hamilton.......O. S. Clarke.

Vankl'k Hill,O'D'Hochelaga ...D. McInnes.

" Ottawa.........B. A. Herring.

Vernon, B.C..Montreal ......G.A. Henderson.

Victoria,B.C..B. COLUMBIA... G. Gillespie, Man.

E. A. Wyld, Asst. Man.

" ..B. N. America...Gavin H. Burns.

" ..Montreal .......A. J. C. Galletly.

" ..Merchants, H ..George A. Taylor.

" ..Molsons.........H. B. Wilson.

Victoriaville,QQuebec.........C. S. Powell.

" Molsons.........A. Marchand.


{RIGHT COLUMN}

New York, Can. Bk. of Commerce, Merchants Bk.

of Canada ; Chicago, Bk. of Nova Scotia ; Boston,

Bank of Nova Scotia ; Mexico and South America ;

London Bank of Mexico and South America ;

China, Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corpora-

tion ; Australia, Bank of Australasia ; Honolulu

Bishop & Co.

BRITISH NORTH AMERICA, BANK OF--London, England,

Head Office. New York, W. Lawson and J.

C. Welsh, Agents ; Boston, U. S., Merchants

National Bank and Commercial Bank ; Ireland,

Provincial Bank and National Bank ; Paris, Mar-

cuard, Krauss & Co, ; West Indies, Colonial Bank ;

Australia and New Zealand, Union Bk of Astralia.

CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE--London, Bank of Scot-

land, London and County Bank, German Bank of

France, Credit Lyonnais, Lazard, Frères & Cie ;

Germany, Deutsche Bank ; Brussels, Belgium, J.

Matthieu & Fils ; India, China and Japan, The

Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China ;

Australia and New Zealand, The Union Bank

of Australia ; South America, British Bank of

South America, London and Brazilian Bank ;

Mexico, Banco de Londres y Mexico ; New York,

The Canadian Bank of Commerce, The American

Exchange Nat. Bank ; British Columbia and San

Franciso, Cal., The Bank of British Columbia and San

Chicago, The American Exchange National Bank

of Chicago, The Commercial National Bank ;

Hamilton, Bermuda, The Bank of Bermuda ; West

Indies, Bank of Nova Scotia ; Kingston. Jamaica,

Colonial Bank and Branches ; Duluth, First

National Bank ; Maritime Provinces, The Bank of

Nova Scotia

COMMERCIAL BANK OF WINDSOR--London, Union Bank

of London ; New York, Bank of New York ; Halifax,

Bank of Nova Scotia ; St. John, N.B., Bank of New

Brunswick ; Montreal,Canadian Bank of Commerce.

DOMINION BANK --London, National Bank of Scotland,

Limited ; New York, The National City Bank ;

Minneapolis, North-Western Nat. Bank ; Chicago,

Commercial National Bank.

EASTERN TOWNSHIPS BANK--London, National Bank of

Scotland ; Boston,National Exch. Bank ; New York,

Fourth National Bank ; London, Eng., Parr's Bank

(Limited).

HAMILTON, BANK OF--New York, Fourth Nat. Bk. and

Hanover National Bank ; Buffalo, Marine Bank of

Buffalo ; London, Nat. Prov. Bank of England, Lt.;

Chicago, Union Nat. Bank ; Detroit,Detroit National

Bank ; Boston,International Trust Co.; Kansas City,

The National Bank of Commerce ; St. Louis, Nat.

Bank of Commerce.

IMPERIAL BANK OF CANADA -- Canada, Bank of Montrea

and Branches ; Great Britain, Lloyds Bank (Ltd.),

Manchester & Liverpool District Banking Co. (Ltd.);

France, Crédit Lyonnais ; United States -- New

York, Bank of Montreal, Bank of America, Bank

of the Manhattan Co. ; Buffalo, Bank of Buffalo ;

Boston, National Bank of the Commonwealth ;

Chicago, First National Bank, Union National

Bank ; Detroit, Detroit National Bank ; Duluth,

First National Bank, American Exchange Bank ;

Philadelphia, Farmers' and Mechanics' National

Bank ; St. Paul, Second National Bank ; Minne-

{Printed Page: Banks in Canada with their Agencies (Continued)}


{LEFT COLUMN}

apolis, First National Bank ; San Francisco, Wells,

Fargo & Co.; China and Japan, Hong Kong and

Shanghai Banking Corporation ; Austalia, New

Zealand, Tasmania, Union Bank of Australia(Ltd.);

Sandwich Islands, Yokohama Specie Bank (Ltd.).

LA BANQUE D'HOCHELAGA--London, Clydesdale Bank

(Ltd.), and the London agencies of Crédit Lyonnais,

Crédit Industriel et Commercial, Comptoir National

d'Escompte de Paris, Société Générale ; Brussels,

Crédit Lyonnais ; Berlin, Deutche Bank ; Vienna,

Banque Imperiale-Royal Priv.des Pays-Autrichiens;

New York, National Park Bank, the National City

Bank of New York, Merchants' National Bank

of New York, MM. Heidelbach, Ickelheimer &

Co., Importers & Traders National Bank, MM.

Ladenburg, Thalman & Co., Kountze Bros. ; Boston,

National Bank of Redemption, Third National Bank,

International Trust Company, The National Bank of

the Commonwealth ; Chicago, National Live Stock

Bank, Illinois Trust and Savings Bank.

LA BANQUE DE ST. JEAN--Canada, Molsons Bank and

Branches ; New York, Agents Bank of Montreal;

Boston, The Shoe and Leather National Bank.

LA BANQUE NATIONALE--London, National Bank of Scot-

land ; Paris, Credit Lynnais ; New York, National

Bank of the Republic ; Boston, Shoe and Leather

National Bank.

MERCHANTS BANK OF CANADA--London, and other

points in Great Britain, Thr Royal Bank of

Scotland ; New York, American Exchange Na-

tional Bank, and Merchants Bank of Canada, 63-65

Wall Street, T. E. Merrett, Agents ; Chicago,

American Exchange Nationaln Bank ; St. Paul,

Minn., First National Bank ; Detroit, First Na-

tional Bank ; Buffalo, Bank of Buffalo ; San

Francisco, Bank of British Columbia and Anglo-

Californian Bank ; Portland,Tacoma,Seattle, Wash-

ington Territory, Bank of British Columbia ; New-

foundland, Bank of Nova Scotia ; Nova Scotia,

Merchants' Bank of Halifax ; New Brunswick, Bank

of Nova Scotia and Merchants Bank of Halifax ;

British Columbia, Bank of British Columbia.

MERCHANTS BANK OF HALIFAX--Ontario and Quebec,

Merchants' Bank of Canada ; St. John, N.B., Bank

of New Brunswick ; New York, Chase National

Bank, N. Y.; Boston, National Shawmut Bank ;

Chicago, American National Bank ; Buffalo, Na-

tional City Bank ; San Francisco, First National

Bank ; Washington, Bank of the Republic, A. S.

Burchell, Agent ; St. John's, Newfoundland, W.

H. Crowdy, Man. Branch ; London, Eng., Bank

of Scotland, London ; Havana, Cuba, F. J, Sherman,

O. A. Hornsby, J. A. Springer, Agents.

MERCHANTS BANK OF P. E. I.--London, The London

City and Midland Bank, Limited ; Boston, National

Shawmut Bank ; Montreal, St. John and Halifax,

Bank of Montreal.

MOLSONS BANK--London, Parr's Bank (Ltd.), Chaplin,

Milne, Grenfell & Co. (Ltd.) ; Liverpool, Bank of

Liverpool (Limited) ; Cork, Munster and Leinster

Bank (Limited) ; Paris, France, Credit Lyonnais,

Société Generale ; Antwerp, Belgium, La Banque

D'Anvers ; Hamburg, Germany, Hesse Newman


{MIDDLE COLUMN}


& Company ; Berlin, Germany, Deutsche Bank ;

Portand, Casco National Bank ; Butte, Montana,

First National Bank ; New York, Mechanics' Na-

tional Bank, Morton rust Co.,National City Bank,

Hanover National Bank ; Boston, State National

Bank, Kidder, Peabody & Co., ; Philadelphia,

Fourth Street National Bank, First National

Bank, Corn Exchange National Bank ; Phila-

delphia National Bank ; Cleveland, Commercial

National Bank ; Milwaukee, The Wisconsin Na-

tional Bank of Milwaukee ; Chicago, First National

Bank ; Monneapolis, First National Bank ; Detroit,

State Savings Bank ; Toledo, Second National Bank ;

Buffalo, City National Bank ; Nova Scotia, Halifax

Banking Co., Bank of Yarmouth ; New Brunswick,

Bank of New Brunswick ; Newfoundland, Bank

of Nova Scotia, St. John's, Nfld.; Prince Edward

Island, Merchants Bank of Prince Edward Island

and Summerside Bank ; British Columbia and

San Fancisco, Bank of British Columbia ; Quebec,

Eastern Townships Bank ; Ontario, Dominion

Bank, Imperial Bank of Canada and Canadian Bank

of Commerce ; Manitoba, Imperial Bank of Canada ;

Yukon Territory, Dawson City, Bank of British

North America.

MONTREAL, BANK OF--London, Bk. of Montreal,A.Lang,

Manager, H. Haylock, sub-manager ; Bank of

England, London and Westminister Bank, Union

Bank of London, Nat. Prov. Bank of England ;

Liverpool, Bank of Liverpool ; Scotland, British

Linen Company ; New York, R. Y. Hebden, J. M.

Greata ; Bodton,Merchants National Bank ; Buffalo,

The Marine Bank ; Chicago, Bank of Montreal,I. W.

de C. O'Grady, Mgr.; San Francisco, Bank of British

Columbia, Anglo-Californian Bank, First Nat. Bank ;

St. John's, Newfoudland, Bank of Montreal, F. J

Hunter, Manager.

NEW BRUNSWICK, BANK OF--London, Williams, Deacon

and Manchester and Salford Bank, Limited ; New

York, Mechanics' National Bank ; Boston, Eliot

National Bank ; Prince Edward Island, Charlotte-

town, Merchants' Bank of Halifax ; Frederiction,

People's Bank ; Halifax, N.S., Merchants' Bank of

Halifax ; Montreal, Molsons Bank.

NOVA SCOTIA, BANK OF --Chicago, Alex. Robertson, Mgr.

W. H. Davies, Asst. Mgr.; Kingston, Jamaica,

W.1., W. P. Hunt, Mgr., St. John's, Newf'land,

J. A. McLeod, Manager ; Boston, Mass., W. E.

Stavert, Manager ; Harbor Grace, Newfoundland,

Calais, Maine. Correspondents--Canada, Cana-

dian Bank of Commerce and Branches ; Bank of

British Columbia ; Great Britain ; London, Royal

Bank of Scotland ; Scotland, Royal Bank of Scot-

land and Branches; U.S.: New York, Bk. of New

York, N. B. A.; Boston, Merchants' National Bank ;

San Francisco,Bank of Brititsh Columbia ; St.Pierre,

Miquelon, Banque des Iles St. Pierre et Miquelon ;

Havana, Cuba, de Zaldo & Co.; Chicago, First Na-

tional Bank ; Minneapolis, Nicollet National Bank.

ONTARIO BANK --London, Parr's Bank (Limited);

New York, The Agents Bank of Montreal,

The Fourth National Bank of the City of

New York, France and Europe, Credit Lyon

nais ; Boston, Eliot National Bank ; Oswego

First National Bank ; Chicago, Bank of Montreal;


{RIGHT COLUMN}


St. Paul's, Merchants' National Bank ; Nova Scotia,

People's Bank of Halifax ; New Brinswick, Bank of

Montreal, St. John, N.B.; P.E.Island, Merchants'

Bank of Halifax at Charlottetown.

OTTAWA, BANK OF --London, England, Parr's Bank

(Limited); New York, Chicago and Canada, Bank

of Montreal ; Boston, National Bk. of the Republic,

Massachusetts Nat. Bk. and Manufacturers Nat. Bk.

PEOPLES'S BANK OF HALIFAX Dominion of Canada,

Bank of Toronto, Ontario Bank, Bank of New

Brunswick; New York, Bank of New York; Boston,

New England National Bank ; Minneapolis, First

National Bank; London, England, Union Bank of

London; Paris, France, Credit Lyonnais.

PEOPLE'S BANK--London, Union Bank; New

York,Fourth National Bank ; Boston, Eliot National

Bank ; Montreal, Union Bank of Can.and Branches.

QUEBEC BANK--London, Bank of Scotland ; New York,

Agents, Bank of British North America

ST. HYACINTHE, BANQUE--New York, National Bank of

the Republic, and Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co.;

Boston, Merchants National Bank ; Canada, Mer-

chants Bank of Canada and Branches.

ST. STEPHEN'S BANK--Boston, Shawmut Bk.; New York,

New York Bk.and Nat.B'king Association ; London,

Glyn, Mills,Currie &Co.; Montreal,Bk. ofMontreal.

STANDARD BANK--New York, Importers and Traders

National Bank ; Montreal,Can. Bank of Commerce ;

London, Eng.,National Bank of Scotland (Limited).

SUMMERSIDE BANK--Montreal, Molson's Bank; Halifax,

UUnion Bank of Halifax ; St. John, Bank of New

Brunswick; Boston,Shoe & Leather National Ban k.

TORONTO, BANK OF--Great Britain, The London City

and Midland Bank (Limited) London; New York,

Nat. Bk. Commerce ; Chicago, First National Bank;

Buffalo, Manufacturers and Traders Bank ; Detroit,

Detroit National Bank ; Ontario, Bank of Hamilton

and Branches; Quebec, La Banque Nationale; Nova

Scotia, Union Bank of Halifax, People's Bank of

Halifax ; Manitoba, British Columbia and New

Brunswick, Bank of British North America.

TRADERS BANK OF CANADA--London, National Bank of

Scotland ; New York, American Exchange National

Bk.; Buffalo, Union Bk.; Chicago, First Nat. Bk.;

Oswego, Second National Bk, ; Quebec, Quebec Bk.

UNION BANK OF CANADA--London, Parr's Bank (Ltd.)'

Liverpool, Parr's Bank (Ltd.); New York, National

Park Bank, Hanover Natt, ; Boston, National Bank

of the Republiv ; St. Paul, St. Paul National Bank;

Buffalo, Buffalo City Bank ; Chicago, Commercial

National ; Detroit, First National Bank ; Great

Falls, Mont., First Nat. Bank ; Minneapolis, Nat.

Bank of Commerce.

UNION BANK OF HALIFAX--London, London and West-

minister Bank, Ltd.; Newfoundland, Merchants

Bank ; New York, National Bank of Commerce ;

Boston, Merchants' Nat'l Bank ; Montreal, Bank of

Toronto ; Toronto, Bk. of Toronto and Branches.

WESTERN BANK--New York, Merchants' Bank of Canada;

London, England, Royal Bank of Scotland.

YARMOUTH, BANK OF, N.S. --Halifax, The Merchants

Bank of Halifax ; St. John, The Bank of Montreal ;

New York, The National Citizens' Bank ; Boston,

The Eliot National Bank ; London, G.B., The Union

Bank of London ; Montreal, The Bank of Montreal

and Molsons Bank ; Quebec, Bank of Montreal.

{Printed Page: Canadian Commercial Agencies; Synopsis of Fishery Laws; Abstract of Ontario Game Laws; Express Money Orders; Bank Money Orders}

CANADIAN COMMERCIAL AGENCIES.

{LEFT COLUMN}

The following Canadian Commercial Agents (whose

addresses are given)will answer correspondence relative

to commercial and trade matters, and give information

to those interested as to local trade requirements in the

districts they represent.


J. S. Larke, Sydney, N.S.W., agent for Australasia.

G. Eustace Burke, Kingston, Jamaica, agent for

Jamica.

Robert Bryson, St. John, Antigua, agent for Antigua,

Montserrat and Dominica.


{MIDDLE COLUMN}


S. L. Horsford, St. Kitts, agent for St. Kitts, Nevis

and Virgin Island.

Edgar Tripp, Port of Spain, Trinidad, agent for Trini-

and Denmark.

In addition to their other duties, the undermentiones

Canadian agents will answer inquiries relative to trade

matters, and their services are available in furthering

the interests of Canadian traders.


{RIGHT COLUMN}

J. G. Colmer, 17 Victoria St., London,S.W., England.

Harrison Watson, Curator for Canadian Section,

Imperial Institute, London, England.

G. H. Mitchell, 15 Water Street, Liverpool, England.

H. M.Murray, 52 St. Enoch Square, Glasgow, Scotland.

W. L. Griffith, 10 The Walk, Cardiff, South Wales.

Thomas Moffat,24 Wale St.,Cape Town, South Africa,

D. Treau De Coeli, 75 Marché St. Jacques, Antwerp.

Belgium.


SYNOPSIS OF FISHERY LAWS.

{LEFT COLUMN}

Net fshing of any kind is prohibited in public waters.

except under Leases or Licenses. The size of nets is

regulated so as to prevent the killing of young fish.

Nets cannot be set or seines used so as to bar channels

or bays. A general weekly Close-time is provided in


{MIDDLE COLUMN]

addition to speacial close seasons. The use of Explosive

or Poisonous substances for catching or killing fish is

illegal. The use of fire-arms for filling fish is prohibited.

Mill-dams must be provided with efficient fish passes.

The above enactments and close seasons are supple-


{RIGHT COLUMN}

mented in speacial cases, under authority of the Dominion

Fisheries Act (Chap. 95 R. S.), by a total prohibition of

fishing for stated periods. All communications relating

to Fisheries should be addressed: Department of Marine

and Fisheries, Ottawa.


ABSTRACT OF ONTARIO GAME LAWS.

{LEFT COLUMN}

No person not a resident and domiciled in Ontario,

may hunt or kill any animal or bird in Ontario without

having procured a non-resident license.

Deer.--Open season November 1st to November 15th,

both days inclusive.

Only two Deer may be taken in one season by one

person.

Moose, Reindeer or Caribou.--Open season November

1st to November 15th, in the year 1900, noth days inclu-

sive, and in every third year thereafter.

Only one Moose, Reindeer or Caribou may be taken in

one season by one person.

No cow Moose, or young Moose, Reindeer or Caribou

under the age of one year can be killed.

No Elk or Wapiti shall be hunted, taken or killed at

any time in Ontario.

No person may transport or have in possession, except

from November 1st to 22nd,any wild Deer, Moose, Rein-

deer or Caribou, or head, raw skin or other part thereof,

unless accompanied by affidavit that same was taken

during the open season. Deer, Moose, Reindeer or

Caribou may not be carried or transported unless a

license shipping coupon is attached.

No hounds or dogs accustomed to pursue Deer are

allowed at large where Deer are found, during the close

season for Deer.


{MIDDLE COLUMN}

Hounds or dogs running Deer during the close season

may be killed in sight by any person, who shall not be

liable to damage for so doing.

Ducks. --Open season September 1st to December

15th, both days inclusive.

Geese and Swans.--Open season September 15th to

May 1st in the following year, both days inclusive.

Grouse.--Open season September 15th to December

15th, both days inclusive.

Hares.--Open season September 15th to December

15th, both days inclusive.

Partridge.--Open season September 15th to December

15th, both days inclusive. May not be bought or sold

before the 15th day of September, 1905.

Pheasants.--Open season September 15th to Decem-

ber 15th, both days inclusive. English or Mongolian

Pheasants may not be killed before the 15th day of Sep-

tember, 1905.

Plover.--Open season September 15th to December

15th, both days inclusive.

Prairie Fowl.--Open season September 15th to De-

cember 15th, both days inclusive. May not be killed

before the 15th fay of September, 1905.

Quail.--Open season October 15th to December 15th,

both days inclusive. May not be bought or sold before

the 15th day of October, 1905.


{RIGHT COLUMN}

Rail.--Open season September 15th to December 15th,

both days inclusive.

Turkeys, Wild.--Open season October 15th to Decem-

ber 15th, both days inclusive. May not be killed before

the 15th day of October, 1905.

Snipe.--Open season September 15th to December

15th, both days inclusive. May not be sold before the

15th day of September, 1905.

Woodcock.--Open season September 15th to December

15th, both days inclusive. May not be bought or sold

before the 16th day of September, 1905.

Insectivorous birds may not be caught, killed or sold,

or had in possession without a permit, except Hawks,

Crows, Black-birds and English Sparrows.

Squirrels (Black and Grey).--Open season September

15th to December 15th, both days inclusive.

Beaver and Otter.--Open season November 1st to

April 1st in folloeing year, both days inclusive. May

not be taken or killed before the 1st day of November,

1905.

Muskrats.--Open season January 1st to May 1st, both

days inclusive. But no Muskrat may be shot during the

month of April.


NOTE.--For further particulars address E. Tinsley,

Chief Game Warden, Parliament Buildings, Toronto.

Postal

Letter Rates, &c.

Canada.-Letters posted in Canada addressed to any place within the Dominion, 2 cents per oz. If unpaid, such letters cannot be forwarded, but will be sent to the Dead Letter Office. If partially prepaid, the letter will be forwarded to its destination and double to deficiency charged on delivery. Letters mailed at any office for delivery at or from the same office, provided that the office is not one at which free delivery by letter carriers is setablished, are charged 1 cent per oz, and must be at least partially prepaid; otherwise they are sent to the Dead Letter Office. Letters of this nature mailed at and for delivery from an office at which there is a free delivery by letter carriers, are liable to 2 cents per ounce. All postage must be prepaid by Postage Stamps.

Post Cards.- From any place in Canada to any other place in Canada, or to the United States, 1 cent each. British and Foreign, 2 cents each.

Private Post Cards.- Private Post Cards must not exceed 6 by 3 5/8 inches in size, and bear the words "Private Post Card," either printed or written, on the face.

United Kingdom, and the following British Possessions and Portectorates: Aden, Ascension, Bahama Islands, Barbados, Bermuda, British Central Africa, British East Africa, British Guiana, British Honduras, British India (except offices on the Persian Gulf), British North Borneo Company's Territory, including Labuan, Cape Colony, Ceylon, Cyprus, Falkland Islands, Fiji, Gambia, Gilbratar, Gold Coast Colony, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Johore, Lagos, Leeward Islands, Malay States, Malta, Mauritus, Natal, Newfoundlands, Niger Coast Protectorate, Niger Company's Territory, Sarawak, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Straits Settlements, St. Helena, Tobago, Trindad, Turks Islands, Uganda, Windwards Islands, Zanzibar.- Postage on Letters, 2 cents per half oz

Foreign Countries, except United States.- Postage on Letters, 5 cents per half oz. If sent unpaid, double postage will be charged.

United States.- The rate on Letters to the United States is the same as in Canada, and at least one rate must be prepaid.

It is very important to bear in mind that the postage upon letters for the United Kingdom and all Foreign Countries is calculated by the half ounce, and double postage is charged on all unpaid letters.

Registration of Letters.

Persons posting letters containing value should be careful to require them to be Registered, and to obtain from the Postmaster a certificate of receipt for Registration.

The charge for Registration on all classes of matter, in addition to the postage, is five cents.

Both the Postage charge and Registration fee should, in all cases, be prepaid by stamp.

Registration is not an absolute guarantee against the miscarriage or loss of a letter: but a Registered Letter can be traced where and Unregistered Letter cannot, and the posting and delivery or non-delivery can be proven.

Book Post, &c.

A Book Packet may contain any number of separate books. Limit of weight for domestic post, 5 lbs. (except a single book, when 7 lbs. is allowed): for foreign post, 4 lbs. Limit of size, two feet in length, or one foot in width or depth.

Book Packets must also be open at both ends or both sides, and must not contain any letter or sealed inclosure.

The rate on Booko Packets between any two places in Canada is 1 cent per 4 oz, which must be prepaid by stamps.

The rate to Great Britain, the United States and all Postal Union Countries, is 1 cent per 2 oz.

{RIGHT COLUMN}

Patterns and Samples within the Dominion

Patterns and Samples of Merchandise and Goods for sale, not exceeding 24 oz. in weight, except samples of tea, which must not exceed 8 oz. in weight, may be posted in Canada, to be forwarded to any place within the Dominion, on prepayment by Postage Stamp of a rate of 1 cent per 4 oz, under the following regulations:

If such rate be not fully prepaid by the stamp affixed, the packet to be forwarded, rated with the deficient postage, provided deficiency does not exceed 5 cents.

Packages of Samples and Patterns, addressed to any place in Canada, may be registered by affixing thereto stamps to the value of 5 cents in addition to the postage rate, and provided such packet be handed into the Post Offices for registration.

Patterns or Samples must be sent in covers open at the ends, so as to be easy of examination. Samples, however, of seeds, drugs, &c., which cannot be sent in open covers, may be enclosed in bags of linen, or such like material, fastened in such a manner that they may be readily opened, so that the officers of the Post Office may be able to satisfy themselves as to the nature of the contents.

The packet may bear on the outside the address of the sender, in addition to the address of the person for whom it may be intended; and also a trade mark or number, and the price of the sample enclosed; inside, there must be no enclosure but the samples or patterns themselves.

The particulars, however, of the trade marks, numbers, and prices may be marked on the articles themselves instead of on the outside of the packet, at the option of the sender.

Goods sent for sale or in execution of an order, however small the quantity may be, or any article sent by one private individual to another, which are not actually trade patterns or sample, are not admissible. Liquids, oils, etc., may be sent by mail in the Dominion if put up carefully in strict accordance with the directions given in the Postal guide and ascertainable at any post office.

United Kingdom, United States and Foreign Countries.

Patterns and Samples of Merchandise, when addressed to places in the United Kingdom, must not exceed 5 lbs. in weight; to the United States and other foreign countries, 12 oz, and must be prepaid by postage stamp at the following rates:- 2 cent per 2 oz. or fraction of 2 oz., with a minimum prepayment of 2 cents covering a weight of 4 oz.

Samples of liquids, oils, glass, etc., are admitted as samples provided they are put up in strict accordance with the directions given in the Postal Guide.

Parcel Post with the United KIngdom, Newfoundland, and other british Colonies and Foreign Countries.

Closed Parcels may be exchanged with the United Kingdom, Newfoundland, and most foreign countries and British colonies, under the following regulations:-

1. The dimensions of a Parcel must not exceed 2 feet in length by 1 foot in width or depth.

2. A Parcel must not contain any explosive, combustible, or dangerous articles.

3.All Parcels must be securely and substantially packed and closed.

{Printed Page: Miscellaneous Matter; Transient Newspapers; Money Orders; Postal Notes}

{LEFT COLUMN}

Miscellaneous Matter.

{Indented} Miscellaneous matter, described as under, may pass between places in

the Dominion of Canada upon prepayment of the rates indicated below.

The regulations of the British Post Office do not admit of the transmission

by mail to the United Kingdom (or other countries beyond the sea) of

miscellaneous matter as such ; but a great part of the matter referred to

under that head may be forwarded to the United Kingdom by Book Post.

{Indented} 1. On all pamphlets, occasional publications, printed circulars, cata-

logues (in which may be included printed order lists), prices current,

hand-bills, and other matter wholly in print, and on packages of seeds,

cuttings, but not cut flowers, bulbs, roots, bedding plants, scions or grafts,

the rate is 1 cent for each 4 ozs. or friction thereof.


{Indented} 2, On maps, prints, drawings, engravingsm lithographs, photogrpahs

when not on glass or in cases containing glass, circulars produced by a

multiplying process easy to recognize, botanical, natural history and ento-

mological specimens when properly put up so as to prevent injury to the

contents of the mails, visiting cards, whether printed, engraved or written,

sheet music, whether printed or written, stitched or bound, book or

newspaper manuscript whether type-written or hand-written, ptinter's

proof-sheets whether corrected or not and accompanying manuscript

copy, such partly printed and partly written documents as deeds of land,

wills, mortgages made under seal (including chattel mortgages), insurance

policies, renewal recipts when attached to the policies, insurance receipts

sent in bulk from head offices to agents, militia and school returns, customs

manifests, bank pass books, voters'lists when written or partly in writing,

school or college examination papers, municipal assessment rolls, partly

printed and partly written, Dominion and Provincial Government docu-

ments, statute labour returns, municipal returns in general, exhibitors'

entry tickets for provincial and other agricultural and industrial exhibi-

tions, blank books, photograph albums with or without photographs,

printed forms entirely without writing, and official or private post cards

either wholly blank or printed as circulars or as forms to be filed up, but

without any writing whatsoever, the rate of postage rate must in every case

ounces or fraction of 2 ounces ; and the postage rate must in every case

be prepaid by postage stamps or stamped post bands or wrappers. No

letter or other communication intended to serve the purpose of a letter

must be sent or inclosed in any such package or thing mentioned, and the

same must be sent in covers open at the ends or sides, or otherwise so put

up as to admit of the contents being, if necessary, easily withdrawn for

examination by the officers of the Post Office to ensure compliance with

this provision ; (if enclosed in sealed envelopes notched at the ends or

sides, or with the corners cut off, letter rate of postage will be charged).


{Indented} No packet of miscellaneous matter can be transmitted by mailk if it ex-

ceeds 30 inches in length or 12 inches in width or depth, or over 5 lbs. in

weight.


{Indented} Legal and commercial papers generally are liable to letter rate of

postage, except when sent as parcels by Parcel Post, and the exceptions

above given to matter of that class are restricted to the documents speci-

fied, such as Deeds and Insurance Policies.


{Indented} Printed or written requests for return will now be recognized on 3rd

and 4th class matter, addressed to places within the Dominion, and same

will be returned direct to the sender, subject to the payment by the sender,

on delivery to him through the Post Office, of the full amount of postage

to which the article was in the first place liable, together with any charges

rated thereon in connection with any deficiency in the original prepayment.


Transient Newspapers.

{Indented} Transient newspapers and periodicals include all newspapers and peri-

odicals posted in Canada, other than Canadian newspapers sent from the

office of publication, and British and foreign newspapers posted by news

agents for regular subscribers in Canada. When addressed to any place

within the Dominion or the United Stated, they must be prepaid the

following rates by Postage Stamp :--

{Indented} If posted singly and weighing not more than 1 oz., half cent each.

{Indented} If weighing over 1 oz., one cent per four oz. or fraction of four oz.

{Indented} The newspaper rate to England, whether for transient newspapers or

for those sent to regular subscribers, is 1c. oer 2oz. by whatever route they

may be forwarded.


{RIGHT COLUMN}


{Indented} 4. Oils, liquids, etc., can only be forwarded if put up with the same

security required in connection with their transmission as samples in the

ordinary mails. Fragile articles should be packed with special care.


{Indented} 5. Each Parcel must be plainly directed, and such directions must in-

clude the name and full address of the person for whom the Parcel is

intended.


{Indented} 6. For each Parcel the sender must fill up a Customs Declaration. On

this form the sender will supply an accurate statement of the contents and

value of the Parcel, also the address thereof, with signature and place of

abode of the sender. The Customs Declaration must be securely affixed by

mucilage or paste to the Parcel to which it relates.


{Indented} Parcels from the United Kingdom or any other place beyond the

Dominion will be liable to Canadian Customs duties, and under existing

regulations must be examined for the purpose by an Officer of the Customs

in the presence of the person addressed.


{Indented} Rates and limits of weight vary. See Postal Guide, or enquire at

Post Office.


{Indented} Prepayment by postage stamp is required in all cases. Parcels must be

handed to the Postmaster ; in no case should they be dropped into a letter

box or other receptacle for mail matter.


Money Orders.

{Indented} In sending money by mail it is always best to transmit by Money Order,

if possible.


Commission on Money Orders.


{Indented} On Money Orders drawn by any Money Order Office in Canada on any

other Money Order Office in the Dominion, the Commission is as follows :


{Indented} On Money Orders drawn by any Money Order Office in Canada on any

other Money Order Office in the Dominion, the Commission is as follows :


{In the center of column}

On Orders up to......$ 5.00............ 3 cents.

Over $ 5.00 and up tp 10.00............ 6 "

" 10.00 " 30.00............10 "

" 30.00 " 40.00............15 "

" 50.00 " 75.00............25 "

" 75.00 " 100.00............30 "


{Indented} No single Money Order, payable in the Dominion of Canada, can be

issued for more than $100; but as many of $100 each may be given as the

remitter requires.


Postal Notes.

{Indented} Postal Notes have been placed in the hands of all Money Order Post

Offices in Canada. They offer a convenient and safe means of transmitting

small sums through the mails, and their use is likely to be widespread as

soon as the public become acquainted with the system. Their use is con-

fined to Canada.


{Indented} There are seveteen denominations of Postal Notes ; the different

amounts and the commission payable thereon are as follows:


{Left side of mini table}

Denom. Commis.

$0 20.................1 cent.

0 25..................1 cent.

0 30..................1 cent.

0 40..................1 cent.

0 50..................2 cents.

0 60..................2 cents.

0 70..................2 cents.

0 75..................2 cents.

0 80..................2 cents.


{Right side of mini column}

Denom. Commis.

$0 90...............2 cents.

1 00................2 cents.

1 50................2 cents.

2 00................2 cents.

2 50................2 cents.

3 00................3 cents.

4 00................3 cents.

5 00................3 cents.


{Indented} Odd cents may be made up by affixing Canadian postage stamps, not

exceeding nine cents in value, to the face of a Postal Note. For instance,

65 cents may be remitted by means of a Note for 60 cents and 5 cents in

stamps--65 cents will be paid on presentation of the Note.

{Printed Page: Mercantile Law.}

Mercantile Law.

{LEFT COLUMN}


{Indented} PROMISSORY NOTES AND BILLS OF EXCHANGE.

--Must be payable absolutely, and not depend

upon a contingency. Three days' grace allow-

ed except when payable upon demand. Can

be written either in ink or lead pencil. Notice

of dishonour must be sent to all endorsers.

Those not notified are released from all liabil-

ity. Notice must be sent to the correct

address of enforser ; but if that is not known,

notice sent to the place where note or bill

purports to be made will be sufficient. Cheques

are treated as bills of exchange, and must be

presented on the day they are received or on

the following day. Notes and bills endorsed

in blank are transferable by delivery, the same

as if payable to bearer. Notes bear interest

during currency only if so stated. The loss

of a bill or note does not prevent the collection

of it, but if required the holder must give in-

demnity before the lost note is paid. Notes

and bills are payable any time during the day

they mature. If no time is mentioned for

payment, notes and bills on Sunday are void.

Notes and bills falling due on Sunday are pay-

able the next day provided it is not a holiday.

{Indented} LANDLORD AND TENANT.--An agreement for

a lease must be in writing ; a lease, however,

for less than three years can be made verbally.

Rent must be due before it can be distrained

for. If tenancy continues for a term of years,

without any new bargain, it will be as a ten-

ancy from year to year. No notice is required

in case of the termination of a lease for a definite

time. A full six months' notice, ending with

the end of the year, is required to terminate

a tenancy from year to year. A monthly

tenancy requires a month's notice. A weekly

tenancy requires a week's notice to end it. A

covenant for renewal does not call for a renew-

al covenant in the new lease, unless expressly

called for. Destruction by fire during the

currency of a lease does not release the tenant

from payment of rent unless expressly pro-

vided for. The landlord is required to look

after the roof and outside walls, but the ten-

ant cannot require any defect apparent at the

time of the lease to be repaired. Defective


{MIDDLE COLUMN}


districts of Ontario, where the time is extended

by the Act) from date of execution in the

office of the Clerk of the County Court of the

county where the property so mortgaged or

sold is at the time of the execution of the

instument, otherwise they are void as against

creditors of vendor or mortgagor and subse-

quent purchasers or mortgagees in good faith

for value. Mortgages for securing against the

indorsement of any bills or promissory notes

or other liability incurred for the mortgagor

(which liability must not extend for a longer

period than one year from the date of the

mortgage), must set forth the terms of the

agreement as to the indorsements and the

amount of liability intended to be created.

Mortgages for securing repayment of advances

to be made in pursuances of an agreement in

writing for the purpose of enabling the bor-

rower to enter into and carry on business with

such advances (the time for repayment not to

be longer than one year from the making of

the agreement), must set out the terms of the

agreement. A contract to give a chattel

mortgage is considered by the Act to be a

chattel mortgage, and is subject to the above

requirements. A contract to make a sale is

considered a sale, and is also subject to the

above requiremnets. A renewal of chattel

mortgage must be filed within thirty days

preceding the expiration of one year from date

of previous filing, otherwise the mortgage

becomes void as against the creditors of the

mortgagees in good faith for value.

{Indented} LIEN NOTES.-Lien notes, hire receipts and

receipt notes given by persons purchasing

chattels, where the condition of the purchase

is such that the possession of the chattel

passes without any ownership therein being

acquired by such purchaser until the payment

of the purchase money, shall only be valid as

against subsequent purchasers or mortgagees

without notice in good faith for valuable con-

sideration in the case of manufactured chattels,

which, at the time posession is g ven to the

purchaser, have the name and address of the

manufacturer or vendor of the same painted,


{RIGHT COLUMN}

of the acts of an agent will bind the principal.

Agent's authority is not revoked till revocation

is communicated to him. An agent signing in

his own name is not allowed to offer parol

evidence to prove that he did not intend to

bind himself personally, but parol evidence is

admissible to bind his principal. A broker is

not entitled to receive payment for goods,

while a factor is. A del credere agency is

where the agent in consideration of larger

commission guarantees the price of the goods

sold.

{Indented} PARTNERSHIP.--Each member of a partner-

ship is responsible for the whole amount of

the debts of the firm, except in case of special

partnership. A special partner is only re-

sponsible to the amount of the capital con-

tributed by him, but he cannot take any part

in the management of the business. The act

of one partner binds all. Partners are bound

to keep good faith with each other. Partner-

ship may be either for a team of years or at

will. A partnership at will may be dissolved

at any time. The death of one provided for in

the articles of co-partnership. The sale by a

partner of his interest in the firm also dis-

solves the partnership. In the absence of

express agreement partners share equally. If

a partner retires from the firm, he should give

public notice of the fact and notify all persons

doing business with the firm. All persons

associated in partnership for trading, manu-

facturing or mining purposes must register

within six months after the formation of the

partnership with the Registrar of the Registry

Division in which they carry on business, a

declaration in writing, signed by the members

of the partnership, setting forth the names,

occupations and residences of every partner,

the name of the partnership, the time during

which the partnership is to exist, and that the

persons therein named are the only partners.

A similar declaration must be registered in

case of any change in the partnership. On

the dissolution of a partnership a declaration

certifying the dissolution should be registered.

Every person carrying on a business for trad-

{Printed Page: Mercantile Law (Continued)}

drainage, causing injury to life or health, will

justify a tenant in leaving.


{Indented} MASTER AND SERVANT.--A servant is bound

to obey all orders of the master in the scope

of his employement ; a disobedience of orders

will justify an immediate dismissal. Both

master and servant are entitled to reasonable

notice before an engagement is terminated. A

servant wrongfully dismissed is only entitled

to the actual damage sustained ; he must credit

the master with any wages earned by him.

The master is entitled to recover the damages

sustained by reason of a servant deserting his

employ. No wages due to an employee can

be garnisheed (except in the case of a debt for

board or lodging), unless such wages exceeds

the sum of $25, and then only to the extent of

such excess. Whenever an assignment is

made for the general benefit of creditors, the

assignee shall pay, in priority to the claims of

the general creditors, the wages of all persons

in the employment of the insolvent, not ex-

ceeding three months' wages. All employees

of a company being wound up under the Joint

Stock Companies' Winding-up Act of Ontario

shall have the same priority. All employees

of a person whose property has been seized

and sold by the Sheriff under an execution

shall have the same priority in proceeds of the

sale.

{Indented} CONTRACTS.--Contracts may be either parol

or under seal. Parol contracts require a con-

sideration to support them. Contracts for

sale of goods over $40 in value must be in

writing or accompanied by part performance,

or part payment. A contract may be made

by letters and telegrams. Contracts made on

Sunday (with a few exceptions) are illegal.

Contracts contrary to public policy, or of an

immoral character, are illegal. A contract for

sale of land must be in writing. To make a

good contract the names of the parties, the

consideration, and the articles sold or matter

agreed upon should clearly appear. Fraud

vitiates all contracts.

{Indented} BILLS OF SALE AND CHATTEL MORTGAGES.--

All sales and mortgages of personal property

not accompanied by an immediate delivery

and an actual and continued change of posses-

sion must be in writing, with an affidavit of

execution and affidavit of bona fides in the

form required by Act, and must be filed

within five days (except in certain outlying


{MIDDLE COLUMN}


printed, stamped or engraved thereon or other-

wise plainly attached thereto, and no such

conditional sale shall be valid against such

subsequent purchaser or mortgagee as afore-

said, unless it is evidenced in writing, signed

by the purchaser or his agent. The foregoing

shall not apply to household furniture, other

than pianos, organs, or other musical instru-

ments, nor shall it apply to any chattels men-

tioned in any such lien note, etc., shall file

manufacturer or vendor within ten days from

the execution of the lien note, etc., shall file

with the Clerk of the County Court of the

county in which the purchaser resided at the

rime of the purchase, a copy of the said lien

not, etc. A copy of the lien note, etc., must

be left with the purchaser within twenty days.

{Indented} GUARANTEES.--Must be in writing ; will be

constructed strictly ; should be distinctly word-

ed, so that no question will arise whether

limited or continuing.

{Indented} FRAUD.--Sometimes criminal proceedings

may be institued for fraud. Fraud is always

a ground of relief. It is a fraud to conceal

a fraud.

{Indented} INTEREST.--Where interest is payable and

no rate has been agreed upon, the rate allowed

is five per cent. Any rate can be contracted

for. Interest is in the nature of damages, and

it is not allowed upon open accounts, unless it

is shewn that there is either an express ir im-

plied contract to pay interest. Before a

debtor can be charged with interest on ac-

counts, a demand of payment should be made

to him in writing informing him that interest

will be claimed from the date of the demand.

Interest is allowed on overdue bills and notes

from the day they become due. Payments are

applied first in payment of interest to date,

then in reduction of principal. The practice

of allowing interest on both sides of an account

to day of settlement is not correct. Com-

pound interest is not allowed, unless expressly

agreed upon. A contract to reduce the rate

of interest in case of punctual payment is good,

while onw to increase the rate in case of default

is bad. Mortgages of real estate must shew

on thier face the rate at which interest is to

be calculated.

{Indented} PRINCIPAL AND AGENT. -- Principals are

responsible for the acts of their agents.

Agency may be either general or limited. An

agent must be a third person, not the other

contracting party. A subsequent ratification


{RIGHT COLUMN}

ing, manufacturing or mining purposes, and

who uses as his business style some name

other than his own name, or who in such style

uses his own name with the addition of "and

Company," or some other word or phrase in-

dicating a plurality of members in the firm,

shall register within six months a declaration

containing his name, occupation and address,

the style of his business, and that he alone

carries on the business. Every person failing

to register a declaration shall incur a penalty

of $100. Persins forming a limited partner-

ship must register a certificate in the office of

the Clerk of the County Court of the county

in which the principal place of business of the

partnership is situate.

{Indented} LIMITATION OF ACTIONS. --On simple con-

tracts, promissory notes, debts and money de-

mands, six years. On actions for rent upon

an indenture of lease and upon a bond, or

other contract under seal (except upon the

covenants contained in any indenture of mort-

gage made on or after the first day of July,

1894), twenty years. Actions for damages

and penalties, two years. Actions upon any

covenant contained in any indenture of mort-

gage made on or after the first day of July,

1894, ten years. Actions for the recovery of

land, ten years. Actions against municipal

corporations for damages caused by non-repair

of roads, etc., three months, and damages

caused to owners or occupiers of real property

in the exercise of municipal corporations'

powers, one year. Actions against justices of

the peace, sheriffs and bailiffs for acts done in

the course of their duties, six months. The

effect of the Statue of Limitations will be

avoided by proof of a written acknowledg-

ment of the debt, before the debt is barred, and the

time will only run from the date of such ac-

knowledgment or payment.

{Indented} EXEMPTIONS FROM SEIZURE UNDER EXECU-

TION IN ONTARIO.--(1) Wearing apparel of

debtor and family, bed and bedding in ordin-

ary ise by debtor and family, one cooking

stove with pipes and furnishings, one other

heating stove with pipes, one crane, one pair

tongs and shovel, one coal scuttle, one lamp,

one table, six chairs, one washstand, with

furnishings, six towels, one looking glass one

hair brush, one comb, one bureau, one clothes

press, one clock, one carpet, one cupboard,

{Printed Page: Mercantile Law (Continued)}


MERCANTILE LAW--Continued.

{LEFT COLUMN}

one broom, twelve knives, twelve forks, twelve

plates, twelve teacups, twelve saucers, one

sugar basin, one milk jug, one teapot, twelve

spoons, two pails, one wash tub, one scrub-

bing brushm one blacking brush, one wash-

board, three smoothing irons, all spinning

wheels and weaving looms in domestic use,

one sewing machine and attachments in

domestic use, thirty volumes of books, one

axe, one saw, one gun, six traps, and such

fishing nets and seines as are in common

use, all these articles not to exceed in value

$150. (2) All necessary fuel and provisions

for debtor and family for thirty days, and

not to exceed $40 in value. (3) One cow,

six sheep, four hogs, and twelve hens, in all

not exceeding the value of $75, and food there-

for for thirty days, and one dog. (4) Tools

and implements ordinarily used in debtor's

occupation, to the value of $100. (5) Bees

reared and kept in hives to extent of fifteen

hives. (6) All materials furnished to mechan-

ics and workmen for construction of building

under contract. (No articles exempt from

seizure for debt contracted for identical article.)

Landlord has preferential claim for four weeks,

if let by the week ; two terms, if let for periods

less than a year, but in no case to exceed one

year.


{Indented} ASSIGNMENT.--There is no insolvency law.

Assignments are made to trustee for creditors.

A clause in assignment giving the trustee the

power to carry on trade to realize as a going

concern will not vitiate assignment. Trustee

is bound to use ordinary business prudence in


{MIDDLE COLUMN]

dealing with estate. Trustee is responsible for

fraud or gross misconduct. A trustee can be

compelled in equity to give an account of his

dealings with the estate.

{Indented} MARRIED WOMEN can carry on business, sue

and be sued in the same manner as if unmar-

ried. Are entitled to hold property free from

debts and control of husband, and can convey

away real estate acquired since July, 1884,

without husband's concurrence. Are entitled

to downer in all real estate owned by husband

during the marriage, and in such equitable

real estate as the husband may die entitled to.

The real and personal estate of every man

dying, after the first day of July, 1895, intes-

tate and leaving a widow but no issue, shall in

all cases where the net value of such real and

personal estate does not exceed $1,000, belong

to his widow absolutely and exclusively.

{Indented} ARREST.--Arrest for debt has been abol-

ished, but if a debtor is about to leave Ontario

with intent to defraud or hinder one or all of

his creditors in the recovery of their claims,

he may be arrested under a writ of capias, and

detained until he gives security for the claim.

A writ of ca. sa. may be obtained after judg-

ment. The writ is only issued upon order of

a Judge, and the debt must exceed $100. A

judgment debtor being examines as such, and

not making satisfactory answers, may be com-

mitted to jail by order of the Judge until he

does make satisfactory answers. In the Divi-

sion Court the Judge may order the debtor to

make regular payments on the judgment, and

on default may commit him for not obeying

the order.


{RIGHT COLUMN}

{Indented} ATTACHMENT OF PROPERTY.--If a person

resident in Ontario indebted to any other per-

son departs from Ontario with intent to de-

fraud his creditors, and at the time of his so

departing is possessed of any real or personal

property not exempt by law from seizure, he

shall be deemed an absconding debtor, and his

property may be seized and taken for the satis-

fying of his debts by an order of attachment.

{Indented} REPLEVIN is used to obtain possession of

goods wrongfully detained. Plaintiff must

give security to three times the value of the

goods before he can obtain them, and must

proceed promptly with his action to prove the

ownership of the goods.

{Indented} WILLS.--A will should express the intention

of the testator in clear language. Every will

shall be construed to speak and take effect as

if it had been executed immediately before

the death of the testator. It may be drawn

by any person. A bequest to a witness is

void. No will made by any person under the

age of twenty-one years is valid. A will must

be signed by the testator in the presence of

two witnesses, who, at his request, in his

presence, and in the presence of each other,

should affix their names as witnesses. Chari-

table bequests in wills of testators dying before

the 14th day of April, 1892, are only payable

out of pure personal estate ; but in wills of

testators dying on or after that date, land may

be devised to or for the benefit of any chari-

table use, but such land shall be sold by the

decisee within two years from the death of

the testator. Money charged or secured on

land may be devised for a charitable use.

{Printed Page: Sittings of the Court}

Sittings of the Court

{LEFT COLUMN}

SUPREME COURT OF CANADA sits at Ottawa on third

Tuesday in February, first Tuesday in May, first Tues-

day in October.


{Indented} EXCHEQUER COURT.--For the trial of causes the Court

sits at such places and times as are appointed by the

Judge of the Exchequer Court. For hearing demurrers,

etc., the Court sits at Ottawa every Monday,at 11a.m.,

except during vacation or during the absence of the

Judge.


{Indented} COURT OF APPEAL.--There are five regular sittings of

this Court, commencing on second Tuesday in January,

the first Tuesday in March, the second Tuesday in May,

the first Tuesday in September, and second Tuesday in

November.


{Indented} DIVISIONAL COURTS OF THE HIGH COURT. --Unless

otherwise ordered, sittings of the Divisional Courts are

held at Toronto, anf commence on the first Monday of

each month, except during the long vacation and Christ-

mas vacation ; and continue to sit for two weeks (except

on Saturdays and public holidays, and on any days fall-

ing in any vacation).


{Indented} CIVIL AND CRIMINAL ASSIZES. --Not less than two

sittings of the Civil and Criminal Assizes are held at the

County Town of every County and union of Counties in

each year. In the County of York, at Toronto, not less

than three of such sittings are held in each year, and

also a fourth such sititngs, if necessary. In the Counties

of Carleton, Wentworth and Middlesex, at their res-

pective county towns, not less than three of such

sittings are held in each year. Sittings are held twice a

year at Sault Ste. Marie, Port Arthur and Rat Portage,

and once a year at Parry Sound, Bracebridge, Gore Bay

and North Bay. The Judges of the High Court appoint

the days upon which all such sittings of the Civil and

Criminal Assizes are held.


{MIDDLE COULMN}

{Indented} WEEKLY SITTINGS AT OSGOODS HALL, TORONTO.--A

Judge of the High Court sits at Osgoode Hall, at Toronto,

every week, except during vacations, for the purpose of

disposing of all business, except trials, which may be

transacted by a single Judge. The business of the

weekly sittings is as follows:--Monday and Friday,

Chambers ; Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, Court.


{Indented} COUNTY COURTS.--Execpt in the County of York, these

Courts ait twice a year for the trial of causes at the

same time as the Court of General Sessions, being on

the second Tuesday in June and December. For the

County of York there are four such sittings, commencing

on the first Tuesdays in March and December and on

second Tuesdays of May and September. For special

hearing of causes without a jury, except in the County

of York, the Courts sit on first Tuesday in April and

October in each year. Besides these sittings the Judges

may sit at such other times in their discretion for the

trial ofnon-jury cases. Sittings in Lieu of Terms.--

In the County of York on the second Monday in Janu-

ary, June and October, and the first Monday in April in

each year. In other counties on the second Monday in

January and the first Monday in April, July and Octo

ber, lasting one week each.


{Indented} DISTRICT COURTS AND GENERAL SESSIONS OF THE PEACE

IN UNORGANIZED DISTRICTS.--Sittings are held each year

as follows :--1. At Rat Portage, on the first Tuesday of June

and second Tuesday of October. 2. At Port Arthur, on

third Tuesday of May and second Tuesday of November.

3. At Sault Ste. Marie, on second Tuesday of May and

third Tuesday of October. 5. At North Bay, on second

Tuesday of June and November. 6. At Parry Sound,

on first Tuesday of June and November. 7. At Brace-

bridge, on third Tuesday of June and November.


{Indented} SURROGATE COURTS.--There are four sittings in each

year, which (except in the County of York) commence


{RIGHT COLUMN}

on the second Monday in January and the first Monday

in April, July and October. In the County of York the

sittings commence on the second Monday in January,

June and October, and the first Monday in April.


{Indented} GENERAL SESSIONS OF THE PEACE.--Sits on the same

days as the County Court jury sittings in each county.


{Indented} MARITIME COURT.--The principal seat of the Court

is at Toronto, but there are also Maritime Court offices at

most of the principal cities and towns of the Provinces,

with Deputy Registrars and Deputy Marshals in charge.

There are no regular sittings of the Court. Sittings are

held by the Judge of the Court at Toronto or elsewhere

in the Province at such times as may be appointed by

him.



LEGAL HOLIDAYS.

{Indented} PROVINCE OF ONTARIO.--Sundays; New Year's Day ;

Good Friday ; Easter Monday ; Queen's Birthday ;

Dominion Day ' Labour Day (1st Monday in September);

Christmas Day ;and any day appointed by Proclamation

as a Public Holiday or for a General Fast or Thanks-

giving.


{Indented} PROVINCE OF QUEBEC.--Sundays ; New Year's Day;

Epiphany ; Good Friday ; Acension ; All Saints ; Con-

ception ; Christmas Day ; Queen's Birthday ; Dominion

Day ; Labour Day ; also, any day appointed by Procla-

mation for a General Fast or Thankgiving.


{Indented} The Quebec legal holidays are observed in the Public

Departments, Ottawa.

== {Printed Page: Value of foreign coins in Canada for Customs Purposes.}


{IN A GRID}

{first row}COUNTRY / STANDARD / MONETARY UNIT. / VALUE IN CANADIAN CURRENCY. / COINS.


Argentine Republic... / Gold and Silver. / Peso........... / $ 0.96.5 / Gold, Argentinen ($4.82.4)and 1/2 Argentine. Silver, peso and divisions.


Austria-Hungary ..... / Gold ............ / Crown ........... / .20.3 / Gold, Former system, 4 florins ($1.92.9), 8 florins ($3.85.8), ducat ($2.28.7) and 4 ducats ($9.14.9). Silver, 1 and 2 florins. Present system, Gold, 20 crowns ($4.05.2) and 10 crowns ($2.02.6).


Belgium............ / Gold and Silver. / Franc......... / .19.3 / Gold, 10 and 20 francs. Silver, 5 francs.

Bolivia.................. / Silver .......... / Boliviano......... / .43.9 / Silver, boliviano and divisions.

Brazil................ / Gold............ / Milreis . ........ / .54.6 / Gold, 5, 10 and 20 milreis. Silver, 1/2, 1 and 2 milreis.


Cen. American States : Costa Rica ............ / Gold ........... / Colon........... / .46.5 / Gold, 2, 5, 10 and 20 colons ($9.30.7). Silver, 5, 10, 25 and 50 centimos

Guatemala .......} / Silver .......... / Peso........... / .43.9 / Silver, peso and divisions. Honduras......... Nicaragua.. ..... Sakvador ..........

Chili................. / Gold ........... / Peso ........... / .36.5 / Gold, escudo ($1.82.5), doubloon ($3.65.0)and condor ($7.30.0). Silver, peso and divisions.


China................ / Silver........... / Teal:

                                            Amoy....... / .71.0
                                            Canton....... / .70.8
                                            Chefoo........ / 67.9
                                            Chin Kiang... / .69.3
                                            Fuchau........ / .65.6
                                            Haikwan..... / .72.2
                                            (Customs.)
                                            Hankow...... / .66.4
                                            Hong Kong... / 
                                            Niuchwang... / .66.5
                                            Ningpo....... / .68.2
                                            Shanghai..... / .64.8
                                            Swatow........ / .65.5
                                            Takau......... / .71.4
                                            Tientsin...... / .68.8


Colombia................ / Silver.......... / Peso........... / .43.9 / Gold, condor($9.64.7)and double condor. Silver, peso.


Cuba.................. / Gold and Silver. / Peso ............ / .92.6 / Gold, doubloon ($5.01.7). Silver, peso. Denmark.............. . Gold ............ / Crown .......... / .26.8 / Gold, 10 and 20 crowns. Ecuador................ / Silver .......... / Sucre ........... / .41.8 / Gold, condor ($9.64.7) and double condor. Silver, sucre and divisions.

Egypt.................. / Gold ........... / Pound .......... (100 piasttres). / 4.94.3 / Gold, pound (100 piastres), 5, 10, 20 and 50 piastres. Silver, 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 piatres.


Findland.................. / Gold............. / Mark............ / .19.3 / Gold, 20 marks ($3.85.9), 10 marks ($1.93). France..................... / Gold and Silver. / Franc... ..... / .19.3 / Gold, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 francs. Silver, 5 francs.

German Empire ...... / Gold ........... . / Mark........... / .23.8 / Gold, 5, 10 and 20 marks. Greece ................. / Gold and Silver. / Drachma.......... / .19.3 / Gold, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 drachmas. Silver, 5 drachmas.

Hayti ............... / Gold and Silver. / Gourde.......... / .96.5 / Silver, gourde.

India................. / Silver.......... / Rupee. ........ / .32.0 / Gold, monhur ($7.10.5). Silver, rupee and divisions

{Printed Page: Value of foreign coins in Canada for Customs Purposes; Foreign Money Orders.}


Italy ................. / Gold and Silver. / Lira............ / .19.8 / Gold, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 lire. Silver, 5 lire.


Japan................ / Gold and Silver. / Yen :

                                           Gold .........
                                           Silver........
                                          Dollar..........
                                          Dollar..........


Liberia............... / Gold........... / Dollar.......... / 1.00.0 Mexico............... / Silver .......... / Dollar.......... / .47.7 / Gold, dollar ($0.98.3), 2 1/2, 5, 10 and 20

                                                                        dollars.  Silver, dollar (or peso) and 
                                                                        divisions.

Netherlands.......... / Gold and Silver. / Florin.......... /.40.2 /Gold, 10 florins. Silver, 1/2, 1 and 2 1/2 florins. Norway .............. / Gold ........... / Crown ......... / .26.8 / Gold, 10 and 20 crowns. Persia ...... ......... / Silver ........... / Kran .......... / .08.1 / Gold, 1/2, 1, and 2 tomans ($3.40.9), Silver,

                                                                      1/4, 1/2, 1, 2, and 5 krans.

Peru ................. / Silver .......... / Sol............. / .43.9 / Silver, sol and divisions. Portugal ............. / Gold ........... / Milreis......... / 1.08.0 / Gold, 1, 2, 5 and 10 milreis. Russia ..... ......... / Gold ........... / Rouble......... / .51.5 / Gold, imperial 15 roubles ($7.71.8) and 1/2

                                                                     imperial 7 1/2 roubles $3.85.9).  Silver, 1/4, 1/2
                                                                     and 1 rouble.

Spain ................ / Gold and Silver. / Peseta ......... / .19.3 / Gold, 25 pesetas. Silver, 5 pesetas. Sweden ............... / Gold ........... / Crown ......... / .26.8 / Gold, 10 and 20 crowns. Switzerland ........... / Gold and Silver. / Franc......... / .19.3 / Gold, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 francs. Silver,

                                                                       5 francs.

Tripoli................ / Silver......... / Mahbub of 20 piastres........ / .44.2

Turkey............... / Gold ................ / Piastre.......... / .04.4 / Gold, 20, 50, 100, 250 and 500 piastres. Uruguay............... / Gold ........... / Peso .......... / 1.03.4 / Gold, peso. Silver, peso and divisions. Venezuela............. / Gold and Silver. / Bolivar......... / .19.3 / Gold, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 bolivars. Silver,

                                                                       5 bolivars.


FOREIGN MONEY ORDERS.

{LEFT COLUMN]

TABLE showing the sums payable in Germany in Marks and Pfennings, on Orders issued in Canada.

{Column / Row}

Canadian Money. / cents. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Value in German Money. / cents. 4 8 12 16 20 25 29 33 37 41 Canadian Money. / cents. 20 25 30 40 50 60 70 75 80 90 Value in German Money. / m. pf. 0 83 1 04 1 25 1 66 2 08 2 50 2 91 3 12 3 33 3 75 Canadian Money. / $ c. 1 00 2 00 3 00 4 00 5 00 6 00 7 00 8 00 9 00 10 00 Value in German Money. / m. pf. 4 16 8 32 12 48 16 64 20 80 24 96 29 12 33 28 37 44 41 60 Canadian Money. / $c. 15 00 20 00 25 00 30 00 35 00 40 00 45 00 50 00 Value in German Money. / m. pf. 62 40 83 20 104 00 124 80 145 60 166 40 187 20 208 00

{RIGHT SIDE TABLE}

TABLE showing the sums payable in France, Algeria, Belgium, *Roumania, Servia, Bulgaria, Italy and Switzerland in Francs and Centimes, on Orders issued in Canada.


Canadian Money. / cents. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Value in Foreign Money. / ctms. 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Canadian Money. / cents. 20 25 30 40 50 60 70 75 80 90 Value in Foreign Money. / fr. ce. 1 00 1 25 1 55 2 05 2 55 3 05 3 55 3 80 4 10 4 60 Canadian Money. / $c. 1 00 2 00 3 00 4 00 5 00 6 00 7 00 8 00 9 00 10 00 Value in Foreign Money. / fr. ce. 5 10 10 20 15 30 20 40 25 50 30 60 35 70 40 80 51 00 Canadian Money. / $ c. 15 00 20 00 25 00 30 00 35 00 40 00 45 00 50 00 Value in Foreign Money. / fr. ce. 76 50 102 00 127 50 153 00 178 50 204 00 229 50 255 00


The original Order issued in Canada, and payable in Germany, Belgium, Italy, Switzerland, Roumania, Servia, and Bulgaria, should be retained by the remitter. The payee will receive a proper form of Money Order from the Chief Office at Cologne, Antwerp, Turin, or Basle, as the case may be. Thr original Order issued in Canada, and payable in France or Algeria, musr be sent to the payee by the remitter.

*Sums payable in Roumania, Servia and Bulgaria, will be subject to a further deduction by the Swiss Post

Office of 25 centimes for each 25 francs, no abatement being less than 50 centimes.

{Printed Page: Fire Insurance.}

Fire Insurance.

Classification of Buildings.

First Class.- Stone, brick or concrete buildings roofed with metal, gravel, slate or shingles- in mortar.

Second Class.- Stone, brick or concrete buildings roofed with shingles and brick-nogged, brick veneered, brick-lined rough-cast or metal-clad buildings covered with first-class roofing.

Thirds Class.- Brick-nogged, brick veneered, brick-lined, rough-cast and metal-clad buildings covered with shingles, and wooden buildings covered with first-class roofing, detached, not less than forty feet.

Fourth Class.- Wooden buildings.

Note,-Felt roofs and wooden roofs painted with fire-proof paint, rate same as shingle roofs

Cancelation Rates-Short Date Rates.

The following gives the per centum of premium earned for one month and upwards on teh gross premium of one, two and three years' policies.

This per cent. is to be retained when a policy is surrendered for cancellation, except for readjustment of amount. Fractions of a month to be computed as a full month.

With Policy in force for If written for 1 year. If written for 2 years. If written for 3 years
per cent.. per cent. per cent.
1 month 20 13 10
2 " 30 20 17
3 " 40 25 20
4 " 50 30 23
5 " 60 35 27
6 " 70 40 30
7 " 78 45 33
8 " 84 50 37
9 " 88 55 40
10 " 92 60 43
11 " 96 65 47
12 " 100 70 50
13 " 72 53.
14 " 75 57
15 " 77 60
16 " 80 63
17 " 82 67
18 " 85 70
19 " 87 72
20 " 90 73
21 " 92 75
22 " 95 77
23 " 97 79
24 " 100 80
25 " 81
26 " 83
27 " 85
28 " 86
29 " 88
30 " 90
31 " 91
32 " 93
33 " 95
34 " 96
35 " 98
36 " 100

A Fire Wall.

A fire brick wall is a brick or stone wall without any opening, unless protected by fire-proof doors, extending above the roof in such a way as to entirely cut off any communication between the two buildings.

{Printed Page: Life Insurance.}

{Blank page}

{Loop design}

.. Diary for 1902 ..

{Loop design}

Notes for 1902

{Six-pronged design}

New Year's Day............Wednesday Jan. 1st. | Pentecost. Whitsunday.....May 18th.

Ash Wednesday............February 12th. | Birth of Queen Victoria.....Saturday, May 24th.

Quadragesima, 1st Sunday in Lent..February 16th. | Trinity Sunday.............May 25th.

St. David's Day............Saturday, March 1st. | Corpus Christi..............Thursday May, 29th.

St. Patrick's Day..... .....Monday, March 17th. | Midsummer Day............Tuesday, June 24th.

Palm Sunday. .............March 23rd. |Dominion Day..............Tuesday, July 1st.

Lady Day ................Tuesday, March 25th. | Labour Day...............Monday, September 1st.

Good Friday................March 28th. | Michaelmas Day............Monday, September 29th.

Easter Sunday.... .........March 30th. | Birth of King Edward VII (1841) Sunday, Nov. 9th.

St. George's Day............Wednesday, April 23rd. | St. Andrew's Day ..........Sunday, November 30th.

Holy Thursday..............May 8th. | Christmas Day..............Thursday, December 25th.

January WEDNESDAY, 1 (1-364) 1902

Joe and Dick came home. Dick gone home on morning train. Joe left him down. Robt choring

Maggie Benson married to F. Holmes at about nine o clock and took noon train. very fine day

THURSDAY, 2 (2-363)

Robt. choring all day. Ma and Joe went to Drayton in forenoon. Joe took dinner with Grandma and went to Drayton with Uncle Sam He was here for tea and Da took him to the night train. high wind all day turned colder and stormy at night

FRIDAY, 3 (3-362)

Da choring all day. Da and Ma went down to Isaac Hilborn's 25th wedding anniversary. went about five P.M. home about mid-night. Sara Burrows here and cut out a green skirt for me. very fine. stormy at spells.

January SATURDAY, 4 (4-361) 1902

Da at Drayton at night. Da choring in forenoon. cleaned out hen and pig pens after dinner. Robt. North came here about eleven o'clock for a load of straw. had dinner here. Winnie McEwing brought Miss Wilson in here for a short time in afternoon. very fine day.

SUNDAY, 5 (5-360)

At home in forenoon. Ma, Brock and Olive up to Grandpa Philp's in afternoon. Uncle John Gordon here in afternoon and for tea. I down to Grandma's for a little while. rather soft with a rather raw wind.

MONDAY, 6 (6-359)

Robt choring till about ten o'clock when Mr. McEwing came in and they both went to vote. Da finished choring. after dinner. John Walker here for a little in afternoon. May Gorden and Miss Stone called in here in the afternoon. Olive and Brock started to school with a new teacher Miss Wilson from Brussels. rather soft day. looking like rain. a little fall of snow in evening. Joe McDonald, reeve Wm. Duncan, Dixon, Brooks, Scott, councillors of Maryboro'.

January TUESDAY, 7 (7-358) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and drawing manure after dinner. Mary and Jimmie Rich here afternoon Uncle Richard's here for pigs in afternoon. Very mild foggy morning, but cleared off about noon and was a lovely afternoon.

WEDNESDAY, 8 (8-357)

Da choring in forenoon. and drawing out manure in afternoon. We killed and scalded twenty one chickens in forenoon. Grandma helped us. I went to Drayton to put a card on morning train. Grandma stayed for dinner. very soft snowing falling in forenoon. seems to be packing for sleighing.

THURSDAY, 9 (9-356)

Da choring in forenoon and drawing manure in afternoon. Ma at Drayton in afternoon. Will. McTavish here in afternoon. very fine day.

January FRIDAY, 10 (10-355) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and drawing out manure afternoon. Walt. Plant here in forenoon. also Mr. S. Crocker to see Miss North. fine day. some snow falling

SATURDAY, 11 (11-354)

Da choring in forenoon and drawing manure in afternoon. finished it. Ma and Brock at Drayton in afternoon. Clara and Olive over to see Retta Hilborn Hoshel brought us home. very stormy afternoon.

SUNDAY, 12 (12-353)

Da went up to see Grandpa Philp's in afternoon. We three children down to Grandma's for dinner. very stormy, windy and cold day.

January MONDAY, 13 (13-352) 1902

Da choring in forenoon, and cleaning out pens. after dinner. Will Craig here before dinner. Clara started to school this morning. cold bright day.

TUESDAY, 14 (14-351)

Da choring all day to day. very fine day.

WEDNESDAY, 15 (15-350)

Robt. choring in forenoon and up for a load of sand to Mr. Walker's in afternoon. Percy McEwing in here in morning. fine day, but dull

January THURSDAY, 16 (16-349) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and just lying round with a head ache. Miss North here in afternoon. Aunt Emma and Uncle Richd, Mabel and Mr. John Walker here for tea and spent the evening. went home about eleven o'clock Mr. North came here from Rennie's after tea. I came home at recess very fine day. bright

FRIDAY, 17 (17-348)

Da choring in forenoon and cleaning in afternoon. Lue Flath here for a while after tea. very fine day. bright sharp and drifting Ma and Grandma up to see Grandpa Philp and Aunty Gass.

SATURDAY, 18 (18-347)

Da choring in forenoon and helped us children pick over the apples after dinner. Herb Page brought us a barrel of salt from town Da gone to Drayton at night. soft-like in the morning but windy & rather stormy rest of day. cold

January SUNDAY, 19 (19-346) 1902

Ma and Clara up to Church in fore noon We three children at Grandma's for tea. very, very fine day. lovely moon light.

MONDAY, 20 (20-345)

Da choring in forenoon and killed four pigs in afternoon Watt and Uncle Richd helped very fine, bright day.

TUESDAY, 21 (21-344)

Da choring in forenoon and cutting up pork in afternoon and Grandma helped salt it. very fine bright day. Mr. McEwing went to Guelph and entered an action against Geo. Tucker over this Bull.

January WEDNESDAY, 22 (22-343) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and cleaning out pens in afternoon, and cut up all the ribs. very stormy all day, but bright.

THURSDAY, 23 (23-342)

Da choring in forenoon and drawing up hay from the stack on other place. Walt Plant helping all afternoon helping. Miss North and Carrie here in afternoon and for tea. Mr. McEwing in here this morning for a while. Dad went over to Geo Tuckers to serve him with a writ for $500. raw wind all day not very bright.

FRIDAY, 24 (24-341)

Da choring in forenoon and helping Watt Burrows to kill a cow, in afternoon. Mr and Mrs. Joe McDonald here for the evening till about half past eleven. Ma at Drayton in afternoon. very fine day and lovely moon light night. ______

January SATURDAY, 25 (25-340) 1902

Da choring all day. Olive, Brock and I at Drayton in afternoon. We went round by Mr. Craigs with some meat, and then to town. very very fine mild soft day. turned cooler in evening.

SUNDAY, 26 (26-339)

Uncle Sandy Walker and Sam Schneider here in afternoon for a little while. Ma and Da over to see Fred Burrows for a few hours in evening. stormy and blowing in forenoon and very foggy at times. misting and spitting rain at night.

MONDAY, 27 (27-338)

Da choring in forenoon and up to Grandpa Philp's all afternoon, cleaning their two clocks. very very stormy all day and very cold Watt Burrows brought over a piece of beef and stayed a little while.

January TUESDAY, 28 (28-337) 1902

Da choring all day. Mr. I. Hilborn here in fore morning. very sharp cold day., but bright. Walt here in evening.

WEDNESDAY, 29 (29-336)

Da choring in forenoon and also in afternoon rather mild day. We got word about five o'clock by Mrs. Burrows that Mrs. Jas. Duncan was dead. Da and Ma gone over there this evening. got home about eleven oclock. Mrs. Duncan died at half past one' o'clock at noon

THURSDAY, 30 (30-335)

Da choring all day. Ma and Grandma over to Mr. Duncan's in afternoon. Miss North here in afternoon. and Mr. North came here from Rennies and went home with her. Da and Watt Burrows went over to Mr. Tom Bretts to a meeting of a beef ring. very bright sunshiny day

January FRIDAY, 31 (31-334) 1902

Da choring all day. Went and sat up at Mr. Duncans all night. cold east wind in the morning wined stormy in evening.

February SATURDAY, 1 (32-333)

Da choring in forenoon. Olive and Clara to Drayton in morning and round by Mr. Duncans. Da and Ma at the funeral in afternoon. a very large crowd. The funeral came out Hilborns sideroad. over sixty rigs came with it. rather raw wind in morning, but mild. lovely afternoon the sun shone brightly. Uncle Sam met Uncle Jim at night train

SUNDAY, 2 (33-332)

Grandpa, Grandma and Uncle Jim here for dinner. Had a goose. very stormy day. It snowed and blowed and drifted all day long. Uncle Jim started for 14th but did not go through. It stormed hard all night.

February Monday 3 (34-331) 1902

Da just doing the chores and shoveling tracks to get through. It stormed [children did not go to school] very hard all day. and drifted up awful. Uncle Jim here for tea. the town line is full. Jim went to Drayton by river.

TUESDAY, 4 (35-330)

Da choring all day. very stormy and drifting all day. Uncle Jim went back on morning train. Da had a bad pain in his eye. children went to school.

WEDNESDAY, 5 (36-329)

Da choring in forenoon and cleaning out pens in afternoon. stormy till about eleven o'clock, then faired up and was a lovely sunshiny day. Da went to Drayton in evening for the vetenary, Dr. Pickle. Old Molly did not seem well.

February THURSDAY, 6 (37-328) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and took "Mint" over to Dick Lowes. fine day. Our side road filled up with other storm and not opened yet

FRIDAY, 7 (38-327)

Da choring all day. Olive 12 years old to-day. very stormy, snowy day. children got a ride to and from school with Percy McEwing. Brock at home not feeling well. 12 line drifting to day.

SATURDAY, 8 (39-326)

Da choring in forenoon, and about half past three, walked to Drayton, out across other place. Got a ride home with Mr. Perkin. Looked as if it would be a nice day. but about noon got stormy and was awful stormy all afternoon. It snowed nearly all afternoon.

February SUNDAY, 9 (40-325) 1902

Da up to Uncle Richd for a while in afternoon. Sara Burrows here for a while. not so bad as yesterday. but snowing and storming at quite a rate in afternoon. wind gone down some at night.

MONDAY, 10 (41-324)

Da choring till about 10 o'clock Then he took 2 heifers over to Moorefield. Uncle Richd came through our place and they both went to gether. Got $60 for them. Paid Jim Brady for Flora. very fine day, but sharp and bright

TUESDAY, 11 (42-323)

Da choring in forenoon and went up to see Grandpa Philp in afternoon. fine afternoon.

February WEDNESDAY, 12 (43-322) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and scraping the snow away from the stable doors? Mrs. G. Page in here for a few minutes in afternoon. Brock started to school again. after having chicken pox. Jim Kitley here looking at Bull. fine day.

THURSDAY, 13 (44-321)

Da 46 years old to day. Uncle Jim 29 yrs. old. Da choring all day. Tom Miller here for a few hours after noon. no school to-day as it is convention for teachers Ma and Brock and Grandma went to Drayton. Uncle Richd in here a few minuets also Charlie Stephenson. Very fine bright day, but very sharp.

FRIDAY, 14 (45-320)

Da choring in forenoon and helping fill up seeds oats for Will McTavish in afternoon. Sam Schneider here in forenoon and bought "Nig", the heifer, for $38. Da took her down town and went to lodge at night. Clara and Olive down to see Winnie McEwing for a while in afternoon. very fine bright day. lovely moon light night.

February SATURDAY, 15 (46-319) 1902

{Clara is writing}

Da choring in forenoon and cleaned out horse stable and pens after dinner Dave Corbett came here at noon stayed for dinner and till three' o'clock. Da went to Drayton at night. Mr. Willie Corvan and Mr. Fletcher here in afternoon Fletcher brought old Sam (hog) for $12.00/100. and took him away. very fine bright day.

SUNDAY, 16 (47-318)

Round home all day. Olive and I at Grandma's in afternoon. Wat. Burrows here in evening. fine day. not cold.

MONDAY, 17 (48-317)

Da choring all day. went over to Mr. Craigs at night for a while and then went to Dick Lowes for "Mint" fine day but sharp.

February TUESDAY, 18 (49-316) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and in the afternoon Mr. Perkin here getting a hand to help thresh clover getting a place ready to put in ice. Us and Mrs Burrows are putting in ice to gether. They (Wat & Ned) brought one load to night. putting in bottom end of sheep house man here selling books. got the "Scottish Chiefs" 50¢. fine day but sharp and cold

WEDNESDAY, 19 (50-315)

Walt Plant here in afternoon. Da at Mr Perkins threshing clover all day. Ned and Watt drawing ice. very fine day. Olive not at school. Sick with cold. Ma at Drayton in forenoon.

THURSDAY, 20 (51-314)

Frank Morrison here to-day in Walts place Miss North here in afternoon. Mr. North with her Da and Burrow's boys drawing ice all day. very fine day and night. Big Carnival on the rink in Drayton. Clara went down with Percy and Winnie. Had a nice time home at eleven.

February FRIDAY, 21 (52-313) 1902

{Olive is now writing}

Da and Wat. brought up four loads ice in forenoon. they finished putting in Ice. Ned and Walt. Plant here packing in the ice. Da done chores after dinner. An entertainment in our school to-night. Had Drayton Quartette Miss B. Prosses and Miss U. Robertson, also speeches and recitations. Got home at about 12 o'clock Had a nice time. School full. made very fine day and night.

SATURDAY, 22 (53-312)

Da choring in forenoon and cleaned out pig pens after dinner and brought up a jag of hay from the stack. very fine day. roads cut off quite a bit. Clara up to Plants with a parcel of clothes.

SUNDAY, 23 (54-311)

Ma, Brock and me up to church in forenoon and round into Grandpa Philps. Da went up to Geo. Fishers about five o'clock, then Da and Ma went to Mr. Duncans in evening. fine day. looked like as if it would rain.

February MONDAY, 24 (55-310) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and drawing out manure in afternoon very fine day.

TUESDAY, 25 (56-309)

Da choring in forenoon and drawing manure and clearing pens in afternoon Ma gone to Drayton in afternoon. Clara home from school with cold all afternoon. very fine day. thawing fast. Da went up to uncle Richd

WEDNESDAY, 26 (57-308)

Da took eleven pigs to Moorefield got $120 for them and took the little calf. Uncle Richd took some of our pigs. very fine day. Roads are getting bad and bare. Da did his chores in afternoon. Ma at Grandpa Philp's for dinner

February THURSDAY, 27 (58-307) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and up to Grandpa Philps in the afternoon. Miss North and Mr. North here in afternoon. roads very bare and soft. very fine day. Miss Wilson came here for tea then Charlie, Lizzie and Sara Hilborn here for evening. Raining a little at night.

FRIDAY, 28 (59-306)

Da choring in forenoon and over to Mr. Burrows to get saw fixed in afternoon misty day. rained at times dull all day.

March SATURDAY, 1 (60-305)

Da choring in the forenoon, and after dinner took out two loads manure. Then walked to Drayton. Roads good enough for wheels, except on the Cemetry hill and waters. very dull day. misting off and on all day.

March SUNDAY, 2 (61-304) 1902

Da up to see Grandpa Philp in after noon. It snowed all day, a rather soft-snow.

MONDAY, 3 (62-303)

Da choring in forenoon and up to Mr. Perkin's sale in afternoon. dull day with no wind

TUSDAY, 4 (63-302)

Da choring in forenoon and out to Drayton with team to get them shod got 50 lbs. Drayton flour. very fine day. buggys and sleigh both running.

March WEDNESDAY, 5 (64-301) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and drawing manure from the pens. brought up a jag of hay from stack. very fine bright day.

THURSDAY, 6 (65-300)

Da choring in forenoon and drawing out up hay from stack in afternoon. Mrs. Perkin came here about three o'clock and stayed over night. very fine day.

FRIDAY (66-299)

Da and Ma twenty years married Da choring in forenoon and drawing out manure in afternoon. Mrs Perkin went home about ten o clock. very fine day only not quite so bright. (warm) Ed. Burrows borrowed cart to go to Rothsay.

March SATURDAY, 8 (67-298) 1902

{Clara is now writing}

Da choring in forenoon and after dinner he took a load of oats and wheat down to Drayton for Mr. Perkin. He is moving up near Mitchell. forenoon rather dull it snowed from noon till about five a soft-snow. Children picked over apples.

SUNDAY, 9 (68-297)

{Olive is now writing}

Da and Ma up to see Grandpa Philp this afternoon. We children down to Grandma's rather dull day and cloudy.

MONDAY, 10 (69-296)

Da choring in forenoon and drawing manure in afternoon. Mr. Perkin stayed here over night. dull day

March TUESDAY, 11 (70-298) 1902

Da choring in forenoon, then took down a load of movables for Mr. Perkin, and helped to load his car. Quite a heavy rain about school time with a roll or so of thunder. mild and warm all day. Quite a heavy shower to night. Lilian Page went to the north west to-day.

WEDNESDAY, 12 (71-294)

Da went away a little after five, to Mr. Perkins to help take down the cattle. Mr. Perkin took little white calf with him. Da rode home with Wooddissee's. Rained in the night. Shower at noon. Thunder and lightning and heavy shower to night. John Winn and Hannah Lowes married to-night.

THURSDAY, 13 (72-293)

Da choring in forenoon and took a load of light wood and kindling up to Grandpa Philp's fine bright day.

March FRIDAY, 14 (73-292) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and choring round in afternoon and put the binder back into the new part of driving house. beautiful morning and nice all day. Ma at Drayton in afternoon.

SATURDAY, 16 (74-291)

Da choring in forenoon and took a load of chop to Drayton. fine warm day.

SUNDAY, 16 (75-290)

We children at Grandma's for dinner, Uncle john came after Da. Grandpa Philp not very well. fine day, but windy.

March MONDAY, 17 (76-289) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and went down for the chop. blustry day.

TUESDAY, 18 (77-288)

Da choring in forenoon and took out some manure then brought up to jags of hay from stack. Ma and Clara up to Little Aggie Rogers funeral and down to Drayton. sharp blustry day.

WEDNESDAY, 19 (78-287)

{Clara is now writing}

Da took 10 hogs to Moorefield in forenoon and did the chores after dinner. cold breeze blowing but fine

March THURSDAY, 20 (79-286) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and drawing manure in afternoon. Miss North and Carrie here.

FRIDAY, 21 (80-285)

Da choring in forenoon and drawing manure in afternoon. very fine day.

SATURDAY, 22 (81-284)

{Olive is now writing}

Da choring in forenoon, and drawing out manure in afternoon. Clara took Ma and Grandma to station. They went to Allenford We three children up to see Grandpa Philp in afternoon. Very fine day Clara 17 years old to-day. Flock of wild geese went over

March SUNDAY, 23 (82-283) 1902

At home all day. Grandpa Benson here for dinner. Clara sick with cold. Da killed a mink in the forenoon. about 28" long when stretched. very fine day.

MONDAY, 24 (83-282)

Da choring in forenoon and trimming out currant bushes in afternoon. Clara met Ma and Grandma on the train. very fine day.

TUESDAY, 25 (84-281)

Da choring in forenoon then went over to see if he could get Pages boys here and Art came and they drew in stack beside the barn. very fine day. Jack Winn left for the west to-day.

March WEDNESDAY, 26 (85-280) 1902

Da and Herb. Page did the chores then Art came and they brought up a load of hay before dinner. Drawing all afternoon. Ma and Grandma at Drayton. very fine day. Uncle James died yesterday will McTavish married

THURSDAY, 27 (86-279)

Da choring in forenoon and went back to stack and brought up a jag of hay. very fine weather for March snow all gone and roads Da over to pay Mick Blackwell for wood. dusty.

FRIDAY, 28 (87-278)

Good Friday Da done up the chores and a little after 10 started to Palmerston for flour. Home again about six o'clock. Got 500 of flour. 100 for Grandpa rather fine in forenoon, but sultry. rained all afternoon.

March SATURDAY, 29 (88-277) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and to Drayton in afternoon. Mr. North in here after dinner for a short time. Dull and foggy in forenoon but turned out bright after dinner.

SUNDAY, 30 (89-276)

Easter Sunday. Ma and Clara up to church in forenoon. Da up to Grandpa Philp's in afternoon raw wind in forenoon and dull. drizzling rain all afternoon. got colder at night and snowed some.

3 MONDAY, 31 (90-275)

Da choring in forenoon and took some chop to Drayton after dinner. He went down to Geo. Cowans for some seed pease. Brought home a little Jersey calf from Joe Davidson. Walt. brought three loads sawdust from Fishers for ice. Soft snow falling all day. sloppy under foot. rather cold wind. Winnie McEwing 17 years. old.

April TUESDAY, 1 (91-274) 1902

{Clara is now writing}

Da choring in forenoon and then took sow over to Mr. Duncans. cleaned out pig pen when he came home. blustering and snowing all day Grandpa and Brock at Drayton.

WEDNESDAY, 2 (92-273)

Da choring in forenoon, then brought down two loads of saw dust. not feeling well. pain in his eye. Mike Norris came after Flora at noon, snowy and cold.

THURSDAY, 3 (93-272)

Da choring in forenoon, and drawing up wood from G. Pages bush to Grandpa Philp. took up two loads. Miss North and Oswald here to-day. rather fine morning snowy afternoon.

April FRIDAY, 4 (94-271) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and drew two loads of wood to Rothsay. Ma, Olive & I down to Drayton in forenoon, Ma helping Mrs. Burrows paper in afternoon. fine day roads muddy and sloppy. Mabel Philp 21 yrs. old

SATURDAY, 5 (95-270)

Da choring in forenoon, and drawing wood to Rothsay. We, three children to Drayton in afternoon to get horse shod. Mr. Craig and Willie here for seed oats in forenoon. very fine bright day.

SUNDAY, 6 (96-269)

At home all day. Mr. and Miss Duncan here for the evening very fine day but looking like rain.

April MONDAY, 7 (97-268) 1902

Da choring in forenoon, and took up the last load of wood to Rothsay. mizzling and raining till about 10. o'clock then very heavy fall of snow till noon. colder in afternoon.

TUESDAY, 8 (98-267)

Da choring in forenoon, and sharpening stakes and driving some in the afternoon. very high wind blowing all day from the east. Drayton horse show to-day.

WEDNESDAY, 9 (99-266)

Da choring in forenoon and took a load of chop to Drayton in afternoon. brought home some tile. fine day.

April THURSDAY, 10 (100-265) 1902

{Olive is now writing}

Da choring in forenoon. After dinner Joe Davidson came up and helped load hay Da took it down for him and brought home the chop. Ma went up to see Grandpa Philp. Miss North and Oswald here for super. rather dull forenoon bright afternoon Another of Waller's White's sons died of fever.

FRIDAY, 11 (101-261)

{Clara is now writing}

Da choring in forenoon and helped Geo. Fisher fill up seed oats. After dinner he went up to Uncle Rich'd to help kill pigs Ma at Drayton afternoon. Annie Craig here for tea. fine day, strong wind drying day.

SATURDAY, 12 (102-263)

Da choring in forenoon and helped Mr. McDougal load a load of hay for Uncle John. He here for dinner. Da back at the fence - afternoon. Children up to see Grandpa Philp. nasty day. snow and sleeting at times all day.

April SUNDAY, 13 (103-262) 1902

{Olive is now writing}

Da went up to see Grandpa Philp Jack Rich and wife came here in afternoon. raw, cold, wind.

MONDAY, 14 (104-261)

Da choring in forenoon, back at fence afternoon. Clara and Brock took our three duck over to Mr. McKee's in evening. fine, bright, breezy day.

TUESDAY, 15 (105-260)

Da choring in forenoon back at fence afternoon, with team. very fine day.

April WEDNESDAY, 16 (106-259) 1902

Da choring and cleaning up alsike clover seeds. before dinner, went back and moved rails. with team. {"with team" added after and written on a slant after the word "rails."} Ma at Drayton afternoon. very fine day.

THURSDAY, 17 (107-258)

Da choring and opened potato pit before dinner. afternoon he drew the manure off the pit and brought down load of clay for garden. Miss North here. very fine day but looked like rain in day.

FRIDAY, 18 (108-257)

Da choring and we started to pick over the potatoes. Had 19 bags of good ones. terrible lot rotten ones. after dinner finished the potatoes and started to plow the little patch. Ma up to see Grandpa Philp in forenoon Grandpa Benson helped pick our potatoes. Henry Hazeltine came at noon to dig. fine day. looking like rain.

April SATURDAY, 19 (109-256) 1902

Da choring and finished plowing and harrowed little patch before dinner. planted 12 rows potatoes and sowed the rest to peas and oats. Girls at Drayton afternoon. Da at town at night. Henry digging till noon fine forenoon. showery in afternoon.

SUNDAY, 20 (110-255)

up to church in morning. Da and Ma up to see Grandpa Philp, in evening. fine day.

MONDAY, 21 (111-254)

Da started seeding. Spring toothing back another place. Henry digging. finished and stayed all night. raw wind but fine day. put pork into bags and hung it up.

April TUESDAY, 22 (112-253) 1902

Da back on other place. sowing and harrow-ing. Clara at Drayton afternoon. very high wind, but fine drying day. sultry out of wind.

WEDNESDAY, 23 (113-252)

Da back on other place cultivating and sowing. terrible windy and cold. very heavy gale in the night.

THURSDAY, 24 (114-251)

Da back on other place had 14 1/2 acres in at noon. Miss North here. Nell and May Gorden here in afternoon. fine bright day but windy. we finished our third quarter in music. Nell Gorden been at nursing one year to-day

April FRIDAY, 25 (115-250) 1902

Da working back on other place until about half past four. Started to rain about four and with {"with" is written above "and"} thunder and lightning at night. dull and cold. Clara over to Mr. McKee's for the duck eggs.

SATURDAY, 26 (116-249)

Da done the chores in forenoon and fixed up a bridge to driving house. mizzling and raining off and on all day. high wind. Mr.Craig got load of hay Uncle Jim came home.

SUNDAY, 27 (117-248)

Uncle Jim here for dinner. Da up to see Grandpa high wind all day

April MONDAY, 28 (118-247) 1902

Da cultivating and sowing back on place. very fine day. Jim Johnson got seeds oats here. Jim went back.

TUESDAY, 29 (119-246)

Da came up about eleven o'clock from other place having finished putting in 30 acres. after dinner plowing sod by Poplars. rainy afternoon. foggy at night. Miss Wilson here to tea.

WEDNESDAY, 30 (120-245)

Da ploughing sod all day. Clara over to Mr. McKee's and up to Grandpa's. Mr. Duncan in in afternoon. raw cold day. good breeze blowing Da over to Mr. Duncan's with sow.

May THURSDAY, 1 (121-244) 1902

{Clara is now writing}

Da ploughing all day. finished the sod. Miss north here. just gave me a lesson. Jim Braedy here for dinner. His first trip. fine day.

FRIDAY, 2 (122-243)

Da disced and harrowed sod forenoon. shower at noon, went down and started to cultivate at line fence. showery and dull.

SATURDAY, 3 (123-242)

Da choring in forenoon and sowed peas on the sod. in afternoon Clara and Olive at Drayton in afternoon. dull day rain-in night.

May SUNDAY, 4 (124-241) 1902

Da put 9 head cattle out to the bush. I went down for Mr. & Mrs. T. Henderson about ten, and took them home after tea. Da and Tom up to see Grandpa Philp. rather fine day Mollie foaled about half past twelvesultry {the final "ve" in "twelve" and the "s" in "sultry" on top of each other} . (mare colt)

MONDAY, 5 (125-240)

Da done chores and took two sows over to Mr. Duncan's home about two. then helped Mr McTavish load hay. and cleaned out pens. Went up and got the lend of Geo. Fisher's black horse at night. fine day hot little windy.

TUESDAY, 6 (126-239)

Da cultivating down by line fence and behind barn. Ma over to Mr. McKee for ducks heavy rain at night. rather dull day. ma 39 years. old.

May WEDNESDAY, 7 (127-238) 1902

Da choring in forenoon. drawing out manure after dinner. terrible windy, and dull in forenoon brighter in afternoon.

THURSDAY, 8 (128-237)

Da sowing barley next line fence and harrowed it. little shower at noon. quite a rain at night. Miss North here. Jim Braedy here for dinner bright day between the showers. very windy.

FRIDAY, 9 (129-236)

Da went back to plow sod on other place, but it was not fit. came back and drew out manure rest of day. bright day but very windy hard frost at night.

May SATURDAY, 10 (130-235) 1902

Da drawing manure all day. Ma, Brock and Clara at Drayton in forenoon. fine day, but cool. very heavy frost at night.

SUNDAY, 11 (131-234)

Da and Ma up to see Grandpa Philp. children at bush. very fine day. put 6 head of cattle out to bush.

MONDAY, 12 (132-233)

Da drawing out manure all day. Clara at Drayton to get teeth filled, in morning. Mr. D. Corbett here in evening and bought Susie & calf. fine day. Another of Wallie White's sons dead with fever (Hiram) this make 5 children dead all in a year

May TUESDAY, 13 (133-232) 1902

Da drawing manure all day. Mr. Raynor here and tuned the piano, in two hours. Da led Susie, and Ma took calf in cart to Moorefield after tea. very fine day. Mr. Webber fixed rod on wind mill.

WEDNESDAY, 14 (134-231)

Da drawing manure till about four o'clock then went to Drayton with load of chop. very fine day. drew the manure from a pile in the field.

THURSDAY, 15 (135-230)

{Olive is writing}

Da did chores and went after the chop. then spread manure till noon. gang plowing in afternoon. Jim Bready here for dinner Miss North here. very fine day. Clara over to Mr. Craigs.

May FRIDAY, 16 (136-229) 1902

Da gang plowing and harrowing behind Poplars. Clara up to see Grandpa Philp very fine day. Da gone to town in evening

SATURDAY, 17 (137-228)

Da did chores then up helping Geo. Fishers move his old barn all day. very fine day hot.

4 SUNDAY, 18 (138-227)

Clara up to church with Grandpa then we went over to Graveyard Mr Craig here for tea. nice shower in evening

May MONDAY, 19 (139-226) 1902

Da gang plowing all day. Roy and Harry helping. Ma, Clara and Grandma at Drayton in afternoon. very hot day, looking like rain. Mr. McTavish got load of hay at noon.

TUESDAY, 20 (140-225)

Da sowing barley and Harry harrowing Da finished about four and went and spring toothed little patch. very fine day. Earl Lowes & Harry got a pup

WEDNESDAY, 21 (141-224)

Da gone back to plow ^sod {the word sod has been inserted above the words "plow" and "on"} on other place Harry here all day plowing. hot day. Da sowed corn after tea.

May THURSDAY, 22 (142-223) 1902

Da and Harry plowing all day. Da sowed the corn before he went back. Mr. Bready here for dinner. very hot day until about half past five then terrible, wind, rain and thunder storm came up. Miss North and Mr. here . Ma went up with them to Palmerston and then takes morning train for Glencoe.

FRIDAY, 23 (143-222)

Da plowing sod all day. Will McTavish here all day. Harry here from noon. finished plowing the field. rain storm in forenoon, showry afternoon. very hot between showers.

SATURDAY, 24 (144-221)

Victoria Day. Da discing and Harry harrowing Roy came after dinner and they sowed 6 or 7 acres of pease. Quite a heavy shower in forenoon. fine afternoon. Mr. Craig got load of hay. Uncle Sandy and Aunt Cathy called in afternoon

May SUNDAY, 25 (145-220) 1902

Da up to see Grandpa Philp in afternoon. heavy shower forenoon. showery afternoon.

MONDAY, 26 (146-219)

Da discing and harrowing on sod very cold and misty. Ma came home on night train. Had a splendid time

TUESDAY, 27 (147-218)

Da working back on the sod sowed flax this afternoon. Dr. Pickle got a pup this morning heavy snow storms at times real cold. heavy frost.

May WEDNESDAY, 28 (148-217) 1902

Da went back and sowed and harrowed the barley. after dinner harrowing and rolling root ground. Ma & Mrs. Burrows up to see Grandpa Philp. cold day but bright heavy frost.

THURSDAY, 29 (149-216)

Election Day Da went back and finished rolling. Then went to vote. Drawing out manure rest of day. Jim Bready here for dinner. Miss North and Mrs. Bell here in afternoon. Jas. McEwing & Jas Tucker candiates. bright day, but windy. Tucker elected with majority of 103. In the house 47 Tories & 50 Grits Got it down to a tie

FRIDAY, 30 (150-215)

Disced the potato patch. Then helped cut potatoes After dinner Grandpa, Ma and me dropped potatoes. planted 8 rows. hot day.

May SATURDAY, 31 (151-214) 1902

{Olive is writing}

Da at Drayton with chop and got team shod, in forenoon. Then sprouted potatoes in afternoon. Ma and Grandma at Drayton in afternoon. very warm day.

June SUNDAY, 1 (152-213)

Clara drove Grandma up to church. Da up to see Grandpa Philp in afternoon. Da and Ma down to Tom Hendersons for the evening. little shower. morning warm and sultry.

MONDAY, 2 (153-212)

Da fixing fence back on other place all day. little shower in morning very hot and sultry in the afternoon. thunder storm at night. quite a wind.

June TUESDAY, 3 (154-211) 1902

Peace declared in South Africa. Da drawing manure to root ground all day children home at noon. We three and Grandpa went to Drayton in afternoon to celebration. quite heavy rain afternoon.

WEDNESDAY, 4 (155-210)

Da drawing manure to root ground forenoon, plowing it in afternoon. bright beautiful day.

THURSDAY, 5 (156-209)

Da ridging up turnip and mangold ground sowed them after tea with Mark. Miss North here in forenoon. Jim Bready here Clara went over to S. Gillree's for Beef. First beast killed to day. cool in morning. but very calm and warm rest of day. Uncle Willie {blank space for a number that wasn't filled in} years old.

June FRIDAY, 6 (157-208) 1902

Da drawing manure all day to root ground. Clara at Drayton in afternoon. Tom and Jack Miller here in evening, Sarah Burrows gone to Toronto to work out Fine day looking like rain in evening.

SATURDAY, 7 (158-207)

Da tagging sheep in forenoon. Then neighbors washed sheep in afternoon. very dull forenoon and misty. cleared up and was rather bright in afternoon.

SUNDAY, 8 (159-206)

Ma and we children up to see Grandpa Philp. misty at noon fine afternoon. but cool. very heavy frost. froze potatoes black.

June MONDAY, 9 (160-205) 1902

Da working on root ground all day rather cold heavy wind all day. Grandpa hoeing potatoes. frost at night.

TUESDAY 10 (161-204)

Da working on root ground. ridging up in afternoon. Clara at Drayton in afternoon. Got box of pine apples up from Uncle Jim. cool day, but bright in afternoon. Da and Watt took white bull back to other place. very misty, rainy and foggy forenoon. (dull)

WEDNESDAY, 11 (162-203)

Da finished ridging up and sowed them turnips. Grandpa hoeing potatoes. fine bright day.

June THURSDAY, 12 (163-202) 1902

Da shearing the sheep. finished about three o'clock. Then drew out manure till five o'clock. Then went to Mr. Lawton's to help raise staff of windmill. Jim Bready here for dinner Miss North here, afternoon. Grandpa got Mark shod dull at times with few drops of rain.

FRIDAY, 18 (164-201)

Da working on root ground, such as drawing out manure and spreading a pile in the field Bill Gass and Mrs Lappin, (Maggie Gass) here about an hour this afternoon. very warm fine day.

SATURDAY, 14 (165-200)

Da working on root ground all day. Ma and we children at Drayton in afternoon. very warm day.

June SUNDAY, 15 (166-199) 1902

Da and Ma up to see Grandpa Philp in evening. very sultry and hot after noon.

MONDAY, 16 (167-198)

Da cleaned up a little chop and choring in forenoon. then working on root ground. has it ready to ridge up. rainy in morning. cleared off and was fine. high wind. heavy rain about 4 morn.

TUESDAY, 17 (168-197)

Da ridging up root ground and sowed the rest of the turnips. Clara went to Guelph on the excursion to the farm. Had a fine time. Saw Nell and was at Hospital went with May Gorden. cool all morning. warmer afternoon. high wind but very bright.

June WEDNESDAY, 18 (169-196) 1902

Da went to Drayton with chop in forenoon drawing clay from Hilborns hill to fill up the old well in the barn yard. very fine day. Ma and Da over to Grave yard in evening.

THURSDAY, 19 (170-195)

Da drawing clay for the well all day. got it filled. Went over to Mr. F Pages to see about a man. Mr. Bready here. Miss North here. Ma at Drayton afternoon. very fine day.

FRIDAY, 20 (171-194)

Da started to work at the road work. Herb Page here for dinner. Mr. Mc Grogon here over night. He bought our wool. very warm day. no wind. rain in evening

June SATURDAY, 21 (172-193) 1902

Da working on road all day. Herb and Art here for dinner. Ma and we children up to a concert of bell ringers in Rothsay, at night. very fine concert. high wind all day. little misty showers in evening. misty forenoon.

SUNDAY, 22 (173-192)

Da up to see Grandpa Philp in afternoon. Ma over to Mr. Burrows in evening. misty forenoon. fine afternoon. cool. Orton's birth day.

MONDAY, 23 (174-191)

Da finished the road work to night. graveled from Mr. McEwing's gate to our gate Herb and Art here for dinner and tea. Went back and brought up the trough from the back well, before tea. very fine cool day, but bright.

June TUESDAY, 24 (175-190) 1902

Da went to Drayton in morning to get horses shod. brought up load of clay to put in front of driving house with him. Brought down 2 loads gravel and put there in afternoon. very fine day. 2

WEDNESDAY, 25 (176-189)

{Clara is now writing}

I took Olive to Drayton. She started to write for Entrance. Ma took Grandpa to station He went to Listowel races, at noon. Da brought down three loads of gravel in forenoon and one after. rained very heavily all afternoon. Da went after Olive & brought Maggie McDonald she stayed all night. I stayed all night with Grandma. 4

THURSDAY, 26 (177-188)

Da brought down five loads gravel and spread it. I took the girls to Drayton and went after them. Little rain this afternoon. very windy. Mr. Bready here for dinner. I stayed with Grandma. 5. Maggie did not stay to night.

June FRIDAY, 27 (178-187) 1902

Da drawing gravel for the lane, all day. Clara took the girls to Drayton and went after them. Ma and Brock went to greet Grandpa at noon. Miss North, Mrs. North & Stewart here for tea. very fine day but cool. drew 6 loads gravel. I took Mag home even'g Brock passed into the Third Book.

SATURDAY, 28 (179-186)

Da drawing gravel all day for lane. drew 5 loads. Wal brought our trough up from Drayton, and Da went back with him and put it up. the children up to Grandpa's this afternoon. very fine day. 5

SUNDAY, 29 (180-185)

Ma and Grandma over to see Lizzie Benson. She is very poorly. Da & Wall down to Riches. with cow at night. rainy morning fine afternoon.

June MONDAY, 30 (181-184) 1902

Da drawing gravel all day. Drew 6 loads. Roy and Harry here for straw and potatoes in forenoon. mizzling and raining all day. Got word this morning that Wm Chambers died yesterday. 6

July TUESDAY, 1 (182-183)

Dominion Day Da drew 6 loads of gravel. very fine day. warmer than what we have had. Da scuffled potatoes after tea. 6

WEDNESDAY, 2 (183-182)

{Clara is now writing}

Da drew 5 loads gravel. Scuffled the field potatoes after tea. Ma, Brock, Olive at Drayton in forenoon. Mr. Webber here in afternoon very fine warm day. looking like rain 5

July THURSDAY, 3 (184-181) 1902

Da went over for beef. Then took "Jennie" cow to Mr. Riches had dinner there. Mr Bready here. Da and Walt brought down 4 loads sawdust in afternoon. very wet & dull {"& dull" written after the fact and written above the words "wet" and "forenoon"} forenoon. fine afternoon

FRIDAY, 4 (185-180)

Da plowed patch of sow thistle in forenoon. cutting thistles on other place in afternoon. Olive & Clara at Drayton forenoon. Ma, Olive and I up to Mr. Lawtons in evening very warm day. lot of lightning at night.

5 SATURDAY, 5 (186-179)

Da took load of chop to Drayton and got horses shod in forenoon. Went up to Uncle Rich'd in afternoon. After milking drove up to Palmerston. home about 12 o'clock terrible hot day.

July SUNDAY, 6 (187-178) 1902

{Clara is now writing}

Ma, Olive and I up to church in morn, Da Ma and Brock up to see Grandpa Philp in evening. very hot day. Thermometer 100 at milking time.

MONDAY, 7 (188-177)

Da went back and scuffled turnips till eleven o'clock. Then cleaned out pens. After dinner went to hoe potatoes. Terrible storm of rain came on about three another heavy one at milking. Ma and Olive at Drayton in morning. got teeth filled. Chas. Walker got shed struck with lightning cooler after rain.

TUESDAY, 8 (189-176)

{Olive is now writing}

Da cleaned out hen house in forenoon hoed turnips in afternoon. Clara at town in forenoon. very warm day. Ma at Grandma's to see Lizzie Benson. Grandpa brought three crates of straw berries from Drayton.

July WEDNESDAY, 9 (190-175) 1902

{Clara is now writing}

Da just choring and straightening up driving house. heavy rain before five this morn. rainy forenoon and muggy dull and cooler afternoon.

THURSDAY, 10 (191-174)

Da hoeing turnips all day. Mr. Bready here for dinner. Miss North here in afternoon. very fine day but cooler.

FRIDAY, 11 (192-173)

{Elizabeth is now writing}

Clara & Olive gone up to Tarra for a week Robt hoeing turnips and took them to train then hoeing aft beautiful day I over at Mrs Burrows doing some baking for her. (aft)

July SATURDAY, 12 (193-172) 1902

Robt hoeing all day Celebration in Moorefield Grandpa Brock and I over. Robt went to Drayton at night beautiful day there were 12 or 13 lodges and as many speakers.

SUNDAY, 13 (194-171)

At home all day till evening then Robt & Brock & I went up to Rothsay. very fine day

MONDAY, 14 (195-170)

Robt hoeing and some scuffling Emma here for shoulder of Meat very hot and sultry. Terrible wind and rain storm at five o'clock

July TUESDAY, 15 (196-169) 1902

Richards raising both up there all day Mr & Mrs Burrows & Ma helped me milk turned out a beautiful day

WEDNESDAY, 16 (197-168)

Robt & Wat took Beef Ring Heiffer over to Gillries Morning then Robt hoeing turnips rest of day very fine day little rain in the night

THURSDAY, 17 (198-167)

Robt delivered beef morning turned out fine Mr B_ hoeing a while here Brady here Robt & Brock hoeing aft, Brock 9 years old

July FRIDAY, 18 (199-166) 1902

Young cattle out of pasture field Robt went back and fixed fence and then hoeing rest of day Ned & Wat helping hoe aft. Brock Grandma & I at Drayton very fine day

SATURDAY, 19 (200-165)

Robt Wat & Ed hoeing for a couple of hrs. then a heavy rain, mizzling all aftenoon. Mr Craig here for tea. very dull Robt gone to Drayton at night

SUNDAY, 20 (201-164)

All at home all day dull rainy & miserable

July MONDAY, 21 (202-163) 1902

Robt cl & McEwing fixing line fence for a couple of hrs. morning then choring and filling up chop. Mr. Webber helping & here for dinner Robt gone to Drayton with chop rather fine aft.

TUESDAY, 22 (203-162)

{Clara is now writing}

Da hoeing turnips all day. Ned and Walt helping. Ma and Brock at Drayton and met us. arrived home on afternoon train had a lovely time. fine day Mr Webber here helping at hay fork

WEDNESDAY, 23 (204-161)

Da hoed potatoes then scuffed them and the turnips. Ma poisoned the bugs. Da went down to Jack Riches with "Jennie" cow. fine warm day, but looking like a terrible storm at night. quite a little shower.

July THURSDAY, 24 (205-160) 1902

Da and Burrows boys putting up scaffold in driving house in forenoon. choring round grinding knives and getting mower ready Olive and I up to Grandpa's for goose berries. little shower in evening. warm day.

FRIDAY, 25 (206-159)

Da cut the little patch hay in front then cut the piece below orchard. raked it and put it up in afternoon. Olive & I over to Mr. Craigs in evening. very fine day. Grandpa Philp 83 yrs. old

SATURDAY, 26 (207-158)

Da, Mr, Craig and Willie here drawing hay till noon. Mr. Craig went away at noon. D Brought in two loads after dinner. little shower about half past two. Da at Drayton with Uncle John. Willie helped bring rest of hay after dinner.

July SUNDAY, 27 (208-157) 1902

Ma and Olive up to church in forenoon. Dick Lowes and Ann here in afternoon. fine day, but storms passing round.

MONDAY, 28 (209-156)

Da cut ^ting at {^ below writing line} {"ting at" above the words "cut" and "piece"} piece next to ditch. Raked up what he cut and put some of it up. Ma and Brock up to see Grandpa Philp in afternoon. fine day warm.

TUESDAY, 29 (210-155)

Da mowing in forenoon Mr. Craig here in forenoon. Willie here in afternoon. Da raking and helping put it up. Olive and I at Drayton in afternoon. Miss Magee and Mrs. Newstead here after tea for a while. Ross bought meat. very hot fine day. Old Mr. Allen from Carlton Place here.

July WEDNESDAY, 30 (211-154) 1902

Da cutting hay till noon. Then raked it up and finished putting it up. Willie Craig here in afternoon. very fine day. Mary Fisher and Mrs. Geo. Fisher here morn.

THURSDAY, 31 (212-153)

Mr. Craig and Willie here all day drawing in hay from field above turnips. Ma at Drayton in afternoon. fine forenoon. rather dull afternoon. rain at night: The tea man here in evening. Ross brought meat

August FRIDAY, 1 (213-152)

Da took load hay to Rothsay. Mr. Craig helped him unload it and they brought in one load before dinner. Willie here afternoon also. finished that field to night fine day.

August SATURDAY, 2 (214-151) 1902

{Olive is now writing}

Da started to cut clover and cut till noon. then raked it and Willie and he put it up. Brock and Grandpa met Uncle Jim to-night Clara at Drayton in morning. Mr. North here for dinner. Mr. Jas Gilmore here for a little while. very fine day.

SUNDAY, 3 (215-150)

Uncle Jim here for dinner. We over to the graveyard in afternoon. very fine day. cool at evening

MONDAY, 4 (216-149)

Da finished cutting the clover at noon. raked it after dinner and put it all {"all" is written slanted upwards} up. Mr. Craig and Willie here in afternoon. very fine day.

August TUESDAY, 5 (217-148) 1902

Da and Willie drew in three loads of hay then heavy rain till noon. Then tinkering around and choring. Da up to see D. Corbett. at night. Miss Duncan here over night. dull afternoon. rain at night.

WEDNESDAY, 6 (218-147)

{Clara is now writing}

Da cutting hay all day from noon {"from noon" written above the crossed-out words}, down by bush. Took seven pigs to Moorfield in morning Miss Duncan went home after dinner. Olive and I at Drayton - afternoon. dull day with showers at times.

THURSDAY, 7 (219-146)

Da finished cutting patch, then went over to Mr. Craigs till noon, Raked hay up then he and Mr. Craig putting up till about four. then steady rain till night. Watt brought the meat.

August FRIDAY, 8 (220-145) 1902

Da took load of chop to Drayton in morning raked up hay and putting it up in afternoon. Ma, Brock and grandma up to see Aunty Gass. very fine day but dull and misty forenoon. good breeze.

Coronation Day. {Handwritten} SATURDAY, 9 (221-144)

Da got binder out and cleaned up, then Mr. Craig and Willie came and they drew in at the clover. very fine day. King Edward VII crowned.

SUNDAY, 10 (222-143)

Olive and I drove Granma up to church in morning. Mr. F. Page here in afternoon. Ma and Da up to Grandpa Philp's in even-ing. quite a shower before breakfast. sultry and dull in forenoon. very sultry afternoon.

August MONDAY, 11 (223-142) 1902

Da went to Drayton for chop but did not get it. After dinner rigging at binder then fixing driving house doors. Uncle Jim came up at noon went back with the 4.44. dull afternoon with showers at times. fine forenoon with strong breeze. girls over to H. Hilborns at night.

TUESDAY, 12 (224-141)

Da cut barley behind barn, then went back and cut timothy. Mr. Craig and Willie came after dinner and they drew at the clover. Da went back and put up timothy very fine day, cool wind.

Finished haying {handwritten} WEDNESDAY, 12 (225-140)

Mr Craig and Mr. Scott here helping draw in, also, in afternoon, Charlie & Hoshel Hilborn finished haying and brought in timothy. very fine day. Da put up barley after dark.

August THURSDAY, 14 (226-139) 1902

Da went back and started to cut oats on other place, they are very rusty. Clara at Drayton in morning to get "Mark" shod. Olive and I up to Uncle Rich's in afternoon Da gone back to shock up some oats after tea. Seth brought the meat. very fine day.

FRIDAY, 15 (227-138)

Da went back and shocked up till about ten then cut the rest of the day. Went back and shocked up after tea. dull and misty in morning. fine rest of day. Mr. McEwing here in morn. Charlie and Hoshel came over and got white headed pup. Winnie & Nell here - afternoon.

SATURDAY, 16 (228-137)

Da finished cutting 14 acres at noon. Then shocked up after dinner and tea. Gone to Drayton at night. Olive and I over to Mr. Page's - afternoon. very fine day good breeze.

August SUNDAY, 17 (229-136) 1902

Ma and we children up to church in morning. Da up to see Grandpa Philp at night. very fine day, but looking like rain at night.

MONDAY, 18 (230-135)

Da cutting oats on other place all day. Mr. Webber here for oats evening. dull day also showry. rain at night. School opened with Miss Green, Fergus, as teacher

TUESDAY, 19 (231-134)

Da went to Drayton to get chop and get Molly's shoes set. cutting oats after dinner Gone to Craig's flax-bee after tea. dull all day. Mabel here for meat. Mr. McDonald here in evening.

August WEDNESDAY, 20 (232-133) 1902

Da went back to shock up oats. Mr. McTavish helping him. finished about milking time. Ma over to see Mrs. Bob Mitchell afternoon. rather fine at times. little shower at milking

THURSDAY, 21 (233-132)

Da took lamb over to Moorefield in forenoon. Henry Hazeltine brought word. Charlie Hilborn brought meat. Da cutting down piece in afternoon. Charlie Hilborn helping shock up. Ma and Grandma at Drayton in afternoon. rather dull morning. fine rest of day with cool wind

FRIDAY, 22 (234-131)

Da went back and finished cutting down piece on other place. Carrie up about eleven and cut barley next to Ezra. finished about four o'clock and started to cut barley behind the Poplars. Da shocking barley after tea I over to Mr. McTavishe's at noon. fine day on horses strong wind blowing. Black pig has 4 little ones.

August SATURDAY, 23 (235-130) 1902

Da at Isa. Hilborn's threshing in forenoon. After dinner cutting at the barley. Mr. McTavish came and shocked some oats on other place. then shocking barley all afternoon. Da put up what was not up, after night We children at Drayton afternoon. fine day with strong wind.

SUNDAY, 24 (236-129)

Ma and we children up to church in morning. Da and Ma & Brock {"& Brock"} written in after and written on an angle} up to see Grandpa Philp in evening. very fine day.

MONDAY, 25 (237-128)

Da finished cutting barley about ten o'clock then went and shocked it finished at noon. Mr. McTavish at Mr. Lawtons threshing forenoon. Da drew in barley behind barn. Ma and I helped in noon. Uncle Willie came on noon train. Da and he went to Drayton at night to hunt men for harvest. very fine day. most like harvest day we have had.

August TUESDAY, 26 (238-127) 1902

Da and Art. Garreau drawing barley in front of Grandpa's in forenoon. Mr. Dingman, his team, Jim Davidson, and Geo. Schmaus. here in afternoon and drawing up oats. John Allen here for the evening and over night. I over to Montgomerys to see about men. Uncle Willie here for dinner and this evening. very fine day and hot. Da at Drayton at night to hunt a man.

WEDNESDAY, 27 (239-126)

Men drawing up oats with two teams all day. Da, Mr. Dingman, Jim Davidson, Geo. Schmaus and Mr. Lister. Aunty Philp here for tea and over night. Uncle Willie and Da at Drayton, for men at night. very fine day and hot. Merritt Noecker died about noon.

THURSDAY, 28 (240-125)

Men finished drawing the oats at six, then brought in 2 loads of barley from side-road. Same men as yesterday, except in Mr. Lister's place was Geo. Leitch. Da and Ma down to Mr. Neocker's. very fine day and hot. lightning at night. 10 little pigs on other place.

August FRIDAY, 29 (241-124) 1902

Men finished drawing in barley at night. Geo. Schmaus and Geo. Leitch helping Uncle Willie, Olive and I at Merritt Noeckers funeral in afternoon. Ma helping Mrs. Burrows get ready for threshing. Uncle Willie here at night. very fine day Willie Walker got pea-rake and brought it back to-night

SATURDAY, 30 (242-123)

Da over to Mr. Burrows threshing in forenoon. with the team drawing in for Mr. Burrows in afternoon. Olive, Uncle Will and I up to see Aunty Gass and Grandpa Philp in afternoon. Da at Drayton at night. Uncle Will here very hot day.

SUNDAY, 31 (243-122)

At home all day. Da and Uncle Will over to Frank Pages in evening. Close and sultry with high wind. looking like rain.

September MONDAY, 1 (244-121) 1902

Labor Day. Da went over with team and helped Burrows draw in, in forenoon. Then went back and cut six acres of barley, in afternoon. Dave Corbett here in morning to see pigs. Mr. McEwing here in evening. Uncle Willie ^ went {the word "went" is in between and above "Willie" and "home"} home on morning train. very fine day. and hot.

TUESDAY, 2 (245-120)

Da mowed the little patch of oats in front, in forenoon. Shocked the barley in afternoon. Wat. Burrows took some chop to town for us. very fine harvest weather. good breeze.

WEDNESDAY, 3 (246-119)

Da Raked up barley stubble by sideroad in forenoon. Put away binder and drew in this loose oats. Ma at Drayton in afternoon. fine bright day. cool breeze blowing.

September THURSDAY, 4 (247-118) 1902

Da went for the beef. then cleaning pens and stables all day. weather like the Equinoxes. Da served with summon to go on the Pitit jury. quite heavy frost.

FRIDAY, 5 (248-117)

Da packing away the mows to make room. Mr. Craig here in afternoon helping also. Ma at Grandmas for dinner. Mrs. Martin of Toronto here in afternoon. I over to Mr. McTavish's at noon. Da over to Drury's at night. fine day. cool.

SATURDAY, 6 (249-116)

Da, Mr. McTavish, and Wilmot drawing in barley from away back. Wat. Burrows, Percy and Ross McEwing brought up loads each in afternoon. Looking very like rain, but held off till night, then little shower. Da at Drayton at night. Olive & I there in afternoon.

September SUNDAY, 7 (250-115) 1902

All up to church in morning. Jack Allen rode up with them. Da and Ma up to Grandpa Philp's fine day with strong wind.

MONDAY, 8 (251-114)

Da raked up barley stubble {"stubble" is written on a slant in between words "barley" and "next"} next to Ezra, then brought it in. Went with team to Mr. McEwings all day. very fine day. rain in the night.

TUESDAY, 9 (252-113)

Da just choring round and fixing pegs to hang harness on. Hettie over in after noon. very nasty day. raining and mizzling all day. rather cold rain.

September WEDNESDAY, 10 (253-112)

Da loaded up the old sleighs and took them to Goldstone. Home about one o'clock. Then pulled at the peas, other side of Poplars. Ma at Drayton in afternoon. Dick Lowes here at noon. Misty & dull till about ten, then very fine day.

THURSDAY, 22 (254-111)

Da finished pulling peas. Mr. McEwing forked them out. Da down at McEwings with team drawing oats in afternoon. Miss North started in her rounds again. dull all day

FRIDAY, 12 (255-110)

Da choring round in forenoon. took Perkin sow over to Mr. Craigs in afternoon. very nasty day. steady rain all day.

September SATURDAY, 13 (256-109) 1902

Da started away for Palmerston for flour at ten o'clock forenoon. Home about six. Dick Lowes and Harry here for tea. Ma and we children down to Drayton in afternoon. dull and rather misty in forenoon. turned out fine but cold. heavy frost at night.

SUNDAY, 14 (257-108)

Olive and I drove Grandma up to church at home rest of day. very fine day. good strong breeze blowing.

MONDAY, 15 (258-107)

{Olive is now writing}

Da went back and started to pull peas by the pump on other place. pulled till noon one of Mr. McEwings forking out. Clara at Drayton in afternoon. Da drawing in at Mr. McEwing in afternoon. fine day.

September TUESDAY, 16 (259-106) 1902

Da finished pulling the peas on other place Percy turning out in forenoon. no one here in afternoon. Grandpa went down town and brought up 9 baskets of fruit then I went down and got other 9. Carrie from Guelph. very fine day.

WEDNESDAY, 17 (260-105)

Da turned out peas next sideroad then went over and got Wat. in forenoon. Mr. McEwing, Percy, Ross and team here in afternoon. Wat helping. brought up 4 loads from other place very fine day.

THURSDAY, 18 (261-104)

Da cleaned out pens then went back and turned other peas. Then Mr. McEwing and Da brought up a load each before dinner. Drawing all afternoon and stacking them behind driving house. Uncle Rich'ds three and team here afternoon Miss North and Mrs. Bell here. looking like rain little shower. Da at Drayton at night.

September FRIDAY, 19 (262-103) 1902

Da went over to Mr. McTavish's about ten o'clock to thresh, but they did not thresh till afternoon. There in afternoon. Ma at Drayton in afternoon. dull in forenoon, but turned out fine.

SATURDAY, 20 (263-102)

Da cleaned out pens then went back to see young cattle with Mr. Col {Large blank space left here, perhaps didn't know how to spell the name correctly and left it blank}. Sold 9 young cattle for $300. Then cleaned up chop and took it to Drayton, afternoon. Brought home new trucks which came from Goldstone. very fine day.

SUNDAY, 21 (264-101)

Ma and we children up to church in morning. Da and Ma up to Grandpa Philp in afternoon. very fine day.

September MONDAY, 22 (265-100) 1902

Da, Wilmot, and Charlie took the young cattle over to Moorfield in forenoon. Da gone down to Mr. Noecker's at night. Da ploughed out garden potatoes and picked them up. half of them rotten. I helping Grandpa raise his. sultry warm day.

TUESDAY, 23 (266-99)

Da and Mr. McEwing went to Guelph to be examined over this Tucker case. Did not come home at night. Jack Dingman brought word out at night that Da did not come. rather dull at times. Mr. & Mrs. Lawton called in afternoon.

WEDNESDAY, 24 (267-98)

Da came home on noon train. Then he went over to Caleb Lowes and hunted up Ed. Maxwell for a witness. Then went to Drayton at night. Cold wind blowing all day. rain at night.

September THURSDAY, 25 (268-97) 1902

Da got wood up to thresh with and choring round in forenoon. Da at Mr. McEwings threshing in afternoon. Miss North here. Ma at Drayton afternoon. very cold wind all day. rain at night.

FRIDAY, 26 (269-96)

Da at Mr. McEwings threshing all day. I up to Grandpa Philp's with bag of flour. had dinner there. dull day and rather foggy.

SATURDAY, 27 (270-95)

Da at McEwings till about ten, then machine came here and threshed till half-past three. Da and Willie Craig straightening up after machine went away. dull day and foggy in morning.

September SUNDAY, 28 (271-94) 1902

{Clara is now writing}

Olive and I up to church in forenoon Ma at Grandma's for tea. Mr. & Mrs. John Fair there. quite a heavy shower in afternoon misty and sultry in forenoon.

MONDAY, 29 (272-93)

I took Da to station, he gone to Berlin to this trial of Tuckers. Mr. Henry Hilborn here for scraper in afternoon. misty in morning. came out hot. cooler towards evening.

TUESDAY, 30 (273-92)

Da returned home from Berlin on night train. Case settled. Won it against Tucker #200. each {each written above "200" and "and"} and costs. Drayton Show. Ma, Olive, Brock and I down all afternoon. foggy and dull in forenoon. very nasty afternoon. steady rain from about four o'clock.

October WEDNESDAY, 1 (274-91) 1902

Da went up to Uncle Rich'ds and boys came down and helped load the pigs. Da took them to Moorefield. Boys took home a load of straw. Da cleaned up grist of chop and took it to Drayton about four o'clock. dull and cold wind blowing all day.

THURSDAY, 2 (275-90)

Da went back and plowed out potatoes and picked them up in forenoon. potatoes very good. After dinner harrowed them out and pick them up & pick them over and put in root house. Miss North here. very fine day inclined to be cool.

FRIDAY, 3 (276-89)

Da started to draw manure out on to where the peas were. Ma at Drayton in afternoon very fine day cold wind.

October SATURDAY, 4 (277-88) 1902

Da finished drawing manure. took load rails and fenced little hay stack, then brought up a load turnips for calves. At Drayton at night for Uncle Jim. very fine day. rather raw wind.

SUNDAY, 5 (278-87)

I drove Grandma up to church in forenoon Uncle Jim here for dinner. Da and Ma up to Grandpa's in evening very cold wind blowing in forenoon. heavy rain in afternoon. heavy rain at night.

MONDAY, 6 (279-86)

{Olive is now writing}

Da went back and skinned ram, who got killed by Burrow's ram, then ploughing rest of day on pea ground. I took Uncle Jim to station in morning very fine day. good breeze blowing.

October TUESDAY, 7 (280-85) 1902


{Clara is now writing}

Da plowing all day. Took three pigs over to Mr. Duncan's at noon. Helped Wat take his heifer over to Sussex Gilree's, at night. fine day. strong wind. heavy shower Old Mr. Lang buried. evening.

WEDNESDAY, 8 (281-84)

Da plowing all day in barley stubble. dipped little pigs at noon. H. Hilborn's young folks over for the evening. very fine day strong wind.

7 THURSDAY, 9 (282-83)

{Olive is now writing}

Da ploughing all day. Miss North and Carrie came here in forenoon and for dinner. very fine day. very hard frost at night.

October FRIDAY, 10 (283-82) 1902


Da ploughing all day. Over to Mr. Duncans for sows at night. Ma at Drayton in afternoon. very warm in middle of day. cooler towards night.

SATURDAY, 11 (284-81)

{Clara is now writing}

Da plowing all day at Drayton at night and brought up a little sow which came by ex press from Crampton. $14. rather dull day, but muggy and sultry.

SUNDAY, 12 (285-80)

Ma and we children up to Grandpa Philps then over to funeral. Mrs. Joseph Freeland brought to the church from near Palmerston and buried at Derryadd rather hazy all day. quite a heavy shower about five o'clock.

October MONDAY, 13 (286-79) 1902


Da went to Drayton and sent the money away to H. George & Sons. Then plowed till noon. Cleaned up a grist and took it to Drayton. heavy rain in night. lot of rain fell during day. very windy afternoon rahter raw and cold wind.

TUESDAY, 14 (287-78)

Da finished plowing in that field and brought up load of turnips, Ma over at Mr. Burrows baking. I at Drayton in afternoon. rather fine day. but cold. lottle showers towards evening.

WEDNESDAY, 15 (288-77)

{Olvie is now writing}

Da ploughing all day in pea stubble on other place. Miss North here for dinner. fine day, strong wind. rather cloudy at times. Henry Howard Hilborn of Lither got his right hand caught in threshing machine andhad it taken off about a week later.

October THURSDAY, 16 (289-76) 1902

{Clara is now writing}

Thanksgiving. Da plowing all day on other place. Olive and I over for beef. Sarah and Wat. Burrows here for tea. Olive up to Uncle Rich'd very fine day. Another of Walter White's children died of fever. Jessie.

FRIDAY, 17 (290-75)

Da plowing on other place all day. Ma and Grandma at Drayton. in afternoon very fine day. hard frost at night. Walt brought up two bags of potatoes from the station which came from Guelph.

SATURDAY, 18 (291-74)

Da choring round in forenoon. After dinner went over and helped Walt kill a pig, then he and Walt went to Drayton for sugar (a barrel). from Guelph. dull and rainy all forenoon. dull and rather foggy afternoon.

October SUNDAY, 19 (292-73) 1902

Olive and I up to church with Grandma. Ma and we children up to Grandpa Philp's in afternoon. Uncle Sandy and Aunt Catty there. fine day. rather foggy in morning.

MONDAY, 20 (293-72)

Da started at Mangolds, working at them all day. very hard to pull. Sara Burrows here in morning. She gone back to Toronto to work. changeable. misty at noon. strong wind.

TUESDAY, 21 (294-71)

Da finished the Mangolds. and took a load of turnips down to Grandpa. I at Drayton in afternoon. very fine day.

October WEDNESDAY, 22 (295-70) 1902

Da topping turnips all day. cleaned the pens at noon. mizzling off and on all day. very dark at night.

THURSDAY, 23 (296-69)

Da topping turnips all day. Ma at Drayton in forenoon. Miss North did not come. very dull and misty all day.

FRIDAY, 24 (297-68)

Da finished topping turnips, harrowed some out and brought in one load before dinner. Drawing all afternoon. Ma and I helping very heavy thunder and lightning and shower towards noon. very fine rest of day.

October SATURDAY, 25 (298-67) 1902

Da drawing in turnips all day. harrowed some out in morning. Stanley and Norman Flath here helping in afternoon with team. Ma & Brock at Drayton forenoon. raw wind blowing. rather fine.

SUNDAY, 26 (299-66)

At home all day. balmy day rain thunder and lightning in evening.

MONDAY, 27 (300-65)

Da took load of turnips up to Grandpa Philp. came round by Uncle Rich'd for bbl. salt. drawing in turnips rest of day dull all day. Mrs. Jim Davidson dropped dead this evening

October TUESDAY, 28 (301-64) 1902

Da went to Drayton with load of chop in forenoon brought Grandpa's flour. drawing at turnips - afternoon Ma at Mrs. Faulkner funeral Skuds of snow all day. rather stormy night

WEDNESDAY, 29 (301-63)

Da went over to Mr. Duncans for a sow. cleaned out pens when he came home. drawing turnips in afternoon rather fine afternoon hard frost at night.

THURSDAY, 30 (303-62)

Da went back up and brought up the cabbage then brought the plow up from back field. Started to plow in sod field in front of house. Miss North here. very squally in forenoon fine in afternoon, but very high wind

October FRIDAY, 31 (304-61) 1902

Hallow E'en. Finished taking in the turnips Mr. Irvin here with his team in afternoon Wat Burrows here all day. Da over to Irvin's before breakfast. very fine day.

November SATURDAY, 1 (305-60)

Da ploughing on other place all day. Ma, Olive and I at Drayton in afternoon very fine ^ mild {the word "mild" is above and in between "fine" and "day"} day. little rain at night. Will Gregory got load turnips for Uncle Johnny. Gordon.

SUNDAY, 2 (306-59)

I drove Grandma up to church. down to Grandma's afternoon. very fine day. mild and warm Mr Craig brought piece meat.

November MONDAY, 3 (307-58) 1902

Da plowing on other place all day rather dull, but turned out fine.

TUESDAY, 4 (308-57)

Da ploughing on other place all day. I at Drayton in afternoon. dull and foggy in forenoon. finer in afternoon.

WEDNESDAY, 5 (309-56)

Da went back and finished plowing that field. came up and plowed little patch and cut weed on corn ground and took down some apples. dull and foggy all day, but rather warm. little rain at night.

November THURSDAY, 6 (310-55) 1902

Da plowed little corn patch then plowing on the sod in front of house. Ma & I at Drayton in afternoon, got me a hat and caperine. misty and rainy off and on all day.

FRIDAY, 7 (311-54)

Da plowing in sod all day. cleaned pens at noon. Alice Page and I down to see Winnie in afternoon. very fine day.

SATURDAY, 8 (312-53)

Da plowing sod all day. Olive and I up to see Grandpa Philp in afternoon. Brock at Drayton in forenoon. very fine day.

November SUNDAY, 9 (313-52) 1902

King's Birthday.

I up to church forenoon. Da and Ma down to Jack Rich's for dinner and tea. rather fine day, but raw wind blowing.

MONDAY, 10 (314-51)

Da ploughing sod all day. very fine day but rather dull in forenoon.

TUESDAY, 11 (315-50)

Da plowing sod all day. rather fine but rained quite a bit through the night.

November WEDNESDAY, 12 (316-49) 1902

Da took load chop to town and got horses shod. Home noon. Plowing in afternoon. Grandma and I at town afternoon. Quite heavy showers in forenoon. rather clear and balmy - afternoon.

THURSDAY, 13 (317-48)

Da plowing all day on sod. Miss North and Carrie her for dinner. dull in morning, but very bright afternoon.

FRIDAY, 14 (318-47)

Da finished plowing sod field. rather dull - forenoon. fine in afternoon. muggy and hot on horses.

November SATURDAY, 15 (319-46) 1902

Da moved fence between front field and little field above Poplars and plowed fence bottom, then drew rails from other place for wood. Olive & I at Drayton - afternoon. very misty all day and rather raw wind.

SUNDAY, 16 (320-45)

Da and Ma up to Grandpa Philps in evening. Will Mc Tavish here in afternoon. dull all day.

MONDAY, 17 (321-44)

Da and Mr McEwing measured a field on other place. Da drawing rails and plowing over there. Uncle Rich'd got ladder. cold raw wind blowing with skuds rain at times.

November TUESDAY, 18 (322-43) 1902

Da ploughing sod on other place all day. very dull damp day misting off and all day. muggy.

WEDNESDAY, 19 (323-42)

Da ploughing all day on other place Ma and Grandma at Drayton in afternoon. very misty in morning but cleared off and was very bright afternoon. roads very muddy.

THURSDAY, 20 (324-41)

Da ploughing sod, all day on other place Miss North and her mother here for tea. misty and foggy in forenoon but lovely afternoon. Da over to Bosworth to get man for Lawton's threshing.

November FRIDAY, 21 (325-40) 1902

Da plowing on other place till about three o'clock. then at Mr. Lawton's threshing. Da drove me over to H. Hilborn's to a party. Henry H. Hilborn of Luther there. rather dull and hazy but mild.

SATURDAY, 22 (326-39)

Da at Mr. Lawton's threshing till noon. plowing afternoon. rain about noon turned colder and quite snow storms in afternoon, strong wind all day.

SUNDAY, 23 (327-38)

At home all day. rather bright at times, but cool wind.

November MONDAY, 24 (328-37) 1902

Da plowing and moved a large stone. Grandma and I at Drayton in afternoon. Ethel, Howard and Henry Howard Hilborn here to spend the evening. Wilmot at Page's threshing in afternoon very fine day.

TUESDAY 25 (329-36)

Da moving a few rails and plowing sod on other place. Wilmot Drury at F. Page's threshing for us. cool, but bright. hard frost at night.

8 WEDNESDAY, 26 (330-35)

{Olive is perhaps writing}

Da went to plough {whole sentence before this point is in much larger letters. Words after this point get smaller then almost seam to change hand} but had to come back on account of frost. Moving potatoes and apples to barn and then up to Uncle Richard's threshing after dinner Started to snow after dinner.

November THURSDAY, 27 (331-34) 1902

Choring and went to Mr. Henry's threshing. Miss North and her father here for tea. Clara gone to St. Andrew's concert Snowing and cold.

FRIDAY, 28 (332-33)

Choring in forenoon and fixing x stable {"stable" written in between lines, closer to the top} and getting young cattle in. Ma and Grandma up to see Aunty Gass. Grandma stayed all night. Aunty very poorely x with {"with" written above poorley} inflammation of Bowels. Beautiful day.

SATURDAY, 29 (333-32)

{Clara is now writing}

Da choring and went to Drayton about four o'clock to get Mark shod. Home about ten o'clock. not very nice day.

November SUNDAY, 30 (334-31) 1902

{Two lines of words have been scratched out}

Da and Ma up to see {"see" written slanted above "to"} Aunty Gass and over to Grandpa Philp's nice day.

December MONDAY, 1 (335-30)

Da getting ready to kill pigs in forenoon Wat, Percy Uncle Richd here and killed our four pigs and Grandpa's. I came home on noon train from Guelph had a fine time. rather fine day. Old Mr. Sam Noble died in morning.

TUESDAY, 2 (336-29)

Da choring and cutting up the pigs. Uncle Rich'd got one pig. very fine forenoon, but dull afternoon. raining at night.

December WEDNESDAY, 3 (337-28) 1902

Da choring in forenoon. Both over to Mr. Noble's funeral. very nasty day. misty in forenoon. sort of snow and rain afternoon.

THURSDAY, 4 (338-27)

Da choring in forenoon and took team went over to vote on Referendum then round by Grandpa Philp's and got the cheese, from factory. Miss North here in afternoon. I finished my fourth quarter in music. rather fine day little snow storms at times.

FRIDAY, 5 (339-26)

Da choring in forenoon and cleaning out pig-pens and putting it round trees. I over to Mr. Craigs with a piece of maet in afternoon. fine day, but cold.

December SATURDAY, 6 (340-25) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and brought down two loads gravel for box stall. At Drayton in evening. little fall snow in afternoon rather fine but cold wind.

SUNDAY, 7 (341-24)

We children at Grandma's for tea. Very stormy at times, but calmed down towards evening.

MONDAY, 8 (342-23)

Herb. Page here all day choring, Da at Drayton in afternoon. Mr. North stayed over night. very cold day, rather stormy fine night.

December TUESDAY, 9 (343-22) 1902

Ma took Da to station. He gone to Guelph on jury. Herb. choring all day and took Ma to station in afternoon. She gone to Guelph. Lizzie Hilborn came in afternoon to stay with us. very fine day, but sharp. fall snow in forenoon. ("fall snow in forenoon" written above "very fine day, but sharp")

WEDNESDAY, 10 (344-21)

Herb. choring all day. Went to station at night to meet Da and Ma. Sharp with little sleet. rather fine . Da got himself a coon coat in Guelph.

THURSDAY, 11 (345-20)

Da and Herb. choring in forenoon. Da gone to help Uncle Richd with school. Herb. went up to Wm. Wilson's for cheese cheques. Lizzie went home in forenoon. Da over to H. Hilborns asking hands to move school to-morrow. very fine day

December FRIDAY, 12 (346-19)

Herb. choring all day. Da helping to move the school. Ma at Drayton in afternoon & paid taxes. very fine day lovely and bright.

SATURDAY, 13 (347-18)

Da working at school all day. Herb. choring. Da at Drayton at night. very stormy in forenoon, but clear after dinner, but very cold all day.

SUNDAY, 14 (348-17)

Ma and we children up to Grandpa Philp's in afternoon. very fine day, but sharp.

December MONDAY, 15 (349-16) 1902

Da choring in forenoon and helping move school in afternoon. rather stormy all day strong, raw, east wind.

TUESDAY, 16 (350-15)

Da choring in forenoon. Then over to Adam Flath's and round by Drayton in afternoon. Da up to Uncle Richd for cement. rain and turned to soft snow and freezing

WEDNESDAY, 17 (351-14)

Da choring and helping Mr. Flath cement the box stall. Herb Page {"Page" written on a slant after "Herb"} helping move the school for us. rather stormy and strong wind all day. very icy.

December THURSDAY, 18 (352-13) 1902

Da and Herb choring in forenoon Da at Mr. Mc Ewing's threshing in afternoon. I got Mark shod in forenoon. very fine day. rather soft about Miss North and her noon. father here for dinner {"noon" came after "about" and "Miss North and her" was written after "noon" was written. "father" is written on a down slant towards the line below where the sentence continues "here for dinner"}

FRIDAY, 19 (353-12)

Herb. choring all day. Da at Mr. McEwing's threshing till two o'clock then went to I. Hilborn. Ma at Drayton in afternoon fine day rather soft.

SATURDAY, 20 (354-11)

Herb. choring all day. Da at I Hilborn threshing. We children at Drayton in afternoon. Geo. brought Miss Duncan here to-night. very raw day rather misty in forenoon, but turned to sleet in afternoon.

December SUNDAY, 21 (355-10) 1902

Ma and Miss Duncan up to English Church to hear pipe organ. very nasty day. drizzling and raining all day. Herb. Page {"Page" written on a upwards slant after "herb"} came here to-night.

MONDAY, 22 (356-9)

Da at I. Hilborns till about nine. Then he and Herb. at Henry Hilborn's threshing Olive and I took Miss Duncan home after dinner. Rather cold all day.

TUESDAY, 23 (357-8)

Da and Herb. at H. Hilborns threshing till four o'clock. I went up and got Grandpa Philp and took him to Drayton in afternoon. very fine day.

December WEDNESDAY, 24 (358-7) 1902

Da at Wilmots {s is crossed out} Drury's threshing till noon. Then machine moved to Burrow's. Da and Herb getting ready to thresh, in afternoon. Ma, Olive & Brock at Drayton afternoon. Heavy fall of snow at night, but rather soft

THURSDAY, 25 (359-6)

Christmas Day. Da choring. We children at Grandma's for dinner. Uncle Jim came home on noon train. Ma left about two o'clock to drive to Palmerston, she was to get Miss Duncan at her Uncle's on the way up. Gone to concert. very fine bright day. ground covered with snow

FRIDAY, 26 (360-5)

Da at Mr. Burrows threshing till about 4 o'clock. Herb. there in afternoon. machine moved here. Ma arrived home about twelve at noon. rather stormy all day.

December SATURDAY, 27 (361-4) 1902

Threshing here all day. rather fine day. little snow in afternoon.

SUNDAY, 28 (362-3)

I drove Grandma up to church in forenoon Ma and Da up to Grandpa Philp's at night. rather sharp wind, but bright

MONDAY, 29 (363-2)

Finished threshing here at noon, had dinner and moved from here to Uncle Richd. Da and Herb. there in afternoon. rather stormy all day with soft snow falling.

December TUESDAY, 30 (364-1) 1902

Da and Herb. at Uncle Richd threshing till four o'clock. Herb went home to-night. rather stormy with lot of snow falling.

WEDNESDAY, 31 (365)

Da choring, cleaning pens and straight-ening up. We children at Drayton in afternoon. very fine day. had our first cutter ride.

Thursday, January 1. 1903 {hand written}

Da choring in forenoon and cleaning up the barn floor. Mr. Duncan here for dinner. very fine bright day.

MEMORANDUM.

Friday, January, 2, 1903. Da choring in forenoon, cleaning pens and getting ready for fisher to come to chop. He brought down the machine this evening. soft, balmy day, turned to rain at night.

Saturday January, 3, 1903.

Sunday, January 4, 1903.

MEMORANDUM.

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Citation

“Clara, Olive, & Elizabeth Philp Diary, 1902,” Rural Diary Archive, accessed October 1, 2022, https://ruraldiaries.lib.uoguelph.ca/transcribe/items/show/175.

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  130. Philp_1902-129.pdf
  131. Philp_1902-130.pdf
  132. Philp_1902-131.pdf
  133. Philp_1902-132.pdf
  134. Philp_1902-133.pdf
  135. Philp_1902-134.pdf
  136. Philp_1902-135.pdf
  137. Philp_1902-136.pdf
  138. Philp_1902-137.pdf
  139. Philp_1902-138.pdf
  140. Philp_1902-139.pdf
  141. Philp_1902-140.pdf
  142. Philp_1902-141.pdf
  143. Philp_1902-142.pdf
  144. Philp_1902-143.pdf
  145. Philp_1902-144.pdf
  146. Philp_1902-145.pdf
  147. Philp_1902-146.pdf
  148. Philp_1902-147.pdf
  149. Philp_1902-148.pdf
  150. Philp_1902-149.pdf
  151. Philp_1902-150.pdf
  152. Philp_1902-151.pdf
  153. Philp_1902-152.pdf
  154. Philp_1902-153.pdf
  155. Philp_1902-154.pdf
  156. Philp_1902-155.pdf
  157. Philp_1902-156.pdf
  158. Philp_1902-157.pdf
  159. Philp_1902-158.pdf
  160. Philp_1902-159.pdf
  161. Philp_1902-160.pdf
  162. Philp_1902-161.pdf
  163. Philp_1902-162.pdf
  164. Philp_1902-163.pdf
  165. Philp_1902-164.pdf